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San Francisco (Calif.). Board of Supervisors.

The municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) online

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Company

General Contractors

Specialists in Unusual Construction
Problems



1909 Hobart Bldg.



Phone Kearny 2731



Telephone SUtter 0643



factory: Bayview



DAN P. MAHER PAINT COMPANY

specializing in

INDUSTRIAL, MARINE AND TECHNICAL

PAINTS AND VARNISHES



Office: 85 Second Street



San Francisco



The Newton Fireworks Display Company

Contractors for

FIREWORKS DISPLAYS

Grand Exhibition Fireworks for City Displays, Public Cclebtadotu,
Fairs, Carnivals, «tc.

TELEPHONE SUTTER 3420
249 Front Street San Francisco, Calif.



Buy from firms that advertise with us



[line



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



37



"Good Bye — Good Luck



ZEMANSKY!''



Wr




HEN Registrar of
Voters J. Harry Zeman-
sky clears off his desk
on the last day of this
month, San Francisco
officially will bid adieu
to a public servant,
whose forty-seven years
of service have set a
mark for loyalty and
usefulness.

Since 1908 Mr. Ze-
mansky has kept con-
stant vigil over San
Francisco's ballot
boxes. To him belongs,
in great measure, the credit for the probity great fairness. In parting with him, San
and their increasing security. Mr. Zeman- Francisco will do so with regret, but will
sky has proved himself an expert in election remember him as one of the most efficient
law, and will leave the public service only officers this city ever has had.

The following friends wish J. Harry Zemansky farewell and God speed after twenty-nine years
of faithful service to San Francisco and its citizens:



J. Harry Zemansky,

Registrar of Voters



because of the age limit
for retirement.

In the twenty-one
years that Mr. Zeman-
sky has been in charge
of San Francisco's elec-
tion machinery he has
seen the poll list increase
from 61,000 in 1908
to 199,000 at the 1928
election.

During the years that
Mr. Zemansky has been
Registrar of Voters he
has performed the du-
ties of that office with



H. J. STRATFORD, Neal, Stratford & Kerr
D. C. MOSES, Neal, Stratford & Kerr
PHILLIPS & VAN ORDEN CO.
THE SHALLCROSS CO.



GOLDEN WEST LITHOGRAPH CO.
JAMES H. HJUL
FELIX GROSS
THOMPSON BROS, Inc.



UNION TRANSFER CO., E. S. Ciprico, President




j5t- • k-i- At-Msmoic-jgCP



What's What South of Market



UNIT of inestimable service to
• the entire South of Market sec-
tion will be completed and ade-
quately equipped in July by Dr.
Arthur C. Armstrong to care for all
industrial accidents in this area.

The corner of Third and Brannan
Streets, in the heart of the throbbing
industrial life of San Francisco, was
selected by Dr. Armstrong as the
best location for an industrial acci-
dent office. Five years' industrial
accident practice in the plants of this
city convinced him of the imperative
importance of rendering medical as-
sistance in highly competitive pro-
duction with the utmost speed in
order to safeguard the health and
efficiency of the vast army employed
on the battlefields of modern indus-
try. When a worker is injured the
least possible amount of time should
elapse between the time the accident
takes place and medical attention by
a physician.



Dr. Armstrong brings to the serv-
ice of this industrial section, the skill
and efficiency of three intense years
caring for the wounded on the bat-
tlefields of France during the World
War. From January 15, 1915, until
the end of the war. Dr. Armstrong
served as an officer in the Medical
Section of the British Army. He was
in charge of Public Health work in
the etape area. For his outstanding
efficiency and effective service in
caring for French and British sol-
diers on the firing line, he was dec-
orated by both the French and Brit-
ish governments. France conferred
upon him the Croix de Guerre with
a palm, and Great Britain bestowed
upon him a British Fellowship in
Public Health and the British Mili-
tary Cross.

