Copyright
San Francisco (Calif.). Board of Supervisors.

The municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) online

. (page 31 of 84)
Online LibrarySan Francisco (Calif.). Board of SupervisorsThe municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) → online text (page 31 of 84)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


Boeken are intended to give our
readers an idea of the nature of
the inner workings of a street
railway organization. — The
Editor.



The last twenty-five cars procured
have air-controlled gates and step
lights, features not connected w^ith the
older cars.

Every precaution was used in design-
ing these cars to insure the safetv and
comfort of the traveling public.

In addition to the regular means of
controlling them, they are safeguarded
with conductor's air valve, to be used
should the motorman suddenly become
incapacitated, and emergency reverse
as a safeguard against power stoppage
or damaged air pijjes, etc.

The trucks for the cars were pro-
cured from the J. G. Brill Companv of
Philadelphia, and the Baldwin Locomo-
tive Works of the same city.

The finished style of the ^lunicipal
Ivailway cars, the fine lighting and in-
terior trim, the roomy platforms which



greatly facilitate the loading and get
ting away at congested places, the sys
tern of fare collection which permits
of loading and unloading at both ends,
the comparatively noiseless running of
same (much of which is due to the fact
that steel wheels are used in place of
cast-iron wheels, more commonly used
by street railways on account of saving
in expense), and the care given to the
upkeep and appearance of the rolling
stock, have brought the most favorable
comment from visitors, particularly
street railway critics, from all parts of
the country.

18 Busses in Service

In addition to the above passenger
equipment, the Municipal Railway
has eighteen busses, among which
are included Whites, Pierce-Arrows,
Macks and Fageols, with seating ca
pacities ranging from eighteen t'
twenty-nine persons each, and which
were purchased at a cost of $7600 to
S9500 each.

The total invested in passenger
cars and busses is more than $2,425.-
000, more than one-third of this equip- J
nient, or about $1,000,000 worth, being i
in use only three hours each day, or '
during peak-hour travel.

There is also invested in other J
equipment, including wrecking cars,'!
grinding car. shop equipment, etc.,
more than $50,000.

The amount carried in stores usedy
in the upkeep of this equipment is in^
the neighborhood of $41,000.

The increase in cost of these carsi
from $7100 to $19,200 in the past fif-|
teen years is typical of all other ex-
penses connected with street railway
operation brought about since the war,

Care and Upkeep

The care and upkeep of this largeli
number of cars and busses requires theji
services of one hundred and forty men.l
about sixty of whom are engaged in]
inspection and overhauling work, thir- '
ty-five in washing, cleaning and disin
fecting and ten in painting. The
remainder of the force consists o
machinists, blacksmiths, carpentersi
armature winders, garage men, etc

Practically all the work in connec
tion with the upkeep of the equipment'
is done in the shops at the car-barn,
2600 Geary Street.

Due to the large expansion of tlie
Municipal Railway since its inception
in 1912, the repair shop capacity is
sadly overtaxed as the original con-
struction was suitable for about seven-






lulv



THE M r N I C I P A L E M 1 ' 1 . < ) ^' }•: 1-:



41



za^^^^^S;







"Superior Funeral Service**

-WHITE'S SUPERIOR FUNER.IL
SERVICE" provides the utmost in efficient
and sympathetic funeral service.

You ivill marvel at the subtle understand-
ing of "WHITE'S SERVICE," a service
that anticipates your every need and uish.

Call the ranking funeral service of this
city—'ff'HITE'S SERVICE."

Telephone WE st 0770

S. A. WHITE

Leading Funeral Director
TRANS-BAY AND PENINSULAR SERVICE WITHOUT EXTRA CHARGE



Tcl«pl»on»
Wesh



2200 Sutter Street



San Francisco







in

1870.




FOR YOUR LAWN AND GARDEN




Hand and Power Lawn
Mowers / Sprinklers
Hose r Grass and
Pruning Tools » Fer-
tilizers f Insecticides
Rollers / Sweepers, etc.



H. V. CARTER CO.

52 Beale Street San Francisco



J. Hotchner


Novelty Electric




President


Sign Co.


