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San Francisco (Calif.). Board of Supervisors.

The municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) online

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1927-28 there were five teachers).

After his return from an extended Eastern trip.
where he studied plans and methods of the best-
known cancer and psychopathic institutes. Dr. William
C. Hassler explained to the Board of Health plans
formulated by him for the cancer and psychopathic
wards to be added to the San Francisco Hospital. The
occasion was a dinner given by the board in honor of
Dr. Hassler at the Laguna Honda Home. Dr. Hassler
explained that, with the bond money provided for at
the recent election, the two units could be made the
very latest and most efficient in hospital standardiza-
tion.



Bonaventure Cardinal Cerretti, papal legatee at the
recent Eucharistic Congress in Australia, on his ar-
rival in San Francisco last month was welcomed by
Mayor Rolph and many church dignitaries. The Car-
dinal spent several days visiting religious orders in
Central California, and while in this city was the guest
of Archbishop Hanna.



Admiration j

Perfedo Garcia /

Puerto Del Rey V

Webster \



CIGARS



PIPES



The House of Service




SHAW-LEAHY CO., Inc.

WHOLESALE CANDY, CIGARS 6f NOVELTIES

Largest Distributors of Pipes on the Pacific Coast
Phone HEmlock 3610

207-211 NINTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO



R. Prigioni


A. Vivorio


BAY CITY GRILL

The Landmark of S. F.

Oysters, Steaks, Chops, Fish and Poultry
Private Dining Room for Ladies


Telephones — PROSPECT 10049


.. FRANKLIN 3431


45 Turk Street


San Francisco



Purchasers of Live Stock, Liberal Advances on

Consignments

Beef, Calves, Sheep and Hogs Bought or

Slaughtered on Commission

JAMES ALLAN & SONS

Wholesale Butchers

Office and Abattoir

Third Street and Evans Avenue San Francisco

Telephones: Mission 6975, Mission 991



KITCHNER and GRAKOO

Dining Service

Operating Dining Rooms

GOLDEN GATE FERRY CO.
VALLEJO-RODEO FERRY CO.
BENICIA-MARTINEZ FERRY CO.

Lunches Put Up for Tourists



TRY BIMBO'S

SPECIAL ITALIAN DINNERS
Music 1 Dancing



DOUGLAS 6253



2295 PoweU Street



301 Bay Street



Phone — DOuglas 4277

C. AND O. RESTAURANT

Oysters and Steaks



131 SIXTH STREET



SAN FRANCISCO



Buy from firms that advertise vrith us



26



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



January



FOR YOUR LAWN AND GARDEN



Hand and Power Lawn
Mowers i Sprinklers
Hose < Grass and
Pruning Tools i Fer-
tilizers < Insecticides
Rollers i Sweepers, etc.



H. V. CARTER CO.

52 Beale Street San Francisco




Certified Laboratory Products

Nitrous Oxide Oxygen Ethylene
Carbon Dioxide



Phone MArket 4227
1379 Folsotn Street San Francisco, Calif.



LOUIS STRAUS, INC.

wholesale
MANUFACTLTRERS OF CLOTHING

Phone KEarny 1566
51 First Street San Francisco, Calif.



Phone DAvenport 9180



THOMAS PORCARO

724 MONTGOMERY STREET
SAN FRANCISCO



Importer and Wholesaler of

PORCARO BRAND OLIVE OIL
ITALIAN CHEESE < MAJOLICA WARE from Italy

The Olive Oil That Should Be In Every Home

PRINCIPE UMBERTO BRAND

Packed in luly for Thomas Porcaro



The City's Playgrounds



(Continued from Page 13)

Douglass Playground entailed the greatest amount
of planning of all our recent additional grounds. Be-
cause of its unique location, the sloping of the quarry
cliffs, the surfacing, drainage and planting have re-
quired expert engineering skill. Adequate recognition
was given this department for the work accomplished
by the district's representatives on the day of the
Douglass Playground's dedication.

