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San Francisco (Calif.). Board of Supervisors.

The municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) online

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dent Owen and a citywide clean-up
is carried on for six days and the re-
sults obtained are wonderful in the
removal of debris from yards, vacant
lots and all lands aside from streets.



Two Important Board of Works Events



L'pper picture: Signing the Duboce
Avenue Tunnel contract. Left to
right (sitting): IVilliam J. (Dick)
Fitzgerald, Colonel C. E. Stanton,
Timothy A. Reardon, Frederick J.
Meyer, (Standing) : Joseph Cal-
laghan, John B. Gartland, Nelson
Eckhart, Mayor James Rolph Jr.,
John L. McNab, John J. O'Toole,
Leonard Youdall.

Lovier picture: Signing contract for
construction of Hetch Hetchy Dam.
Left to right (sitting): M. M.
O'Shaughnessy, IV. H. Ifattis, T. R.
Reardon, D. G. Eraser, Thomas F.
Boyle. (Standing): J. B. Gartland,
R. M. Searls. J. G. Tyler, A. J.
Cleary, Ray fV. Taylor, Ralph Mc-
Laren, W. J. Fitzgerald, Mayor
James Rolph, Jr., H. R. Smoot, J. If.
Moyles, Dixuell HevAtt, Burl .Irm-
strong, Joy Lichtenstein.




— Photos by Charfee



28



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



June



"The Great Highway in 1881"




Completing the Great Highway, 192.9



WITH the Great Highway
and Ocean Beach Esplanade,
costing more than ?1,000,UOO, and
financed from the $9,380,000 high-
way bond issue voted by the people,
completed, San Francisco today
stands ready to show visitors from
all over the world the finest stretch
of highway ever constructed.

Completion of the highway was
climaxed Sunday, June 9, by a mon-
ster celebration. More than 50,000
people massed at the end of Lincoln
Way. Music from a band of 1014
musicians filled the air in joyous
not, while thousands of autoists
tooted horns to add to the noise of
the occasion.

The opening up of the Great
Highway marked inauguration of
the last link of the Esplanade and
the connecting up of the widest
stretch of pavement in the United
States with Sloat Boulevard, Skyline
Boulevard and other heavy traffic
arteries.

Mayor Dedicates Highway

The huge roadway was formally
dedicated by Mayor James Rolph
Jr. He saw in the completion of the
great project, he said, only the be-
ginning of a vast program of mag-
nificent municipal improvements for
this citv. In an address the Mayor
predicted a city with its street cars




I



M. M. O'SHAUGHNESSY
City Engineer
S.\N Francisco

in a great underground boulevard
under Market Street, a city con-
nected by enormous bridges with
Marin County and the East Bay and
with vast sheets of traffic arteries
belting all the confines of the city
and county.

In closing his address the Mayor
paid glowing tributes to the genius
and foresight of City Engineer
M. M. O'Shaughnessy and Park Su-
perintendent John McLaren in
bringing to fruition one of the most
magnificent municipal projects in
the United States.

Supervisor Andrew J. Gallagher,
chairman of the city's streets com-



mittee, presided at the dedication ex-
ercises which included a program
marked by a marathon race, swim-
ming contests at Fleishhacker Pool,
a parade down the Great Highway,
in which transportation of American
eras was portrayed. Thousands of
motorists, bandsmen and Boy Scouts
participated.

The massed band of 1014 mus:
cians, representing many of th
city's municipal organizations,
played under the direction of Super-
visor Alfred Roncovieri.

Following an address by City En-
gineer M. M. O'Shaughnessy ii
which he gave an interesting recita
of the manner in which the worl
on the Great Highway and the Es
planade was carried on, Bert B
Meek, chief of the State Departmen
of Public Works, pointed out thi
work the state is doing to help kni
the people of all counties togethe
by better highways. The venerabl
John McLaren, superintendent o
Golden Gate Park, accepted th(
great project for his department.

