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San Francisco (Calif.). Board of Supervisors.

The municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) online

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CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSIONERS
Meet Monday at 4:30 P. M., Room 151
E. A. WALCOTT. President. 345 Sutter Street.
WM. P. McCABE, 2940 16th Street.
HUGH K. McKEVITT, 235 Montgomery Street.
JAMES J. MAHER, Chief Examiner and Secretary,
649 San Jose Avenue.

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH
Main Office. 1085 Mission Street, near Seventh

Meets every Thursday at 5 p. m.

FRANK J. KLIMM. President, 456 Ellis Street.

ALEX. S. KEENAN, M. D.. Flood Building.

JAMES W. WARD, M. D., 391 Sutter Street.

WILLIAM W. WYMORE. M. D., 909 Hyde Street.

LAURENCE ARNSTEIN, JR.. 86 Third Street.

ARTHUR H. BARENDT, Mills Building.

ARTHUR M. SHARP, 2864 Broadway.

WM. C. HASSLER, M. D., Health Officer, 1085
Mission Street.

EDW. M. COFFEY, Chief Clerk and Statistician, 120
Parnassus Avenue.

ARTHUR A. O'NEILL, M. D., City Physician, 350
Post Street.

T. D'ARCY QUINN, M. D., City Physician, Flood
Building.

JOS. F. POHEIM, M. D., City Physician, Flood Bldg.

EDMUND BUTLER, M. D., Chief Surgeon Emer-
gency Service.

LEON M. WILBOR, M. D., Supt. San Francisco
Hospital.

C. M. WOLLENBERG, Supt. Laguna Honda Home.

PARK COMMISSIONERS
Office: Golden Gate Park Lodge
HERBERT FLEISHHACKER, 1 Sansome Street.
WILLIAM SPROULE, 1150 Sacramento Street.
M. EARL CUMMINGS, 3944 Clay Street.
GEORGE TOURNY. 526 California Street.
WM. F. HUMPHREY, Standard Oil Building.
B. P. LAMB, Secretary.
JOHN McLAREN, Superintendent Golden Gate Park.

PLAYGROUND COMMISSIONERS
Meets first and third Wednesdays at 2 P. M., Room 376
JAMES D. PHELAN, Phelan Building.
ALICIA MOSGROVE.
GEORGE HEARST.

DANIEL C. MURPHY, Board of Education.
MRS. SIGMUND STERN, 1998 Pacific Avenue.
JOHN McLaren, superintendent Golden Gate Park.
CONSTANT J. AUGER. 178 Geary Street.
JOSEPHINE DOWS RANDALL, Superintendent of

Recreation.
VEDA B. YOUNG, Secretary.

CITY PLANNING COMMISSIONERS
MATT I. SULLIVAN, President, Humboldt Bank

Building.
MAJOR CHAS. H. KENDRICK, First National Bank

Building.
MRS. PARKER S. MADDUX, 2868 Valleio Street.
W. W. CHAPI.X. 2108 Washington Street.
RAY S. ROSSITTER, 715 Victoria.
R. S. WOODWARD, Secretary and Engineer.

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES
THOMAS FLAHERTY, Sealer, Room 6.

WIDOW'S PENSION BUREAU
MISS EUGENIE SCHENK. Director, Room 462.

SAN FRANCISCO MUNICIPAL BAND
PHILIP H. SAPIRO. Director, Room 483.

BOARD OF EDUCATION
Regular Meeting every Tuesday at 4 p. m., Room 290.
DANIEL C. MURPHY, President.
IRA W. COBURN, Hearst Building.
MRS. ERNEST J. MOTT, 2806 Vallejo Street.
ALFRED I. ESBERG.

MRS. MARY PRAG, 2712 Webster Street.
MISS ALICE R. POWER. City Hall.
WILLIAM F. BENEDICT, 451 California Street.
JOSEPH MARR GWINN. Superintendent of Schools.
H. M. MONROE, Secretary.

PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUSTEES
Trustees Meet Second Wednesday of Each Month
HON. JAMES D. PHELAN, President.
FRANK P. DEERING, Nevada Bank Building.
GEORGE W. KELHAM, Sharon Building.
ALBERT BENDER, 311 California Street.
WM. R. K. YOUNG, 2460 Green Street.
EUGENE J. BATES. 2000 California Street.
R. B. HALE, Fifth and Market Streets.
MAX C. SLOSS, Mills Building.
EUSTACE CULLINAN. Phelan Building.
MISS LAURA McKINSTRY, 2988 Pacific Avenue.
MISS EUGENIE LACOSTE, 3233 Jackson Street.
GEO. A. MULLIN. Secretary, 2602 Filbert Street
ROBERT REA, Librarian, 715 Page Street.



