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San Francisco (Calif.). Board of Supervisors.

The municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) online

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oven. Stewing and brewing, the gun
above the fireplace and the cradle on
the hearth. In the corner the old spin-
ning wheel. Truly women's work was
never done in those far off days. Sav-
ing from summer's bounty for winter's
needs by preserving and pickling.
Cherished recipes in faded dainty
script lie neglected in our modern elec-
trified kitchens for the time, space and
skill are now denied most of us to put
them to use.

But one old family recipe refused to
be put away in lavender. It walked
right out into the business world and
its new home was the second kitchen —
the Best Foods Fannings Bread and
Butter Pickle Plant, whose spotless
efficiency was such a contrast to the
primitive equipment and open fire in
the colonial farmhouse. Little did
Cora Fanning realize, when she made



her first batch of pickles from great
grandmother's recipe that homemakers
all over the country would some day
sing the praises of Fanning's Bread
and Butter Pickles and that their sour-
sweet flavor would be packed into mil-
lions of jars with the same expert com-
bining of ingredients and careful cook-
ing as were done in the original home-
made pickles. Mechanical devices and
many hands have given speed to the
preparation of the cucumbers in large
quantities, yet the actual "pickling"
process is just the same.

Fresh cucumbers, the secret of the
delicious flavor of Bread and Butter
Pickles, come from various points,
from the Sunny South as they ripen,
insuring a supply of newly picked fruit
from May to October. Spotless clad
workers tearfully peel the onions which
contribute to the flavor, and others
place the spices and sugar in bags to go
into each copper kettle where the cu-
cumbers remain until they have become
tender and crispy, and are then packed
in sterilized glass jars.

This miracle of quantity production
makes it possible for any homemaker
on either side of the continent to take
down the telephone receiver and order
the same delicious homemaile pickle as
delighted the neighbors of Mrs. Fan-
ning when she shared witii them the
fruits of hergreat grandmother's recipe.



20



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



August



New School Year Opens



By Joseph Mark Gwinn

Superintendent of Schools



GREETINGS from the Board of
Education, the Superintendent
and stafT. and best wishes for the
school year 1929-30. The records of
last year are made and show satis-
factory progress.' Some of the out-
standing achievements of last year
were called to your attention in a re-
cent bulletin. The opening of schools
this vear finds conditions for work in
the schools as a whole better than ever
before. The general level of qualifica-
tions of the teaching corps is higher
than before. The school buildings are
better. The courses of study are more
definite in several divisions and the
schools are better supplied with courses
of study. The instructional supplies
are more adequate. It is our sincere
belief that the demands and oppor-
tunities of the new year can be better
met than before and that all will find
in these demands and opportunities a
stimulating challenge to superior ser-
vice.

To the new teachers in the schools a
cordial welcome is given not alone by
the Superintendent and his staflf but
by the teaching, supervising and ad-
ministrating corps generally. We trust
that these new teachers may be happy
in their work and successful in ac-
complishing the requirements of the
schools.

Physical Well-Being

It is more and more appreciated that
the educational achievements of a
school are dependent upon the physical
well-being of pupils and teachers. The
absence of the teacher or the decreased
efficiency of the teacher due to lowered
physical fitness seriously lessen the
quantity and quality of learning by the
pupils.

One of the least satisfactory records
of last year was the record of an un-
usually large amount of absence among
teachers due to health conditions. Per-
haps most of the excess absence is ac-
counted for by the epidemic of "flu"
during the months of November and
December. Some have suggested that
the number of absences in a school is
closely related to ventilation and heat-
mg and to some other elements of hy-
giene more or less within the control
of the principal and teacher. Good
health is a resultant of many influences.
Some of these influences may be in the
school while some of them are not con-
nected with the school.

, More attention should be given to
providing .school conditions that will
safeguard the physical well-being of




JOSEPH MARK GWINN

teachers. Teaching and managing
forty children make a large demand
upon a teacher's physical powers.
These powers must be conserved. It
has been suggested that all of us to-
gether this year should give special at-
tention to the problem of the physical
well-being of teachers. The principal
and faculty of each school should
make this a subject for an early meet-
ing. Special attention will be given to
the theme in the first principals' meet-
ing.