Miss Lucy Young, beautiful 15
year-old daughter of Governor C. C
Young, cut the ribbon that stretchedf
across the highway for the parade to
pass over it. The ribbon-cutting
was witnessed by Mayor Rolph, Su-
pervisors Gallagher, Suhr and Ron-



Tune



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



29



AUTOMATIC

OIL BURNER



More Than 630 in Use in San Francisco

♦♦<

E. A. CORNELY, INC.
14S2 Biuh Street Phone Ordway 1921



R. M. GARDINER LBR. CO.



Phone DOUGLAS 6400



312 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO



YUBA MANUFACTURING
COMPANY

Hydraulic Engineers



^



351 California Street
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA





D.


ZELINSKY & SONS

Incorporated

PAINTERS— DECORATORS




165


GROVE


STREET MARKET
SAN FRANCISCO


0721






Buy from firms tl



Manufacturers of

Electric, Hydro-Electric and Hydraulic

Elevators for Every Conceivable

Purpose

Elevator Repair Work
Elevator Service

Inquiries Invited

Spencer Elevator Company

166-180 Seventh Street, San Francisco, Calif.
Telephone MArket 2500



California Corrugated

Culvert Co.

armco culverts



818 Crocker BMg.
San Francisco



Phone Douglas
4457



Oakland Phone: HOlliday 1638 San Francisco Phont: DOuglu 7388

Western Crane Service Corp.

H. J. ROBLEE

PORTABLE UNIVERSAL TRUCK CRANES

CLAM SHELL BUCKET WORK
EXCAVATING — CAR UNLOADING
TRUSSES AND STEEL ERECTING



932 Hunter-Dulin Bldg.



San Francisco



The Youngstown Sheet and Tube Co.

YOUNGSTOWN, OHIO



Wrought Steel Pipe



< "/s



'^ in. - 20 in.



JAMES H. GILHULY, District Sales Agent

55 New Montgotnery Street
SAN FRANCISCO



30



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



June




Supervisor Andrew ./. Gallagher, Chairman of the Supervisors' Streets Committee, presiding
at the opening of the Great Highway. Supervisor Alfred Roncovieri, also a member of the

Committee, standing at the left.



covieri, Superintendent McLaren,
President Timothy A. Reardon of
the Board of PubHc Works, and
Bert B. Meek. Little Rita du Fossee
of the Sunset District held the
ribbon.

Highway Features

Outstanding features of the Great
Highway include :

A stretch of pavement fronting
Golden Gate Park, the widest
stretch of pavement for a distance
of approximately 3000 feet anywhere
in the United States.

A wonderfully constructed Espla-
nade of enduring concrete which will
render for all time the beach safe
from the destructive effects of the
ocean's activities.

Two roads that stretch like rib-
bons for a distance of two miles from
Lincoln Way to Sloat Boulevard,
fifty feet in width, of the highest
type of construction, flanked on
both sides by ornamental grass plots
and seasonal flowers.

An equestrian ramp built into the
face of the Esplanade, which allows
easy access with safety for the
lovers of horses, from Golden Gate
to the beach.

An ornamental system of elec-
troliers of the latest modern type,
so placed that the maximum of effi-



ciency of lighting effects are ob-
tained.

Traffic signals have been installed
so that on peak days the traffic may
be handled with safety and ef-
ciency.

Underpasses at Fulton Street.
Judah Street, Taraval Street and
Sloat Boulevard, were designed and
constructed to take care of the
thousands of people who visit the
beaches, and who, thereby, are not
forced to cross the highway.

The esthetic side of the picture
was taken care of by Superintend-
ent McLaren of Golden Gate Park
and shows the genius of this man.
He has combined the beautiful ef-
fects of grass-covered slopes with
ornamental shrubs and flowers.

Equestrian Ramp

The equestrian ramp is a new de-
parture in highway construction. It
enables horsemen to ride down the
face of the Esplanade to the ocean,
and serves as a protection against
high tides during the storm periods.
The ramp was built directly on the
face of the Esplanade and is reached
from the main highway. Mayor
Rolph pointed out that in no other
place in the world has such con-
struction been carried out.



The Market Street Railway Com-
pany has constructed at the rear of
the Beach Chalet a station where
passengers may alight and walk di-
rectly through the underpass to the
beach.

City Engineer M. M. O'Shaugh-
ness)' and his assistant, Clyde E,
Healy, prepared the plans for the
Great Highway and Ocean Beach
Esplanade, which were approved by
the Supervisors' streets committee,
composed of Supervisors Andrew J.
Gallagher, Fred Suhr and Alfred
Roncovieri.



