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San Francisco (Calif.). Board of Supervisors.

The municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) online

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Meyers Safety Switch Company

419 TEHAMA STREET, San Francisco, Calit".




Made in San Francisco



Electrical Safety
Switches

Panel Boards

Electrical Sheet
Metal Products

Industrial
Switchboards

Apartment House
Meter Boards

Cutout Boxes, Rp'-e-
ways. Etc.

Electrical Specialties




WE BUY, SELL, RENT,
REPAIR, INSTALL
AND EXCHANGE



MOTORS



Star-Delta Electrical Works

272-274 Fremont Street

SAN FRANCISCO
Telephone GA rfield 0936



Buv from firms that advertise with us



48



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



luly



A Novel Tour of the World

By Anne M. Farrell

Hend of Fiction Department, Piihlie Lihreiry



HIGH romance, and the open
road ! Gala travel folders, and
reduced railway fares! The world
and his friends prepare for a jaunt
to mystic isles and forgotten lands,
while the stay-at-home fitfully be-
rates an unkind fate who wills that
all mankind are not made to roam.
But there is a way to unlock the
stubborn doors that guard the ad-
ventures of the earth, the librarian
holds the key, so softly now, while
we explore the world via the land
of books.

Our Starting Point

With San Francisco as our start-
ing point, we discover "Behind
That Door" (Biggers) a city of in-
trigue and mystery which but whet.^
our taste for the journey to come.
We board a train for the south and
soon are trodding Hollywood's Bou-
levard with "Merton of the Movies"
(Wilson) as our escort. In the
Santa Fe country in the Southwest
we hear that "Death Comes for the
Archbishop" (Gather), so we leave
and wander toward the Windy City,
Chicago, with "The Girls" (Ferber).

But time is short and we arrive
in New York after an overnight
train trip. At first we are confused
by the noise of the city, the blatant
glare of the electric lights and the
incessant rush of the inhabitants.
However, we soon find mir way
about and in the Ghettcj hear the
mournful strains of "Humoresque"
(Hurst), while on Broadway we sec
"Butterfly" (Webster) from the
"Nigger Heaven" (Van Vechteii)
of one of the greatest theatres in
vXmerica.

We're Sailing Away

(Jur sailing date arrives, and with
regret we waye a farewell and settle
down to enjoy the Atlantic. After
a day we feel like veritable "Deep
Sea Warriors" (Lubbock) and the
trip is all too short. After a slicnt
delay with the customs we are mo-
toring toward London. In London.
the Bobbies and the traffic rules in-
trigue us, and we view the social
elect at "No. 5 John Street" (White-
ing), and the perils of the under-
world in "Linichouse Nights"
(Burke).

In the light of the late aftermuin
we find ourselves in a quaint little
street that seems echoing with mem-
ories of the things that were. We



I



F YOU are among those who
cannot afford the luxuries of
a round - the - world journey,
peeping at mystic isles and for-
gotten lands, why not let Miss
Farrell unlock for you the
stubborn doors that guard the
adventures of the earth? Go
with her on the journey she
has so delightfully and enter-
tainingly portrayed in this ar-
ticle. 'Y'ou can make a world-
wide journey without leaving
your own fireside. Miss Far-
rell's articles always are inter-
esting, but in this, "A Novel
Tour of the World," she has
outdone her former efforts.

—The Editor.



find on a doorstep a tiny volume.
"The Little House" (Dawson), a
poignant tale of the little street.

In Rural England

The ne.xt few days we rush about
through rural Lngland with a copy
of "Doomsday" (Deeping) tucked
under our arms and scurry along
the cliffs of Wales in search of a
"Golden Arrow" (Webb). We even
manage a trip over to Ireland, where
we meet an old friend "Hand)'
Andy" (Lover). In .Scotland
"Christine" (Barr) is our hostess,
and a very charming rme. too, but
we tear ourselves away, and reach
England in time to fly to the con-
tinent.

