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San Francisco (Calif.). Board of Supervisors.

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women's section of the City Prison
was empty.

J. P. Holland recently was awarded
by the Board of Public Works the
contract for construction of the Laguna
Honda Boulevard between Lawton and
Plaza streets, having submitted a bid
of f 103,520.55 for the work.

Fire Chief Thomas R. Murphy, who
had been in ill health several weeks
owing to creosote poisoning while
fighting a fire, spent the holidays in
New York. The Chief was accompa-
nied by his daughter.

Hearings to determine the date of
expiration of several Market Street
Railway Company franchises were
begun December 27 before Superior
Judge Franklin H. Griffin.

Louis Campbell, 72, for many years
a familiar figure at the Hall of Justice,
died Christmas Day in a lodging house
on Folsom Street.



CLASSIFIED

BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL CARDS

A list of selected firms and individuals who
are dependable and deserve your cooperation



ARCHITECTS



ARCHITECTS



Francis J. Catton

ARCHITECT

358 Sutter Street

STUDIO 402 SUTTER 4439



W. H. Grim, Jr.


Architect


425 Kearny



A. J. Horstmann

ARCHITECT
110 Sutter Street San Francisco



MASTEN & HURD

Architects

210 POST ST. SAN FRANCISCO



J. R. MILLER

AND

T. L. PFLUEGER



H. A. Minton

ARCHITECT
SAN FRANCISCO



Ed. Musson-Sharpe

ARCHITECT

PhoDe Garfield 1090 60 Sansome St.

SAN FRANCISCO



Joseph IL\nkin

ARCHITECT
57 Post Street



SHEA & SHEA

Architects
454 MONTGOMERY



J. Harry Blohme Clarence R.


Ward


WARD 8c BLOHME




Architects




310 Sansome Street San Francisco,


Calif.



ARCHITECTS — APPRAISERS



EDWARD GLASS

Architect and Appraiser

Telephone Douglas 212

57 Post STREET SAN FRANCISCO



ARCHITECTS — ENGINEERS



O'Brien Bros.
W. D. Peugh, A. I. A.

ARCHITECTS r ENGINEERS



BAKERS' SUPPLIES — FLOUR



STIEFVATERS'

Flour and Bakers* Supplies

DISTRIBUTORS FOR BULK CRISCO,

FLAKEWHITE SHORTENING

750 Battery Street San Francisco



CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT



BULLOCK, KELLOGG
a: MITCHELL

1018 RUSS BUILDING
Kearny 0465



Buy from firms that advertise with us



32



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



January



CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS



Benjamin H. Hicklin

C. p. A.
Accounting / Auditing i Tax Service

941 Russ Building Sutter 2083

SAN FRANCISCO



Hood & Strong

423 Standard Oil Building

SUTTER 0793



ROBINSON, NOWELL&CO.

Certified Public Accountants

DOUGLAS 1868

Crocker Bldg. San Francisco



COACHING — CIVIL SERVICE



CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS
Special Coaching Courses

In the past eight years 95% of my appli-
cants were successful. Thorough drills in
all subjects.

MABEL BOX, Teacher

Graduate San Jose State Teachers* College

For information. Phone Hemlock 7675. 6 to 7 p. m.



CONTRACTOR — ELECTRICAL



Motor Maintenance



Hemlock 7380 - 7381



W. B. BAKER & CO., INC.

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS

Ventilating Engineers and Manufacturers
Motor Fans and Blowers

W. B. BAKER San Francisco, Calif.

270 6TH STREET



ENGINEERS — CONSULTING



Charles T. Phillips

Consulting Engineer

550 Montgomery Street

SAN FRANCISCO



ENGINEERS — CONSULTING HYDRAULIC



CHARLES H. LEE

M. Am. Soc. C. E.
Consulting Hydraulic Engineer

Phone Sutter 6931
Holbrook Building San Francisco



FRUIT-VEGETABLES — WHOLESALE



Phones: Douglas 5188 - 5189

Longo 6C Company

Wholesale Fruits and Vegetables

Hotel, Restaurant, Club, and Hospital

Supplies a Specialty

529-531 FRONT STREET

San Francisco, California



I UNCH ROOM



KENNY BROS.