KNOWN AT THE HALL



JOHN E. (otherwise known a;
Jack) Foley, lately promoted tc
a vice-presidency in the Bank oi
Italy, was born South o' the Slot
some time between the discovery oi
the old Channel swimmin' hole and
the disastrous shake-up of 1906.

In his early childhood Jack dis-
played considerable mathematical
ability. Consequently he was sent
to the Jefferson and the Lincoln
Grammar Schools. He absorbed
more knowledge than his teachers
possessed, including everything that
"X" is equal to and those fanciful
relationships that are assumed to
exist between the side of one angle




and the trigonometrical function of
some other equally interesting angle.
Later he enrolled at Lowell and the
Commercial High Schools. He de-
parted those institutions with more
honors for a first-class business edu-
cation than he can remember. Mod'



une



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



31



C. B. BABCOCK COMPANY

GAS APPLIANCES

SUTTER 4474

135 Bluxome Street

SAN FRANCISCO



LINDAUER & GO.

Dealers in

SAND, SAWDUST AND SHAVINGS

TELEPHONE SUTTER 2017

35 Oak Grove Street, Bet. Harrison and Bryant, 5th and 6th
SAN FRANCISCO



HANCOCK BROS.

EXPERT TICKET SERVICE

25 Jessie Street

SAN FRANQSCO



Construction Equipment for Rent or Sale

J. S. NEEL COMP.\NY

FRED W. KREIDER, ilmtger

KEARNY 7650

54« HOWARD STREET SAN FRANCISCO

Los Angeles OflSce — 1824 East 15th Street — WEstmore 8295



Pacific Pipe Company

PIPE Y VALVES Y FITTINGS

201 Fokom Street
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.

Factories:
Oakland Los Angeles San Franosco



PACIFIC ABRASIVE SUPPLY
COMPANY

Distributors for

The Carborundum Company

Carborundum and Aloxite Grinding Wheels

Carborundum and Aloxite Stones and Sticks

Carborundum and Aloxite Paper and Cloth

Niagara Brand Flint Paper

Abrasives in eveiy form

Carborundum High Temperature Refractories



340 Sixth Street



San Francisco



MArket 2427



PATTERSON PARTS, INC.

NEW Standard Brand Replacement
Parts for All Cars



601 TURK STREET Phone FRanklin 8803

SAN FRANCISCO



Positive Lock Washer Company

NEWARK, N. J.
Manufacturers of

LOCK WASHERS

All types and sizes for all purposes
Pacific Coast Stock Carried by Factory Distributors

MAYDWELL & HARTZELL, Inc.

138 Eleventh Street San Francisco, California



Good Work, Courteous Routeman

SAN FRANCISCO
LAUNDRY



TELEPHONE WEST 2000



Buv from firms that advertise with us



32



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



Jun<



esty forbids him to talk of these past
events.

For some time Jack was torn be-
tween two loves — whether to step
out in the business world and show
"em what a real South o' Marketer
could do, or to join San Francisco's
official family. Jack chose the latter
course and signed as a full-fledged
deputy sheriff. He succeeded his
father, Peter Foley, a prominent old-
time politician who served for many
years as deputy sheriff and also as
treasurer of the Iron Molders'
Union.

Jack and his shining office star
were conspicuous in the Sheriff's



office from 1906 to 1907. It was then
he decided his services were needed
in the business world. In conse-
quence, he joined the staff of the
Universal Electric & Gas Company,
as a sales executive. Jack remained
in the electric and gas business long
enough to find out all about meters,
watts, ohms, kindred units, and what
have you, and then he took to real
estating. He sold so many lots and
houses for his employers that he
elected to quit the business before
all of the realty in San Francisco was
sold.

In June, 1926, Mr. Foley joined
the Bank of Italy. He worked so
fast and so industriously it was im-
possible for the big bank's chiefs to



keep their eyes off him. Just foi
that, they elevated him to a vica
presidency.

Industry has its own reward!

Fraternally, Mr. Foley is a value*
member of the San Francisco Lodg
of Elks and of San Francisco Aeri«
No. 5, Fraternal Order of Eagles
Having been born South o' the Slot
it followed as a matter of course tha
the South o' Market Boys welcomei
Jack with open arms when he ap
plied for membership in that orgai
ization.

