Copyright
San Francisco (Calif.). Board of Supervisors.

The municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) online

. (page 3 of 84)
Online LibrarySan Francisco (Calif.). Board of SupervisorsThe municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) → online text (page 3 of 84)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


Unlimited Parking Space for Automobiles



FESS SYSTEM Sa-ves Juell

As the FESS SYSTEM COMPANY has
grown, its high standard of quality in ma-
terial and workmanship have been stricdy
adhered to and its constant aim has been to
build the product up to the point of highest
efficiency rather than down to the lowest
price.

F/RM5 Orf7M£/^c/F/cCofl5T7Af/N/< OfOu/^

"we do not hesitate to say that our experience
with the Pees Rotary Burner is the most satisfactory^
In every way. We have had quite a number of thei^
Burners in operation and have been satisfactory, al-
though the repairs have bean more, due possibly to
the fact that they have had several different repre-
sentatives here in our city and the service behind
them has not been as good as that behind the Fees
Burner, which have had the same agency for a period
of ten or twelve years and has been eminently satis-
■^actory. i)



UPOfi

FE55 3YSTEM

FESS SYSTEM COMPANY

218-220 Natoma Street
San Francisco California, U. S. A.




The Economy Pumping Machinery Co.

Chicago, III.

VACUUM PUMPS CENTRIFUGAL PUMPS

SUMP PUMPS CONDENSATION PUMPS

SEWAGE EJECTORS VACUUM AIRLINE PUMPS

J. HARRY RUSSELL

Kepreientative



330 Monadnock Bldg.



SUtter 4665



PHO




PHOTOSTAT CORPORATION

437 Monadnock Building
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA



Executive Office:
Providence, Rhode Island



Sates Office:
Rochester. N. Y,



Branch Offices

Boston Chicago Cleveland Jacksonville Kansas City

Los Angeles New York Philadelphia Pittsburgh

St. Louis Washington



Telephone DOuglas 6329

BEN G. GERWIGK, Inc.

Contractors i Engineers
Specialists in Pier and Wharf Repairs

Construction of

WHARVES, PIERS, TERMINALS, BRIDGES

FOUNDATIONS, CAISSONS

SUBMARINE <S' SUBAQUEOUS WORK

PILE DRIVING



Ben C. Gerwick, President



112 Market Street



San Francisco



The T. J. Cardoza Company

Manufacturing Stationers

Superfinish Products

Paper Rulers

Bookbinders

School Supplies

Annuals, Catalog

and Check Covers

Pass Books
Savings Pass Books

Telephones: DOUGLAS 2995 and 2996
455 Mission Street San Francisco




Buy from firms that advertise vfith us



Tanuary



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



19



Educational Activities

By A. J. Cloud, Chief Deputy Superintendent of Schools



THIS is a review of the year just closed in the
San Francisco schools.
In the proper and efficient development of a
system of schools, as well as of other important enter-
prises, a definite program of progress must be laid

out years in advance.
It is important that
such a program, once
conceived, be well
understood by those
in control and be fol-
lowed as closely and
as rapidly as condi-
tions will permit. We
have endeavored to
formulate and carry
out such a program
in San Francisco.
Some of its more im-
portant features are :

(a) The Building
Program :

The building pro-
gram is the most im-
portant feature of a
program of progress
in relation to the
physical plant, as it
is evident that good




A. J. CLOUD

— Photo by Boye



school work cannot be had without adequate housmg
and suitable equipment.

(b) School Organization:

Better arrangement of the divisions of the school
organization is a second essential element in the pro-
gram of progress. Until 1925, the plan of school or-
ganization in San Francisco was what is known as the
8-4 plan; that is, eight years of elementary school
and four years of high school. The present plan is
to reorganize the school system on the 6-3-3 plan;
that is, six years of elementary school, three years of
Junior High school, and three years of Senior High
school. The new elementary school buildings are
being planned in accordance with that policy. Al-
ready seven Junior High schools are in operation;
and the new organization is being introduced as rap-
idly as the building program can be carried into effect,
(c) Other Main Points :

Besides the two outstanding features above noted,



the main points involved in our general program of
progress may be outlined thus :

(1) Modernization of school facilities, and general
improvement of the school plant.