W^e loiter in ]5eigium awhile \is-
iting "The Professor" (Bronte) and
thence into Holland where "Eve"
(Maartens) points with pride to her
tulip beds. "Martin Schuler" (Wil-
son) welcomes us to Germany, and
we become veritable sightseers,
hearing the romping music of von
Weber and drinking the pale pro-
hibitive liquid, topped by billows of
white foam.

In the Northern Countries
In .\orway we find ".ShalhiW
Soil" (Hamsun) so burr}- awa\' to
.Sweden where we are entertained
by the "Minister's Daughter" ( Di.\-
elius). We are fascinated by the life
in these northern countries. l)Ut
France is calling and we journey
south again, stopping for a moment
onl\- in .Switzerland to call on "The




ANNE M. FARRELL

Forest Schoolmaster" (Rosegger)
Then at last we are in Paris
Playing about in Montmatre witl
"Conrad in Quest of His Youth
(Merrick). "Consuelo" (Sand) fine
us and whisks us away to run
France to see "The Country Doc
tor" (Balzac). A desire to see th
land of the bullfighters and th
handsome .\lfonso takes possessia
of us and we cross the Pyraned
with a man in a "Three Cornere?
Hat" (.\larcon).

Off for Italy

Italy is our next goal and the
"Don Orsino" (Crawford) appoin
himself host, and we wander wil
him amid the grandeur that wi
Caesar's. In Venice we discovi
that it is a "Foregone Conclusioi
(Howells) that we cannot get 1
Florence, so we write to our frien<
there and say that we will retui
in "An Indian Summer" (Howell
to see them. Just as we leave Sici
we meet "Corleone" (Crawforc
who tells us that in Russia she rj
across a ".Secret City" (Walpoh
and found some "Black Diamoiil "
(Jokai) in Hungary. .

We are "Disenchanted" (Loti i •'
Turkey so we hurry away to Egypt
where "The Weavers" (Parker)
show us about the bazaars anf!
row streets, heavy with myster>
much too hurried journey take
to Arabia where we view
amusement "The Cigarette-m:i
Romance" (Crawford) and then
the Holy Land where we re-n
W'allace's ])o\\(.rfnl storv,
Hur."

In Persia we are entertained b
recitation of "The Adventures
Hajji Baba of Isaphan" (Mori^
and vow to return again to this f;
cinating land.

We are amazed to find that tra\ei
in the Orient is not so difficult as
we had been led to suspect, and are
pleasantly surjirised to find "A.
Isaacs" (Crawford) waiting for



lulv



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYE li



49



Phone WEst 0146



Night Phone EVergreen 8485



E. J. Lynch Electric Go.

Construction, Industrial Wiring
and Supplies

2080 Sutter Street, San Francisco



ATLAS ELECTRIC COMPANY

343 Fourth St., near Folsom St. Phone SUtter 3580



MOTORS



FIXTURES



Industrial
Apartments
Residences



WIRING



Phone RAndolph 5671



Open Evenings



ARC ELECTRIC COMPANY

F. MENICUCCI

WIRING AND LIGHTING FIXTURES
Electrical Work of All Kinds < Estimates



4792 Mission Street, near Onondago



San Francisco



Phone MARKET 620



Thelen Electric Supply Company

Wholesale Distributors of
Electric Supplies



c*^



640 Natoma Street



San Francisco



SANGAMO ELECTRIC CO.

L. A. NOTT, District Manager

A.C. and D.C. Watthour Meters / Amperehour Meters
Portable Test Meters * Electrically Wound Clocks



1061 HOWARD STREET



SAN FRANCISCO



TELEPHONE DO uglas 5100

VICTOR LEMOGE

ELECTRICAL CONSTRUCTION

281-285 Natoma Street
SAN FRANCISCO



F. H. LYNCH, President



GEO E. ROE, Sec. and Mgr.



Enterprise Electric Works
THE MOTOR HOUSE



WE



RENT, REPAIR, SELL and EXCHANGE
MOTORS, RENT HOISTS, SAW TABLES
and COMPRESSORS, INDUSTRIAL WIRING



652-654 Mission Street
SAN FRANCISCO



Telephone
SUtter 4670



^ttpj^nnr lEbrtrtr OI0.



