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San Francisco (Calif.). Board of Supervisors.

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vanced and post-graduate courses.

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Consignments Solicited



Tel. ATwater 2026



William J. Turner & Son

WHOLESALE BUTCHERS
Cattle, Calves, Sheep, Hogs



1208 Evans Avenue



San Francisco



GALLO
PASTRY COMPANY

PHONE KEARNY 2908

1510 Stockton Street San Francisco

Phone Fillmore 2261

CHESTNUT BAKERY
AND CAKE SHOP

2161 Chestnut Street
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.

SINGER'S
FOOD SHOP

Market at Seventh

Provisions at Prices
That Satisfy



L. Yc



Originators J. Fogliacco



Ycre French Bakery

The Home of Crisp Rolls

The Best Since 1906



1923-25 FILLMORE STREET
Phone Fillmore 3535 San Francisco



SKYLINE 4575

Steinhauser's
BAKERY AND
COFFEE SHOP

Danish and French Pastries, Coffee Cakes

Birthday and Wedding Cakes

Our Specialty

726 CLEMENT STREET
Bet. 8th and 9th Aves. San Francisco, Calif.



Phone WEST 2864

NEW ENGLAND
BAKERY

KARL HENNB, Prop.

1709 Divisadero Street
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.



San FRkNcisco




Twenty-five Cents



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA, JUNE, 1930



JAMES ROLPH, JR.

Mayor of San Francisco



Vol. IV No. 6




Know WHAT You're
Drinking





ORANGE ^ CRUSH

Made from FRESH Oranges



[{♦•♦•■♦•♦a



NEW CENTURY BEVERAGE
CO., Inc.

DOuglas 0547



820 Pacific Street



We offer a complete service
for underwriting and distrib-
uting Municipal, Govern-
ment, Public Utility and
Corporation bonds.



Bradford, Kimball 8C Co.



Ill Sutter Street

San Francisco

sutler 5200



1001 Tribune Tower

Oakland

GLencouTt 8521



ill ■iiiiiiiiiiii mil iiiiiiiiiim II iiHuiiiiiiii iiiiiiiniiii



1



M



Specify

DICKEY

PRODUCTS



The name "DICKKY" is everywhere recogoized as a
guide to Clay Products of uniformly high quality.

Dickey masieriile

Standard Load-Bearing Hollow Building Tile



Partition Tile
Drain Tile
Veneering Tile
Furring Tile
Fireproofing Tile
Floor Tile
Roof TUe
Sewer Brick



Face Brick

Fire Brick

Paving Brick

Step &. Wall Brick

Wall Coping

Flue Lining

Mortar Colors

DICKEY Flashing Blocks



W.S.DigkeyGlayMfg.Go.

116 NEW MONTGOMERY STREET
San Francisco



165 Broadway, New York 39 So. La Salle St. Chicago
210 West 7th Street, Los Angeles



A. E. FITKIN & COMPANY

LIMITED



Bonds



SUITE 2401, RUSS BUILDING
235 Montgomery Street



SAN FRANCISCO



Buy from firms that advertise with us



June



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD




The Making of An Ideal Candidate For Qovernor



By Charles Jacobs



rHE administration of an important
public office is a trying job.

The head of a great corporation has fre-
quently only his board of directors as his
critics, but the Mayor of a great city has
literally hundreds of thousands of critics
watching his every move.

Figuratively speaking every time the
Mayor tilts an eyebrow, draws in his breath
or fastens his suspenders the action causes a
ripple of comment in the citizenry of the
city.

Powerful figures in the electorate, still
more powerful organizations, legislative
and executive institutions are affected by
the Mayor's position or official action on
every issue that comes up for decision. The
Mayor is counselled, cautioned, warned,
advised, threatened, appealed to, instructed,
ordered and forbidden times without num-
ber during his administration. He is reached
directly through his waiting room, through
the legislative counsel chambers, through
the phone, behind telegraph poles and over
the transom of his office. His is a job that
demands rare qualities of judgment, a con-
sideration of every want of his fellow man,
a sense of infinite fairness, an intuition that
prevents the slightest wounding of the feel-
ings of those with whom he comes in con-
tact.