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. CALIFORNIA PALACB
OF THE LEGION OF HONOR

HERBERT FLEISHHACKER, President, 1 Sansome

Street.
WILLIAM F. HUMPHREY, Standard Oil Building
WILLIAM SPROULE, 1150 Sacramento Street.
M. EARL CUMMINGS, 3966 CUy Street.
GEORGE TOURNY, 526 California Street.
MRS. A. B. SPRECKELS, Hunter-Dulin Building.
PAUL SHOUP. 65 Market Street.
WALTER D. K. GIBSON, 2 Pine Street.
W. M. STROTHER, Secretary, c/o de Young Mn-

seum. Golden Gate Park; P. O. Station "M."
CORNELIA B. SAGE QUINTON, Director.

BOARD OF TRUSTEES H. H. DeYOUNG

MEMORIAL MUSEUM
GEO. T. CAMERON, Hon. Pres., S. F. Chronicle.
HERBERT FLEISHHACKER, Pres., 1 Sansome St.
WILLIAM F. HUMPHREY, Standard Oil Buildina.
WILLIAM SPROULE, 1150 Sacramento Street.
M. EARL CUMMINGS. 3966 Clay Street.
GEORGE TOURNY. 526 California Street.
JOSEPH O. TOBIN, Hibernia Bank Building.
NION R. TUCKER, 1919 California Street.
MRS. HELEN CAMERON, Burlingame.
W. M. STROTHER, Sec, c/o de Young Museum,

Golden Gate Park; P. O. Station "M."
GEORGE BARRON, Curator.

PUBLIC POUND
Office and Pound, leth and Alabama Streets
MATTHEW McCURRIE, Secretary.

CITY AND COUNTY OFFICERS
Auditor— THOMAS F. BOYLE, Room 111.
Treasurer— JOHN H. THIELER. Room 110.
Assessor— R. L. WOLDEN, Room 101.
Coroner— T. B. W. LELAND. 650 Merchant Street
Tax CoUector— EDWARD F. BRYANT, Room 100.
Recorder— EDMOND GODCHAUX, Room 167.
City Attorney— JOHN J. O'TOOLE, Room 206.
District Attorney— MATTHEW BRADY, 333 Kearny

Street.
Public Administrator — PHILIP C. KATZ, Phelaa

Building.
County Clerk— H. I. MULCREVY, Room 325.
(Criminal Department in Hall of Justice)
Sheriff— WM. J. FITZGERALD. Room 335.
Public Defender— FRANK EGAN. 333 Kearny Street

SUPERIOR COURTS

THOMAS S. MULVEY, Secretary to Judges, Jury

Commissioner, Room 480.
Civil Departments, 4th Floor.

Dept. 1— MICHAEL J. ROCHE. Judge, Room 411.
Dept. 2— F. J. MURASKY, Judge, Room 450.
Dept. 3— GEO. H. CABANISS, Judge, Room 403.
Dept. 4— J. J. VAN NOSTRAND, Judge. Room 466.
Dept. 5— FRANKLIN A. GRIFFIN, Judge, Room

402.
Dept. 7— E. P. MOGAN. Judge, Room 472.
Dept. 8— T. I. FITZPATRICK, Judge, Room 465.
Dept. 9— FRANK H. DUNNE. Judge, Room 417.
Dept. 10— THOS. F. GRAHAM, Judge, Room 452.
Dept. 13— DANIEL C. DEASY. Judge, Room 435.
Dept. 14— W. P. JOHNSON, Judge. Room 429.
Dept. 15— EDW. P. SHORTALL, Judge, Room 418.
Dept. 16— LOUIS H. WARD. Judge. Room 426.
Criminal Department — Hall of Justice. Kearny aa4

Washington Streets.
Dept. 6— LILE T. JACKS, Judge.
Dept. 11— C. J. GOODELL, Judge.
Dept. 12— JAMES G. CONLAN, Judge.

