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San Francisco (Calif.). Board of Supervisors.

The municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) online

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ship between San Francisco and neigh-
boring cities.



Impressions of the
Chamber

of
Commerce

Good Will Tour

By Fred Suhr

Supervisor




The Good Will Tour of the Cham-
ber of Commerce of San Francisco
throughout the Orient and the Antipo-
des on the S. S. Malolo was replete
with generous hospitality, hopeful can-
didness, and abundant information.
The benefits that will derive from
such a tour can hardly be measured by
the rule of thumb — rather the effects
of it will be of a quiet, steady and
prosperous growth of business rela-
tions which will redound to commodity
retailers on both sides of the Pacific
and in Australia.

The people of the Orient are desir-
ous of doing business with .\merica.
The)' have a fine generous feeling
toward America. Wherever the Ma-
lolo docked — at Shanghai, at Hong-
kong, at Freemantle, at Sidney — the
officials of the tour and the numerous
commercial bodies represented were
received with open manifestations of
joy and were given assurances that all
that was necessary for the continua-
tion of commerce and trade among



these countries and its further devel-
opment to full fruition was the adjust-
ment particularly of the methods of
doing business. This last. I say, struck
me as the most important question in-
volved in commercial relations with
the Orient.

I believe it was Colonel James
Smith who said. "Do not rush the
Orient ; go along with it." And this
categorical imperative contains the
principle of successful trade with the
people on the other side of the earth.
Their culture is positively opposed to
rush and hustle. Their mode of life
in the tropical climate requires quiet.
steady movement. Their instinctive
self-respect forbids much of that out-
ward show of anxiety and interest
which seems to be one of the dominant
requirements of all American business
men. Hence, if commercial relations
with the teeming millions of the Orient
and the Antipodes are to be developed
America must do business with them



after the manner and style they de-
mand.

This. I think, is a prime essential.
Thus the buyer on the other side of
the Pacific is not placed in a position
of being forced to take something that
he does not want, that he does not re-
quire, but he is placed in the position,
as it were, of giving to .America first
choice. Any one familiar with the
(Orient knows that the centuries old
suavity and ease and cultural develop-
ment are not thus shaken, nor is it
shown to the buyer that his method
and mode of life are not as they
should be. or that their way of busi-
ness falls short of the more progres-
sive methods of the Occident. This
will make for real success in the Orien-
tal trade.

Second to method of doing busi-
ness. I would say that successful com-
mercial relations can be made worth-
while through faster ships nnining on
regular schedules. All through the
Orient are the signs of the pioneers



io6



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



April-May



who blazed the trail of commerce.
California's canned goods are in evi-
dence; California oil is lighting the
Orient ; the roads are being tied to-
gether with our asphalt, and the auto-
mobiles of America are making neces-
sary such roads. Given a change in
our way of doing business, placing
larger and faster ships on the lanes
across the Pacific, and exhibiting goods
that are intrinsically of high quality,
will very shortly evidence the effect
of the Good Will Tour of the Malolo.
I have never spent, in my whole
life, three' weeks of such splendid en-
joyment, excellent information, and



well-needed rest. There was humor,
of course, intermingled with the seri-
ous business of advertising California
to the other half of the world. There
were sights that have been sketched
by more facile pens than mine ; but I
must tell of the longest bar in the
world in Shanghai, the unique and
heavy grades of the Peak Railroad at
Hongkong, which takes one to the top
of that rocky fortress; of the granite
quays and docks at the beautiful har-
bor of Sydney, and the fantastic
Christmas tree celebration at Free-
mantle.

There is no hurry in those coun-
tries — men live there, not merely exist.



and withal, there are billions of dol-
lars of business done each year in
those ports and the marts which open
so longingly, as it were, to the western
coast of these United States.

Nor should I overlook the scenic
features that are second to none in the
world — the snowcapped cone of Fuji-
yama thrusting its crystal-line shape
into the bluest of skies. Then there is
the scenic trip from Nagasaki to
Tokyo, and the marvelous industry
represented in the complete building
of this latter city, with broad thor-
oughfares after the manner of our
western cities. The industry was phe-
nomenal.



Office Employees' Association Protests Civil
Service Commission Recommendations



EITHER a square deal or defeat is
the slogan of Office Employees'
Association No. 13188, A. F. of L., in
relation to the "Recommendations of
the Civil Service Commission to the
Board of Supervisors Regarding
Standardization of Salaries." These
recommendations provide for a step
so far backward for the clerical and
semi-clerical workers of the city that
even the future would hold no possible
hope or incentive for these employees.
With one stroke this report would
wipe out the wage advances gained
through years and years of eflfort and
completely break the morale of the
men and women engaged in this class
of work for our city government. This
report is a ruthless and heartless
wrecking machine designed to stifle
ambition, stamp out "efficiency, darken
the future of present city employees
and set up starvation salaries for fu-
ture employees.