C. X. SCHMITT
Electrical Contractors



Phone DOuglas 1847



517 Phelan Building



C. R. BACH COMPANY


FRANK G.


BECK, Prop. 1


factory Branches
252 Fifth Street San Francisco


Wiring


Electric Heaters


Pass dC Seymour. Inc.


Anderson-Pitt Corporation


Conduit
Central Tube Co.

Mesco Products


Signalling Apparatus
Patrick & Wilkins Co.

Fire Alarm & Telegraph
Insts.


Manhattan Elec. Supply Co.


J. H. Bunnell St. Co.



Keystone Electric Company

Wiring ' Locksmithing ' Radio Supplies

1754 Divisadero Street

SAN FRANCISCO
Phil Grenadier Telephone WAlnut 5675



Buy from firms that advertise with us



50



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



lulv



ill India with a roving commission
to show us about. He took us to
tea "Under the Deodars" (Kipling)
and it was his friend "King of the
Khyber Rifles" (Mundy) w h o
warned us not to miss "The Casua-
rina Tree" (Maughan) when we vis-
ited the South Sea Islands.

Australia was delightful, and
made more so by "The Recollections
of Geoflfrey" (Kingsley) who told
many quaint tales of this fascinat-
ing island.

Back on American Soil
We felt like waving flags and
huskily singing "The Star-Spangled
Banner" when we reached the Phil-
ippine Islands, the first American
soil we had touched since leaving
Xew York. We saw many interest-



ing sights there including a man
with a "Twisted Foot" (Rideout) as
we walked "Straight Down the
Crooked Lane" (Runkle) to embark
for China.

"It Happened in Peking" (Miln)
that "Wang the Ninth" (Weale)
told us that "The Feast of the Lan-
terns" (Miln) was about to be cele-
brated, but unfortunately we had to
go on to Japan where "IMadame
Chrysantheme" (Loti) had arranged
a special performance of "Aladame
Butterfly" (Long) for our benefit.

Homeward Boxmd

It was a sad day when we realized
that vacation was growing to a close
and we must embark for home. On
the Pacific we waved to a passing
"Transport" (Glenn) bound for the



Orient. On board our ship there
were many interesting people, par-
ticularly a San Franciscan who had
spent the previous summer in
-Alaska. "The Alaskan" (Curwood)
she told us is a most friendly person
and the country itself abounds in
great natural wealth. She said that
on her way home from Alaska she
had met in Canada a most interest-
ing "Prospector" (Connor) and his
"Prairie Wife" (Stringer).

Through the Golden Gate and we
are Home ! We awake with a start
to replenish the fire which has
burned low. No gala folders, no
dust}^ trains! An armchair by a
fireplace, a cherished pipe and a
friendly book. Romance and the
open road, the highway of adven-
ture.




Main entrance to San Francisco's tnn.jmfiicnt Public Library



i\



Jlllv



T HI-. M r N 1 C 1 P A L !•: M PLOY F. E



Tel. DAvenport 2500

JOSHUA HENDY IRON WORKS

Iron Founders - Machinists' Engineers



Office : 200 Pine Street



SAN FRANCISCO



CALIFORNIA



PHONE KEARNY 262 3



F. J. CARROLL, Prop.



San Francisco Brass Foundry

Established 1880

BRASS, BRONZE AND ALUMINUM CASTINGS



48-30 Clementina St.

Bet. First and Second
SAN FRANCISCO



Manufacturers of

SUPERIOR BRONZE BUSHINGS

COMET BRONZE BEARINGS



HERZOG ELECTRIC 8C ENGINEERING
COMPANY

Established 1900 - Incorporated 1919

Marine and Stationary Electric Installations

Marine Electric Fixtures, Supplies and Repairs
Searchlight Projectors

Marine Engineering and Machine Repairs a Specialty

172-74 Steuart Street

Telephone DAVENPORT 4257



Oscar Abben Electric Company

EVERYTHING ELECTRICAL

509 Washington Street, San Francisco

KATHERINE ABBEN, Manager

Phone DAvenport 747}



Since 1883



HETTY BROS.