The construction program was not confined to San
Francisco, but also was carried on at the summer
camp at Mather. Here twenty-five new cabins, three
new wash rooms and a store were erected. New
water, sewer and septic systems were installed. The
lodge was rehabilitated, and included alterations in
the kitchen and dining room. Many other improve-
ments were made, additional equipment was installed,
and trees were planted at the lake. These additional
facilities provided a happier vacation season for the
850 people who were at camp during the summer.

The numerous activities held throughout the year,
such as basketball, tennis, volley ball, baseball, swim-
ming, and events of every conceivable nature made the
playgrounds a mecca for thousands of children. There
was an attendance of 2,752,310 children recorded for
the year. The handicraft activities — kite making,
basketry, airplane construction and soap sculpturing —
also were responsible for the big increase in the
playground attendance. Music and dramatics played
an important part in bringing children to the grounds.
Several glee clubs, choral groups and harmonica bands
were formed. A number of musical programs were
piesented. In the dramatic department a play contest
was held and three of the winning plays were staged.
May Festivals and seasonal dramatic programs were
held on many of the grounds. The best program, how-
ever, was the Fall Festival, presented in the Civic
Auditorium with 715 children participating. A large
costume room with adequate storage, dyeing and
laundering facilities for the dramatic department was
provided on Sacramento Street, between Fillmore and
Webster streets.

The department has gained greater recognition of
its work by the citizens of San Francisco, because of
its attempt to raise a $3,100,000 bond issue. Although
the bonds did not carry, 64,141 people voted in favor
of providing additional playgrounds for San Francisco.

A six weeks' recreation training course for pla}'-
ground directors was successfully held, and has pro-
vided a new inspiration for the work being conducted
at the grounds. The library in the playground office
also will help to provide new ideas for the playground
directors. It will stimulate new interest on the part
of the children attending the playgrounds.

With the eagerness of children wondering what
Santa Claus will bring, we welcome the New Year.
The Playground Department is sincerely planning to
serve this community in a bigger and better way than
ever before. This department also is striving to reach
the goal of providing adequate recreation for the
leisure time of the people of San Francisco.



Under a recommendation of the finance committee
of the Board of Supervisors, bids for the sale of the
$41,000,000 Spring Valley water bonds will be called
January 14. The sale will represent the largest in
the history of the city.



Buy from firms that advertise with us



January



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



27



Two Faithful Public Servants



(Continued from Page 8)

interesting pictorially and editorially that it developed
into a valuable property, and, when sold after fifteen
years' service, became the West's most famous maga-
zine. His stories and articles, illustrated by photo-
graphs skilfully taken by himself, were an important
part of the editorial contents when "Sunset Magazine"
was young.

When war came and the Government took over
operation of the nation's railroads, Mr. Shoup, with
twenty-seven years of Southern Pacific service behind
him, was made vice-president in charge of the prop-
erty interests of the company and its affiliated and
proprietary concerns. In 1920 he was made vice-pres-
ident and assistant to the president of Southern
Pacific. Five years later Mr. Shoup was made pres-
ident of all Southern Pacific's electric and other trac-
tion interests, and executive vice-president of the
Southern Pacific Company.

He is recognized as a foremost authority in all ques-
tions concerning Western industry, business, trans-
portation, tractions, electricity and oil.

Mr. Shoup is a member of the Jonathan, California
and Union League Clubs of Los Angeles and of the
Bohemian, Olympic and Pacific Union Club of San
Francisco. In 1900 he married Miss Rose Wilson,
daughter of Colonel Jack Wilson of San Francisco.
Mr. and Mrs. Shoup have three children, Carl, Jack
and Louise.



Veteran Firemen's Association



By John S. Farley

THE regular monthly meeting of the Veteran Fire-
men's Association of San Francisco, Inc., was
held Tuesday, December 4. The meeting was called
to order by Charles Cullen, first vice-president. The
minutes of the previous meeting were read and ap-
proved, as were the minutes of the special meeting
called to attend the funeral of our late comrade. Fred
Sayers.