(2) Closer coordination and unification of all de-
partments within the school system.

(3) Increased cooperation with all agencies which
have as their object the elevation of the life of the city.

(4) Better adaptation of courses of study to indi-
vidual and social needs.

(5) Improvement in methods and standards of
supervision and instruction.

(6) Increased attention to means, through which
the public may be informed and advised accuratelj'
and fully as to the activities, conditions, and needs of
the schools.

(7) Extension of opportunities for adult education
with special emphasis on courses in citizenship.

(8) Extension of opportunities for the training of
teachers, both in the period of preparation and during
the period of professional service.

(9) Establishment of closer contacts with the home
through the encouragement of home and school asso-
ciations.

This outline of our general program of progress may
serve to give at least a broad idea of the plans, which
have been formulated and are under way, in large de-
gree, in the development of the school system of San
Francisco.

Some Evidences of Progress

The school year 1927-28. witnessed the continuance
of that steady forward movement on the part of the
San Francisco Public Schools, which has been under
way for several years past. Some of the evidences of
this movement during the year just past are:

(a) Nine new buildings and additions occupied, and
contracts awarded for three others.

(b) Half-day classes virtually eliminated.

(c) Eight additional classes organized for physi-
cally handicapped children.

(d) Ten new corrective centers — for correction of
physical defects — created, and apparatus supplied.

(e) High school courses of study made ready for
publication.

(f) Tentative tenth-year courses of study ("terminal
courses") prepared for needs of special types of stu-
dents in Junior High schools.

(Turn to Page 25)



INSTALLATIONS
MAINTENANCE y REPAIRS

San Francisco Elevator Co., Inc.

KEARNY 2443
860 Folsom Street < San Francisco



SCHOOL TIME

In San Francisco — is Standard

Thirty Public Schools equipped with Time Qocks by

The Standard Electric Time Co.

The Standard for School Time
Phone Sutter 241 690 Market Street



20



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



January



HANCOCK BROS.

EXPERT TICKET
SERVICE

Street Car Transfers
Roll Tickets

25 JESSIE STREET



The Leader Dairy Lunch

INCORPORATED

Main Office
44 Eddy Street, San Francisco

Phone sutler 237

Branches

35 SIXTH STREET, 1730 FILLMORE STREET, 70 FOURTH

STREET, 631 BROADWAY, 63 FIFTH STREET



San Francisco's Midnight Playground



COFFEE DAN'S

O'FARRELL AT POWELL STREETS

for 20 years



Golden Gate Dairy Lunch

FOOD OF QUALITY



<P



173 Eddy Street



San Francisco



Municipal Railway Breaks Record for
Holiday Receipts

A new record of total receipts by the Municipal
Railway for any one week in the fifteen years the lines
have been in operation was established in the seven
days ending Saturday, December 22. The receipts for
the week totaled $74,965.09. The largest receipts for
any previous seven-day period were those of one week
in September, 1917, during the strike on the Market
Street Railway, when the total was a little more than
$70,000.

Though traffic in general has shown a satisfactory
increase. Chief Clerk William S. Scott of the Munici-
pal Railway explained that the new record is partly
due to the income from the new N line, in operation
since October 21, averaging about $1100 a day.

By days the receipts of the Municipal Railway for
the week were: Sunday, $5721.15; Monday, $11,376.75;
Tuesday, $11,566.70; Wednesday, $11,574.35; Thurs-
day, $11,406.30; Friday, $11,852.69; Saturday, $11,-
467.15.



City Treasurer Honored



City Treasurer John H. Thieler has been named a
member of the committee on arrangements for the
convention of the National Association of State
Auditors, Treasurers and Controllers, to meet in San
Francisco September 17 to 21. Word of his appoint-
ment came to Mr. Thieler from W. S. Johnson, State
Treasurer of Virginia, and S. H. Blan, Alabama State
Auditor. It will be the association's first convention
in San Francisco.