Electrical Work
in Every Branch



372 Ellis Street
PROSPECT 0333



JOHN FINN, Prttldcni



ROBERT B. FINN, Setmary



JOHN FINN METAL WORKS

SAN FRANCISCO and SEATTLE

Babbitt Mttali and SolJert ■ Type lUelah and Zinc Dun
Galvanizing and Sherardizing

372-398 SECOND STREET
TELEPHONE SUTTER 41S8



Galifornu Corrugated
Culvert Co.

ARMCO CULVERTS



818 Crocker Bldg.
San Francisco



Phone Douglai

4457



Telephone GArfield 5989



A Home Industry



Combs Elevator Company

Electric and Hydraulic

ELEVATORS

DUMB WAITERS < BELT CONVEYORS

INSPECTING and REPAIRING



503 Fourth Street



San Francisco



Bertrand Electric Company

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS

Registered Electricians

530 Pine Street San Francisco

Phone DAVENPORT 3991



Phone


MArket 1545 Res. Phone EVergreen
Res. Phone HEmlock 1540

D. J. & T. SULLIVAN

INCORPORATED

HOUSE MOVING AND RAISING

Builders Exchange, 180 Jessie Street


8738


Office


and Yard: 1940-44 Folsom St., San Francisco,


Calif.



Buv from firms that advertise with us



52



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



July



OFFICE EMPLOYEES' ASSOCIATION NO. 13188,

A. F. OF L.



By William T. Bons(1r



SALARY setting under the Stand-
ardization Act is the all-important
matter of deep concern to the city em-
ployees. Following adoption of the
classification by the Board of Super-
visors, the Civil Service Commission
was requested to submit to the board
a proposed schedule of compensations
in accordance therewith. The com-
mission promised the Board of Super-
visors its report in due time. The
commission is still in the midst of this
work. The board has the power to
accept, reject or amend the salary pro-
posals of the commission. It did not
have power to amend the classification
which prevented an earlier adjustment
and forced the employees to waive
many objections and accept an un-satis-
factory classification.

The aggressive battle of the Labor
Council and this union prevented pas-
sage of a classification in a much more
unfavorable condition from the city
employees' standpoint. It was the in-
sistance of Labor, through this Asso-
ciation, that compelled the mandate of
the Charter to be followed in the allo-
cation of positions pending classifica-
tion. This is an all-important part of
the procedure. It was intended b\' the
commission to allocate positions after
the setting of salaries which would
have placed numerous office workers
in the position of not knowing where
they stood, placing them at an unfair
advantage as to salary setting. The
Charter provides that compensations
be not lowered as of September, 1924.
Labor has secured the promise of ex-
tension of this period to date. Among
other advantageous things secured by
Labor in the classification was the
writing into same of positive protec-
tion for all existing civil service rights
for all employees, including exemption
from promotive examinations to the
point where previous examinations
have qualified one. We also secured
elimination of the humiliating desig-
nation "Junior."

However, it is quite possible that
the real battle has not yet begun. This
may come in the matter of salaries and
the Labor movement of this city is
ready and determined to make it, if
necessary, to the end that conditions
secured be not broken down for those
now in the employ of the city or those
who may enter this employment in the
future. We know that certain forces
seek to break down prevailing condi-
tions and lower prevailing salaries and
particularly so in regard to future city
employees.