Before returning to civilian prac-
tice at the close of the war, Dr. Arm-



strong devoted two years to post
graduate study at the University of
Vienna, and at the University of
London. In London he carefully
investigated the methods success-
fully employed by Great Britain in
the Pannell System. This personal
investigation ably qualifies Dr. Arm-
strong to co-operate with those for-
ward-looking employers in Sail
Francisco who are adapting thl
Pannell System to meet their needj
in this city.

Besides expert professional prepd
ration and wide experience,
Arthur C. Armstrong brings to
service of the South of Market dia
trict a broad and comprehensiv
grasp of employers' needs in maiii
taining the efficiency of their work
ers in highly competitive productio^
and in preventing and eliminating
all possible health hazards in mod-
ernly equipped plants.



DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICITY EDITION







|^£iti!p(<»|ei



SEKmX^EEEKXENCr^CO-OREK/VTIQN



Twenty-Five Cents



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA, JULY, 1929



Vol. Ill, No. 7




Mr. H'i7o



CHIEF RALPH W. WILEY, DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICITY, AT HIS DESK IN CITY HALL

».<>»,h«r ^,.// P„«* PrPiiJent nf ilip International Association of Municipal Electricians, is one of the outstanding figures



Helps Your Police to Catch the Crook




TELETYPE

has revolutionized the art of controlling crime and detecting criminals.
Instantaneous and accurate communication of police information seri-
ously handicaps the activities of the criminal element. San Francisco's
Police Department is equipped with this most modern aid in the war
on crime and San Francisco will later be a part of a general state-wide
Teletype system.

TELETYPE is used commercially the world over in business of every
sort. Its speed, accuracy and legibility enable executives to keep pace
with the growing complexity of modern business. And in no activity is
it more valuable than in the work of the police. For full information
address



SIERRA EQUIPMENT CORPORATION

Telephone HEmlock 2314 361 9th Street, San Francisco

SucceisoTi in Business to Sierra Electric Co. and West Coast Electric Sales




FIRST AGAIN!

KLEIBERS selected by San
Francisco's Fire Department
for the First Flood Lighting
Equipment in the West.



Made in California

/ Put Your Haulage Problem Up to \V

Your Nearest KLEIBER Dealer Listed Below



O. Hasenpusch Crockett, Cal.

Wm. McDermott Knights Landing, Cal.

Kleiber Sales Co. - Los Angeles, Cal.

Mancini Garage Mountain View, Cal.

Savercool & McDermott

1217 Del Paso Blvd., No. Sacramento, Cal.

Kleiber Motor Company Oakland, Cal.

Turner Motor Sales Co. Oroville, Cal.

Sparks Motor Service Petaluma, Cal.



Kleiber Motor Sales Co.,

15th & E Sts., San Diego, Cal.

Anton Bergk San Luis Obispo, Cal.

Knowles & Hoffman Sonora, Cal.

Highway Garage Tracy, Cal.

Lawrence Marshall Watsonville, Cal.

Middleton & Scambt Battle Mountain, Nev.

Anderson Bros. Gardnerville, Nev.

M. P. Armstrong Reno, Nev.



\ Or KLEIBER MOTOR COMPANY, Folsom at 1 1th St., San Francisco



/



Mention Thi* Msgstin* When You Pstronit* AJvertif€T»



pAvmvjmm mvjmjmmm mvmmvy^^^




w?^!lt-^ T^i* iJTTV-—^, ,



SEE^CS-EEnCCENCT-CaOPEEATION

PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY

MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE PUBLISHING COMPANY
1093 Market Street Phone Market 8438



Philip P. Levy
Business Manager



Herbert B. Gee, Editor

M. B. Bothwell

Advertising Manager

George H. Allen, General Manager



John D. Gibsom
Assistant Business Manager



Volume III



JULY, 1^29



No.