132 4th Street



MALT HOPS



Best-Ever



J«ii«»Hops mL



REINE CO.

903-905 Howard Street
SAN FRANCISCO
Phone Sutter 6337

iHEBESTrEEVERDSED



METAL WORKS



Telephone Fillmore 7316 T. M. Warren

California Metal and Radiator Worb

Manufacturers of

Aluminum, Brass, Copper and Sheet Iron

Specialties

Fenders, Radiators and Windshields

ALL WORK GUARANTEED

453 Fulton Street San Francisco



MORTUARY SERVICE



JULIUS S. GODEAU, INC.

41 Van Ness Ave. San Francisco

Phone Market 711

OAKLAND , STOCKTON

"Independent of the Trust"

COMPLETE MORTUARY SERVICE

AT A COST WITHIN YOUR MEANS

Our understanding service tightens

your burden of grief



OUTFITTERS



Columbia Outfitting Co.

We Dress the Entire Family on
CHEERFUL CREDIT

2600 MISSION STREET AT 22ND



POULTRY, EGGS, ETC.



Guaranteed Fresh Meats and Poultry

Western Poultry Co.

EGGS, POULTRY and MEATS

Phone Randolph 10246

3360 Mission and 4555 Mission Street

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.



SERVICE STATIONS



Gas & Oil — Free Crank Case Service

"Where Service Is Paramount"

BILL NUTTER'S

Visitacion Valley Service Station

Visitacion and San Bruno Avenue
REST ROOM



THEATRES



HtW FILLMOR
m M SSIQN



TYPEWRITERS



ENGINEERS

We have the only Typewriter that
fills your every need

Varityper Incorporated

593 Market Sutter 1521



Anderson & Ringrose, contractors,
on a bid of |146,000, submitted to the
Board of Public Works, have been
awarded the contract to construct the
Marina Elementary School on Divisa-
dero Street between Beach and North
Point streets. Other successful bidders
on the school work were: Alta Elec-
tric Company, electrical work, $7600;
A. Lettich, mechanical equipment,
$12,260; plumbing work, Oscar Aaron,
$9660.



The City Planning Commission has
recommended to the City Planning
Committee of the Board of Supervisors
the re-zoning of Silver Avenue, be-
tween Coldy and Bowdoin streets,
from first residential to commercial
classification. The re-zoning will pro-
vide for the opening of a new sub-di-
vision, upon which Meyer Brothers an-
nounced they would erect 200 homes a
year.



Under the supervision of Supervisor
Milo F. Kent, and in keeping with a
tradition that has lasted for more than
a quarter of a century, Christmas Eve
was observed by merrymakers at an
elaborate program presented at the
Civic Auditorium. A preliminary con-
cert was given by the Municipal Band,
under the direction of Philip Sapiro,
while Dr. Hans Leschke led the Mu-
nicipal Chorus in caroling.



Dr. A. H. Giannini, former San
Francisco Supervisor, and now a
banker in New York, banqueted on
Christmas with his friends of former
days, an annual affair that brings to-
gether members of former Mayor E. R.
Taylor's Board of Supervisors. Among
some of those in the group with Dr.
Giannini were Messrs. James A.
Johnston, Paul Bancroft and Allen
Pollock.



"How It Feels to Be a City Official,"
was the theme of an address delivered
recently by Supervisor Milton Marks to
the Junior Commercials, an informal
organization among the younger mem-
bers of the San Francisco Commerical
Club. Mr. Marks described his activi-
ties as a member of the judiciary, tun-
nel and festival committees of the
Board of Supervisors.



Comprising a notable event in the
history of Western Jewry, the thirty-
first annual convention of the Union
of American Hebrew Congregations
will convene in San Francisco, Febru-
ary 11. Chicago will send a special
train carrying 1000 delegates and visi-
tors. Mr. Samuel Dinkenspiel is chair-
man of the convention committee.



Probationers, who report to William
H. Nicholl, chief of the Adult Proba-
tion Department in San Francisco, had
earned $124,800 up to last November,
according to the monthly report made
public December' 20.

