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San Francisco (Calif.). Board of Supervisors.

The municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) online

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partment of the railway is in the hand-
ling of the returns from conductors,
the making up of pay rolls and in the
check taken of all materials and sup-
plies received and issued, the hand-
ling of transfers, sale of school tickets,
which in addition to being sold at each
car barn, are sold in eighteen different
schools, which make periodical re-
turns of same.

Railway Pay Roll

The pay roll of a street railway re-
quires a great deal of work. The Mu-
nicipal Railway has 1300 employees
and a semimonthly pay roll of over
$100,000. Nearly every one of these
employees must turn in an individual
daily time card stating the nature of
the work engaged in and properly en-




FREDERICK BOEKEN

Superintrndent Municipal Railway

dorsed by his immediate car dis-
patcher, foreman, or department head.

Most of the employees are platform
men and their time being kept to the
exact minute, with few being alike,
constitutes the bulk of the work of
this department. A special computing
machine which reduces minutes to
hours is used. The time sheets, when
completed, must agree with the total
of the time cards, as well as the total
time called for by the timetables of
the various lines, thus providing a
double check.

Time schedules are badly disrupted
daily by congestion caused by auto-
mobile traffic and automatic signals,
together with parades and special
events, which greatly increases the
work of the timekeeper.

Labor Expense

A great deal of work is involved in
the proper distribution of the expense
of labor, as shovk'n by the time cards.

Aside from the platform men, the
time cards of most of the other em-
ployees show that they have worked
at various occupations. Sometimes a
man will be engaged in several dif-






September



THE M U N I C I P A L EMPLOYEE



15



HASKINS 8C SELLS

CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS

CROCKER BUILDING

San Francisco

Offices in the principal cities of the United States, and in London, Paris, Berlin, Shanghai, Manila, Havana,

Montreal and Mexico City



LESTER HERRICK & HERRICK



Seattle, Wash.

White Building



Certified Public Accountants
Agents in Federal Taxation

San Francisco
Merchants' Exchange



Los Angeles
C. C. Chapman Bldg.



DOUGLAS 6897



SKINNER & HAMMOND

Certified Public Accountants

Hunter-Dulin Building



Indemnity
Insurance Company



of North America



CASUALTY



SURETY



^:



Pacific Coast Department:
206 Sansome Street, San Francisco

R. W. FORSYTH, Manager
City Office:

204 Sansome Street

Telephone DAvenport 8320



San Francisco



Pioneers of Protection



Pacific Odast iNsuRANci^GENERAL Agents




200 Bush Street



Francisco.



PIONEERS OF 91



EDWARD BROWN 8C SONS

WRITING THROUGH AGENTS

AND BROKERS ONLY

EVERY FORM OF

INSURANCE



200 Bush Street Phone SUtter 7120

SAN FRANCISCO



Buy from firms that advertise with us



16



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



September



JOHN FINN, President



RpBERT B. FINN, Secretary



JOHN FINN METAL WORKS

SAN FRANCISCO and SEATTLE

Babbitt Metals and SoUen - Type Metals and Zinc Dust
Galvanizing and Sherardizing

372-398 SECOND STREET
TELEPHONE SUTTER 4188



Tel. DAvenport 2500

JOSHUA HENDY IRON WORKS

Iron Founders - Machinists' Engineers



Office : 200 Pine Street



SAN FRANCISCO



CALIFORNIA



PHONE KEARNY 2623



F. J. CARROLL, Prop.



San Francisco Brass Foundry

Established 1880

BRASS, BRONZE AND ALUMINUM CASTINGS



48-50 Clementina St.

Bet. First and Second
SAN FRANCISCO



Manufacturers of

SUPERIOR BRONZE BUSHINGS

COMET BRONZE BEARINGS



Public Servant, Too !



The automobile is mankind's greatest
and most efficient public servant. Its
value should be judged entirely from the
standpoint of the service it will render.
The pre-eminent position Pierce Arrow
motor cars occupy in the automobile
world is based entirely on the long, satis-
factory and faithful service Pierce Arrow



owners receive.