I

a

PI

i



i



I



In This Issue



PAGE

Official Endorsement 1

Editorial 9

Ralph W. Wiley 10-1 1

San Francisco's Department of Electricitv 12

By Ralph JJ'. ff'iley
The Plant Department of the Department of
Electricity - 1 8

By Gordon C. Osborne
The Inspection Bureau, Department of

Electricity a 20

By Samuel C. Curtis
The Central Fire Alarm Station, Department of
Electricity 23

By Chester L. Balliette
The Store Room, Department of Electricity 25

By Joseph A. Rossi
Thirty-seven Years in the Department of

Electricity 26

By Frank A. Biedermann

William G. Pennycook 27

Adjusting Claims on San Francisco's Municipal
Street Car Railway 28

By Ray If. Taylor
Overhead Inspection by the Department of

Electricity 29

By James J. Wharton
The Department's Business Office 30

By Joseph P. Murphy
Shop Branch of the Department of Electricitv. . 31

By Frank R. Eickhoff



PAGE



City Purchaser of Supplies Leonard S. Leavy

Heads Blindcraft Drive 32

The Department's Secretar>' 33

Major Collins Takes Over Registrar's Office.... 33
Mills Field, San Francisco's Twenty-four Hour

Air Harbor 34

The Sanitation of San Francisco's Restaurants.... 36

By Thomas P. Lydon
A "Judge" of Good Fish.. 38

The City's Street Car System 40

By Frederick Boeken
Problems of the City Attorney's Office 42

By Syh'ain D. Leipsic
Former Chief O'Brien Is Police Commissioner.... 44
Playground Commission Activities 46

By I eda Beresford Young
A Novel Tour of the World 48

By Anne M. Farrell
Office Emplovees' Association No. 13188. A. F.
of L \ 52

By William T. Bonsor
David P. Hardy, The Board of Education's

Executive Officer 54

Technical Engineers' Union 54

By J. L. Slater. Jr.

Municipal Organization Officials 56

Speaking of Insurance, He Sells It 56

Known at the Hall 58

Engineer Promoted 58

Directorv of Cir\- Officials. 64



I
i



i

!



I



•«wi^5?$^"?i\5?l^»/l\»?i^^^57i^5?i^^i^f^»,W^5^^



4 THEMUNICIPA I. EMPLOYEE Jul}


]♦ G* Pomeroy Co*




BETHLEHEM STEEL


Pacific Coast Representatives




COMPANY


336 Azusa Street 960 Folsom Street
LOS ANGELES, CALIF. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.

2207 First Avenue, South
SEAIILE, WASH.




IS HERE TO HELP THE FABRICATORS

AND JOBBERS IN THE UPBUILDING

OF SAN FRANCISCO


Representing




Specify Bethlehem Plates and


M. B. Austin Company

Outlet Boxes and Conduit Fittings.

Edwards & Company

Signaling Devices, Telephones, Hospital
Signal Systems, Annunciators, Bells, Buz-
zers, Push Buttons.

McGill Manufacturing Co.

Lamp Guards, Wiring Devices, Solder
Paste, Lamp Coloring.




Shapes for your Buildings
and Bridges

PACIFIC COAST OFFICES:

SAN FRANCISCO:
Matfon Building


Goodrich Electric Company

Industrial Illumination, Porcelain, Enamel,
Steel Reflectors.




Los Angeles: Portland, Ore.: Seattle:

Pacific Finance Bldg. Northwenera L. C. Smiib BIdg.
Rank Bldg.


Columbia Metal Box Co.

Service and Cutout Cans.

Garland Manufacturing Co.

Rigid Iron Conduit, Galvaduct and
Loricated.












UNITED MATERIALS CO.


ERIE MALLEABLE
IRON CO.

Kondu Threadless Fittings. First
in the field of Threadless Fittings.
Send for catalog.