Vice-President


HOTCHNERS




LU-MI-NUS






Letters

Patemcd


LU-MI-NUS


Marquees.

Theater

Rental Letters


March 12, 1918


SPECTACULAR NEON


Roof Signs


1,259.2;;


HIGH SPEED BORDERS




LU-MI-NUS




HIGH SPEED


NEON


Telephone HEmlock 9290-9291


NEON


Signs and Tubes




BORDERS


Patcnis Pending


290-292 Seventh Street

SAN FRANCISCO,

CALIFORNIA


Patents Pending






Buy from firms th



WM. F. PIDGE



T. B. CURLEY



C.-P. PARKING STATION
25c PARKING

Catering to Fox Theatre patrons

Drive Up Service * Uniformed Attendant Serves You



275 CAR CAPACITY
OPEN FROM 8 A.M. TO 1 A.M.



Opposite Fox Theatre
1325 Market St.



Telephone
MArket 5150



RAILS— New or Relaying— RAILS

In Sizes Ranging from 8 lb. to 100 lb.

LOCOMOTIVES — CARS

Freight and Passenger Equipment

Machinery

New and Used

United Commercial Company, Inc.

234 Steuart Street, San Francisco
Phorte DAVENPORT 2355



BOSS of the ROAD

OVERALLS

(Union Made)
Manufactured by

NEUSTADTER BROS.

San Francisco, Portland, New York and Los Angeles




42



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



Till



ty-five cars, while at the present time
more than three times that many must
be taken care of in the same shop.

Master Mechanic William C. Bendel
is in charge of all work in connection
with the repair and maintenance of
Municipal Railway equipment. Mr.
Bendel served his time at the Union
Iron Works and prior to coming to the
Municipal Railway in December, 1912.
as Master Mechanic, he was connected
with the Napa Valley Electric Railroad.

The Municipal Railway buys prac-
tically all its electric power from the
Pacific Gas & Electric Company. The
cable system is nearly all underground,
and power is furnished to the trolley
from eight substations with more than
forty feeder connections. These sta-
tions are so distributed that the drop in
power in the more isolated or outly-
ing districts is scarcely noticeable.
This insures uniform speed as well
as good car lighting.

The Municipal Railway's power bill




One of the sturdy gray cars of the Municipal Railivay entering the car barns
at 2600 Geary Street.



paid to the Pacific Gas and Electric
Company for the year was $481,000.
During the same period $52,000 was
paid to the Market Street Railway
Company for power furnished, prin-
cipally to lines on Market Street.

In the later construction of lines
concrete trolley poles were used.



amounting to more than one-half of the
system. The conventional black paint
used on the iron poles is giving way to
aluminum, which presents a more pleas-
ing appearance.

The superintendence of the overhead
system also is taken care of by Mr.
Bendel.



Problems of the City Attorney s Office



By Sylvain D. Leipsic

Assistant City Attorney



HUNDREDS of San Francisco's
citizens daily tread the corri-
dors of the City Hall going to and
from the various departments of the
city's government that are housed
beneath the dome of one of the finest
civic structures in the world. It is
justly said that "San Francisco
Knows How" when our City Hall
and the entire civic center is con-
sidered.

The directories located in the City
Hall inform those who do not know
that the City Attorney's office is
located on the second floor south-
east, entrance room numbered 206.
The words "City Attorney" are
painted on the door in neat, clear-
cut lettering. Here may be found
Honorable John J. O'Toole, and his
staff of assistants, legal and clerical.

An Efficient Staff

Modestj' forbids the writer to
comment upon the industry of this
office and the ability of those who
work there. None the less it may
be briefly said that each day, and
frequently at night and on holidays,
too, are spent in the handling of the
city's many legal matters, to-wit :
consultations and conferences, pre-
paring actions for and on behalf of
the city and preparing the defense
for actions and suits instituted
against the city, writing opinions
and briefs, replying to legal in-




JOHN J. O'TOOLE
City Attor-ncy

quiries from other communities and
officials, giving legal advice and
doing numerous other things in con-
nection with the work of the office.