Changes in Rules

The changes in the method and
amount of deductions due to absence
necessitated by the ruling of the At-
torney-General, and the changes con-
tained in the resolution of the Board
of August 14, 1929, relating to classi-
fication and pay of substitute teachers,
repealed all parts of the rules and reg-
ulations in conflict with these new
rules and regulations concerning pay-
Principals should make proper correc-
tion in their official copies of the rules
and regulations. These changes be-
came effective with the opening of
schools August 19.

Constitution Day

It is appropriate that the anniversary
of the signing of the United States
Constitution should be celebrated in
the schools. The courses of study
make ample provision for suitable pro-
grams to be arranged in honor of this
important event in our history.

This year the patriotic society named
"The Sons of the American Revolu-
tion" offers a valuable prize to the
senior high school which will be ad-



judged the winner in an essay contest.
The general plan is to have each senior
high school select, according to its own
methods, a student who will enter this
competition. The essay contest is lim-
ited to senior high school students,
and the essay itself should not exceed
2500 words in length.

Working Permits

Under the new state law. principals
are no longer authorized to issue work-
ing permits of any kind to pupils. In
accordance with Section 1.177 of the
-School Code "The person authorized
to issue permits to work to minors
under the age of sixteen years exempt-
ing such minors from full-time day
school attendance, may also issue to
any minor over the age of twelve years
a permit to work outside of school
hours for a period of time which, when
added to the time such minor is re-
quired by law to attend school, shall
not exceed eight hours in any one day."
I have designated the Director of At-
tendance and Guidance as the person
to issue such permits. All applications
for working permits should be referred
to the Bureau of Attendance and
Guidance, 750 Eddy Street.

EDUCATION
(Anon3nTious)

"I am Education. I bear the torch
that enlightens the world, fires the
imagination of man, feeds the flame of
genius. I give wings to dreams and
might to brain and brawn.

"From out the deep shadows of the
past I come, wearing the scars of
struggle and the stripes of toil, but
bearing in triumph the wisdom of all
ages. Man. because of me. holds do-
minion over earth, air and sea; it is
for him I leash the lightning, plumb
the deep, and shackle the ether.

"I am the parent of progress, cre-
ator of culture, molder of destiny.
Philosophy, art and science are the
wheels of my hand. I banish ignor-
ance, discourage vice, disarm anarchy.

"Thus I have become freedom's
citadel, the arm of democracy, the hope
of youth, the pride of adolescence, the
joy of age. Fortunate the nations and
happy the homes that welcome me.

"The school is my work shop ; here
I stir ambitions, stimulate ideals, forge
the keys that open the doors to oppor-
tunity. I am the source of inspiration,
the aid of aspiration. I am irresistible
power,"



I



August



THE MUNI CIPAL EMPLOYEE



21




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LOCOMOTIVES — CARS

Freight and Passenger Equipment

Machinery

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Phone DAVENPORT 2355



B. A. Stephenson



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22



THE M UN I C I P A L E M P L O Y E E



August



J. G. JOHNSON



INCORPORATED



WHOLESALE
BUTCHERS



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Beef, Cattle and Calves Bought or Slaughtered on
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SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO
PACKING 8C PROVISION CO.

Wholesale Butchers and Pork Packers



1510 Galvez Avenue



San Francisco, Calif.



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LIVESTOCK



206 Mendell Street
Mission 5462



KUVALIS MEAT CO.

Phones: DOuglas 2970-2971-2972

WHOLESALE BUTCHERS
780 Folsom Street San Francisco, Calif.



P. LIPP



A. GIOVANETTI



South San Francisco Tallow Works

1420 EVANS AVENUE
Mission 4914



Buy from firms that advertise with us



August



THE M U N I C I P A I. F. ^r P I. O Y !•: I-:



23



I



San Francisco's New Pedestrian
and Traffic Control

By Ralph W. Wiley

Chief, Def>tirt/iient of Electricity



LIKE all other cities in the L'nited
^States, the City of San Francisco
is confronted with the serious problem
of traffic and pedestrian control, and
in no two of these cities are the traffic
control problems identical.

Boston's irregular narrow streets
are more or less the outgrowth of the
old cow trails.