Vote Divided

The recommendations of the Civil
Service Commission were not unani-
mous. Commissioner William P. Mc-
Cabe voted against the set-up for the
clerical workers and was recorded as
favoring a salary range of $160 to
$200 a month for B216 clerk. This
carries with it approval of the union
wage rates of our association for the
various clerical and semi-clerical
classes. It must give our membership
a considerable degree of satisfaction to
learn that Commissioner McCabe, a
student of economics and a prominent
figure in the labor movement for the
past thirty years, agrees with our pro-
posals after studying thoroughly the



By William T. Bonsor

evidence thereon submitted by our as-
sociation.

It is indeed fortunate that Angelo
Rossi, chairman of the Finance Com-
mittee of the Board of Supervisors,
occupies the position he does at this
time, as he sponsored and introduced
in the Board of Supervisors the char-
ter amendment providing for classifi-
cation and standardization of salaries
in 1924. At that time and during con-
sideration of the amendment by the
board, and since Mr. Rossi has repeat-
edly and emphatically stated that he
did not propose the measure for the
purpose of reducing salaries.

Establish Equal Pay-
He has declared that he sought to
establish equal pay for equal service
in departments, and similar work in
one and all departments should pay
equal salaries. His purpose was to
establish a fair and orderly system of
wage fixing and eliminate oportunities
for those who might be able to secure
salary advances for themselves to the
exclusion of those who were perform-
ing the same duties, but who might be
less fortunate by not having the so-
called "pull" of the more fortunate
ones. His expressed ideas for a basis
for such wage standardization was upon
that being paid city employees. Com-
pensations paid outside the city govern-
ment were never considered by the
Supervisor in connection with enact-
ment of this amendment.

Rossi Will Not Accept

It is, therefore, to be expected that
Supervisor Rossi will not accept the
recommendations of the majority of
the Civil Service Commission, and it



is reasonable to assume that he will
favor the rates advocated by this as-
sociation.

The Bureau of Governmental Re-
search has been desperately striving to
reduce wages for city employees, and
particularly the clerical and semi-cler-
ical workers. The bureau has been
given an unfair advantage throughout
while classification and standardiza-
tion has been under consideration.
Advice of the bureau has been sought
and given continuously on this ques-
tion, and the bureau has had access to
every phase of consideration to the
exclusion of those most vitally inter-
ested, the employees. This situation
has existed in spite of the fact that it
is a public secret that the mission of
the bureau, in this instance, is to re-
duce wages. We are informed of the
riot call sent out by the bureau for
help. The Chamber of Commerce,
improvement clubs, etc., have been
frantically called to the assistance of
the bureau to assist in the plan of re-;
ducing wages.

Resorts to Propaganda

It seems that propaganda must be
restored to in order to attempt to
make the Supervisors believe that
there is a public demand for thet-
scheme of the bureau to reduce wages.' |
It is hoped that these organizations
will stand for a square deal in the
matter of wages and not be hood-
winked into assisting in carrying thtf'l
bureau's banner of going backward irt
this regard.

A considerable number of protests]
by employees of the many depart-
ments, including the Water Depart-



i i



I



i



April-May



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



107



ROBERTS-AT-THE-BEACH

Since 1897

Dinner . . . ^1.75

NO COVER CHARGE
MONTROSE 4400



SUTTE^^72 352 GJ^NT'AVENnE
SAN FRANCISCO.CALIF.




GEO. OSTERTAG

CALIFORNIA INN

RATHSKELLER

Restaurant and Grill
BOWLING

Polk and Turk Streets Phone ORdway 2044



RICH PIE SHOP

*' Exceptionally Good"



HEMLOCK 1818



1086 Folsom St.



San Francisco



p. A. VOGLER, Prop.



Reiidence Phone: LOckhaven 3481



'Quality — Our Motto"



QUALITY PIE SHOP

QUALITY PIES AND CAKES



Phone PRospect 0579



919-B Leavenworth St.



San Francisco



Buy from firms that advertise with us












j^^^^^


i SUPERBA






^


PACKING
CO.




^^m


Manufacturers of


"Superba" Brand Products

FACTORY

2501 Howard Street San Francisco, Calif.

Phone,: MISSION 449J -«462 |



io8



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



April-Ma>



ment, for changes in classification are
in the hands of the Civil Service Com-
mission and have not heen reported
out with the report. We understand
that the commission will, as soon as
time permits, give each and every pro-
test thorough investigation and con-
sideration. It is a fact that the com-
mission has had neither the time nor



the number of employees with which
to deal properly with classification pro-
tests while considering standardization
along with its regular activities.