The directors' report was received. All reports on
sick were received. Bills amounting to $1109.88 were
referred to the board of directors for approval and
were ordered paid. The banquet committee reported
progress.

Under the head of new business the following were
declared elected for the ensuing year: Charles Cullen,
president; Fred Shade, first vice-president; Henry F.
Horn, second vice-president; D. J. Harrison, financial
secretary and collector; R. J. Courtier, treasurer; John
S. Farley, recording secretary ; Charles Reinfeld, super-
intendent of hall ; Sam Baker, William Brown, Alfred
Florence, Archie Jensen, Henry Tricou, directors.

The new officers will be installed January 8. The
secretary was instructed to send notices to all mem-
bers to be present.

Receipts of meeting $474; total cash assets,
$11,074.86.



Los Angelea



Portland



Seattle



Salt Lake City



WILLIAM J. BURKE & COMPANY

Sole Western Distributors

Williams Form and Column Clamps

Main Office and Warehouse
200 Davis Street DOuglas 8390 San Francisco



GRAYSTONE 6616

HAVE YOU TRIED SAN FRANCISCO'S
MOST LUXURIOUS TAXICAB SERVICE?
BETTER THAN THE BEST, FOR LESS.

LUXOR CAB CO.



When in Need of Good Tires, Priced Right
Call on Your Neighbor

CITY HALL TIRE EXCHANGE

238-242 Van Ness Avenue
1 Block Below City Hall Phone UNderhiU 3561



SERVICE







"Superior Funeral Service"

The sympathetic, personal interest taken in
your problems and the splendid facilities at our
disposal for best carrying out your wishes, are
among the many features which make White's
Service distinctive and give it the name of
being one of the leading funeral services of
San Francisco.

S. A. WHITE

Leading Funeral Direzlot

TRANS-BAY AND PENINSULAR SERVICE WITHOLT EXTRA CHARGE

2200 Sutter Street V S.in Francisco

West- I^^^^S^^ ,. ^a^S i^^^^Mt •"

1870,



28



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



Tanuarv



O. G. HOPKINS

TRINIDAD MASTIC FLOORS

BARBER ASPHALT CO.'S

"CURCRETE"

For Curing Concrete

1174 PHELAN BLDG. SAN FRANCISCO



GOFFINREDINGTON GO.

Wholesale Druggists

Importers and Jobbers of

Drugs, Chemicals and Druggists' Sundries

DEPOT FOR PARKE, DAVIS & COMPANY

401-433 Mission Street San Francisco



Phone KEarny 1790



Residence: SUnset 3324



GEO. FRANKEL

PLUMBING / HEATING
CONTRACTING / JOBBING

Industrial Installations a Specialty

443 Stevenson Street, bet. 5th and 6th
SAN FRANCISCO



Compliments of

WESTERN BUTCHERS SUPPLY CO.

156 - 160 FOURTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO



MARKET 3040

LO-FARE CAB

With the Friendly Meter



Parks and Museums



E. N. Hawkins


J. R. McKay


Edward Glass


Appraisal


and Tax Valuation


Company


APPRAISAL ENGINEERS < DEPRECIATION




San Francisco Analysts




57 Post Street




DOuglas 0212



(Continued from Page 15)

increase in the number of berths available for boats
of various descriptions. The Garden of Shakespeare's
Flowers, started in 1927, has been improved and addi-
tional plantings made. Improvements also have been
made at the Beach Chalet and the cafe at the Children's
Playground in Golden Gate Park. The San Francisco
Fly Casters' Club has put up a headquarters building
at the side of Stow Lake. Replacing the old suspen-
sion bridge over the Middle Drive is a new concrete
underpass.

Among the animal acquisitions in the Parks are
several important ones at Herbert Fleishhacker Play-
field, gifts of Mr. Fleishhacker, President of the Park
Commission. These include two camels, an African
water buffalo, and a Barbary sheep. Four black-tailed
deer from Mendocino County, the gift of Mr. John
McNab, were placed in Golden Park. At Stow Lake
the water birds acquired included two American white
pelicans, a brown pelican, and six white swans. At
the Japanese Tea Garden a pair of blooded fowl, a
cock and hen of the variety called "Shirafuji" in Japan,
or "white wistaria" in English, have been installed.
The aviary has been enriched notably by the addition
of two Numidian cranes from Africa.