:^:



Pierce Arrow Pacific Sales Co.

W. F. CULBERSON, President

Geary and Polk Streets ORdway 3412

In Oakland — Broadway at 26th Street







Conveying, Screening, Elevating and Trans-
mission Equipment. Labor-Saving Machinery
of all kinds built to specifications.



B



O DINSO



MANUFACTURING CO., INC.



N



4401 San Bruno Avenue



San Francisco



FOR YOUR LAWN AND GARDEN



Hand and Power Lawn
Mowers / Sprinklers
Hose < Grass and
Pruning Tools i Fer-
tilizers / Insecticides
Rollers i Sweepers, etc.



H. V. CARTER CO.

52 Beale Street San Francisco




COFFIN-REDINGTON CO.

Wholesale Druggists

Importers and Jobbers of

Drugs, Chemicals and Druggists' Sundries

DEPOT FOR PARKE, DAVIS & COMPANY

401-433 Mission Street San Francisco



Telephones: Hemlock 4570-4571

DECKER & HORSTMANN

Distributors

U. S. ROYAL CORDS
U. S. SOLID TRUCK TIRES

141 Grove Street San Francisco



KITCHNER and GRAKOO

Dining Service

Operating Dining Rooms

GOLDEN GATE FERRY CO.
VALLEJO-RODEO FERRY CO.
BENICIA-MARTINEZ FERRY CO.

Lunches Put Up for Tourists



Buv from firms that advertise with us



September



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYER



17



ferent occupations on the same day ;
i. e., while he may be a carpenter or
blacksmith, etc., his day's work must
be charged to different accounts, as
shown by the time card and called for
by the I. C. C. accounting system.

In the Interstate Commerce Com-
mission's uniform system of accounts,
as used by the Municipal Railway,
there are 262 accounts of which 165
are used by the Municipal Railway.
Some 100 blank forms, cards, etc., are
necessary for almost daily use, rang-
ing from tags to be attached to arti-
cles left on cars by thoughtless passen-
gers to the large traffic forms on
which is recorded the work of the
conductors, such as number of trips
run, fares and tickets received, trans-
fers issued and received, total passen-
gers carried, etc., each day. The
operation of 215 cars with a mileage
of 27,000 miles and an average of
240,000 passengers carried, is the
daily record of the Municipal Rail-
way, the cash fares averaging $9850
per day and amounting to slightly
over four cents per passenger carried.

$200,000 in Materials

Approximately $200,000 worth of
materials and supplies are carried in
the Municipal Railway storerooms.
This amount is made up of over 3000
items, ranging from small screws to
armatures, car wheels and rails.
Twelve thousand dollars worth of
material per month is purchased and
a similar amount disbursed, making a
turnover of about $300,000 per year.

Individual stock cards are kept for
each item by what is called the "Per-
petual Inventory System," test checks
on stock being made almost daily.

Subsidiary ledgers are kept of the
various items of equipment, and de-
preciation set up for each one, thereby
maintaining a complete history of all
assets individually.

The 5-cent fare, from the time it
leaves the passenger's hand and en-
ters the fare-box until it finally rests
in the treasury, entails a large amount
of detail work, running the gauntlet
of receivers, fare-box checkers, short-
list adjusters, entry clerks, and final
bookkeeper's ledger. The fare-box
readings must present an endless chain
with every fare accounted for.

Accounting Department

Some thirty employees, including
clerks, stenographers, timekeepers,
bookkeepers, comptometer operators,
receivers, etc., are required to do the
work of the accounting department.
This department is directed by Wil-
liam H. Scott as chief clerk. Mr.
Scott entered the employ of the Mu-
nicipal Railway in 1913 as a clerk, and
has arrived at his present responsible
position by applying himself dili-
gently to the interests of the railway.



The Municipal Election



By C. J. Collins

Registrar of Voters



THE Registration ofifice is making
the necessary preparations for the
forthcoming election. The various
polling places have been secured with
the view to installing voting machines
so that everything will be ready and
all confusion avoided, and voting con-
ducted with convenience to the voters.
This in itself is no easy task. In some
precincts we may have a dozen places
to select from, and in others, such as
hotel and apartment house precincts,
space is limited and there is no choice
— we take what we get.