WILLIAM T. BONSOR

This standardization was adopted by
the people for the purpose of paying
equal pay for equal service in all de-
partments and to prevent individual
favoritism. At no stage of standardi-
zation was the matter of economy dis-
cussed, so this is not to be an economy
standardization. The Charter provides
that : "The Board of Supervisors,
through the Civil Service Commission
. . . shall cause a schedule of compen-
sation to be proposed, under which like
compensations shall be paid for like
ser\ices, with due regard to prevail-
ing economic conditions, and to all
other compensations paid in the city
and county service," which evidently
means that the basis for fixing such
compensations must be looked for in
the economic conditions prevailing
here and the corresponding compen-
sations paid in the various depart-
ments of the city government, and that
no other basis existing elsewhere is to
be taken into account for the purpose
of equalizing and standardizing sal-
aries in our city and county employ-
ments.

In spite of this language in the
Charter the commission asks that data
be submitted on compensation paid in
San Francisco, or in cities having a
similar standard cost of living. The
Labor Council and its affiliated unions
have adopted a resolution refusing to
approach the question in this manner
and also refusing to submit the data
asked on the ground that it is unneces-
sary under the Charter and is simply a
u.seless waste of time which is now



valuable if salaries are to be stand-
ardized.

The Charter also provides that :
"Department heads and employees
shall furnish such information as may
be required for such classification,
grading and standardization," which
means that information furnished by
department heads and employees of
the city shall be sufficient on which to
base the proposed schedule of compen-
sations, so that recourse to other
sources of information is unnecessary
if not altogether barred. We see no
reason for using the services of t'le
Bureau of Governmental Research,
which neither is a part of the city gov-
ernment nor represents any of the
departments or the employees. Yet we
find the bureau vigorously engaged
in the salary-making set-up. The city
employees and their representative
unions with the Labor Council do not
intend that this institution, not in-
volved, set the wages of the city
workers. The employees, their repre-
sentatives in conjunction with the city
officials given the salary-setting power,
are capable and fully qualified to deal
with this problem which concerns
them alone and surely not the Milpitas
salary-cutting benevolent society.



SAN FRANCISCO WINS
A. A. U. SWIM MEET



SAN FRANCISCO has won the
national A. A. U. swimming cham-
pionships, it is announced by Henry
Ingwersen, swimming commissioner
of the Pacific Association of the
A. A. U.

The meet will be held at Fleish-
hacker Pool, starting August 22 and
closing August 25. Scores of Amer-
ica's most noted swimmers of both
sexes will compete in the various
title events.

The Public Welfare Committee of
the Board of Supervisors, composed
of Supervisors Mile F. Kent, An-'
drew J. Gallagher and Frank J. Mc-
Govern, has agreed to finance the
pretentious preparations for the
meet as a big advertising medium
for San Francisco's cool summer
weather. Thousands of swimming
fans from all over the nation are ex-
pected to come here for the national
meet.

A general committee appointed to
handle the city's participation in the
arrangements includes Joseph R.
Hickey, chairman; Henry Ingwer-
sen, William M. Coffman and Frank
R. Geis. Mayor James Rolph, Jr.,
will name a Citizens' Committee of
100 to organize the official reception
and entertainment programs.



lulv THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE 53



1



INSURE YOUR LIABILITY

y4 SSEMBLY BILL 595, approved by the Governor of Cali-
/% fornia on May 11, makes the state, counties, cities and
counties, municipal corporations, irrigation districts, school
districts and other sub-divisions of the state owning any motor
vehicles responsible to every person who sustains any damage by
reason of death or injury to person or property as the result of
the negligent operation of any such motor vehicle by any officer,
agent or employee.

The new law also makes such political sub-divisions respon-
sible for damage caused by any other motor vehicle and resulting
from the negligent operation of such vehicle by any officer,
agent or employee acting within the scope of his agency or
employment.

The law further provides that "the state, county, city and
county, municipal corporation, irrigation district, school dis-
trict, district established by law and political sub-division of the
state, may insure their liahility,^^ . . . and the premium for
such insurance shall be a proper charge against the respective
general fund of the state, county, city or other municipal cor-
poration or district.

For rates and other information, address the Company at
its Head Office or consult our agent in your town.