Our association will issue a pam-
phlet within the next few days deal-
ing with standardization in much
greater detail. In the meantime we
feel that the Board of Supervisors



will deal with this important question
in a fair maner. After all, the Board
of Supervisors is the salary-setting
power and can amend this report from
the commission to suit the board. Rep-
resentatives of the employees stand
ready to cooperate with the Super-
visors for the purpose of assisting the
employees in securing a square deal.



Veteran City Officer Dies

Thousands Mourn Thomas F. Boyle



TECHNICAL ENGINEERS'
UNION




THE death of Thomas F. Boyle,
City Auditor, Saturday night.
May 3, was a shock to all. Mr. Boyle
died of pneumonia at the age of 72.
His death brought to a close a career
which began as a newsboy and in-
cluded 22 years as city auditor.

He spent many years in the news-
paper field, following his first promo-
tion to be a subscription clerk on the
old Morning Call.

He became circulation manager and
the business manager of the Call, fin-
ally going to the Bulletin as business
manager when Fremont Older trans-
ferred to that corner.

A difference of affiliation in politics
between himseld and Older caused him
to leave the Bulletin. Older atacked
Mayor Eugene Schmitz. Mr. Boyle
supported him.

Appointed Commissioner

Shortly thereafter Mr. Boyle was
appointed election commissioner, then
to the school board.

According t o Supervisor Alfred
Roncovieri, who was superintendent
of schools when Mr. Boyle was presi-
dent of the board following the fire,
the former newspaperman was respon-
sible in greater degree than any other
man for the rehabilitation of the school
system.

He became auditor in 1908.

Throughout the years Mr. Boyle



never lost touch with newspaper work-
ers. For 40 years he was a member of
the Press Club. The evening before
he was stricken he dropped in there
for a round of dominoes.

Many Friendships Told

He was, his friends pointed out, a
man with an unusual gift of establish-
ing a personal and friendly touch in
connection with all his activities and
relationships.

Many remember him for some small
favor which he might easily have
avoided. Perhaps it was a matter of
slashing red tape. Others remember
him for innumerable charities about
which he said nothing.

He is survived by Nina, Thomas C.
and Marion Jean Boyle. His wife,
Mrs. Jessie Boyle, died some time ago.



EFFICIENCY PLEDGED BY
NEW CITY AUDITOR



"The City Auditor's office will be
administered in an efficient, business-
like manner."

This was the pledge made by Ben-
ning Wentworth, appointed by Mayor
Rolph Jr. to succeed the late Thomas
F. Boyle.

Wentworth's first day in his new
post was occupied chiefly by receiving
congratulatory messages over the tele-
phone and visits by fellow employees
in the City Hall.

Among the first and most ardent
well-wishers was Dan Leary, who re-
tired from the Auditor's department
last year after more than forty years'
service to the city.

The new Auditor is a native San
Franciscan, born south of Market.
He attended the Valencia Grammar
School and graduated from the old
High School of Commerce.

His first job was with the H. M.
Newhall Insurance Agency and from
there he joined the Auditor's force un-
der Asa Wells.

The stafT of the Municipal Record
congratulates Mr. Wentworth on his
appointment and wishes him every
success.



By J. L. Slater, Jr.

Adami tried his best to make a pho-
tographer out of O'Dowd one rainy
day, but did not make much headway.
Pat said he would rather watch 'em
pouring concrete or laying pipe than

fussing around with chemicals.

* * *

Sutton has finished the work of lo-
cating the monument lines for Bay
Shore Boulevard and is tackling the
lines for Portola Drive and Roosevelt
Way. * * *

On the afternoon of March 23 one
of our younger members, Roger Mc-
Carthy, passed away. He had been
of? work since last June when he was
ordered to stay in bed owing to a lin-
gering illness. A few days previous
to his death his wife reported that he ,
was improving nicely. Complications
set in, however, which necessitated an j
operation from which he did not re- '
cover. Roger was very popular with ,
all those who came in contact with him i
and his passing is keenly felt by his 1
numerous friends and co-workers.

Just eight days after the death of
Brother McCarthy, Edmund Burke, j
our treasurer, and an engineer under |
Jim Owens, died after an illness of
several months. Ed was very well
liked and had been an employee of the
city for more than twenty years. Our
deep sympathy is extended to his

widow, who survives. \

* * * \

Surveyor Schlotzhauer, who was re^
tired a little over a year ago, occasion-*
ally drops into the office to shake hands
with all his friends. John looks quit^
hale and hearty despite his seventy^
odd years.