Mr. Foley is happily married an
lives at 1380 Sixteenth avenue. Th
Foleys have two daughters — Mai
jorie, a student at the Lowell Hig
School, and Barbara, a student
the Jefferson school.



The City's Street Car System



By Frederick Boeken

Superintendent, Municipal Street Railway



PROBABLY few people are ac-
quainted with or are interested
in the large amount of detail work
in connection with the operation of
a street railway system, contenting
themselves, in their contact with
street cars (which in most cases con-
sists of the ride to and from their
places of business or employment),
in reading the daily papers, enjoy-
ing a smoke, discussing the stock
market or latest styles in dress,
weighing the merits of radios or
picture shows, or observing points of
interest along the line, paying very
little attention to their mode of con-
veyance as long as the service is
regular and nothing out of the ordi-
nary occurs.

For the purpose of these articles
the subject will be handled by de-
partments, keeping in line as nearly
as possible with standard practice as
prescribed by the Interstate Com-
merce Commission for the operation
of street railways, and which has al-
ways been followed by the Munici-
pal Railway in its accounting sys-
tem, and including the following
five subjects, which will be dealt
with in detail in this series of arti-
cles, taking them in the order listed :

1. Way and Structures

2. Equipment

3. Power

4. Conducting Transportation

5. General and Miscellaneous
There are two other subjects in-
cluded in the I. C. C. Classification,
namely. Traffic and Transportation
for Investment, but as they enter
very little into the affairs of the Mu-




FREDERICK BOEKEN
Superintendent, Municipal Rail<uiay



THIS is the first of a series
of five articles by Mr. Boe-
ken which are to deal in detail
with the various departments
connected writh the operation
of a street railway system in
general and the Municipal
Street Railway of San Fran-
cisco in particular. This and
the subsequent articles by Mr.
Boeken are intended to give our
readers an idea of the nature of
the inner workings of a street
railway organization. — The
Editor.



nicipal Railway, they will not b
dealt with.

The Track Department, whic
constitutes the major portion of this
subject, is in charge of Engineer
Frank F. Sheehan, who has been
connected with the Engineering De-
partment for fifteen years. He has
a force of 100 men, including one
general foreman, five sub-foremen,
eighty-seven trackmen and two
chauffeurs who drive the motor
equipment used in this department

It is his duty to look after the
upkeep of eighty-five miles of track
with a regular program of repairs,
taking care of all emergency work,
keeping track and switches clear in
stormy weather, renewing special
work, paving, etc., keeping right of
way in a neat and clean condition,
and he is responsible for ordering all
stock and supplies used in this de»
partment, including rails, specijj
work, switches, ties, bolts, fish'
plates, bonding material, etc.

A large supply of material is kept
in stock, and the records of this de-
partment entail a great deal of cler-
ical and accounting work in the gen-,
eral office. J

As practically all of the lines weA
built under contract, Mr. Sheehan^
work at the present time consists
mainly in repair and renewal worl

During the first eight or ten ye
of the operation or life of a stre
railway, repairs or renewals are usu-
ally quite small, the life of the railJ
being estimated to be from twenty tO
twenty-five years, according to the
amount of traffic on the line, with



IISIS

or^



me



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



33



Jewell Steel & Malleable Co*



JEWELL STEEL CASTINGS
MALLEABLE CASTINGS



Office and Works



1375 Potrero Avenue



ROBERT W. JAMISON

Railroad Supplies

Phone PArk 1267

1222 Mission Street, San Francisco
California



MARSHALL-NEWELL
SUPPLY CO.



Spear and Mission Streets
SAN FRANCISCO



RAILS— New or Relaying— RAILS

In Sizes Ranging from 8 lb. to 100 lb.

LOCOMOTIVES — CARS

Freight and Passenger Equipment

Machinery
New and Used

United Commercial Company, Inc.

234 Steuart Street, San Francisco
Phone DAVENPORT 2355



PAYNE'S BOLT WORKS

Telephone DAVENPORT 3700
Establisbed 1871 — Incorporated December 17, 18S8



The Only Carriage Bolt Works on the Pacific Coast

Manufacturers of

Iron and Steel Set Screws, Cap Screws, Studs

And AU Kinds of

BOLTS AND NUTS



^



201 Main Street



San Francisco, Calif.