"In first-class condition, with no repairs necessary,"
was the report recently made by City Engineer M. M.
O'Shaughnessy, after an inspection of the upper nine
miles of the Hetch Hetchy tunnel from Early Intake
diversion dam to Adit 8-9. The inspection was made
personally by Engineer O'Shaughnessy and his as-
sistants, Engineers L. T. McAfee and L. W. Stocker.
It was the first inspection of the tunnel since the Moc-
casin Creek power plant went into operation in Au-
gust, 1925, water flowing through the long bore at full
load for approximately 1215 days.



SINCE 1875

S. MARIANI & SONS
Hardware

3364 Mission Street 23rd and Florida Streets



LINDGREN and SWINERTON,


Inc.


BUILDERS






-4}>-






225 Bush Street


San Francisco



Buy from firms that advertise with '



January



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



21



Of Interest to Women



(Continued from Page 14)

fancy dress costume of red and black lace, with even
a high comb to complete the aesthetic outrage. I
thought I heard sobbing in a Spanish accent from be-
hind one of the big pillars, but maybe it was only the
head waiter speaking harshly to a bus boy.

Don't be afraid to be daring, but don't mix your na-
tionalities, if you want to be striking. Too many folks
express their suppressed desires in the evening clothes
they select. This is only a word of warning. Wait
until Mardi Gras, and then do your darndest, in a
fancy dress costume.

But that's enough of a lecture for January. I'll give
you the next installment in February, if you're not
too bored to read it.

At any rate, au revoir till then.

. FEEDING THE HUSBAND



Bestfoods

BREAD AND BUTTER PICKLES!



By Martha Adams
The Best Foods Home Economics Service

FAMOUS psychologists have predicted an unhappy
ending for every marriage in which the wife aims
to change her husband's ways. The bride of today,
with the wisdom which is the heritage of the modern
Eve, knows that she cannot force down an unwilling
throat dishes prepared according to her idea of what
is healthful. She represses her horror when the new
husband clamors for quantities of meat and spicy
foods, which she knows slow down vitality, clog the
system and make for disaster. She adheres as closely
as her dietetic wisdom permits to the type of foods he
really enjoys, but she balances them with those she
knows he requires.

Ham and eggs, steaks and chops, baked beans and
pie have ever been thought of as the staple diet of
the American man. But the wise wife knows that
salads, prepared with a definite understanding that
men like hearty foods and ample quantities, will be
accepted without protest, to put in their life-saving
work, unnoticed. But cunning and seasoning must
be employed to make them appeal. If you can
inject real flavor into your salads, a husband, new or
old, will proclaim you a cook without a peer.

Most men can be made enthusiastic over fish if
made flavorful with spicy Best Foods Relish Spred and
many a health-giving salad can be given the zest and
snap that makes it popular by the addition of this real
man's dressing. Or try serving a substantial salad
like the following, which always brings masculine
plates back to the salad bowl for a second helping.
Best Foods Ham Salad

Combine three-quarters of a cup of diced ham, a
quarter of a cup of diced celery and a quarter of a cup
of diced cold potatoes. To these add a quarter of a
cup of crunchy Best Foods Bread and Butter Pickles
for vim and accent. Moisten with plenty of Best Foods
Mayonnaise and serve on crisp lettuce leaves. A slice
of Best Foods Bread and Butter Pickles, whole, and
more mayonnaise as a garnish will make this salad
so tempting that the most voracious man will eat
without questioning the motive of his wife in serving
him the life-giving salad plants to balance his diet.

James F. Sheehan, former San Francisco policeman
and retired corporation attorney, died Christmas Dav
at his home in San Anselmo. Mr. Sheehan, while a
member of the Police Department, was injured in 1899
and later retired on pension.

Buy from firms that advertise with us




NOT "Just Another Pickle"

FRESH SLICED CUCUMBERS
Picked and Packed the Same Day
A Delicious Flavor All Its Own

HICKMAN PRODUCE CO.