Chicago, with its loop district and
located as it is on the shore of Lake
Michigan, lias its problems. ,



t



New York's Problem



New York's problem is its density
of population in a comparatively long
and narrow area. A few years ago the
merchants in Fifth Avenue spent ap-
proximately $250,000 for a few orna-
mental bronze traffic towers which
were installed in the center line of the
avenue every six or eight blocks. These
towers supported three sets of various
colored lights and it was thought at the
time that this installation was the
acme of perfection for traffic control
for a considerable time to come, lint
it developed that these towers, instead
of being a solution of the problem,
were very inefficient. The space thev
occupied was needed for two addi-
tional traffic lanes, and the towers
were, therefore, removed and a two-
light signal installed -at the curb loca-
tion at each intersection.

San Francisco's Problems

Now let us consider our own city,
San Francisco, which is acknowledged
by all traffic engineers as the most
difficult city in the United States from
the standpoint of traffic and pedestrian
control, and analyze some of the traf-
fic problems with which we are con-
fronted.

In view of the fact that the dense
traffic area is located in the eastern
portion of the city, this district must
be filled and drained almost entirely
from one direction, the West, and,
therefore, the east and west streets
carry very heavy traffic at peak loads.

Let n|;e remind you that New York
has its subwavs, Chicago its elevated



trains to transiiort a large percentage
of the population to and from the
downtown district, while San hran-
cisco must depend solely on surface
cars to carry ap])roximately 82 per
cent of the population during the peak
loads. This in itself creates a serious
problem.



Wl



'HEN the pedestrian
signals, which are now
being installed at all intersec-
tions on Market Street from
the Ferry to Van Ness Avenue,
are placed in service, San Fran-
cisco will be the first and only
city in the world to control
pedestrian traffic by a special
pedestrian signal, says Mr.
Wiley in this article. The use
of these signals is made neces-
sary on Market Street as a ma-
jority of its intersections are
five-street intersections at vari-
ous angles ; also on account of
the great width of Market
Street and the fact that in most
cases the pedestrian lanes are
not in close proximity to the
traffic signal.



San Francisco's dense traffic area is
unique in that its main thoroughfare
( Market Street) divides two sections
which are entirely different in block
patterns — the blocks south of Market
range from 632 to 907 feet, those
north of AJarket Street from 343 to
480 feel, while the blocks in Alarket
Street range from 360 to 907 feet. The
streets south of Market run parallel
and are at right angles with .Market
Street, while the streets north of Mar-
ket approach it at various angles.

This condition creates a very seri-
ous problem for traffic and pedestrian
control. From these variations in
block lengths, it will be readily seen
that to obtain the most efficient pro-
gressive timing three different cycle
lengths must be used in setting up the
timing schedule.

S)mchronized Tinier

Before describing the new syncho-
nized tinier, and traffic and pedestrian




RALPH W. WILEY

control. I should like to explain the
condition under which traffic is being
controlled at the present time.

Three years ago a small temporary
timer, consisting of four circuits, was
designed by the Department of Elec-
tricity and installed in the Central Fire
.\larm Station. This small tinier is at
the present time controlling approx-
imately 100 intersections throughout
the city, having as many as forty-seven
intersections in one circuit. The entire
downtown area is operated on two cir-
cuits, all signals in Market Street on
one circuit and all signals north and
south of ^Market on the other circuit.
Van Ness Avenue and the outlying
districts are operated on the remaining
two circuits.

\\hen this is understood by the
automobile public, it will be seen that
such a condition does not permit flex-
ibility nor scientific timing. To have
so many intersections controlled by the
.same circuit creates a very inefficient
timing system as there are scarcely
any two intersections with like traffic
characteristics ; for example, traffic
conditions at an intersection such as
Post and Stockton Streets are obvi-
ously different from one at an inter-
section such as Third and Howard, yet
these two intersections are on the same
circuit.

Traffic Signal Program

The new traffic signal program,
which is fast nearing completion, con-
sists of a new .synchronous progres-
sive timer with a ca])acity of 104 cir-
cuits. It is located in the Central Fire
.\larm Station.

This timer, and the traffic and pe-
destrian signals were designed and
manufactured in the Department of
Electricity shop.