Buy from firms that advertise with us



34



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



JuiljP



special work such as switches, frogs,
crossings, etc., lasting from twelve
to fifteen years.

All of the construction work of
the Municipal Railway has been of
the highest type, using in the paved
streets heavy nine-inch girder or
grooved rail sixty feet long and
weighing from 106 to 141 pounds per
yard, and in our private right of way
of eleven miles, which includes two
tunnels: Twin Peaks 12,000 feet
long and the Sunset Tunnel 4,000
feet long, five-inch 60-foot tee rail
weighing seventy pounds to the
yard.

The average cost of entirely re-
newing an old crossing is in the
neighborhood of $4,545, of which
$1,600 is represented by labor.

In the last. two years six of these
crossings have been renewed with
an average life of fifteen years.
These crossings are located as fol-
lows :

Geary and Fillmore Streets
Bryant and Eleventh Streets
Vallejo and Polk Streets
Geary and Divisadero Streets
Mission and Eleventh Streets
Market and Third Streets

Many features enter into the
proper" construction and maintenance
of a street railway track, and en-
gineers must, to be successful, keep
in touch with the latest improved
methods of laying, bonding, paving,
grade and curve alignment, drain-
age, etc.

The matter of drainage is quite
important, particularly where
switches or other special work is
involved. Years may be added to
the life of a crossing by insuring a
dry and solid foundation which helps
to withstand the pounding of heavy
cars weighing in the neighborhood
of twenty-five tons when empty.

Proper bonding of the rails to in-
sure against leakage or loss in elec-
tric current, is also an important fea-
ture of track-laying.

After the first fe\y years' use the
rail joints need a great deal of atten-
tion; paving must be dug out to give
access to the fish plates and ties so
the necessary repairs can be made,
which usually consist of tie-tamp-
ing, renewing of fish plates, bolts,
grinding of face of rail and in renew-
i'lg of rail bond, which sometimes
becomes broken through the pound-
ing of heavy cars, and quite fre-
quently the rail itself splits at the



bolt holes, necessitating the' putting
in of a short section of new rail,
usually about ten feet long.

With the exception of the crossing
renewals and some curve rail re-
newals, the Municipal Railway has
renewed only four blocks of rails of
its original construction, all on
Geary Street; two west of Octavia
and two west of Lyon Street.

The cost of this renewal work
amounted to more than $10,000 per
block and included new ties, paving,
etc.

Due to the fact that some of the
lines are nearly seventeen years old,
the cost of maintenance and renew-
als is rapidly increasing each year.
The following is the cost of such
work for the last five years :

1925— $115,073.68

1926— 155,497.94

1927— 210,495.40

1928— 180,009.15

1929— 215,000.00 (Estimated)

A recent survey conducted by the
Engineering Department indicates



that in the next five years $443,461
will have to be expended annually
in maintenance and renewal work to
keep the Municipal Railway up to
the high standard it has always
maintained.

The asphalt paving work is done
by the Street Repair Department of
the Board of Public Works and is
paid for by the Municipal Railway.

More than $100,000 worth of ma-
terial and supplies is kept on hand
for use in the Track Department,
and there is also some $46,000 in-
vested in equipment and tools, in-
cluding work cars, grinding car,
automotive equipment, tower trucks,
etc.

The draughting and blue-printing
necessary for this work is taken care
of by the City Engineer's staff in
conjunction with Mr. Sheehan.

In addition, Mr. Sheehan has su-
pervised the original construction of
all the lines of the present Muni-
cipal Railway.

(The next article will be on
"Equipment.")