Exclusive Distributors
910 Harrison Street San Francisco




VIRDEN

PACKING

CO.

San Francisco, Calif,

UNDER

U.S.

GOVERNMENT

INSPECTION



ONLY the CHOICEST CUTS



of



EASTERN PORK



ARE USED IN THE MASUFACTVRE OF



CAMP FIRE

BRAND

HAMS and BACON



^You'll note the difference"



22



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



January




Jusi Good Wholesome
Milk and Cream——



Telephone Market 5776

A-1 Butter, Eggs 8C Cottage
Cheese

Del Monte Creamery

M. DETTLING, Prop.

Pure Pasteurized and Certified
Milk

Family Trade a Specialty



375 POTRERO AVE.
Near 17tb St.



San Francisco
California



BRUNO ENDERLEIN F. DONOVAN

CALIFORNIA HALL

RATHSKELLER



Restaurant and Grill
BOWLING



MEALS AT ALL HOURS



Polk and Turk Streets Phone Graystone 7652



ountam




BOSS of the ROAD

OVERALLS



(Union Made)
Manufactured by

NEUSTADTER BROS.




*li^04 ^iIaAK



San Francisco, Portland, New York and Los Angeles



Guardians of a City's Morals



(Continued from Page 10)

Of the present three members, each came to her po-
sition by appointment, she previously having won val-
uable experience in social service work.

The nation boasts none more efficient, more capable,
more painstaking in line of duty, than Mesdames Kate
O'Connor, Katheryene Eisenhart and Kathlyn Sulli-
van, San Francisco's star triumvirate in women's pro-
tective work.



W errenrath and Saengerbund to
Feature Next City "Pop"



THE outstanding musical event of the New Year
will be the city "pop" concert to be given the night
of February 7 in San Francisco's Civic Auditorium
with Reinald Werrenrath, noted American baritone,
as soloist, and the Pacific Saengerbund of 300 voices
as the features. A special program has been prepared
by Conductor Alfred Hertz for his San Francisco
Symphony Orchestra, while Frederick G. Schiller,
director of the famous German singing organization,
will lead in presentation of the dramatic "Feast of the
Holy Grail" from Parsifal.

Mr. Hertz has announced that the program will
include as purely orchestral numbers the Saint-Saens
"Danse Macabre" and the Phedre overture of Masse-
net. The numbers to be presented by Werrenrath
will be announced shortly.

In view of the fact that the concert will mark the
first official appearance of the Pacific Saengerbund,
augmented by a special chorus of women, under city
auspices, great interest is already being shown by
music lovers around the Bay. A capacity audience,
equal to that which attended the premiere of Ernest
Bloch's "America," seems assured.

Chairman James B. McSheehy and his colleagues,
Supervisors Warren Shannon and Franck R. Havenner
of the Auditorium Committee, are urging those who
are not regular city "pop" season subscribers to make
reservations at once. The concert is one of the regu-
lar city programs to which all purchasers of season
"pop" tickets are entitled to attend without further
expense. Single reservations can be made at Sherman,
Clay & Company's Kearny Street store at the usua!l
municipal popular scale of prices.



William Thomas Wiley, father of Ralph W. Wiley,
chief of the city department of electricity, died Tues-
day evening, December 11, while visiting a daughter,
Mrs. B. B. Johnson, 838 Indian Rock Avenue, Ber-
keley. Mr. Wiley, formerly a merchant in Ohio, had
made his home in San Francisco since 1900. Funeral
services were held from the Suhr Undertaking Com-
pany's chapel on Friday, December 14.



Lady Attendant at All Hours



Telephones :
Mission 98 and 99



H. F. SUHR CO., INC.

Funeral Directors



H. FRED SUHR, Pres.
HERBERT F. SUHR, Mgr-



2919 Mission Street

Between 25th and 26th
San Francisco



Buy from firms that advertise with us



January



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



23



Widows and Orphans' Concert and Ball

By Corporal Peter B. Maloney
President Widows and Orphans' Aid Association

THE Widows and Orphans' Aid Association of the
San Francisco Police Department will hold its an-
nual concert and ball in the Civic Auditorium, Satur-
day night, February 9.