Sunday, April 6, was the fiftieth an
niversary of Brother Aradou's leanin|
over the drafting board. This musjj

be a record for the books.

* * *

At our last meeting Frank Kevillo
was elected treasurer, taking the officii
left vacant by the death of Ed Burke
Carl Markle was elected guide, vice
Andy Olsen, and Rod Surryhne was
elected trustee, vice Frank Keville.
All three were elected unanimously.









April-May



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



109



>Jt



STAK

\OLIVE/

OIL



Finest Imported from Italy



Tel. DAvenport 2500

JOSHUA HENDY IRON WORKS

Iron Founders - Machinists' Engineers



Office : 200 Pine Street



SAN FRANCISCO



CALIFORNIA



Building Supplies Co.

Janitorial Supplies r Brushes
Brooms r Paper



623 Sacramento Street



San Francisco



ROY E. CLARK
President and General Manager



J.J. RAUER
Secretary and Treasurer



TELEPHONE GARFIELD 4583

Rauer's Law and Collection Co.

INCORPORATED
All Branches of Collections Promptly Attended To

700 Glaus Spreckels Building, San Francisco



Telephones: Hemlock 4570-4571

DECKER & HORSTMANN

Distributors

U. S. ROYAL CORDS
U. S. SOLID TRUCK TIRES

141 Grove Street San Francisco



COFFIN-REDINGTON CO.

Wholesale Druggists

Importers and Jobbers of

Drugs, Chemicals and Druggists' Sundries

DEPOT FOR PARKE, DAVIS & COMPANY

401-433 Mission Street San Francisco



Lady Attendant at All Hours



Telephone:

Mission 1811



H. F. SUHR CO., INC.

Funeral Directors



H. FRED SUHR. Pre».
HERBERT F. SUHR, Hgr.



2919 Mission Street

Between 2Stb and 26th

San Francisco



California Corrugated
Culvert Co.

ARMCO CULVERTS



818 Crocker Bldg.
San Francijco



Pbonc Dougla
4457



PHONE KEARNY 2623



F. J. CARROLL. Prop.



San Francisco Brass Foundry

Esublubed 1880

BRASS, BRONZE AND ALUMINUM CASTINGS



48-50 Clementina St.

Bet. First and Second
SAN FRANCISCO



Mmtufaeiurert of

SUPERIOR BRONZE BUSHINGS

COMET BRONZE BEARINGS



JOHN FINN, President


ROBERT B. FINN,


Secretary


JOHN


FINN


METAL WORKS


SAN FRANCISCO and SEATTLE




Babbitt Metals


and Solders


Type Metalt mnd Z.inc


Dust




Gatyanizing


and Sherdardizing






J72-398 SECOND STREET






Telephone


SUTTER 4188





COMPLIMENTS

of



Champion Electric Lamps

Are being used in all City Institutions as well as all
Leading Hospitals

They are sold by

Panama Lamp & Com. Company

815 Howard Street



Buy from firms that advertise with us



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



April-May |



LAUBSCHER BROS., INC.
DELICATESSEN

Spreckels Market i Grant Market
Hale's Food Shoppe



Incorporated jilOO.OOO.OO
Established 1878



John B. Campodonico, President
We Use All Codes



SCATENA-GALLI FRUIT CO.

General Commission Merchants

100-106 Washington St. < 101-103 Oregon St.

301-309 Driunm St. / Phone DAvenport 5674

Members of: San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, Western Fruit

Jobbers Association, Wholesale Fruit and Produce Merchants,

Credit Association of San Francisco



R. PRIGIONI



A. VIVORIO



BAY CITY GRILL

The Landmark of San Francisco

Oysters, Steaks, Chops, Fish and Poultry

PRIVATE DINING ROOM FOR LADIES

Telephones: PRospect 10049 :: FRanklin 3431
45 Turk Street San Francisco



J. G. JOHNSON, INC.



WHOLESALE
BUTCHERS



SAN FRANCISCO

Since 1862



'SLENDERIZE" with




Phone UNderhill 4628

Andrews- Wilmans Biscuit Co.

"FROM OVEN TO YOU"



1026 Mission Street



San Francisco



GLOBE BAKERY

CARL ENGELHARD FRED SULGER

The Finest in Pastries

Special Attention to Party and Lodge Orders



3065 Sixteenth Street



MArket 3468



Phone Mission 7975



Lithwin 8C Waegell, Props.