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J Ual.i Lily Poiul. GolJrn Gulf Park

Park Superintendent John McLaren received many
congratulations the past month upon attaining his
eighty-third birthday. This event, occurring on De-
cember 20, was the occasion of the presentation to him
by the office employees of the Park Commission of a
beautiful brass desk set. Mr. McLaren has been Park
Superintendent continuously since 1887, and in that
time has made an international reputation for himself,
and, incidentally, for Golden Gate Park.



Paul McHugh is mourning the death of one of his
charges at the bear pits in Golden Gate Park. This is
none other than Herbert Hoover, the little black bear,
formerly the mascot of the sailors on the U. S. Air-
plane Carrier, the Lexington. The bruin died of fright
when a huge limb was blown down on the top of his
cage during a severe storm in the middle of December.

(Turn to Page 30)



January



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



29



City Officials and Employees Named
in Community Chest Drive




ONCE each year the thousands who live in health
and comfort are reminded of the few whom for-
tune has struck down. While San Francisco has gone
forward, progressed and developed, many of these
unfortunates have fallen by the wayside.

Thev are helpless children who have lost their
parents . . . the youth with two paths lying before
his feet . . . once able men who are ravaged by dis-
ease . . . aged women
with no relatives to
lean on . . . the crip-
pled . . . the desti-
tute.

The 107 agencies
of the Community
Chest — your Com-
munity Chest — care
for them all the year
round. With the
advent of each suc-
cessive spring the
people are asked to
provide for this work
for another twelve
months.

The time is close
at hand when an or-
ganization of more
than 5000 men and
women, volunteering
their time and serv-
ices without compen-
sation other than a
knowledge of a
needed humanitarian
work well done, are
preparing to conduct
the annual communal appeal for funds.

The Community Chest plan of financing welfare and
relief agencies has long since passed the experimental
stage, and through the splendid achievements of six
j'ears of service has justified its existence and right to
expect the sympathetic and whole-hearted cooperation
of the entire citizenship in doing that which is neces-
sary to carry on the great program of work.

Officials and employees in every branch of the mu-
nicipal government of San Francisco have consistently
accorded the Chest movement full-hearted and gen-
erous support each year since its inception. This year
is no exception to the rule, as is evidenced by the
preliminary steps already taken in organizing each
department in preparation for the coming appeal
scheduled to take place March 4 to 15. The Munici-
pal Division, designated at campaign headquarters,
527 Mason Street, corner Post, as No. 34, is in charge
of Leonard S. Leavy, City Purchaser of Supplies.
Mr. Leavy is dignified with the title of Colonel, and
assisting him as Lieutenant Colonel will be Matthew
D. Ashe.

The Municipal Division will be composed of five
battalions, each directed by a major, who in turn will
be in charge of five captains. Each department of the
government will be solicited for Chest funds by its
respective representatives, thus saving employees the
annoyance of being called on by outside solicitors
with whom they are not acquainted.



LELAND W. CUTLER
Chairman 1929 Community
Chest Campaicfn Committee



The line-up of the different municipal battalions will
be as follows :

City Hall, Parks and Playgrounds — Battalion "A":
Major Franck P. Havenner; Captains: Matthew D.
Ashe, Bernard Peter Lamb, Robert W. Dennis, J. E.
Sharp and Robert Munson.

Department of Public W^orks — Battalion "B": Ma-
jor Fred W. Meyer; Captains: S. J. Hester, P. W.
King, Martin J. Tierney, F. Boeken, Peter J. Owen.

Police, Jails, Enforcement Offices — Battalion "C" :
Major Theodore J. Roche; Captains: William J.
Quinn, William J. Fitzgerald, J. C. Astredo, Matthew
Brady, Dr. T. B. W. Leland.