Our Association is one purely of benevolence. We
have had an average of twenty-two deaths a year, for
which the Association has disbursed in benefits $5j,000




Lieutenant Samuel Miller



Sergeant William Bennett



Yosemite Gray Line Limousines

INCORPORATED

High Class Limousine Service

for all occasions at

reasonable rates



<i?



515 Powell Street



GArfield 0300



annually. The concert and ball will be given to re-
plenish those funds.

Lieutenant Samuel Miller of Headquarters Com-
pany is chairman of the affair. Detective Sergeant
William Bennett, chairman of the entertainment com-
mittee, announces that the forthcoming ball will sur-
pass all our others. He is arranging a two hours
entertainment to include numerous radio stars. Lap-
tain Charles Dullea of the Detective Bureau, chair-
man of the hall and decorating committee, has prom-
ised us some novel features in the way of decorations.
Lieutenant Henrv Powell, chairman of ticket sales
committee, has spent endless hours disposing of
blocks of tickets to the big ball. Sergeant Thomas t".
McEnernev. chairman of the floor committee, is sched-
uled to lead the grand march. He is noted as the city s
most capable grand march leaders. Patrolman \\ alter
E. Harrington of the Bush Street Police Station, is
chairman of the reception committee, and will see
that guests are properly seated. .

Owing to the illness of our chief. Daniel J. O Brien.
we do not know if he will be present. If he does not
attend he will be sorely missed, as the Chief, for the
last twenty years, has been a member of the Associa-
tion and has helped to build it up to where it is todav.
Chief O'Brien was chairman of the Widows and
Orphans' ball committee in 1921. and that ball still is
talked about.

Chief of Police William J. Oumn. who has suc-
ceeded Chief O'Brien, has been a member of our Asso-
ciation for twenty-one years. He was chairman of the
ball committee two years ago and set a mark for ball
receipts, the highest in the history of the Association.
We know that Chief Ouinn will be with us on Feb-
ruary 9, because he is working tirelessly for the success
of the ball and concert.

Sergeant Patrick H. McGee. chairman of our pub-
licity 'committee, reports that "Everybody in town is
going to the ball."

Tickets may be purchased from any police otticer.
or reservations may be had by telephoning Daven-
port 0020.

Buy from firms that



Compliments of

ACME PLANING MILL

1845 San Brimo Avenue
Phone ATWATER 0151



SCOTT 8C GILBERT CO.

Jobbers, Importers, Exporters
Manufacturing Chemists, Wholesale Druggists



Telephone DAvenport 0150
268 Mission Street San Francisco, Calif.



HAPPY NEW YEAR

JEFF D. FLOYD

GENERAL INSURANCE BROKER



-4>-

550 Polk Street, near Turk



FRanUin 1795



advertise with us



24



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



January



Phone PArk 1267



ROBERT W. JAMISON
Railroad Supplies



1222 Mission Street, San Francisco
California



BOULDER CANYON

Plastic Dolomitic Finishing

HYDRATED LIME

Other Lime Products
manufactured by

United States Lime Products Corp.

SAN FRANCISCO PORTLAND LOS ANGELES



California Corrugated
Culvert Co.

ARMCO culverts



818 Crocker Bldg.
San Francisco



Phone Douglas
4457



JOHN FINN, President



ROBERT B. FINN, Secretary



JOHN FINN METAL WORKS

SAN FRANCISCO and SEATTLE

Babbitt Metals and Solders • Type Metals and Zinc Dust
Galvanizing and Sberardizins

372-398 SECOND STREET
TELEPHONE SUTTER 4188



Member Builders' Exchange Phones: MArket 9541 - 0766

Eclipse Lime and Cement Co.