The new underground cables radiat-
ing from the tinier have ample capac-
ity for the necessary number of cir-
cuits to permit a maximum degree of
flexibility and iirovide progressive
timing throughout the city.



24



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



August



Pedestrian Signals

When the pedestrian signals, which
are now being installed at all inter-
sections on Market Street from the
Ferry to Van Ness Avenue, are placed
in service, San Francisco will be the
first and only city in the world to
control pedestrian traffic by a special
pedestrian signal. The use of these
signals is made necessary on Market
Street as a majority of its intersec-
tions are five-street intersections at
various angles ; also on account of the
great width of Market Street and the
fact that in most cases the pedestrian
lanes are not in close proximity to the
traffic signal.

The pedestrian signal consists of a
small iron standard, painted green,
containing two red and two green
lenses with the words, "Stop" and
"Go." The words "Pedestrian Signal"
also appear on the side of the signal,
and there should be no difficulty in
distinguishing it from the traffic sig-
nal. The type of lens used and the
design of the signal are such as to
give an approximate spread of only
twelve degrees, and, with this narrow
angle of spread, the reflected light
from the signal is entirely confined



to the width of the pedestrian lane.
This fact makes it necessary for the
pedestrian to be within the area of the
pedestrian lane before the red or
green light is visible.

"Watch Your Step"

The pedestrian, before stepping off
the curb, should glance at the pedes-
trian signal on the opposite side of
the street and be guided by that signal
rather than the signal close at hand.
He should not pay any attention to the
traffic signal. The pedestrian has
become accustomed to step of? the
curb at the first bell before the inter-
section is cleared of vehicles, which he
does at his own risk, although he may
continue to do this at all intersections
with the exception of the intersec-
tions in Market Street. At these
intersections the pedestrian signals are
so co-ordinated with the traffic signals
that, when the green light shows in the
pedestrian signal, the intersection will
have been cleared of vehicular traffic
and pedestrians can then cross in
safety.

These pedestrian signals will be
placed in operation within a month's
time.



ASSESSOR'S DEPARTMENT



By Louise

THE yearly epidemic of Vacation-
itis has broken out in its most
virulent form in the Assessor's office,
the following being a short list of the
stricken ones :

Bill Stetson is rusticating at Apple-
gate, sleeping out of doors at night and
teaching the grasshoppers how to play
golf during the day. Bill has to keep
in form so that he may beat the Boss
when he returns.

Gladys Smith and her nieces did
Rainier National Park and didn't slide
on any glaciers, either.

Lillie Kuck doesn't seem to hear
enough spouting at her post so she's
taking in Yellowstone Park to see
whether the geysers up there can give
her a better blowout.

Dick Harris is showing New York
and Cuba how the theatrical business
should be conducted. Dick's the office
impresario, you know.

May Black and her father spent a
hectic two weeks in Los Angeles, Tia
Juana and Hollywood. They wanted
May to understudy Clara Bow but
May gets a bigger kick out of the
switchboard, so we are the winners
and Hollywood can't have everything.

James Gallagher has just returned
from his usual tour of the MALE por-
tion of these western states. Our
James Aloysius is such a rabid He man
that he scorns any other part. Jim
will elucidate gladly for your benefit
his opinions in this matter.



M. O'Hara

Emil Klopfer looks cheerful since
ht has shown "Hobergs" a real appre-
ciation of their culinary art.

Bob Shepston's back home and
broke, having sampled the resorts of
the aristocracy, such as Hartsooks and
various other of the Caviar ilk. Any-
way Bob's gained a few pounds in
weight and that helps a little bit.

Nick Polidori spent most of his lei-
sure in the wilds of Strawberry Hill
and fishing in the icy waters of Stow
Lake. Have you ever heard Nick tell
of his marvelous catches ? You ask
him, it's some tale.

Mrs. Bartlett and her sister spent
their time at Fallen Leaf Lake and
Tahoe and then returned to Baltimore
Park where Mrs. B. finished her deco-
rative lily pond and is now building
some rose arbors in her garden. Her
home is one of the show places in
Larkspur Canyon and most of the
beautifying has been done with her
own hands. Our little pioneer is an
ambitious lady.