The test of a good public official is when
he can be re-elected to office. His re-elec-
tion stamps him as a qualified public offi-
cial who has demonstrated his worth and
satisfied his constituency. Few public offi-



cials, however, can "make the grade" for a
second term. Fewer indeed for a third
term.

Mayor James Rolph Jr. has been elected
Mayor of San Francisco, not once or twice,
but five successive terms/

A record like that means that he has no
bosses; that he is everybody's Mayor, that
he has administered his office with a degree
of fairness and wisdom that stamps him as
an eminently qualified candidate for an
even higher office than that which he holds.
To preside over a great metropolis like San
Francisco for nearly twenty years stamps
Rolph as the ideal candidate for Governor.

The affairs of a large city are akin to the
affairs of a state. The institutions of admin-
istration — executive, legislatix^e and judi-
cial — are the same. There are the same
problems of employment, of commerce, of
health, of public works, of education, of
laws that there are in the state.

Mayor Rolph has come from a crucible
rare indeed in the annals of city govern-
ment. He has brought the city through the
perils of the post-earthquake period in such
manner that has made it the Wall Street of
the West, a metropolis of prosperity.

Mayor Rolph can do for the State of
California what he has done for the city of
San Francisco.

With no bosses, the tool of no one faction
or combination of factions, intimately ac-
quainted with every section of the State of
California, he has unquestionably qualified
himself now for the office of Governor of
California — the one ideal candidate/



I30



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



June



RILLI ANTSHINE

USED BY

The San Francisco Fire Department



PACIFIC COAST BOILER
WORKS

ROBT. A. HENRY

Manufacturers of

MARINE AND STATIONARY BOILERS

Steel Tanks and Sheet Iron Work

of Every Description

Marine and Stationary Repairs Promptly Attended To

235-237 Main Street Telephone DAvenport 1843

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.



Phones: BAyview 6833 < LOckhavcn 4818

PIOMBO BROS. & CO.

General Contractors and Hauling

Steam Shovel Work
124 PARKER AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO



Phone GRaystone 5430 Repairing Given Prompt Attention

MORGAN SPRING CO.



MANUFACTURERS




Wholesale— SPRINGS— Retail
670 Golden Gate Avenue San Francisco



COFFIN-REDINGTON CO.

Wholesale Druggists

Importers and Jobbers of

Drugs, Chemicals and Druggists' Sundries

DEPOT FOR PARKE, DAVIS 8c COMPANY

401-433 Mission Street San Francisco



SUTTER 1722



E. W. TUCKER 8C CO., Inc.

MACHINISTS AND ENGINEERS

347 Fremont Street, San Francisco
OUR PATENTED SPECIALTIES

Tucker's Self-Adjusting Metallic Packing for Marine and Stationary
Engines, Pumps, etc., and Fuel Oil Systems, atomizing mechanically,
or with air or steam; Twin strainers, Heaters, Pumping Sets and Com-
plete Plants for all purposes. Special Machinery designed
and built to order.



PEERLESS YEAST

AND

MALT EXTRACT

Cereal Products Refining Corp.

762 Fulton



Phone FRanklin 3621



Unlimited Insurance Protection



A. CROSETTI BRO. & CO.

BUILDING MAINTENANCE

Window Oeaning and Janitor Service

Janitor Supplies



Bonded
Employees



574 Eddy Street
San Francisco, Calif.



Tel. DAvenport 2500

JOSHUA HENDY IRON WORKS

Iron Founders - Machinists' Engineers



Office : 200 Pine Street



SAN FRANCISCO



CALIFORNIA



Buy from firms that advertise \vith us



June



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



131



MAYOR ROLPH



THE STORY
OF A BUSY
EXECUTIVE

By Charles Jacobs



The Life of Mayor James

Rolph, Jr., for the past

twenty years is a history

of the growth of San

Francisco



THE growth of San Francisco in
the past twenty years and the ca-
reer of Mayor James Rolph. Jr.. in the
same period of time form such close
chronological paths, so intimately in-
tertwined, that the mention of the one
simultaneously recalls the other.