AGENTS



AFFILIATED AGENCIES

"Purchasing and Sales

C«MTf/'<»" Professional Buyers Who
>3ervil.e Ooutie Your Savings

511 Phelan Bldg. 760 Markel St.

SUlter 5460



Buy from firms that advertise with us




SElLVTCE-EEHCIENCr-CO OPBKATION



Twenty-five Cents



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA, FEBRUARY, 1929



Vol. Ill, No. 2




— Phot.i b* Couftesv Spring Vallev Water Csmpanv

P„/„^. T„.,,.^/ nuil(.t end nf the Hetch Hetchy line at Crystal Springs Reservoir, San Mateo County



GRUNSKY VON-SCHMIDT

O'SHAUGHNESSY MANSON SCHUSSLER

HERRMANN ELLIOTT



SAN



HETGH
HETGHY




SPRING
VALLEY



FRANCISCO

A tribute to the Engineering
Spirit that has provided SAN
FRANCISCO with WATER

ROBERT W. HUNT CO.

Engineers



SAN FRANCISCO



CHICAGO
PITTSBURGH
ST. LOUIS



NEW YORK

LONDON

MONTREAL



"HUNT PROCESS



59



Of Curing Concrete

Eliminates:

All dirt, dust and mud in curing
concrete pavements. Allows streets
to be opened to pedestrian traffic
in 48 hours; auto traffic in 7
to 10 days, and produces stronger
pavement.



McEVERLAST Protective Coat-
ings are unequalled for Pipe
Lines and all exposed surfaces

McEVERLAST, INC.

429 Russ Bldg.
DOUGLAS 1044 SAN FRANCISCO



Tel.: South S.F. 436
P. O. Box 475



Main Office and Equipment Yards
SOUTH LINDEN AVENUE



A. J. & J. L. FAIRBANKS, Inc.

Contractors

HIGHWAYS i RAILROAD
PUBLIC WORKS

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO



Mention This Magazine When You Patronize Advertisers




£msfi(mse



Philip P. Levy
Business Manager



PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY

MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE PUBLISHING COMPANY

1093 Market Street Phone Market 8438

Herbert B. Gee, Editor

M. B. BOTHWELL
Advertising Manager
George H. Allen, General Manager



John D. Gibson
Assistant Business Manager



Volume III



FEBRUARY. 1^2^)



No. 2



CONTRIBUTING EDITORS



Assessor's Office Louise M. O'Hara

Auditor's Office J. Everett Sharp

Board of Education

D. P. Hardy and Mrs. Harriet Leaman

Board of Health Edward M. Coffey

Board of Public Works Sid Hester

Bureau of Engineering N. A. Eckart

Bureau of Supplies Ivy Perkins Cerkel

City Attorney's Office Edmond P. Bergerot

Civil Service Commission James J. Maher

Civil Service Association Edward M. Coffey

Coroner's Office Jane Walsh

County Clerk Howard Gudelj

Dept. of Electricity Joseph P. Murphy

District Attorney Henry Goldman

Engineers' Union J. L. Slater, Jr.

Exposition Auditorium James L. Foley

Fire Department Lieut. Fred Jones

Justice Courts Robert W. Dennis



Mayor's Office Sgt. Thomas Walsh

Municipal Railway Eugene W. Clisbee

Municipal Carmen's Union Edward D. Vandeleur

Office Employees' .\ssn William T. Bonsor

Parks and Museums W. M. Strother

Per Diem Men's Assn F. J. Ferguson

Playground Commission Veda B. Young

Principals' Association Susie A. Ward

Public Library Anne M. Farrell

Public Administrator Henry Boyen

Recorder's Office Daniel McGloin

Registrar's Office George L. Sharp

Retirement Board John W. Rogers

San Francisco Hospital Mrs. Mae H. Noonan

Sealer of Weights and Measures Mrs. M. Dolan

Sheriff's Office W. J. Martenson

Superior Courts Henry J. McGrath

Tax Collector's Office Homer Warren

Treasurer's Office L A. Richardson



In This Issue



I'.AGE

M. M. O'Shaughnessy 4-5

Present Status of the Spring V<illev Purchase 7

By N. A. Eckart
Office Employees' Association 8

By IVilliam T. Bonsor
Great Highway and Esplanade 9

By J. G. Stalker
The Election of 1928 10

By J. Harry Zemansky
Photographic and Blueprinting Department 11

By Horace B. Chaffee

Schools Aid in Chest Drive 12

Conquering Aviation's Greatest Enemy .. 13

By Lyle At. Broun



PAGE

Playgrounds 14

By J'eda Beresiord Young

Parks and Museums 15

A Court Decision Concerning Firemen, Police-
men and Other Cit>- Employees 17

Technical Engineers' Union 20

By J. L. Slater. Jr.