When the Fun Begins

-Among the many people who
daily call at the City Attorney's
office are those who mistake the
identity and the purpose of the same.
I refer to those who, and in man)'
instances, innocently think and be-
lieve that the City Attorney's office
is established for the purpose of aid-
ing and advising all people in their
legal problems and representing



them in actions instituted against
them. Some of these people are
really funny and their problems hu-
morous. It has been Mr. O'Toole's
rule and order to all in his office
since he has been City Attorney,
correctly to inform mistaken people
of their errors and to treat them
with courtesy, and if possible with-
out the taking of too much time, to
advise them what is best for them
to do with reference to their legal
worries. This is simply a reflection
of the man who is our City Attor-
ney, for he is well known for his
kindliness and consideration to all,
particularly to the unfortunate, ig-
norant and misinformed.

Perplexing Inquiries

To cite a few of the inquiries made
by the people last referred to. Peo-
ple have called to ask if they must
pay their rent when they have had
arguments with their landlords.
Frequently, women will want toj
know what they should do when
their laundries fail to return some
of their washing. One day a ladyl
called and wanted to know how she
could get rid of her mother-in-law,|
who lived with her husband ano
herself and interfered with the man-1
agement of her home. Leases and I
other written documents are often
l-.rought to the office with the re-
quest that we advise whether or not



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOY E E



43




The Most Versatile

Adverrising Sign

in America

C.H. JENKINS CO., Inc.

Distributors
457 Kearny Street

Phone KEamy 4940




When you want better

LIGHTING FIXTURES

insist on

THOMAS DAY CO-

725 Mission Street
SAN FRANCISCO



"The Choice of the World's Products

for

HOME, HOTEL and INSTITUTION'



Hotel and Restaurant

Equipment and Supplies

Crockery, Glassware,

Silverware, Kitchen

Appliances, Ranges



Household Supplies

Furnaces, Heaters

Refrigerators, Stoves

Utensils, Fireplace Goods



CONTRACT TILE WORK



MANGRUM-HOLBROOK COMPANY



1235 Mission Street
WHOLESALERS



IMPORTERS



San Francisco, Calif.
MANUFACTURERS



Copeland Electric Refrigerators




and




Bosch Radios




ARTHUR DAHL




470 Sutter Street KEarny


8753



Here are some outstanding and exclusive features of our

NEON SIGNS "DE LUXE"

Approved by the Underwriters Laboratories

Waterproof and fireproof construction.

Serviced from outside exclusively in a few moments'
time, without danger, even when current is on.

Our electrodes are self centering, self insulating, self
supporting, thus avoiding electrical leakage common
to other makes of NEON SIGNS.

No disfiguring of face of sign by handholes or screws.

High tension connections are made of German silver,
or other non-corroding metal.

These NEON SIGNS "De Luxe" are without equal
on the Pacific Coast from standpoints of design and
construction, mechanically and electrically.

We invite your closest investigation.

"// You Will Make Comparisons, We Will Make
Your Sign"

NECN

ELECTRIC -SIGN CO.

Manufacturers of the celebrated
NEON SIGNS "DE LUXE"



PETER BERCUT
President



1559 Howard Street
San Francisco



Phone MARKET 9376



FAIR MANUFACTURING CO.

p. J. FEYKERT, Prop.

Miscellaneous and Ornamental

Iron and Bronze of Every

Description



S



617 BRYANT



SUTTER 5001



Buv from firms that advertise with us



44



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



July



the agreements are fair. Alvvaj-s the
papers have been signed and the
parties bound by their own contract.
The case of doing first and thinking
after.