808 Sharon Building
SAN FRANCISCO

Warehouses: San Francisco — Oakland — Richmond

Distributors of

Richmond Clay Products
of Distinction






FACE BRICK

Fire Brick

Paving and Step Brick

Hollow Building Tile

Promenade Tile


«'^v3^




Also Distributors of 1


^ f^




ATLAS WHITE CEMENT
(The non-staining cement)


Merchandise Sold Through
Distributors Only




ATLAS LUMNITE CEMENT
(The twenty-four-hour cement)


Buy from firms t


lat ;


idvertise with us

i



ulv



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



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I



EDITORIAL PAGE



s



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The Department of Electricity

THIS edition of THE Municipal Employee
is dedicated to San Francisco's Department
of Electricity, its chief and his corps of efficient
and loyal subordinates.

Except for building contractors and electri-
cians, comparatively little was known of the
Department of Electricity until Ralph W.
Wiley assumed charge as chief. Today the de-
partment is on the map and to stay.

It is not easy to get material personally con-
cerning Chief Wiley. He does not court pub-
licity and if he had his own way any outline of
his work would be confined to the tersest para-
graphs, with a total elimination of adjectives.
He does big things in the quietest, simplest man-
ner and his success has not robbed him in any
wise of the personal charm that, to strangers and
intimates alike, is a predominating characteristic.
Mr. Wilev became chief of the Department of
Electricity in May. 1920. Since then he has
brought each associated department to a standard
of highest efficiency. His electrical inspection
department stands second to none in the United
States. And this because meetings frequently are
held at which Mr. \Viley, the Chief Inspector,
and the other inspectors, attend. Matters per-
taining to the better protection of the public,
including fire and life hazards, freely are dis-
cussed.

The police telephone and fire signal systems,
maintained by the Department of Electricity,
without exception, are unequaled in the nation.
The public, generally, does not realize that this
particular department of the Department of
Electricit)' is the backbone of the Police and Fire
Departments. The fire alarm station in Jefferson
Square is the pulse of this great city. There one
may find at any hour of the day or night a group
of trained men constantly on the qui vive for the
first tap of the gong.

The pictures in this edition of THE MUNICI-
PAL Employe were taken exclusively for this
magazine and were made possible through the
hearty cooperation of Chief Wiley and his effi-
cient assistant, Gordon C. Osborne.



This Is Our Birthday



WITH this issue of The Municip.al Em-
ployee we start into the third year of suc-
cessful and, we hope, a helpful existence.

In our initial editorial declaration, two years
ago, this magazine said:

"The Municipal Employee has no politics
and is not interested in the personal ambitions of
anyone. It is interested in anything that makes
for the good of the city at large and it is vitally
interested in the needs and in the life of those
who form the army of 10,000 or more em-
ployees."

To those principles we have adhered. By doing
so we have gained and retained the confidence of
our readers.

Our slogan: "Service, Efficiency, Coopera-
tion," has been our guidance. It will so continue.

In the two years of this magazine's life there
has been a magnificent growth in San Francisco's
importance and physical properties. We have
grown with them and we plan to keep pace with
the Cit\- whose employees are those to whom our
columns are devoted.

The best minds in municipal affairs contribute
to The Municipal Employee. Our editorial
department is reaching out to gain in the number
of those contributors.

At all times this magazine has been construc-
tive in its policies.

W^e are not only for San Francisco's army of
joval municipal emplovees —

"WE ARE FOR SAN FRANCISCO!

* * *

San Francisco Harbor Day



Immensely important to San Francisco was
Mayor Rolph's proclamation naming August
22 as Harbor Day. The day is to be set aside
for the citizens of this city and count\- to pro-
mote unit\' of purpose among all public agencies,
shipping, export and domestic trade interests con-
cerned in the future welfare of San Francisco.
Harbor Day should be a memorial event for
San Francisco.



* * *



Nothing can stop a man who has set before
him a definite plan and is determined to see it



through.