The San Francisco Hospital .' 22

By Mrs. Alae Himes Noonan

Norman D. Cook Named as Aide to District
Attorney 25

Times Have Changed 27

Palace of the Legion of Honor 28

Bv If. AT. Strother



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



February




M. M. O'SHAUGHNESSY

City Engineer



February



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



<J}(t. zM. & Shaughnessy



II "^OING bit/ things and doing them ivell is the
yf J / record that stands behind the many years that
Michael Maurice O'Shaughnessy has served as
City Engineer for San Francisco and other munici-
palities.

Mr. O'Shaughnessy was born in Limerick, Ireland,
May 28. 1864, a son of Patrick and Margaret
(O'Donnell) O'Shaughnessy. He received his educa-
tional training in the public schools of Ireland and
matriculated from Queen's College, Cork, in Octo-
ber, 1881. Later he spent two years at Queen's
College. Galway. and graduated with honors from the
Royal University, Dublin, October 22, 1884, with the
degree of Bachelor of Engineering.

He came to San Francisco in April, 1885, and from
April, 1886. to the latter part of 1887, was assistant
engineer for the Southern Pacific Company, having
supervised the construction of 300 miles of railroad
line. Subsequently Mr. O'Shaughnessy was a civil
engineer at San Luis Obispo and in Mill Valley. He
was Chief Engineer for the California JVidwinter
International Exposition in Golden Gate Park and
which opened in January, 1894.

THE following is a list of the more important of
Mr. O'Shaughnessy's achievements: Chief En-
gineer and director, Mountain Copper Com-
pany, Shasta County, 1895-1896, built railroad twelve
miles long.

General engineering, San Francisco and vicinity,
1897-98.

Consulting engineer twenty sugar plantations , Ha-
waiian Islands, 1899-1906. Built tunnel aqueducts for
irrigating sugar plantations aggregating more than
thirty miles in length — Olokele aqueduct, ten miles,
Kauai; Kohala aqueduct, Hawaii: Koolnu aqueduct,
Laui. The scenery along this work is described in Jack
London's "Voyage of the Snark."

Consulting engineer. Southern California Moun-
tain IFater Company, 1907-12, building Dulzura
Aqueduct and Morena Dam, San Diego, which is the
only structure in San Diego County that survived the
floods of 1916.

IF on the James Loivry prize from the American
Society of Civil Engineers, for the construction of the
Morena Dam, the largest rock fill dam in the world.



B



ECAME City Engineer of San Francisco on Sep-
tember 1, 1912. First repaired the leaky Twin
Peaks Reservoir ; completed high pressure pump-
ing station at Fort Mason and balance of high pressure
fire system, fire alarm signal station in Jefferson
Square. Completed Mile Rock Sewer, nine by eleven
feet in size, under Sutro Heights, going out to the
ocean and going in tunnel under Golden Gate Park;
completed many important additions to the main
sewer system of San Francisco; recommended the setver



bond improvement program which has been approved
by the voters in a recent election; eighty-five miles of
Municipal Railways plus two steel and concrete car
barns: had special difficulties tuith railroad location
over Church Street hill, where property owners pro-
tested, but finally won out. Completed Stockton Street
Tunnel, 885 feet long and fifty feet ivide, nineteen feet
high; Twin Peaks Tunnel, 12,000 feet long, twenty-
five feet wide and eighteen feet high; and Sunset Tun-
nel, 4232 feet long, twenty-five feet wide and eighteen
feet high; the three costing approximately $6,500,000.
Developed the boulevard system of San Francisco,
ichich has been completed or is now under construc-
tion, including the Market Street Extension, Portola
Drive, Twin Peaks Boulevard, Sloat Boulevard, Hard-
ing Boulevard, Point Lobos Avenue and improvement
of Sutro Heights, Ocean Beach Esplanade, Hunters
Point Boulevard, Railroad Avenue and San Bruno
Road, Marina Boulevard, Telegraph Hill Boulevard,
and the new work such as Alemany, Bay Shore, Juni-
pero Serra, Nineteenth Avenue and Sunset Boulevards,
and is planning the extensions of Junipero Serra Boule-
vard into San Mateo County and a main boulevard
along the Ocean Beach to Santa Cruz. He has also
been responsible for the widening of numerous arterial
streets and the extension of Van Ness Avenue south.
The Bernal Cut, also included as a boulevard project
and right of way for the Municipal Railroad, is under
construction due to a movement inaugurated by him.
He has investigated and recommended many special
projects, such as the Islais Creek Reclamation Project,
a rapid transit raihvay system, the re-subdivision of the
Golden Gate Heights District. He has represented the
City in various hearings held in Washington by com-
mittees of the Senate and House of Representatii-es and
before various Federal departments.