Segregating Callers
The most difficult problem in the
reception room of the office and
which taxes the charming lady in
charge there, is to determine who
really call on business and wish to
see Mr. O'Toole personal)}'. There
are so many callers and deceiving-
characters who insist they have an
appointment with the City Attorney
or who assert they must see him in
person. Usually, these are people
(and frequently cranks) who fabri-
cate and call for no other purpose
than to waste time or inquire about
some nonsensical matter which. has
nothing to do with the work of the
office. The lady in charge has be-
come well trained to recognize those
who are callers at the office on mat-
ters of business and who really must
see Mr. O'Toole. The wasters and
others who call for no good purpose



MANY people labor under
the mistaken idea that the
City Attorney's office is a clear-
ing-house for their legal, finan-
cial and marital woes, says Mr.
Leipsic in this article. Unfor-
tunate, ignorant and misin-
formed persons are not given a
deaf ear in that department,
however, for the City Attorney,
who is known for his kindli-
ness and thoughtful considera-
tion, has instructed his staff
correctly to inform mistaken
people of their errors, to treat
them with courtesy, and, if pos-
sible, to advise them what is
best for them with reference to
their legal worries. It must
require a deal of patience,
though, when the City Attor-
ney's attaches are called upon
to solve such inquiries as what
must be done when laundries
fail to return the wash and how
to get rid of a mother-in-law
who is interfering with the
management of a home.



are either interviewed by an assist-
ant city attorney or promptl}' dis-
missed — but courteously.

What the general public does not
know is this : The Charter of our
city and county, ARTICLE \ .
CHAPTER II. SECTION 2, pro-
vides :

"The Cit}' Attorney" must prose-
cute and defend for the City and
County all actions at law or in
equity, and all special proceedings
for or against the City and County;
and whenever any cause of action at
law or in equity or by special pro-
ceedings exists in favor of the City
and County he shall commence the
same when within his knowledge,
and, if not within his knowledge
when directed to do so by resolu-
tion of the Supervisors. He shall
give legal advice, in writing, to all
officers, boards and commissions
named in this Charter, when re
quested so to do by them, or either
of them, in writing, upon questions
arising in their separate departments
involving the rights or liabilities of
the City and County."



FORMER CHIEF O'BRIEN IS
POLICE COMMISSIONER



FORMER Chief of Police Daniel
J. 0'r>rien, one of the most pop-
ular men in San l<"rancisco, has
returned to the city's official family.




I'rancisco Police Department, but his
health has improved to such an extent
his physicians have allowed him to
return to official life.

Mayor Rolph recently announced the
appointment of the former police chief
as a member of the Police Commission
to succeed Commissioner Andrew
Mahony, retired.

City officials and friends of the for-
mer chief were present at the July 21
meeting of the Police Commission to
welcome Mr. O'Brien as he sat for
the first time as a member of that com-
mission. Mayor Rolph and Commis-
sioner Theodore Roche paid high
tribute to the former Chief of Police
and officially welcomed him to the
board. Mr. O'Brien, on formally tak-
ing his place on the commission, spoke
highly of the efficiency of the Sail
I'rancisco Police Department.

Commissioner O'Brien took his oath
of office in the office of County Clerk
Harr\- I. Mulcrevv.



A SNIPPY ANSWER

PRODUCES DISTRESS



TLJrEXRY BRUNNER, registry



DANIEL J. O'BRIEN



and among those with whom he for
merly was associated.

Sickness caused Chief O'Brien to iieen soliciting for magazines for
rclin(|uish the office as head of the San ten years so that she may get



clerk in County Clerk H. I.
.Mulcrevy's office, has vowed never
again to give a snippy answer to a
book agent. He has had a distress-
ing experience.

A pretty young woman, who has



enough money to go to college after
she gets out of the second grade of
grammar school, called at the
Brunner home.

Brunner, eating dinner, had his j
coat off, and as a precaution against J
soup on the vest and spaghetti on
the necktie, had one of his wife's
aprons tied around his neck. When
the door bell rang, Brunner, still
wearing his apron, answered the
summons.

"I have called to give you some-
thing for nothing" said the woman,
in most dulcet tones. "I will give ■
you, with one year's subscription to /
Blah, the magazine that should be
in every home, this beautiful, hand-
somely bound leatherette hook
hand-tooled, deckelcd edge volume
of prose and poetry. I — "

"Aw, g'wan," said Brunner. "I
don't want any magazine and don't|
want any book. We got a book
last year. Nothin' doing."

The beautiful young woman gave
Brunner one of her most soulful
looks and said sweetly, "Go back to.
the kitchen and do j-our housework
you big pill."

The door slammed.