Castro Bakery and Confectionery

QUALITY CAKES, PIES AND PASTRIES
Wedding and Birthday Cakes Made to Order



531 Castro Street



San Francisco



Buy from firms that advertise with us



April-May



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



GOLD MEDAL COOKED SALAD
DRESSING MEETS SUCCESS



A nation-wide survey conducted by
Best Foods showed a surprisingly
large number of housewives making
their own cooked salad dressing. It
was obvious they would welcome the
opportunity to buy this type of prod-
uct if they could find a brand that
would come up to the home-made
standard. Laboratory experiments
were launched immediately. The re-
sult was Gold Medal Salad Dressing —
a cooked salad dressing — with an en-
tirely new flavor — sweet, yet not too
sweet — tart, yet not too tart — and with
a "different" spiciness.

Here are just a few reasons why
Gold Medal Salad Dressing has made
the best seller class in one leap : Its
delightful flavor is just exactly the
flavor of the home-made product. It
comes in a distinctive patented square
jar. It sells for 20 cents the 12-ounce
jar. The very low price is made pos-
sible by lower cost of manufacture.

Gold Medal Salad Dressing pleases
everyone's palate, yet its most strik-
ing appeal is made to the woman who
must keep down her weight. For, al-
though Gold Medal Salad Dressing is
highly nutritious, it contains very lit-
tle oil — and its other ingredients, all of
the finest quality, are non- fattening.
The remarkable response to the "slen-
derizing" keynote of these advertise-
ments proves the great need for a non-
fattening dressing — yet the man of the
family, who, as a rule, doesn't care for
a heavy oil dressing has welcomed this
new product just as heartily.



SAMUEL WILSON SMITH

The death, recently, of Samuel Wil-
son Smith, president of the United
Materials Company, was a severe blow
to many in San Francisco's official
family, who knew and liked him. Mr.
Smith was born in Rockville, Ind., in
1863 and was a pioneer San Francisco
business man, having been a resident
of this locality for more than twenty-
five years.

Besides being president of the
United Materials Company he was
also head of the Richmond Pressed
Brick Company and Potters, Inc. He
was a member of the Builders' Ex-
change, Past Master Charter Oak
Lodge, F. and A. M., and founder of
the same.

Mr. T. G. C. Johnson succeeds Mr.
Smith as president of the company,
while our old friend, former Super-
visor E. E. Ellison, will have entire
charge of sales for the above organi-
zations.



Teacher Replacement Policy
of Supt* of Schools



By Joseph Marr Gwinn

Superintendent of Schools



IT IS the policy of the office of the
Superintendent of Schools to recom-
mend for placement the teachers best
qualified for the work. The chief con-
siderations are educational prepara-
tion, successful experience where ex-
perience is required, and personality.

Applicants resident in San Fran-
cisco are given preference if they
ofTer qualifications equal or nearly
equal to those applying from outside
San Francisco.

Since teachers are state employees
and schools are state institutions, it
would not be a sound educational
policy for a city system to become so
provincial that only home-grown prod-
ucts would be considered.

In order to incorporate into our
system the best educational thought of
the nation it is desirable to bring in
occasionally outstanding graduates
from the leading universities of the
country who are familiar with the
educational procedures of other lead-
ing school systems. Otherwise a sys-
tem becomes inbred and cannot hope
to remain in the vanguard of leading
educational systems. To what extent
this policy has been carried out during
the present administration can be de-
termined from the following figures
taken from the records of the office of
the Superintendent of Schools, De-
partment of Personnel. These figures
cover the last two years' appointments,
January 1, 1928, to January 1, 1930,
and are representative of placements
made for a number of years previous.

Elementary school placements, 177,
distributed as follows :

Resident in San Francisco, 111;
resident in California, outside San
Francisco, 60 : resident outside state, 6.

These elementary placements are
determined by competitive examina-
tions, a system which has existed for
many years in San PVancisco. No re-
striction as to the place of residence
has ever been made of these appli-
cants. It has been a rare occurrence,
however, that an applicant comes from
any other than California State Teach-
ers" Colleges, of which there are seven.

Junior high, senior high, and special
school placements, 174, distributed as
follows :

Resident in San Francisco. 80: resi-
dent in California outside San Fran-
cisco, 84 ; resident outside of state, 10.

Placements in the junior and senior
high schools have been selected pre-



dominantly from graduates of the
University of California and Stan-
ford.

To cover a longer period, the fol-
lowing may be found of interest. From
January, 1924, to January, 1930, there
were 1133 placements in the system,
distributed as follows:



Online LibrarySan Francisco (Calif.). Board of SupervisorsThe municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) → online text (page 55 of 84)