Mr. Grimes and family have been
enjoying the beauties of Russian River
but he's returned in time to hold out
his hand for the usual collection. Drat
the man! We all like him just the
same.

Mrs. Conran and her daughter chose
the simple life among the cows and
chickens on the farm near Sacramento.

Our winsome Thelma Benson is
charming the deer at Yosemite. Oh,



both kinds, of course, why ask? We
trust she will leave the filmy Bridal
Veil to grace the valley a while longer.

The Pride of the Senate and belle of
the Attaches ball, our own stately
Kathleen Tuite has acquired that
swanky tan week-ending at Santa Cruz
throughout the summer.

The office soubrette and comedienne,
vivacious Emma Foley, is motoring
with newly-weds throughout the North,
visiting Victoria, Banff and Lake
Louise. These resorts will require no
entertainers while Emma's there.

Camillia Rosette assisted the Amer-
ican Legion at the convention in San
Diego.

Margaret Lewis is sojourning at
Eagle Lake near Susanville.

The severe illness of Mrs. Alex-
ander's sister has prevented her from
leaving the city. We hope the sister
will soon recover.



BLINDCRAFT "KNOWS HOW"
AND DOES IT!



By Elmer M. Stover

To again be of service to the world.

To develop our talents with the view
of earning therefrom.

To overcome by contact with our
fellow man the sensitiveness caused by
the attitude of the ignorant public
towards the blind.

To read and write Braille, thus gain-
ing both knowledge and independence.

Comradeship upon a basis of equal-
ity with sighted men and women.

Every man's right as an American
citizen, namely a 100 per cent oppor-
tunity to become self-supporting, self-
respecting men and women.

Musical training.

Blindcraft places us again in the
working world as producing citizens.

Enables us to support ourselves and
our families in a descent, self-respect-
ing manner.

Gives us the priceless freedom of in-
dependence.

Permits us to live our lives how and
where we will without interference.

Destroys the terrible bondage which
is part of blindness, by persistent
encouragement.

Recreation

Daily reading of good books during
the noon hour.

Occasional picnics in the countrj
when employees and their familie
enjoy a day of happiness, with plent
of good food.

If the above few of the many ad
vantages offered us by Blindcraft con
vince you that Blindcraft "Know
How," we urge you to get back of
the $125,000 drive now on.

The blind need Blindcraft. San
Francisco needs Blindcraft, and now
we need you, San Francisco.



August



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



25



L«d7 Anendant at AU Houn



Telephones :
Mitaion 0098 and 0099



H. F. SUHR CO., INC.

Funeral Directors



H. FRED SUHR, Pre*.
HERBERT F. SUHR, Hgr.



2919 Mission Street

Between 2Sth and 2eth

San Francisco



Phone MISSION 3614
GEORGE L. SUHR

SUHR & WIEBOLDT

Funeral Directors and Embalmers

1465 to 1473 VALENCIA STREET
Between 25th and 26th Streets, San Francisco, Calif.



Phone MARKET 0142

SULLIVAN'S PET SHOP

CANARIES < DOGS ' CATS

CAGES AND SUPPLIES

1240 Market Street, Opposite Whitcomb Hotel
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.



KEARNY 7699



Night: LOCKHAVEN 3274



Costello Bureau of Investigation

International Detectives

Secret Service for Corporations, Attorneys and Individuals

Former Special Agent U. S. Department of Justice

Chief, Radical Division Secret Service. State of Washington

D. F. COSTELLO, Owner

Suite 406 Pacific Bldg., San Francisco



Flashlights i


Flashlight Batteries


i Mono-Cells


Radio B Batteries < High Vacuum


Bond Radio


Tubes


1 Edison Mazda Flashlight |




and Auto Bulbs




BOND ELECTRIC CORP.




OF CALIFORNIA






KEARNY 0870-0871




370 Fourth Street




San Francisco



FRANZEN & PARENT

H. D. PARENT
CARPENTERS

Store and Oflice Fittings - Contracts Taken - Estimates Given for

All Kinds of Building • Alterations General Jobbing



Online LibrarySan Francisco (Calif.). Board of SupervisorsThe municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) → online text (page 37 of 84)