"I'll never talk roughly to anothei
book agent," sighed Brunner, as he
made change, answeerd a legal ques-
tion, picked up the tele])hone and
registered an action, all in one
movement. "They embarrass out
so."



luh



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



45



BBN/^^illN

ELECTRIC MANUFACTURING CO.



MILES F. STEEL. Manager



San Franciscc



448 Br>ant Street

Electric Lighting Specialties < Industrial Lighting Equipment

Wiring Devices < Panel Boards and Cabinets < Punch

Press Efficiency and Safety Devices t Enameled Steel

Reflectors, Specialties < Stampings and Drawn Work

General Office, nud Works: CHICAGO. ILL.

Brmchei: NEW YORK. TORONTO, CAN.. LONDON. ENGLAND

DhlrUl Offices: BOSTON. PITTSBURGH. CINCINNATI.

DETROIT. ST. LOUIS



Does Your Car STOP
QUICKLY r SMOOTHLY ^ SURELY

The new State brake Ian- will be rigidly enforced after
August 14, 1929

Have your brakes tested on the only four wheel
BRAKOMETERS in San Francisco at

THE UNIVERSAL SAFETY CO.



BUSH & LARKIN
ORdway 4600



135 HYDE ST,
FRanklin 4011



The Modern Way to
Measure Minutes

Telechron Observatory Time from
Your Electric Outlet

Recent installations of Telechron clocks or to be
installed later:



SAN FRANCISCO

Geary Street School
Balboa Grammar School
Marina School
Roosevelt Jr, High School
Park Presidio High School
The Emporium
O'Connor, Moffatt SC Co.
Ov\ Drug Co.
Sears. Roebuck & Co.
L Magnin Si. Co.



OAKLAND

East Oakland High School
Herbert Hoover Jr. H. S.
Fruitvale School
Laurel School
Whittier School
Burbank School
Hawthorne School
Emporium-Capwell Co.



TELECHRON CLOCKS FOR THE HOME
^15.00 UP

5ee Our Window Display

F. A. THOMAS CO., Inc.

47 Second Street San Francisco, Calif.

Phone SUtter 0809



Congratulations to Ralph Wiley and

the Department of Electricity on his

New Traffic Control System



THE WIND -ENGINEERING
AND MFG. CO.



All Kinds of Molds for Battery Manufacturing and
Specializing in Tool, Die and Model Work



P. S. WIND, Prop.

739 Larkin Street San Francisco

Phone GRAYSTONE 1359



KEARNY 5383



EDGAR A. CASTELLINI



COLUMBUS ELECTRIC CO.

Wiring RADIO Fixtures

Agents for

SPARTON - BOSCH r PHILCO < ATWATER KENT
STEWART WARNER

Electrical Engineering ' Theatrical Lighting
507 Columbus Avenue 2121 Chestnut Street



Arrow

Reg. VS. Pel. Off.

ARROW ELECTRIC DIVISION

of
THE ARROW - HART & HEGEMAN ELECTRIC CO.

Manufacturers of Wiring Devices

HARTFORD, CONN.

Pacific Coast OflSce: 617 Howard Street
SAN FRANCISCO



Buv from firms that advertise with us



46



THE MUNICIPAL EM P L O Y E E



Tulv



Playground Commission

By V^EDA Beresford Young, Secrc



Activities



SWIMMING is, unquestionably,
one of the outstanding activities
conducted by the Playground Com-
mission.

When you realize that the water
at the two swimming pools oyierated
by the department is exceptionally
pure and exceeds all requirements
laid down by the Department of
Public Health, the popularity of this
sport readily can be attested. Excel-
lent instruction is also a great incen-
tive for the children to frequent the
pools.

The Supervisor of Swimming,
Miss Helen Wollang, held the An-
nual Girls' Swimming Meet on Fri-
day, June 28, at 2:30 p. m. at the
Mission pool. The junior and senior
events included thirty-yard dashes,
airplane, egg and ladle, and umbrella
races, diving, under-water swim-
ming and lifesaving demonstrations.
The girls showed real enthusiasm in
passing their tests and practicing
for the meet, which was very suc-
cessful. A large audience witnessed
this interesting event.