ADULT PROBATION BOARD— 333 Kearny Stretl
ANDREW Y. WOOD, Chairman, 693 Stevenson St
JAMES S. FENNELL. Vice-Chairman, 180 Jessie St
AUGUSTIN C. KEANE, Secretary. Hearst Buildiac
MRS. HENRY SAHLEIN. 1718 Jackson Street.
GEORGE FILMER, 330 Jackson Street.
WM. H. NICHOLL, Chief, AduU Probation Dept.

JUVENILE COURT— ISO Otis Street
FRANK J. MURASKY, Judge.
J. C. ASTREDO, Chief Probation Officer.

PROBATION COMMITTEE

MISS L. L. McKINSTRY, President, 2988 Pacific

Avenue.
MRS. WALTER ARNSTEIN, 2211 Washington St.
REV. JOHN W, SULLIVAN, 3321 Sixteenth Stre "
MISS RUTH TURNER, Fairmont Hotel.
CHARLES DeY. ELKUS, 485 California Street.
MAURICE HARRISON, Crocker Building.
BYRON MOBBS. Bank of California.

JUSTICES' COURTS

T. F. PRENDERGAST, Judge, Room 386.
CORNELIUS J. KELLY, Judge. Room 306.
FRANK T. DEASY. Judge. Room 385.
FRANK W. DUNN. Judge. Room 387.
ISADORE HARRIS. Judge. Room 379.
ROBERT W. DENNIS. Justices' Clerk, Room 300.

POLICE COURTS
Hall of Justice, Kearny and Washington Streett
Dept. 1— D. S. O'BRIEN. Judge.
Dept. 2— S. J. LAZARUS, Judge.
Dept. 3— JOSEPH M. GOLDEN, Judge.
Dept. 4— GEORGE J. STEIGER. JR . Judge.

LAW LIBRARY
ROBERT C. OWENS, Librarian, Room 426.




SiggriCE^EFHqENCr-CaOPEKATIOy



Twenty-Five Cents



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA, SEPTEMBER, 1929



Vol. Ill, No. 9




5cl,m.d/, »/..7e on the box with the Mayor » Uttle Barbara Ann Kmg. was p



.«^^



ires

«EKyic&:



'^Superior Funeral Service"

For almost two decades the name of S. A.
PVHITE. has stood for "SUPERIOR FUN-
ERAL SERVICE." To the people of this
city and the bay counties it symbolizes a ser-
vice that gives the utmost in modern efficiency
and in thoughtful, sympathetic attention.
Call the ranking funeral service of this city,
"WHITE'S SERVICE."

Telephone WEst 0770

S . A.WHITE

Leading Funeral Director
TRANS-BAY AND PENINSULAR SERVICE WITHOUT EXTRA CHARGE

2200 Sutter Street '^ San Francisco

Telcplione



E!iioUii)i.a|t

in

3870.



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M t Cil A N I CA L
I MPROVf MtNTS








fITMENTS BY
i CAUTI tR.



THREE NEW
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SAN FRANCISCO



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The



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Ask for "Three Star Malt Syrup"

E. CLEMENS HORST CO.

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

Largest Hop Growers in the World — Your dealer carries "Three Star"



Mention This Magazine When You Patronizt Advertisers



September



THE M U N I C I P A L E M P E O Y E. E.



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EDITORIAL PAGE



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Our New City Treasurer

MAYOR James Rolph, Jr., is to be congrat-
ulated for his appointment of Captain
Duncan Matheson as City Treasurer. Captain
Matheson is one of those faithful public ser-
vants who has been tried and not found wanting.
F'or twenty-eight years Captain Matheson was
connected with the City's Police Department, the
last twelve of which he served as captain of
detectives. Never has the finger of suspicion
pointed toward the veteran official. In the ver-
nacular of his legion of friends, Captain Mathe-
son "always makes good." In appointing Captain
Matheson as City Treasurer, Mayor Rolph be-
spoke the sentiment of San Franciscans when he
said : "I have appointed one whom I hope people
will look upon as the ideal 'watch dog' of their

treasury."

* * *

Spelling Is a Gift

A RECENT survey at the University of Cal-
ifornia disclosed the rvventy words most
frequently misspelled by the students. The
words, in the order of frequency, were: separate,
lose, ninety, privilege, villain, Chautauqua,
accommodate, all right, repetition, ecstasy,
exhilarate, hypocrisy, indispensable, irrelevant,
oneself, sacrilege, supersede, councilor, embarrass
and harass.