E. L. SNELL, Manager
SAND

Monlerev White Wet and Dry, Fan Shell White Wet and Dry
Lapis, Amber (Keystone) River

PLASTERERS' AND MASONS' SUPPLIES

B. H. AIGELTINGER, Sales Manager

14S Landers Street, next to Sibley Grading Be Teaming Co.'a Yard



Judge James G. Conlan Becomes

Presiding Jurist of Superior

Court Bench




SUPERIOR Court Judge James G. Conlan is
the 1929 presiding jurist of the Superior Courts of
San Francisco, and will take over that important post
Monday, January 8, when he will move from the Hall

of Justice, where since
1926 he presided over
one of the criminal de-
partments, to the City
Hall.

The induction of Judge
Conlan to the highest
honor in the gift of his
fellow Superior Court
judges, was the occasion
for many complimentary
speeches. Hundreds of
messages of congratula-
tion came to Judge Con-
lan from men and women
JUDGE JAMES G. CONLAN throughout the state and
representatives in all walks of life. Judge Conlan is
extremely popular with everybody.

Judge Conlan is a native of San Francisco and has
lived here all his life save for the years he attended
the University of Michigan, from which he graduated
in 1903, later having returned to this city to practice
law.

In 1910 Judge Conlan was an assistant district
attorney and, from the start, won recognition as a
fearless and conscientious public prosecutor. A year
later he was elected Justice of the Peace.

San Franciscans showed their confidence in and
respect for Judge Conlan by electing him Justice of
the Peace for four consecutive terms. During the time
he was Justice of the Peace he was presiding justice.
In the lower court Judge Conlan early displayed the
judicial temperament and learning that has made him
an outstanding member of the San Francisco Superior
Court bench.

There is no doubt that Judge Conlan will prove a
popular presiding judge. He has the executive ability
so necessary to that office. He has, in addition, a
kindly, human heart that blends well with the position
of presiding judge.

The Municipal Employee joins with Judge Con-
lan's hosts of other friends in wishing him a successful
j-ear as the presiding jurist of the San Francisco
Superior Courts.



Board of Public Works



(Continued from Page 11)

M. J. Tierney, Superintendent of Public Buildings,
in charge of repairs to schools and public buildings.

J. B. Leonard, Superintendent Bureau of Building
Inspection. Inspects buildings in course of construc-
tion.

C. H. Sawyer, Superintendent Bureau of Architec-
ture. In charge of construction of all new school and
public buildings.

John P. Hannan, Superintendent Bureau of Ac-
counts, financial wizard of the Board.



Buy from firms that advertise with us



January



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



25



Educational Activities



(Continued from Page 19)

(g) Professional training of teachers in service en-
couraged.

(h) Business department developed, with special
reference to efficient handling of supplies and ma-
terials.

(i) Opportunities for adult education extended, and
courses of instruction improved.

(j) Adjustment class begun.

(ic) Additional shop facilities installed in Junior
High schools and High schools.

(1) Teacher-clerks appointed in elementary schools,
enabling principals to devote greater attention to
supervision.

(m) Continuing census established.

(n) School library and text-book service and use
of visual aids expanded.

(o) Activities of Congress of Mothers and Parent-
Teacher Associations aided.

Birdseye View of Pupils and Teaching Staff 1927-28

Number of Pupils Teaching Staff
School Year School Year

Type of School 1927-28 1927-28

HIGH SCHOOLS:

Day High Schools (6) 15,416 568

Evening High Schools (4) 10,899 162

Part Time School 5.308 56

Aduh Day Classes 987 — *»

Total High Schools 32,610 786

JUNIOR HIGH

SCHOOLS (7) 6.981 249

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS:

Day Schools (90) 53.218 1.574

Kindergartens (79) 5,705 83

Evening Schools (4) 3,659 44

Total Elementary Schools.... 62,582 1,701

Total All Schools * 2,736

*Total pupils for "all schools" would be misleading, for the
reason that a large number of pupils passing from one type of
schooh to another, during the school year, would be duplicated
and thus inflate the totals.

**This number is included in day high school figures. (In



Online LibrarySan Francisco (Calif.). Board of SupervisorsThe municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) → online text (page 3 of 84)