October 5 Last Day

Registration for the November 5
election closes Saturday, October 5,
1929, at 12 o'clock midnight. For the
accommodation of voters the office is
open daily from 8:30 a. m. to 5 p. m.
Commencing Alonday, September 30,
and continuing through that week, it
will be open from 8 :30 a. m. to 9 p. m.
continuously excepting Saturday, Oc-
tober 5, when it will be open from 8 :30
a. m. to 12 midnight.

Branch Registration Places

For the further accommodation of
the electors, branch registration places
are now established at the following
places :

Central District — Bank of Italy,
California and Montgomery streets :
Bank of Italy, Powell-Eddy-Market
streets; Bank of Italy, Geary-Stock-
ton-O'Farrell streets ; The Emporium,
835 Market street ; Examiner, Third-
Kearny-Market streets; Hale Bros.,
Fifth and Market streets; O'Connor,
jMoffatt and Company, O'Farrell and
Stockton streets; the White House,
Sutter-Grant-Post streets.

Mission District — Bank of Italy,
Twenty-ninth and IMission streets ;
Hibernia Bank, Twenty-second and
\'alencia streets ; Mission Savings
Bank, Sixteenth and Valencia streets ;
San Francisco Bank, 2501 Mission
street.

Richmond District — Hibernia Bank,
Tenth avenue and Geary street ; San
Francisco Bank, 601 Clement street.

Sunset District — Bank of Italy,
Eighth avenue and Irving street.

Fillmore District — Bank of Italy,
Fillmore and Post streets.

All persons who registered at any
time during 1928 or 1929 and are still
living at the same address are not re-
quired to register, but those who have
failed to register at any time during
the last two years, or. who have
changed their residence since last
registering, must re-rcgister before




MAJOR C. J. COLLINS

October 5 in order to vote at the
November election.

The officers of elections at each
booth will be equipped with every-
thing for their work. Careful selec-
tions are made of men and women
employed in the booths so that all will
be competent. Such officials will have
preliminary instructions so as to be
approximately perfect for their duties ;
the work will be forwarded, therefore.
with due accuracy and everything will
be in order on election day. The pres-
tige of the registration office for cor-
rect and quick returns will be main-
tained.

1154 Voting Machines

All voting at this election will be
by voting machines. At the City Hall
machines are now installed so that
voters not familiar with these appli-
ances may have necessary instruc-
tions. There will be 1154 precincts
that will have 1154 voting machines.
There will be no paper ballots. Where
there is congestion, as at the large
hotels, etc., two machines will be
placed ; this will call for only one addi-
tional inspector beyond the usual force.

The polls will be opened at 7 o'clock
a. m. and close at 8 o'clock p. m. By
midnight the result will be ready for
the public. The morning papers the
next day will have the full returns.
This will be a wonderful change from
the old days when several days were
required to complete the count and
give results.



18



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



September



The count now is mechanically per-
fect and free from errors ; unless from
some unforeseen cause, the results Can
be accepted as final.

Nominations may be made for dif-
ferent candidates for election up to
October 5, 1929. The routine as to
sponsors and all other details may be
obtained at the office of the Registrar
of Voters in the City Hall. The of-
fices to be filled are : City Attorney,
Treasurer, Tax Collector, Recorder,
Public Administrator, two Police
Judges, a member of the Board of
Education, and nine Supervisors.

From October 5 to November 5
the entire office force will be on their
toes. October 5 will be the last day
to appoint precinct boards of election.
On October 26 sample ballots must be



ready to be furnished to applicants at
the office of the Registrar of Voters.
October 28 is the last day to publish
names of election officers appointed
and location of polling places together
with complete mailing of sample bal-
lots. On November 3 election sup-
plies must be delivered to inspectors,
together with an American flag which
must be displayed by the inspector at
or near the polling place. This is the
first time the flag has been used, and
an act of the last Legislature makes it
mandatory at every precinct through-
out the State of California.