It is not only college students who stumble with
orthography. Spelling is a gift. It has been our
observation that many other persons do not know
correctly how to spell. If one can master the
twenty words here given, the hard ones can be
found in the dictionary.

^ ^- ^

The Municipal Election

ONCE again we are reminded that San Fran-
ciscans will be asked on November 5 to
register choices for certain municipal elective
offices. At the forthcoming election the voters
are to choose the following. Two Police Judges;
City Attorney; City Treasurer; Tax Collector;
Recorder; Public Administrator; nine Super-
visors and one member of the Board of Edu-
cation. With the exception of Supervisor Milton
Marks, all of the incumbents are candidates for
re-election.



American Education Week

According to the announcement of San Fran-
l\ Cisco's capable Superintendent of Schools,
Dr. Joseph Marr Gwin, American Education
Week will be observed this year from November
11 to 17, inclusive. San Francisco schools, the
finest in the nation, will take an active part in
observance of the week.

America is dedicated to the ideal that every
boy and girl shall have a fair start in life. To
accomplish that ideal there has been created an
educational system that provides free schooling
from the kindergarten through the university.
The free public school is America's greatest gift
to mankind. American Education Week is time
for rededication and deeper understanding of the
significance of the school in the life of the child,
the community, the state, the nation, and the
world.

During American Education Week the public
comes to the school and the school goes to the
public. Every citizen should make an especial
effort to participate in the observance of so im-
portant an event.

* * *

The Florists' Convention

THROUGH the efforts of former Supervisor
Angelo J. Rossi, the 1930 convention of the
International Florists' Telegraph Delivery Asso-
ciation, will be held in San Francisco. Mr. Rossi,
unaided and at his own expense, traveled to Bos-
ton to tell the world-wide organization of florists
that San Francisco is the greatest convention city
in America. That his argument was convincing
is vouchsafed by the fact that, a few days after
his arrival in Boston, it was his pleasure to wire
San Francisco friends that this city had been
chosen for next year's convention of the Florists.
The coming of such a convention to San Fran-
cisco is an important event and will bring to this
citv several thousands of delegates from every
port in the world. Mr. Rossi certainly is to be
congratulated for his efforts.

* * *

A man isn't licked until he begins to complain

about the rules.

* * ♦

If you are not registered you cannot vote.



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



September



San Francisco — City of
Good Streets



All Roads Lead to City by
Golden Gate



ALL roads lead to Rome. If the
present Streets Committee of the
Board of Supervisors has anything to
do about it, this classic allusion will be
altered to go down in history as "all
roads lead to San Francisco."

It is the undying ambition of Chair-
man Andrew J. Gallagher and his col-
leagues on the Streets Committee, Su-
pervisors Alfred Roncovieri and Fred
Suhr, to have San Francisco known
the world over as "the city of good
streets !" With such goals of achieve-
ment in view, a program within San



Francisco and, also in the immediately
adjacent territory, is now going ahead
full blast.

That the people of San Francisco
believe in the Streets Committee and
its program for the building of roads
and highways, boulevards and streets,
is plainly evidenced by the fact that
several years ago a bond issue of
$9,380,000 was voted by a great ma-
jority — and for work planned by the
Supervisors.

Already San Franciscans are noting
the results of the money voted and





Photos by ("haffee
Junipero Srrra lioitlrvard. i'f^prr: I.ookinij north over Stanley Street fill; Center:
Ltiohincj south over Stanley Street fill; Bottom: Looking north from Estero Avenue.
Constructed under direction of the City's Streets Committee.



ANDREW J. GALLAGHER

Chairman, Supervisors' Streets

Committee



placed in the hands of the committee.
The construction of some of the great-
est highways the world has ever seen
has been carried on, and many units
have been thrown open to the public.
Visitors from foreign lands who have
been whirled over the broad expanses
of the Ocean Beach Great Highway,
or who have motored down the penin-
sula to the rapidly developing munic-
ipal airport at Mills Field, have agreed
that the City by the Golden Gate really
lives up to its reputation of "knowing
how."

One of the great boulevards in the
world today — completed with funds
voted by the people and placed in the
hands of the Supervisors — is the
Highway, so-called, at the Ocean
Beach, extending from the Cliff House
to the city's swimming pool and play-
ground at Sloat Boulevard. At sev-
eral points this roadway is the widest
in. the universe and will undoubtedly
be classed in future years with the
highways built by the Romans.