A boys' meet, under the supervi-
sion of Mark Graham, was held on
Saturday, July 6, at Mission pool,
and proved to be as interesting as
the girls' meet. There also were a
large number of enthusiastic spec-
tators present to watch the events.

Mayor James Rolph Jr., and Su-



pervisors McGovern, Andriano and
Toner, accompanied by several
members of the Playground Com-
mission and executive stafif visited
the Mission swimming tank and
playground on the first annual in-
spection tour conducted by the de-
partment. The Mayor was espe-
cially pleased with his visit, which
not only included his delightful re-
ception at Mission Playground, but
Southside and Chinese Playgrounds,
Edison Schoolyard and the Dra-
matic Work Shop.

One of the most successful ath-
letic activities held this year was the
Annual Track and Field Meet in
which 707 boys participated. The






tary

meet was won by Mission Play
ground, receiving fifty-one points|
Edison placing second with thirty-
six, Richmond third with twenty-
seven, and JefTerson fourth with
twenty. ■

The first Penny Piper Show con^
ducted by the department revealed af
great deal of talent and provided an-
opportunity for imaginative play,
"The Frozen North," the subjed
selected by the boy winner fromi
Richmond Playground presented
clever use of egg shells for Eskim
huts. "Heidi" was beautifully illus
trated by the West Portal winner,
The bathing scene from Dougla
Playground, and especially the Jap-^




I r/<'



Girls rrai-vintj iivimmini/ iiisli in Iidiis ill tlir North Rriuli liallis. Lotxcr: Hoys
learti'nttf the first strokes in sivimmmtj at the Mission llaths.



anese garden from Funston Pla}
ground were executed in an exce
lent manner.

Recently Edward Rainey, E.xeciB
tive Secretary to the Mayor, pn
sented the certificates, ribbons, anfl
other awards to the winners in t^
various tournaments and speci
events held by the department d
ing the last few months in the Ci
Hall Rotunda.

The writer has had the good fo
tune of having recently visited mai
of the outstanding recreation depa
ments throughout the Unit
States, as well as the National R'
reation Training School and t
office of the Playground and Recrea
tion Associaticin of .Xmerica.



tPP



lulv



T H 1". .\[ r X I C I P A L E M TM, O Y K K



47



DUPLEXALITE

FOR EYE COMFORT and EFFICIENCY

Office and Home Illumination that conforms to the

theory of best lighting practice based on the

law of optics

GEO. J. RAAB & GO.

50 Hanthorne Street San Francisco, Calif.

P/io.if KEARNY 1665



National Lighting Fixture
& Supply Company

935 Mission Street, San Francisco

Telephone DOuglas 3643
A Lighting Fixture for Every Outlet



RESIDENTIAL



COMMERCIAL , INDUSTRIAL



State Manufacturing Company

Buildien and Constructors of

ROOF SIGNS

Sign Erection and Steeple Jacking a Specialty

IRON WORK

Martin Bros. HEmlock 4578

35 and 37 Rausch Street



BANKS WRECKING CO.

Wreckers

Phone UNDERHILL 8290



Yards: 2080 Folsom
At 17th Street



SAN FRANCISCO



JAMES ELECTRIC GO.

MOTOR INSTALLATION AND
MAINTENANCE

Electrical Work and Repairing
163 Second Street Phone DO uglas 3007



BOWIE SWITCH COMPANY

High Tension: Sub-Station Equipment, Lightning Arresters.
Bu»-Bar Supports, Choke CoiU

High Tension: Circuit Breakers, Switches, Cutouts, Fu^es

Telephone Mission 1300
813 Tennessee Street San Francisco* Calif.



KRODEPROOF

A protective coating against the action of
corrosion generally

It is a suspension of asphalt in water and
is applied cold

MARTIN DOERR

460 Seventh Street

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.

Representative



WEST COAST ELEVATOR CO.

463 Harrison Street

Phone GARFIELD 5658
W. A. Davis San Francisco, Calif.



Online LibrarySan Francisco (Calif.). Board of SupervisorsThe municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) → online text (page 31 of 84)