10



THE :\IUNICIPAL EMPLO YEE



RallJih Wilson Wi





in^NrERPRISES commanding -ivide-
IlL spread attention are familiar in the
history of San Francisco, which offers
many shining examples of success in both
public and private undertakings. One of
the most noteworthy of the former class
in the City's Department of Electricity,
which, by the nature of its organization,
is a business of the people, for the people
and by the people. And of and for the
people is its Chief Electrician, Ralph W .
Wiley.

Let it be recorded that, in scientific
circles, San Francisco's Chief of the De-
partment of Electricity is recognized as
one of the ablest electricians in the
United States. A young man, he keeps
in touch with the trend of modern scien-
tific events and particularly those of
benefit to this city. An inventor of note,
he has added to the electric systems in
use in San Francisco, numerous refine-
ments of inestimable profit to the city.
The new pedestrian signals, installed at
the curb line at each pedestrian lane at
all intersections on Market Street, were
designed by him. They are the first in-
stallation of their kind in any city in the
United Stales; in fact, in the world.

IQALPH W. WILEY was born in
Jl\, Monmouth, Illinois, where he at-
tended the public schools. In 1898 the
family removed to Pasadena, California,
where Mr. Wiley continued to attend
the public schools. In February 1900,
the family came to San Francisco, after
which Mr. Wiley attended the Hamilton
Grammar and the Lowell High Schools.

In December, 1904, Mr. Wiley went
to work for the Pacific Telephone and
Telegraph Company , where he displayed
his electrical genius. In 1908 he became
associated with the Direct Line Tele-
phone Company, as superintendent.

On June 19, 1912, Mr. Wiley entered
the City's employ as an underground en-
gineer in the Def>artment of Electricity.
He remained there until April 1, 1917 ,
when he was promoted to assistant chief.



He was employed in that capacity until
May 27, 1920, when, because of his un-
usual electrical ability — which included
a keen, inventive mind — he was ap-
pointed Chief of the Department.

One of the outstanding features in the
career of Mr. Wiley is the fact that his
schooling ended with High School days.
He became a wage-earner while still in
his teens, and his subsequent career has
given evidence once more of the truth —
which numerous persons seek to mini-
mize or even to deny — that education is
none the less education because a man
gets it by his own unaided efforts, and
that the mental training gained in this
strenuous way max be of a mvre solid
kind than that attested by a diploma.
This theory more than holds good in the
case of Chief Wiley, who has created for
himself an enviable position in the pro-
fessional world, and has accomplished a
great amount of constructive and serious
work that evidences the soundness of his
mentalities to a marked degree.

i 11 HERE is nothing polemic in the
JL mental attitude of Ralph Wiley.
While his voice is low and well-modu-
lated, one gets the impression immedi-
ately that he is a man of few words. Chief
Wiley owes his present position to the
fact that he kept his main object always
in view, is an indefatigable worker and
is possessed of almost uncanny vision and
foresight which, together with rare,
sound judgment, has gained for him a
unique place in the electrical profession.
Politically, Chief Wiley is a Repub-
lican. His religious connection is with
the Presbyterian church. He is a mem-
ber of Parnassus Lodge No. 388, F. Gf
A. M., California Bodies of Scottish
Rite, Islam Temple, A. A. 0. N . M. S.,
and holds membership also in the Olym-
pic Club, the 12—10 Club, and the
San Francisco Electrical Development
League. He is a member and past presi-
dent of the International Association of
Municipal Electricians.



THE MUNICIPAL E M P L O Y E E



II




RALPH W. WILEY
Chief of the Department of Electricity



12



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



Jul




A portion of the Inspectors' Office, Department of Electricity, in the City Hall. Chief Inspector Samuel C. Curtis standing at the counter.

San Francisco s Department of Electricity

; i By Ralph W. Wiley, Chief



THE Department of Electricity was
created by the charter January 8.
1900, and is charged with the follow-
ing:

1. The electrical inspection of old
and new buildings and the supervision
of overhead electrical construction ;

2. The collection of fees for elec-
trical inspection ;

3. The operation, maintenance and
extension of the fire alarm, police and
traffic signal systems of the city ;

4. The manufacture of such equip-
ment as is necessary properly to main-
tain and extend the fire alarm, police
and traffic signal systems ; and is un-
der the control of a Joint Board com-
posed of the members of the Fire and
Police Commissions.