Mayor Rolph was born in San
Francisco August 23, 1869. the son
of James Rolph, a pioneer resident of
the city. His boyhood was spent at
3416 21st Street, in the Mission, where
he atttended the Pioneer Horace Mann
School at \"alencia and 22nd. later at-
tending the Agassig and Haight Prim-
ary Schools and the Trinity School on
Mission Street, near 11th.

Graduating from Trinity School
May 24. 1888. he began a twelve-year
career in the employ of DeWitt Kittle
& Company, commission merchants.
Afterward he went into business with




George Hind, an old schoolmate, or-
ganizing a shipping and commission
firm. On June 26. 1900. he married
Miss Annie M. Reid. daughter of
John Reid, long established merchant
of San Francisco, establishing him-
self at his present home at the corner
of San Jose Avenue and 25th Street.
Three children were bom to the couple.
James Rolph III. Mrs. Georgina \Vil-
lits and Mrs. Annette Symnes.

Early in his business career his abil-
ity and enthusiasm brought him rec-
ognition as a leader in commercial and
civic betterment. He was chairman of
the Mission Relief Societv alter the



fire of 1906. president of the Mission
Savings Bank, vice-president of the
Islais Creek Inland Harbor Associa-
tion. His growing popularity in the
city finally turned the eyes of the en-
tire population on him and in 1911 he
was nominated and elected Mayor of
San Francisco. In each election since
then that popularity has grown until
it lias exceeded city limits and em-
braces the whole State of California.
During his eighteen years continuous
mayoralty administration he carried
out vast projects, completing the Gear}-
Street Railway, extending the Munic-
ipal Railway System, constructing tun-



132



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



. June



San Franciscans are proud of their excellent schools and the outstanding excellence of its school

buildings. During Mayor Rolph's administration every assistance and co-operation has been

extended to the School Department by the chief executive m



Entrance Toiver of the Alamo School. J. R. Miller and T. L. Pfltiegcr, Architects




nels, building more school houses and
playgrounds, paving streets, building
San Francisco's magnificent Civic
Center and new City Hall ; acquiring
the Hetch Hetchy Water supply and
became known far and wide as San
Francisco's "Exposition Mayor" lie-
cause of his promotion of the bond is-
sue which made the historic Panama



Pacific Exposition with its millions of
dollars worth of exhibits an actual
reality.

In more recent years he has ac-
quired for the City and County of San
Francisco the Spring Valley Water
System and the bond election is now
pending whereby the city will actually
own its own electric light system and



Hetch Hetchy water sufficient for a
population of 10,000,000. When the
Hetch Hetchy permit was revoked he
headed the delegation that went to
\\'ashington, and secured from Con-
gress a new permit more liberal in its
provisions than the one originally
granted. It was the sheer personality



J^



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



'33



and the force of his argument that
won this concession from Congress.

Intensely patriotic, Rolph invested
practically his entire fortune in ship-
yards at Eureka, suffering the loss of
more than a million dollars when the
government abandoned the building of
wooden ships. During the Liberty
Bond drives he "bought till it hurt,"
sacrificing thousands of dollars by
selling these bonds at a discount to
meet financial obligations.

Always a friend of the service man,
he bid farewell to San Franci.sco's own
regiment, the 36,Sr<l. at Camp Lewis



when it entrained for New York and
at the end of the war he was first at
the dock to welcome all those who re-
turned from the hell of war. He is
honorary president of the 363rd and
honorary vice-president of California's
famous 91st Division.