At the Municipal election all good
citizens should go to the polls and
vote. This will assure us of a con-
tinuance of good government that, for
the past twenty years, has character-
ized our citv.



CAPTAIN RIORDAN AND
MRS. MABEL BOX FORM
NEW CIVIL SERVICE
COACHING SCHOOL




Former Supervisor Jngelo J. Rossi and Mrs. Rossi, left, ivitli Constant J. Auger,
Director of the Doiun Town Association, center, and H. R. Given, Chairman of
Publicity Committee, Junior Chamber of Commerce, right, just before Mr. Rossi
departed for Boston, inhere he presented the International Florists Telegraph
Delivery .Association with the beautiful floral emblem shown in the picture



A huge floral emblem inviting the
International Florists' Telegraph De-
livery Association to hold their 1930
convention in San Francisco was car-
ried to the 1929 convention at Pioston
by former Supervisor Angelo J. Rossi,
director of the world-wide organiza-
tion of florists, who went cast as west-
ern delegate.

Shortly after his arrival in Boston,
Mr. Rossi delivered the emblem to the
convention and informed his auditors
that San Francisco was the logical
meeting place for the 1930 convention.
A telegram from Mr. Rossi, a few
days later, announced that this city



had been chosen for next year's con-
vention.

The floral emblem, consisting of a
key to the Golden Gate set over a
replica of the Ferry Building, was
designed by the San Francisco Junior
Chamber of Commerce publicity com-
mittee of which H. R. Given, Jr., is
chairman. The inscription read:
"Welcome florists, the San Francisco
Junior Chamber of Commerce invites
your world convention in 1930.''

Among those who presented the em-
blem to Rossi as he boarded his train
for the eastern trip were : H. R. Given,
Jr., Arthur M. Brown, Jr., president
of the Junior Chamber, Adrian



CAPTAIN MICHAEL RIOR-
DAN, now on a year's leave of
absence from the Police Department,
has joined forces with Mabel Box,
who for the last nine years has con-
ducted a Civil Service Coaching
School. Captain Riordan will give all
of the instruction on Rules and Regu-
lations, Ordinances, Laws, and Duties
required of applicants. Mrs. Box will
teach all other required subjects. A
class will open at 7 :30 p. m. on Octo-
ber 15, 1929, in California Hall for
policemen and firemen who wish to
prepare for the coming promotive ex-
aminations for their departments.

Captain Riordan will bring to the
school the result of his legal and police
training. Incidentally in his own civil
service examinations for promotion in
the Police Department, he led the field
for Sergeant, Lieutenant and Captain.
He is now engaged in the practice of
law, and is a graduate of St. Ignatius
Law School from which he holds a
Bachelor's and a Master's Degree.

Mrs. Mabel Box is a graduate of
the San Jose State Teachers' College,
and originated her system of coaching
for Civil Service examinations. Thou-
sands of men and women now work-
ing for the city have been coached by
her. She is at present coaching a
class of more than 900 for General
Clerks, whose examination is sched-
uled to take place October 1, 1929.




MRS. MABEL BOX



Schoorl, secretary of the San Fran-
cisco Florists Association, Joseph
Cummings, executive secretary of the
Down Town Association, and Malcolm
A. Eraser, secretary of the Tourists-
Conventions.



September



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



19



NATIONAL METER
COMPANY

NEW YORK CITY
Manufacturers of

WATER METERS

Since 1870
A METER FOR EVERY KIND OF SERVICE



— **—

PACIFIC COAST BRANCHES

SAN FRANCISCO
1048 Folsom Street

LOS ANGELES
645 Santa Fe Avenue



B. A. Stephenson



O. L. Stephenson, Jr.



Stephenson Construction
Company

General Contractors

Specialists in Unusual Construction
Problems



1909 Hobart Bldg.



Phone Kearny 273 1




HIGHEST QUALITY
Plumbing, Water and Gas Brass Goods



H



1072-1076 HOWARD STREET



H. C. STOECKLE CO.

557 MARKET STREET SUTTER 5333

PACIFIC GAS
STEAM RADIATORS

Every Type "Pacific" Gas Heating Appliance for

every heating need easily installed in new

or old buildings



RAILS — New or Relaying — RAILS

In Sizes Ranging from 8 lb. to 100 lb.