Ocean Esplanade

Simultaneously, the city of San
Francisco carried on the construction
of the Ocean Esplanade. The open-
ing of the highway and the beautiful
concrete promenade were made the
center of one of the most interesting
civic celebrations ever staged. ' The
Esplanade is a work of art, solidly
skirting the broad stretches of beach.
.\ ramp, unique in construction, built
into the face of tlie seawall, and which
pemiits equestrians to ride directly
down to the shores of the Pacific has
attracted the attention of engineering
bodies in England, France and Spain
Several international publications havi
printed views of the structure.

The highway, sweeping grandly!



September



THE M U X I C I r A I. F. M I" I. O V K K




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Diagram shoeing Junipero Serra Boulii'arJ from Sloal Boulevard to tlie San Francisco-San Mateo County line



along the blue Pacific, has become a
mecca for motorists from the Baj^
region and abroad. Two wide, smooth
roads, separated by a park area of
green grass and vari-colored flower-
beds, form a striking contrast to the
yellow sands of the beach below. Un-
der Chairman Gallagher's direction
traffic rules have been established
v.hich will enable every citizen to en-
iriv the scenic drive with the maximum
assurance of safety.

Another road-building achievement
is the Bay Shore Highway extending
around the waters of San Francisco
Bay into the heart of San Mateo
County. The city has already ex-
pended $2,255,000 for this important
gatewav into the metropolitan area,
and $l!000,000 more will be spent be-
fore it is completed. The road is now
being used by thousands of motorists
and only a few units need to be com-
pleted. The State of California is aid-
ing materially in the development of
this artery of traffic.

Alemany Boulevard is another proj-
ect in which San Franciscans are tak-
ing interest. The road connects the
Bay Shore Highway with Junipero
Serra Boulevard at the count}' line.
This boulevard, costing nearly 51,000.-
000. will greatly assist in the handling
of traffic down the peninsula and also




v.ill be of great attraction from a
standpoint of beauty. Portions of this
road still remain to be financed from
the bond issue \ oted by the people and
steps are now being taken by the
Board of Supervisors to place a num-
ber of the bonds in the hands of in-
vestors.

City Engineer M. M. O'Shaugh-
nessy and his assistant. Clyde E.
Healy, have announced that practically
90 per cent of the rights-of-way
needed for construction of the Sunset
Parkway, to be constructed between
Sloat Boidevard and Lincoln Way and
Thirty-six and Thirty-seventh ave-



nues, has been secured. This park-
way, to be laid down similarly to the
(.ireat Highway with two one-waj'
roads and parked space separating
them, will prove a boon to the district
which has suffered for many years
from the lack of a cross-town route.

The Streets Committee, intrusted
with the boulevard program as well as
the continually expanding program for
developing the connecting net-work of
streets, is particularly gratified at this
time to announce completion of the
Laguna Honda Boulevard, extending
from Laguna Honda Home to Seventh
Avenue and Lawton Street. This




STREETS COMMITTEE OF THE SAN FR.-\XClSCO BOARD OF SIPERVISORS

At right, Supervisor Andretu J. Gallagher, presiding at the opening of the Great Highv;ay; standing «ii//; him is Supervisor Alfred

Roncovieri, arid at the left is Supervisor Fred Suhr, both of vihom are members of the Supervisors' Streets Committee



T H E M U N 1 C I P A L EMPLOYEE



Seiitemljer



highway was constructed at a cost of
$135,000. It is 1700 feet long, has a
width of forty feet with retaining
walls on each side. A feature of the
construction of the new boulevard
will be the removal of the old Ocean
Shore Railroad Station, a landmark,
reminiscent of San Francisco's early
days.

With constant demands being made
by all sections of the city for street
work and reconstruction, the Streets
Committee, with the aid of Chairman
Franck R. Havenner, Milo F. Kent
and Charles J. Powers of the Finance



Committee, has been able to establish
a comprehensive program, "scattered"
all over the municipality. The word
"scattered'' is used advisedly by the
committee and engineers as the net-
work of large streets, small streets and
alleys, when placed on a map resembles
the much-famed Chinese Maze. Suf-
ficient to say. the North Beach Dis-
trict, the Richmond, the Sunset, and
Mission and all other districts have
been highly satisfied with the budget
amounts allowed by Supervisor Haven-
ner. and placed in the hands of the
Streets Committee.