In addition to his close connection
with service men's organizations
among whom he has veritably thou-
sands of personal friends, he is a mem-
ber of the Olympic, Bohemian, Pacific
Union , Union League and Family
Clubs, Native Sons of the Golden
West, Redmen, Elks, Moose, Eagles,



Masons, Shriners and other fraternal
organizations. He has served three
terms as president of the Shipowners'
Association of the Pacific Coast, three
terms as trustee of the Chamber of
Commerce, three years as president of
the Merchants' Exchange, and as di-
rector of the Panama-Pacific Interna-
tional Exposition.

Rolph's remarkable career can only
be accounted for by his worth and
e-xecutive ability. He is a veritable hu-
man dynamo of energy, recognized
now throughout the State as the finest
of gubernatorial timber.



San Francisco Fire Department Leads

The Fire Department of the City of San Francisco is second to none. Able commissioners and expert
fire fighters have attained a rank for the department that provides a goal for others to attain. Mayor
James Rolph, Jr. can take great pride in the standing of this important function of municipal activities




San Francisco Fire Department in action. Scene at tlie height of the Sommer S Kaufmann fire.



134



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



"R E R N A L i




U T



By Clyde E. Healy

Assistant City Engineer




BERNAL CUT— SAN FRANCISCO'S $1,400,000 AID TO RAPID TRAFFIC

This splendid im/roveine/it, one of llie most impressive in San Francisco, has been two years in reaching completion. It ivas started
immediately after the people voted bonds for the above amount on June 14, 1927. M. M. O'Shaut/bnessy is City Eni/ineer, Clyde E.

Ilealy, .Issislant Engineer in chart/e of general city engineering.



m



June



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



'35



A MAJOR ACHIEVEMENT



Ralph's Administration
has been remarkable for
the tremendous munici-
pal projects accom-
plished or now under
way. B ernal Cut is
typical of the great
accomplishments of the
administration



ERNAL cut, officially named by
the Board of Supervisors as Ber-
nal Avenue, opened for traffic on
April 15, with completion of contract
No. 1.

This splendid improvement, one of
the most impressive in San Francisco,
has been two years in reaching com-
pletion. It was started immediately
after the people voted bonds of 81,400.-
i 000 on June 14, 1927.

Clubs Advocate Construction

Since 1914 the improvement clubs
of the Mission district, the South of
Army district, and the Excelsior dis-
trict had advocated the construction of
a vehicular roadway through that por-
tion of the right of way of the South-
ern Pacific Compam' in the Ocean
View line, known as Bemal cut.

The northerly end of this project is
located where Dolores Street meets
San Jose Avenue at the intersection of
Brook Street, just south of Thirtieth
Street. The southerly end is where
San Jose .A.venue meets Monterey
Boulevard.

4200 Feet in Length

The improvement is approximately
4200 feet in length, and of a total
width of 117 feet 6 inches on the bot-
tom, with slopes in the cut proper of
1J4 horizontal to 1 vertical. The bot-
tom width is apportioned as follows :

An 8- foot sidewalk, a 42- foot vehicu-
lar roadway, a right of way for double
tracks for the Municipal Railway, and




Tyf'Ual impro^'iments alnncj liernal Cut



136



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



Jun




BERNAL CUT
Fieivs shoiuing tnagnitude of construction operations



i\



a similar right of way for a double
track for the Southern Pacific Com-
pany, with retaining walls four feet
high on each side of the bottom.

The Bernal cut project to date has
cost $1,334,000, of which $774,000
was paid for the acquisition of prop-
erty and for damages.