LOCOMOTIVES — CARS

Freight and Passenger Equipment

Machinery

New and Used

United Commercial Company, Inc.

234 Steuart Street, San Francisco
Phone DAVENPORT 2355



California Corrugated

Culvert Co.

armco culverts



818 Crocker Bldg.
San Francisco



Phone Douglat
4457



BROWN BROS. WELDING CO.

Manufacturers of
"National" Welding and Cutting Equipment

Distributors of Electric Welding Machines < Electric Welding
Ox>'-Acetylcne Welding, Boilers, Tanks, Drums, Pipe, Marine
Work, Aluminum, Auto Parts and Portable Electric Welding.



223 MAIN STREET



DAVENPORT 0653



Phone FRanklin 7221



Established in 1907



AL NEILL SIGN CO.

SIGNS

of every description



115 Turk Street



San Francisco



Buy from firms that advertise with us



20



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



September



BRUNO ENDERLEIN

CALIFORNIA HALL

RATHSKELLER

Restaurant and Grill
BOWLING



MEALS AT ALL HOURS



Polk and Turk Streets Phone Graystone 7652




Just Good Wholesome
Milk and Cream——



Telephone Market S776

A-1 Butter, Eggs 8C Cottage
Cheese

Del Monte Creamery

M. DETTLING, Prop.

Pure Pasteurized and Certified
Milk

Family Trade a Specialty



375 POTRERO AVE.
Near 17th St.



San Francisco
California



Santa Rosa Branch

328 South A Street
Phone 14J0-J

P. TESTA, Manager



San Jose Branch

484 North 17th Street
Phone Ballard 3119-R

T. BARRACO, Manager



Pompeii Macaroni Factory, Inc.

Manufacturers of

High Grade Alimentary Pastes
Long Cut and Fancy



Sacramento Branch

2428 K Street

J. A. BURNS, Manager



Oakland Branch

501 Franklin Street

Phone LAkeside 1246



Main Office

2987-89 Folsom Street

Near Twenty-sixth
PHONE MISSION 5744
San Francisco, California



Lady Attendant at All Hours



Telephone:
Mission 1811



H. F. SUHR CO., INC.

Funeral Directors



H. FRED SUHR. Pres.
HERBERT F. SUHR, Mgr.



2919 Mission Street

Between 25th and 26th

San Francisco



Geary

at

Sixth

Avenue



. ■■■■ '^^w&i^ - ^■^^'W



Phone

SKyline

8403



ASHLEY 8C McMULLEN

FUSERAL DIRECTORS



Phone MISSION 3614
GEORGE L. SUHR

SUHR & WIEBOLDT

Funeral Directors and Embalmers

1465 to 1473 VALENCIA STREET
Between 25th and 26th Streets, San Francisco, Calif.



BOSS of the ROAD

OVERALLS

(Union Made)
Manufactured by

NEUSTADTER BROS.

San Francisco, Portland, New York and Los Angelei




A Blind-X Gas Fountain Pen

STOPS Instantly and

HIM!



Harmlessly




PRICE
Fountain Pen ^6.00
Cartridges .50

CALIFORNIA ARMS COMPANY

Manufacturers and Distributors

ARMS AND EQUIPMENT

225 Eleventh Street San Francisco

For Use of Civil and Military Governments



September



THE M U \ I C I P A L EMPLOYEE



21



Airport

Business

Shows Steady

Increase

By Harry Sullivan



THE Pacific Coast is credited with
being the most air-minded section
of the United States : San Francisco
one of the most air-minded cities in the
United States. Why San Francisco
is deserving of this credit, and more.
is interesting.

Take, for instance. Mills Field. San
Francisco's municipal airport. There
have been those who have seen no rea-
son for large expenditures to make of
Mills Field one of the largest and best
equipped airports in the world. Not
man}' San Franciscans were air-
minded when the field was completed
and thrown open to the planes of the
world in ^lay. 1927.