All in all, the Board of Supervisors
has been working hand in hand with
every municipal agency, and with the
State of California to develop good
streets, highways and boulevards. The
assistance given outside counties in
bringing in important roads has been
one of the principal tasks. The work
has been a large one. employing neces-
sarily the skill of many tireless work-
ers, but the Streets Committee firmly
believes that its part in the develop-
ment program has been one which will
reflect credit on the name of San Fran-
cisco.




Mayor Rolph

Inaugurates

City s NcAV

Pedestrian

Traffic

Signal System

THE fruits of a year's careful re-
search and planning to find a so-
lution to San Francisco's perplexing
traffic problems was introduced at
noon, September 11, when the new
pedestrian traffic signal system, the




Fiews of the City's new traffic signals, designed hy Chief Ralph W. Wiley of the

Department of Electricity. Upper left: One of the pedestrian signals. Upper right:

Combination pedestrian, traffic signal and street sign. Lower left: .-Inother vievi of

the pedestrian signal. Lower right: A close-up of the pedestrian

"Stop" and "Go" signal.



R.A,LPH W. WILEY
Chief, Department of Electricity

invention of Chief Ralph W. Wiley
of the Department of Electricity,
formally was dedicated.

Thousands Witness Ceremony

Thousands of San Franciscans, re-
leased from employment for the lunch-
eon hour, swarnied into the gore of



I



September



THE M U X T C I P A I, K.MPT.OYEE



»



Market, Montgomery and I'ost Streets
to witness Mayor James Rolph, Jr.,
snap a switch that placed into opera-
tion the finest pedestrian traffic control
system in the world.

Prior to the traffic-opening cere-
mony a "Traffic day" parade, headed
by Supervisor Charles F. Todd, chair-
man of the Supervisors' Traffic Com-
mittee, moved from the Embarcadero
to Market and Montgomery Streets.
In the line of march were motorcycle
policemen, automobiles carr\-ing city
and state officials, and members of the
public and the parochial schools traffic
squads.

Many Notables Present

Ralph ^^■. Wiley, Chief of the De-
partment of Electricity: Dr. ^filler
McClintock, director of the San Eran-
cisco Traffic Survey Committee : Erank
Carroll of the Down Town Associa-
tion ; Supervisors Charles E. Todd.
Walter J. Schmidt and Charles J.
Powers ; Eugene W. Biscailuz. super-
intendent of the California Highway
Patrol; Chief of Police \\'illiam j.
Quinn ; Captain Charles GofF of the
Police Traffic Bureau : Don V. Nichol-
son, Assistant Secretary, California
State Automobile Association, and
others, were stationed on one of the
city's new safet)- isles to await the
parade.

With arrival of the motorcycle po-
licemen, street car and motor traffic
was halted, strips of bunting were
stretched across Market Street and
the ceremony was under wa>".

Key Presented to Mayor

Chief \\'iley mounted a box and
presented Mayor Rolph a key to every
traffic control box in the citv.





} Pedestrian Traffic Day in San Francisco. Top picture shoins the natty traffic reserve
> corps from St. Anne's Parochial School; center, San Francisco Junior High School
i traffic reserve and, bottom, some motor cars of other days.



Picture at left sho^s Mayor Rolph turning on the nev: traffic signal system. Left to
right: Don V. Nicholson. Assistant Secretary. California State Automobile Associa-
tion; Chief Ralph If. Ifiley of the Department of Electricity; Supervisor H alter J.
Schmidt; the Mayor and little Barbara Ann King; Chief of Police ll'illiam J. Quinn;
Supervisor Charles J. Pov:ers and Captain Charles Goff of the Police Traffic Bureau.



"On this ver\- spot eight years ago,"
said Chief \\iley as a preliminary. "I
presented a similar key to the then
Chief of Police Daniel J. O'Brien, and
the late Captain Gleason. at that time
head of the Police Traffic Bureau.
Since that time many boxes have been
added to the signal equipment and to-
day "s occasion marks a vast stride in
traffic direction and control."

Mayor Rolph then mounted the box
and remarked to the assemblage:

"Keep vour eves on the green
light !"

The Mayor praised Chief Wiley and



8



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



September



his department, pointing out that the
traffic signals, "the best in the world,
are a home-made product from the



Online LibrarySan Francisco (Calif.). Board of SupervisorsThe municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) → online text (page 39 of 84)