Fire Department — Battalion "D" : Major William
A. Sherman ; Captains (tentative selection) : Thomas
J. Murphy, A. J. Sullivan, Charles J. Brennan, Martin
J. Kearns, C. J. Strauss.

Department of Health — Battalion "E" : Major Percy
R. Hennessy ; Captains: Dr. Herbert F. Fine, James
I. O'Dea, Miss Myra Kimball, Dr. L. C. Wilbur, Dr. A.
G. Norman.





WESTERN


PAVING


CO.




A. B.


RILOVICH




GENERAL CONTRACTORS 6f


ENGINEERS




Phone


KEarny 006S




743


Call Building




San Francisco



Telephones: Hemlock 4570-4571

DECKER & HORSTMANN

Distributors

U. S. ROYAL CORDS
U. S. SOLID TRUCK TIRES

141 Grove Street San Francisco



PIONEER MARKET

Headquarters for

Corned Meats i Pigs' Heads < Pigs' Tails < Pigs' Hocks

Pigs' Feet and the Famous Picnic Brand

Corned Beef and Pork

Wc supply many firehouses and clubs
3318 Mission Street, near 29th L. F. Armknecht



Phone DAvcnport 7290



Res. Phone SUnset 4995



O. AARON

Registered

PLUMBING AND HEATING

Esfimates Given On All Work - Jobbing Promptly Attended To
289 Fourth St., bet. Howard and Folsom, San Francisco



30



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



January



Parks and Museums



(Continued from Page 28)

The Iris Display Garden Committee is undertaking
to secure a large collection of these plants to be set
out in Golden Gate Park. Superintendent McLaren
has agreed to furnish an acre or more of land near the
water-works opposite Thirteenth and Fourteenth
Avenues and Lincoln Way in the Park and Foreman
Paul Bohm is clearing and preparing the ground for
the new garden.

Lorin E. Smith, son of Ed. Smith, the Superintend-
ent of motor vehicles for the Park Commission, was
married to Miss Katherine Fagan at the bride's home
on December 15. The Rev. Father Ryan of Star of
the Sea Church officiated, and the wedding was fol-
lowed by a family dinner in the Palm Court of the
Palace Hotel. Young Smith is District Agent of the
California State Insurance Company here, and the
couple will make their home in San Francisco in the

Richmond District.

* ♦ *

W. G. Hocking, civil engineer for the Park Commis-
sion, who has been on leave of absence for some
months on account of ill health, is now well and is
again at work.

* * *

Thomas Craney, for many years a faithful and
respected employee of the parks, died at the home of
his daughter on December 6. He was seventy-three
years old.



Palace of the Legion of Honor



THE past year has been a notable one at the Cali-
fornia Palace of the Legion of Honor. Among the
numerous exhibitions the most extensive consisted of
the European section of the Carnegie Institute's
Twenty-Sixth International Exhibition of Modern Art.
This great show comprised 278 paintings from fifteen
foreign countries and occupied ten galleries of the
Palace. It remained on view from March 25 to May 13.
Other shows during the year consisted of the Sev-
enth International Water Color Exhibition of the
Chicago Art Institute ; a group of miniatures by Miss
Martha Baxter; the Whitney Studio Club exhibition
of forty-two paintings ; the gallery of red chalk draw-
ings by the Italian sculptor, Arturo Dazzi; an exhibi-
tion of modern American paintings ; a group of fine
pencil drawings by Maurice Sterne ; a collection of



Persian art supplied by Dr. Ali Kuli Khan ; a group
of paintings by the California artist, Henrietta Shore ;
a one-man show of twenty-eight paintings by Gio-
vanni B. Troccoli, another by Nicolai Fechin, and a
third by F. Luis Mora ; a collection of paintings by
Lorser Feitelson and his wife, Nathalie Newking ;
the exhibition of photographs from all over the world
collected by the Pictorial Photographic Society of
San Francisco ; a group of the works of Rockwell
Kent ; and finally, during the last two months, the
Southwest Exhibition of 133 paintings, water-colors,
lithographic crayon drawings, and etchings by artists
of Taos and Santa Fe, New Mexico. In addition the
notable Jacob Stern Loan Collection of paintings and
bronzes was placed on view July 24 to remain indefi-
nitely.