Contract No. 1 Items

Contract No. 1 embraced the fol-
lowing items : 245,000 cubic yards of
cut and 100,000 cubic yards of fill ; the
reconstruction of Randall Street, be-
tween the Southern Pacific Company's
right of way and Chenery Street; the
construction of approximately 5300
lineal feet of masonry retaining wall
at the toe of the slope in the cut; a
complete drainage system ; a concrete
bridge between Richland Avenue and
Miguel Street ; a concrete bridge ex-
tending from the end of Highland
Avenue to Arlington Street; the re-
moval of the existing arch bridge, and
the construction of a concrete girder
bridge at Bosworth Street ; a perma-
nent asphalt pavement in the cut ; all
curbs in the cut ; walks, coping and
fences, and temporary coping, curbs,
roadway, and sidewalks on the fill.

Moving and Placing the Rock

Moving and placing of the rock was
not all the job, although it was the
most impressive as to results, for the
former narrow one-track cut, 30 to 40
feet wide, made by the original rail-
road that ran through the cut and
started back in the sixties, has been
widened to nearly a city block at the
top, with the width of 117 feet at the
bottom.

The outstanding feature of the Ber-
nal cut project was construction of
the Bosworth Street bridge. Here the
new highway, which is fairly on a



level, passes over the grade of the in-
tersecting street, and the Bosworth
Street structure had to be made heavy
and strong enough to carry a tremen-
dous load of earth, a double-track
steam railroad, two lines of street car
track, a 42- foot highway and an 8- foot
sidewalk.

The Bosworth Street bridge is one
of the greatest concrete girder bridges
in the West. It contains 693,000
pounds of steel and 6400 cubic yards
of concrete, exclusive of the piling.
To obtain a solid foundation it was
necessary to drive approximately 400
concrete piles of about thirty-five feet
in length, making a total of 14,000 feet
of concrete piling. The bridge cost
$181,828.

Completion Relieved Congestion

The completion of Bernal cut has
relieved the congestion on the steep
grades of the already overloaded Col-
lege Hill on Mission Street by divert-
ing heavy freight over its level grades,
and has provided a new and continu-
ous highway into San Mateo County
by connecting the Mission district to
the southerly portion of San Jose
Avenue.

After the 1930-31 winter season,
and when a complete settlement has
been attained, a contract will be let for
permanent paving, curbs, walks, cop-
ing, and wire fence on the fills — now
temporarily paved — and concrete steps
from the sidewalk on Bosworth Street
to the sidewalk on Bernal Avenue.
This work will cost approximately
$20,000.

Table Shows Length

The following table shows the length,
width and cost of the Bernal cut
bridges :

Highland Avenue bridge —
Length 205 feet



Width 40 fee'

Cost $36,28;

Richland Avenue Bridge at Migue

Street —

Length 240 feet

Width 40 feet

Cost $38,47C

Bosworth Street bridge — •

Length 105 feet

Width 117.50 feet

Cost $181,828



HYMAN & APPLETON

ARCHITECTS

SAMUEL UGHTNER HYMAN
A. APPLETON



68 Post Street



San Francisco



Edward A. E antes

ARCHITECT



W. H. Grim, Jr.

Architect

Room 202

488 PINE STREET



1



J'



June



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



m



POPULAR
CAMP MATHER



By Veda Beresford Young

Thousands of San Franciscans enjoy

the pleasures of our municipal

mountain camp




THE popularity of Camp Mather,
the San Francisco Recreation
Camp, has grown so tremendous
that a very successful season is as-
sured.

There is reason for this, since im-
provements made each year af?ord a
truly ideal vacation. This year the
dining room has been enlarged and an
enormous open fireplace constructed
on one side. The kitchen facilities
have been increased, cabins have been
improved and camp has been enlarged
to take care of over two hundred and
seventy-five people at one time. A
beautiful platform built in a pagoda
effect now graces the edge of the big
lake which is the famous mecca for all



swimmers at camp. The clearing of
trails, removal of the old trestle, and
the planting of trees has transformed
the lake area beyond description. The
improvements are so marked that one
must see for himself to appreciate the
changes. Even with all this year's im-
provements and the increased capacity
of camp, the quiet and restful atmos-
phere has not been disturbed one iota.
Camp Mather opened on Sunday.
June 15, with a record group spending
their vacation in this beautiful coun-
try. Many wishing to register for the
first part of July have been disap-
pointed because the quota was filled.
However, at this time there is still
ample room for vacationists in the lat-



ter part of July and the month of
August.