jl^ESIDES this work, he has acted as consultant to
//j ) the City of Detroit for its new Municipal Rail-
way System, which brings in $18,000,000 yearly;
for the Marin Municipal Water District in Marin
County in the construction of the Alpine Dam and the
aqueduct leading therefrom; for the Dix River Dam
in Kentucky: and for various projects connected ivith
other municipalities; author of articles on Irrigation in
Hawaii, and the Helch Hetchy JVater Supply Project.
Chief Engineer of the Hctch Hetchy Water and
Poller Project, completing four dams —

Eleanor Arch Dam 1200 feet long, 70 feet high

Hetch Hetchy Dam 600 feet long, 345 feet high

Priest Dam 1160 feet long, 145 feet high

Early Intake Dam 270 feet long, 81 feet high

Constructed forty miles of tunnel aqueduct ten feet
three inches in diameter, capacity more than 400 mil-
lion gallons daily, 100,000 horsepower hydro-electric
plant; twenty-three miles Transbay Aqueduct, Irving-
ton to Crystal Springs.



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



Ke(>ruarv



THE PORT COSTA BRICK WORKS

Announce their removal to their

new office and display rooms at

Sixth and Berry Streets

PHONE MARKET 2437



a?



Come and inspect our new displays of
tile, common and face brick



UNITED MATERIALS CO.

Distributors of

RICHMOND FACE BRICK

RICHMOND STEP BRICK

RICHMOND FIRE BRICK

RICHMOND HOLLOW BUILDING TILE

RICHMOND PARTITION TILE

RICHMOND PROMENADE TILE

ATLAS WHITE CEMENT

ATLAS LUMNITE CEMENT (the twenty.
hour cement)

Yard at RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA



3435 Wood Street
OAKLAND, CALIF.



808 Sharon Bldg.
SAN FRANCISCO



The Steel Tank and Pipe Company

of California

Designers and Fahricators

General Plate Work

Gas Holders, Generator Sets, Oil Storage Tanks, Elevated

Tanks and Towers, Pressure Stills, Air Receivers,

Grain Elevators, Pen stocks and Pipe Lines

Specialists in

Both Electric and Gas Welding on Pipe Lines, Stills and Tanks
Factory and Offices: BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA



Buy from firms that advertise with us



February



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



Present Status of

the Spring
J^alley Purchase



By N. A. EcKART

Chief Assistant City Engineer



ON May 1. 1928. by the overwhelming vote of
82,490 for. and 21.175 against the proposi-
tion, the people of San Francisco authorized the
ssuance of S41. 000.000 in bonds for the purchase of
the Spring \'alley Water Company's system. That
victory marked the cuhuination of a long-fought battle
for the acquisition of these properties. At five previous
election^-in 1910. 1915. 1921. 1927 and 1928— the pur-
chase had been defeated, generally by quite narrow
margins.

At the time the Spring \'alley purchase was before
the people, they were advised by all speakers that a
charter amendment for the purpose of creating a
public utilities commission for the handling of all of
our public utilities, including the Spring X'alley prop-
erties when acquired, would be submitted to the people
at the November election, and that the plans called
tor the taking over of the properties on or about Jan-
uary 1 last. The charter amendment was submitted,
but was defeated, no doubt through the confusion
resulting from the large number of propositions on
the ballot.