OCCIDENTAL INDEMNITY COMPANY

401 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO

Affiliated with the Fireman's Fund, Home Fire & Marine and Occidental Insurance Companies

Buy from firms that advertise with us



54



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



DAVID P. HARDY, THE BOARD OF EDUCATION'S
EXECUTIVE OFFICER



ENTHUSIASM for the develop-
ment of one ot the finest
systems of education in the coun-
try and understanding of the
requisites for this achievement
characterize the work of Deputy
Superintendent David P. Hardy.
His is the enthusiasm and under-
standing which come from long
association with the school system
of this city. Upon graduation from
the University of California in 1^'12,
Mr. Hardy became instructor of
mathematics in the San Francisco
schools. Since that time he has
served in various capacities on the
Board of Education. He was vice-
principal of the High School of
Commerce when appointed to fill
the office of Deputy Superintendent
upon the organization of the busi-
ness department of the Board of
Education as a separate unit of of-
fices.

Seven Departments

All activities of the Educational
Department are und/er the direct
control of the superintendent of
schools who is the executive officer
of the Board of Education. The
work of the Board of Education is
divided into seven departments ; the
business department is one of these
departments.

When the Business Department
was organized in 1924, Mr. Hardy
was given jurisdiction over all that
pertains to the finances involved in
operating the school system. The
department is responsible for the
wise distril3ution of the funds en-
trusted to it ; for this an intimate
knowledge of the departments which
comprise the educational system
is necessary. Well equipped with
the knowledge of the problems,
possibilities and needs of the school
sj'Stem, gained from active connec-
tion with many of its branches,
makes Deputy Superintendetit
Hardy an efficient executive for
this department.

Department Reorganization

The reorganization of the Busi-
ness Department was sorely needed
to facilitate the adequate function-
ing of an ever-increasing staff.
Many improvements are directly
due to Mr. Hardy's faculty for
operating this vast project of deal-
ing with the finances of a municipal
enterprise. Numerous branches
function under Mr. Hardy, each
branch headed by a specialist in the
particular work handled, such as
purchasing agent, whose work it is



to take liids on supplies ; manager
of supplies and equipment, directi}'
interested in the distribution of sup-
plies ; paymaster ; superintendent of
buildings and grounds ; accountant ;
and various other branches, together
with the usual contingent of office
helpers who make up the force of
workers.

Four Lines of Activity

Four distinct lines of activity are
carried on. The first is the pur-
chase and installment of all equip-
ment and supplies required in the
schools. Negotiations for the con-
struction of the new warehouse soon
to be erected at Harrison Street,
between Tenth and Eleventh, are
also carried on through this branch.
The new three-story loft building,
covering 30,000 square feet of
ground, is to cost $65,000. The old
frame building which has served the
purpose of storage house has be-
come a liability because of danger
of fire which would involve a loss
of about $70,000, the cost of the in-
ventory of supplies kept on hand.

The maintenance and operation of
school buildings and grounds is the
second activity of the department.
Payment of salaries for civil service
people, and of expenses for repairs
and alterations of buildings are at-
tended to. The cost of alterations
and repairs required is computed
and estimates and plans for the
work are then submitted to the
Board of Supervisors who pass upon
the advisability of the work and
costs involved before the work is
begun.

Accounting and Auditing

The third activity pertains di-
rectly to finances ; that is to the ac-
counting and auditing of all moneys
expended for various purposes, such
as the salaries of teachers and per-
sons employed on the school staffs.
The preparation of the annual 'bud-
get, now amounting to ten million
dollars, is the work of this branch
of activities. Of this sum $7,000,000
is paid out for teachers' salaries ;
$1,700,000 is spent annually for new
buildings and the balance is ex-
pended for the operation and main-
tenance of schools and grounds.
Only $400,000 is spent annually for
the upkeep of the l)uildings, which
re[>resents efficient management as
it is less than two per cent of the
value of school propertv, now
amounting to $25,000,000. '

The planning of new buildings is
tlie fourth activity. Upon consider-



ing the construction of a new build-



Online LibrarySan Francisco (Calif.). Board of SupervisorsThe municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) → online text (page 32 of 84)