The Department Has Grown

The department in 1900 was located
in Brenham Place opposite Portsmouth
Square, and housed the Inspection
Bureau, Fire Alarm and Police Signal
.systems. The personnel consisted of
approximately twenty-two employees,
and on their shoulders rested the bur-
den of the activities of the department.



Since 1900 the activities and growth
of the department have kept pace with
the general growth of the city ; that is,
as against the handful of men em-
ployed in 1900. we have a personnel
at the present time of approximately
100 employees, and, during the fiscal
year ending June 30, 1929, expended
in the neighborhood of $315,000.

The department is in charge of
everything electrical for both the Po-
lice and the Fire Departments, and it is
readily seen, were it not for the effi-
ciency of the Department of Electricity,
the Fire and the Police Departments,
representing an annual cost of approx-
imately $7,000,000 could not function
with any degree of efficiency.

Department Activities

The scope of the activities of the de-
partment have increased to a very large
extent over the requirements of 19(X).
The department installs and maintains
all fire alarm boxes, police telephone
signal boxes, automatic synchronized
traffic signal tinier, traffic signals and
pedestrian signals, and operates and
maintains the Central Fire Alarm sta-



tion ; also installs and maintains thi i
teletype system in use in the Polio I
Department.

This large scope of activities necc-
sarily calls for a fair sized up-to-d;ii
machine shop and the services of tl
highest skilled instrument makers m
machinists that it is possible to oKtar
The personnel consists of a fnriin;
and sixteen men.

Fire Alarm Efficiency
In this connection permit me to
due to cable failures or equipment fi
ure, in connection with the telephone'
power service, the subscribers or cor
sumers are inconvenienced, and i^
many cases there is a large loss
revenue, but in fire alarm service
per cent efficiency must be maintaii
as the failure of the signal system]
give notice of the location of
would be disastrous in the extreme,

In the case of a fire any citizen
ing a red fire box has the right to
assured that, after he has pulled
hook, the alarm will be sent in and tli
fire apparatus will arrive at the seen
of the fire with a minimum loss of tinit



Jiily



T H E MUNICIPAL EM P I, O Y E E



13



IN the early days of the De-
partment of Electricity there
were only 248 call boxes. To-
day there are more than 1000
in the same area. In those days
the fire whistle used to blow,
giving the box number of every
fire, a relic of the old volunteer
fire department days. Today
the whistles are silent, because
there is a double platoon fire
department. Much of the credit
for this is due Mayor James
Rolph, Jr., and also much praise
is due him for his humanitarian
innovations that have worked
so well in benefiting those who
make their livelihood in the em-
ploy of the municipality. —
Frank A. Biedermann.



On the other hand, in connection with
crime prevention and crime detection,
the police telephone signal system
must be 100 per cent efficient.

Inspection Bureau

The executive office and the elec-
trical inspection bureau are located on
the second floor of the City Hall. The
personnel of the inspection bureau con-
sists of chief inspector, nineteen in-
spectors of inside construction, one in-
spector of overhead construction, and
four clerks. This bureau is charged
with the responsibility of inspecting all
electrical work within the City and
County of San Francisco from small
installations in bungalows to large in-
dustrial and thirty-story office build-
ings. The various types of electrical
equipment the inspectors are called
upon to inspect enables them to gain a
diversity of experience.

The plant department is located in
Golden Gate Avenue between Hyde
and Leavenworth Streets, with the ga-
rage and storeroom on the ground floor,
and the machine shop located on the
second floor of a two-story brick build-
ing. A good-sized yard back of the



Online LibrarySan Francisco (Calif.). Board of SupervisorsThe municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) → online text (page 25 of 84)