Many important gifts were made to the California
Palace of the Legion of Honor during the year. Dr.
Archer Milton Huntington presented a check for
$100,000 to be used to purchase paintings for the
Collis Potter Huntington Memorial Room ; and he
also presented a superb collection of miniatures,
enamels, snuflf boxes, and carved ivories, besides
paintings, etchings, celadon ware, and period furni-
ture. Albert M. Bender made notable additions to
his other gifts of Oriental art objects.

One anonymous donor gave a painting of "Spes —
Hope — in Prison," by Sir Edward Coley Burne-Jones,
and another presented a landscape painting by
Edward W. Redfield. Ex-Senator James D. Phelan
gave a marble bust of Miss Helen Wills by Haig
Patigian, and the estate of Anne Whitney Sperry
two paintings, one by Haag and the other by William
Keith. One of the Dazzi red chalk drawings was
added to the Palace's permanent collections, as were
three of the rare sixteenth century Flemish Renais-
sance tapestries of the "Moses and Aaron" series.

Announcements of coming exhibitions made by Dr.
Cornelia B. Sage Quinton, Director of the Palace,
and Major W. W. Quinton, Curator, include a group
of 100 American paintings from the Grand Central
Galleries of New York, to be on view from February
8 to the first week in March ; and the great American
Sculpture Exposition under auspices of the Na-
tional Sculpture Society, which will take up the whole
building, the colonnades, and the grounds outside,
from April 1 for a period of six months.



The California State Automobile Association and
the Automobile Club of Southern California have
joined forces to sponsor at the coming session of the
Legislature a compulsory course of safety instruction
in all public schools of the state.





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On Lindley Meadows, Golden Gale Park



January



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



31



The last legal obstruction to the
right of way of the pipe line from
Hetch Hctchy to San Francisco re-
cently was removed by an order of
Superior Judge Welch of Santa Clara
County. The land in question was
owned by William J. Roncy, Mission
San Jose. City Engineer M. M,
O'Shaughnessy, who testified in the
condemnation proceedings, said the
Roney case settlement now gives San
Francisco clear title to complete right
of way for its water system.



The follow'ing transfers have been
announced by the Police Department:

Effective December 24: Officer Al-
bert L. Machado, from Company E to
Company K; Officer Myron A. Hooke,
from Company K to Company H; Offi-
cer William Ranch from Company D
to Company K, and Officer Thomas M.
Cole, from Company H to Company D.
Chester L. Welch, Department School
of Instructions, assigned to Com-
pany E.

Through a resolution of the Board
of Supervisors, recently unanimously
adopted, the city pledged itself to get
behind Benton C. Fremont in his
efforts to recover from the Federal
Government his heritage of Fort
Mason, one time homestead of his
illustrious grandfather. General John C.
Fremont. The Government took the
land as a war measure in 1863.



Transfers ailecting four members of
the Detective Bureau were ordered
December 3. Detective Sergeant Leo
Bunner was assigned to duty in the
check detail, Detective Otto Meyer to
tlie robbery detail. Detective Leo Con-
nors to general duty in the Detective
Bureau, and Detective J. L. English
to the pawnshop detail.

According to a recent report sub-
mitted to the Board of Trustees of the
War Memorial by President John S.
Drum, work on the War Memorial is
to continue without interruption be-
tween the different contracts, and the
great structure, to face City Hall on
Van Ness Avenue, will be a reality
sooner than expected.

A few days before Christmas, Lieu-
tenant James Boland, in charge of the
City Prison, reported that for the first
time in more than ten years the



Online LibrarySan Francisco (Calif.). Board of SupervisorsThe municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) → online text (page 4 of 84)