With the close of the old \ear the
records showed that during the eigh-
teen months ^lills Field had been in
operation there were 22,352 flights.
Passengers numbered 38.105. The
fact that the last eight months of 1928
showed an increase of 600 per cent in
commercial aviation business at Mills
Field over the same period in 1927 not
only reflects the phenomenal progress
of commercial aviation and shows that
San Francisco not only is setting the
pace, but proves that doubters are de-
creasing and that air-mindedness is
contagious.

Steadily each month business at
Mills Field is zooming. In a report
of the August. 1929. business and filed
by Supervisor Milo F. Kent, chairman
of the Supervisors' Airport Commit-





T/iomas Morgan, Manager of Pickv;ici Airv:ays, Inc., standing next to one of the tri-

motored, ten-place Bach air transports used on Pictaick air lines in its passenger flights

bctv;een Mills Field, San Francisco, and Los Angeles and San Diego.



Supervisor Milo F. Kent, center; .Acting

Superintendent Bart Stephens of Mills Field,

left, and Johnny Rogers, inspecting Airport

improvement v:ork.



tee. there were 2576 flights and land-
ings with 3726 passengers during the
month, as against 2236 flights and
landings with 2989 passengers in July,
a gain of approximately 15 per cent in
flights and landings and 25 per cent in
passengers.

Marked progress in the development
of ^lills Field has followed the recent
appointment of an advisory committee
of citizens to cooperate with the Super-
visors' committee. William G. Mar-
vin, director of the Down Town .As-
sociation : Lieutenant-Colonel Gerald
Brandt. V. S. A., and E. E. Mouton.
Chief \\'estern Inspector for the De-
partment of Aeronautics Bureau, make
up the advisory committee, with Su-
pervisors Milo F. Kent. .Andrew J.
Gallagher and Frank J. McGovem
forming the Supervisors' committee.

During August the Board of Super-
visors appropriated S76.000 for urgent
improvements at Mills Field, providing
for completion of the drainage system.



resurfacing in front of the hangars to
allay dust, additional floodlights and
more office space.

Mills Field is now taxed to the full
capacity of its hangar space — 40.000
square feet. Supervisor Kent has an-
nounced that the Airport Committee
has applications for 105,000 additional
feet of hangar space.

Along the Bayshore Highway. Mills
Field is one of the most interesting
sights. From early morning until late
at night the port is alive with activity.
I'lanes take off practically every min-
ute, while others constantly are arriv-
ing from all points of the compass.
The City's Streets Committee has co-
operated wholeheartedly with Chair-
man Milo F. Kent and his Airport
Committee to see that ever)- possible
convenient access is given to the field.
That the people of San Francisco are
air-minded and aware of the necessity
of development in the air. can be
plainly discerned by a trip over the



22



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



September







'i^^:X;fi^~



MN*liwitlirt»<i<»»>w«i 1 » mill'




One 0/ Pickivirk Airways, Inc., ftreet of tri-motoreJ, ten-place Bach air transports used on Pickivick air lines in its passenger flights
from Mills Field, San Francisco, to Los Angeles and San Diego. The company plans to put similar planes in operation on its projected

air tine from Los Angeles to El Paso and Dallas, via Phoenix,



new highway to the flying field. Scores
of men, women and children visit the
spot daily and on Sunday the parking
of automobiles has become a real prob-
lem for the traffic police.

In a resolution recently submitted
to the Board of Supervisors by Super-
visor Kent, he suggested that the City
of San Francisco construct a dirigible
base on city-owned property in San
Mateo County near Redwood City.

The property consists of twenty-six



acres east of Middlefield road and was
purchased by the city because the Pul-
gas tunnel of the Hetch Hetchy proj-
ect runs under it. Supervisor Kent
explained to the Board of Supervisors
the shape of the land is such that it
would be practicable to construct a
hangar 200 feet wide and 1400 feet
long. Also, there is additional land



Online LibrarySan Francisco (Calif.). Board of SupervisorsThe municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) → online text (page 41 of 84)