Immediately after the successful bond election, steps
were taken to bring about the transfer of the prop-
erties. That involved no small task, the magnitude of
which may perhaps be better understood when it is
pointed out that the deed prepared for the transfer of
the properties required some 200 pages, largely of
property, descriptions, involving approximately 153
parcels of land. 125 separate rights of way. and 149
riparian rights. Those descriptions, however, required
checks on approximately 800 separate parcel descrip-
tions, as many pieces of property acquired separately
had been combined in the specific parcels described in
the deed. In addition to the engineering check of the
descriptions of all of those properties, there was in-
volved on the part of the City Attorney's office, which
work was handled by Mr. John Dailey. a comprehen-
sive search of the titles of the properties.

The purchase price to be paid by the City for the
jiroperties is not a simple flat price, but is a variable
quantity. It is based primarily on a valuation of the
properties made bv the California State Railroad
Commission as of 'March 1. 1920, of $37,000,000, to
which was to be added capital expenditures made by
the company in developing the property and expand-




ing the distribution system since that date. As
against these capital expenditures, S300,000 were de-
ductible each year for depreciation, also such sums as
were required to be put into what was known as an
amortization fund. This amortization fund called for
an annual fixed contribution of approximately Sl-t6.000.
and in addition a definite proportion of the surplus
earnings each year after the payment of all operating
expenses, bond interest, and making provision for a
5 per cent dividend to the stockholders. The propor-
tion in the early years was one-half of the surplus.
This recently was changed to two-thirds of the surplus
under orders of the Railroad Commission. Thus the
determination of the purchase price required the ex-
amination and checking of the books of the water
company from 1920 to date.

It is apparent that the exact purchase price cannot
actually be determined until after the date on which
the property is taken over. The price, however, has
been quite closelv estimated as of Februarv 1 at
S40,783,191.

The February 1 date had been determined upon as
the date for taking over the properties, it being the
earliest on which the actual work of preparing the
deeds and making the checks of descriptions and titles
and taking of inventories could be completed. Bids for
the sale of S41, 000.000 of bonds were invited on Jan-
uary 14 last, and although up to within a lew days of
the date set for receiving bids it was confidently
expected that several bids would be received and the
bonds sold at a premium. On the day set no proper
bids were received. The reasons given for the failure



8



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



February



to secure bids on the bonds may be set forth as
follows :

Primarily the condition of the bond market on that
date and at present is such that the market cannot
absorb a block of bonds of this size on a 4^ per cent
coupon rating at par. The charter prohibits the sale
of the bonds at less than par. A recent lot of $4,0CX),000
of Hetch Hetchy bonds bearing the same rate of inter-
est was sold at a premium, and there would be no
difficulty at this time in selling a block of $5,000,000,
or possibly $10,000,000 of San Francisco bonds at a
4J/2 per cent rate at par or better, but in its present
condition the sale of $41,000,000 of bonds in one block
would depress the market and render unsalable at
current prices the large holdings of similar bonds now
offered for sale.

It is quite essential that the $41,000,000 of Spring
Valley bonds be sold at one time, as in order to secure
title to the property the entire purchase price must
be paid to the company at the time of taking over the
properties. It would not do to start to sell the bonds
piecemeal over the counter without assurance that all



could be sold in a reasonable time. Otherwise the City
might find itself in the position of having $15,000,000
or $20,000,000 of bonds sold and the remainder in its
hands for disposition, with no takers, and saddled with
the burden of the interest on that portion of the bonds
sold. The interest on the entire issue amounts to
something more than $5000 each day. It is impossible
for anyone to predict when the bond market will
improve to the point when these bonds may be dis-
posed of. It is safe, however, to say that the present
condition will continue so long as the present activities
in stock speculations in New York continue, making
as it does for a high rate of interest on money and a
consequent low price for bonds.

Every day that the purchase of the Spring Valley
property is deferred there is an actual loss to the City
of $4600, which represents the profits that the City
will enjoy from the operation of this utility after pay-
ing all operating expenses and bond interest and re-
demption charges. It is to be hoped that some plan
will be evolved under which the properties can be
secured at an early date.



Office Employees' Association

By William T. Bonsor



IT IS with satisfaction that our Association looks



Online LibrarySan Francisco (Calif.). Board of SupervisorsThe municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) → online text (page 5 of 84)