Camp Adami, an Ideal Spot for
Vacationists










ai//am pav/i/om



Camp Adam/

Up ^ST£V£A/3 CR££f^

Tents & Tent Hovses for ffent

by Oiy, tVeek or A^ntt?
3\ytMMiNG & Oor//^Q



f/!a^fH,L,^m S*Si. rrOLLOW THE TROUT FARM SIGNS'I A PLAC£ YOU'O Llf<£ TO STAY



Camp Adami, unique in its beauty
of natural setting, nestled in the
hills of historic Santa Clara County,
and only forty-seven miles by motor
from San Francisco, affords the va-
cationist one of the most delightful
camping spots in Northern Califor-
nia. Camp Adami is set among cot-
tonwoods, bay leaf and cypress. The
camp is located on Stevens Creek,
a well-stocked trout stream, and is
equipped with tents and restful tent



houses for guests. It has also Sf
swimming pool, open-air dancia^-
pavilion and hiking trails. The camp
is reached by way of the state high-
way. Motorists may turn off at;
Mountain View or Los Altos, cross?
ing the railroad tracks at Simla Sta-
tion, four miles from the camp.
Camp Adami was established fiv<
years ago by Henry W. Adami, pho-
tostat operator in the city's photo-
graphic and blue-printing deparfa'
ment, and Mrs. Adami.



;ne



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



35




VIRDEN

PACKING

CO.

San Francisco, Calif.

UNDER

U.S.

GOVERNMENT

INSPECTION



ONLY the jCHOIGEST GUTS

of

EASTERN PORK



ARE USED IN THE MANUFACTURE OF



CAMP FIRE

BRAND

HAMS and BACON



"You'll note the difference"



SAINT FRANCIS HOSPITAL

AND

SCHOOL OF NURSING

Accommodations for 323 Patients

BUSH AND HYDE STREET

PRospect 7600




HIGHEST QUALITY
Plumbing, Water and Gas Brass Goods

%UELLER CO.

1072-1076 HOWARD STREET



FOR YOUR LAWN AND GARDEN



Hand and Power Lawn
Mowers « Sprinklers
Hose ' Grass and
Pruning Tools * Fer-
tilizers < Insecticides
Rollers t Sweepers, etc.



H. V. CARTER CO.

52 Beale Street San Francisco




Ideal Lawn Mowers

Power and Golf

THE MOWERS THAT HAVE THE
CONSTRUCTION

THOMPSON AND ECONOMY

SPRINKLERS

FARM— LAWN— GARDEN— GOLF

EQUIPMENT

Chas. Berg Implement Co.

342-348 Washington Street
SAN FRANCISCO




J. G. JOHNSON



INCORPORATED



WHOLESALE
BUTCHERS



(rv*'^^



SAN FRANCISCO

Since 1862



Buy from firms that advertise with us



36



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



Jur



CALIFORNIA POTTERY
COMPANY

ESTABLISHED 187 J
Manufacturers of

CLAY PRODUCTS



Offices

2265 East 12th Street Oakland, Calif.

Oakland Factory and Yard — East 12th St. and 23rd Avenue

Telephone FRuitvale 0S88

San Francisco Yard — 11th 8c Harrison Sts., Ph. MArket 9270

Plants at Oakland, Merced and Niles, Calif.
Yards at San Francisco, Oakland, Fresno and Merced, Calif.



CONSTRUCTION
EQUIPMENT AGENCY

Everything for Construction Work

J. p. SHERBESMAN, Sales Manager

Room 621 74 New Montgomery Street

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.

Phone DOuglas 0134



For Welding and Cutting

Everything for Gas and Electric Welding

Victor Welding Equipment Co.

Phones: DOuglas 0934 and DOuglas 0943
844 Fokom Street San Francisco



PORT COSTA BRICK WORKS



Common Brick
Select Reds
Black Headers
Facing Brick



Partition Tile
Hollow Building Tile
Universal Unit Tile
Promenade Tile



Sixth and Berry Sts. Phone Market 2437
SAN FRANCISCO



^"^^^ Tilley Manufacturing
<^'timco^^ Co., Inc.



J»RODUCTS^



Manufacturers

"TIMCO" Products



Felt, Cork, Packings, Fibre, Asbestos Gaskets and Washers

Imported "Glardon" Swiss Files — Mechanics'

Tools— Heller Bros. Files

Cutting and Sewing Departments for Special Work

Phone sutler 5742
744 FOLSOM STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.



B. A. Stephenson



O. L. Stephenson, Jr.



Stephenson Construction



Online LibrarySan Francisco (Calif.). Board of SupervisorsThe municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) → online text (page 24 of 84)