The splendid personnel at camp is
another reason for its popularity.
Norman Center, the camp manager,
has built up a noteworthy reputation
and is again in charge of the camp
this season. Rose McGreevy, the as-
sistant camp manager and hostess, is
again handling the evening campfire
programs with great success and is
helping everyone to enjoy himself to
the limit. The staff in the kitchen,
headed by Edward Atkinson, the cook,
and David Sytsma, the baker, with
their worthy assistants, are preparing
the most tasty food for the biggest ap-
petites ever created. The boys super-



X HE Public Defender s office
was created in October, 1921,
during the incumbency and
through the co-operation of
Hon. J as. Rolph, Jr., our Mayor.






The office has been held

continuously by the

incumbent,

Frank J. Egan








FRANK J. EGAN


1



138



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



vising the dining room tasks and tak-
ing charge of the guide and swimming
activities continue to make themselves
very well liked.

Situated on High Sierra

The San Francisco Municipal
Mountain Camp is situated on the
high Sierra at Mather, Tuolumne
County, at an elevation of 4500 feet
where Nature has provided a won-
derland of giant trees, crystal lakes
and clear streams. Close at hand are
the incense cedars, fir, spruce, virgin
pines and the meadow lands car-
peted with wild flowers whose sweet
aroma helps to permeate the atmos-
phere.

Mather is but nine miles from the
famous O'Shaughnessy Dam which
provides energy for power which
makes possible a well-lighted camp,
electrical refrigeration and kitchen
equipment. The Big Oak Flat Road
leading to Lake Tenaya, Tuolumne
Meadows, and the Tioga Pass is but
eight miles away.

A Road of Adventure

A road of adventure and romance
is traveled in order to reach this
beautiful mountain camp. No doubt
you will enjoy following in the foot-
steps of the pioneer through an en-
chanted land which Bret Harte
made famous. Even today you may
hear the tales of the gold rush and
of exploration. The transportation
route is by rail from San Francisco
to Stockton and then by auto stage
to Mather. En route from Stockton
one travels through Oakdale, Yo-
semite Junction, Chinese Camp,
Jacksonville, over Priest Grade, past
Hangman's Tree and Tennessee's
Cabin, Buck Meadows, Groveland
and Carl Inn, which is seven miles
from Mather.

San Franciscans Invited

The citizen of San Francisco and
his family are invited to spend an
ideal vacation in the beautiful sur-
roundings offered at Mather. The
camp is provided with well ventil-
ated, comfortable cabins and wood-
floored tents which are furnished
with single cots, mattresses, pillows,
chairs, wash basins, pitchers and
mirrors. It is necessary for excur-
sionists to send their own linen and
blankets. Meals are served cafeteria
style in the large dining room, which
is screened on three sides. Here the
guests may enjoy an excellent and
hearty meal prepared by an experi-
enced staff catering to appetites
whipped up by bracing mountain air.

At camp both hot and cold show-




ers and tub bathing are provided,
in addition to modern sanitary facili-
ties including wash basins, trays and
flush toilets.

There are innumerable opportuni-
ties for amusement offered at camp.
.Swimming is always appealing. The
lake is ideal for good swimmers,
while the new pool is excellent for
the children and the less expert.
Fishing in the nearby streams and
lakes furnishes a source of great
enjoyment and excitement. Those
interested in horseback trips will
find great pleasure in taking any one
of the many outings provided either
during the day or overnight. The
rates are nominal, and the saddle



horse concession is maintained at
camp.

Hiking under experienced leader-
ship is also afforded. Many interest-
ing walks lead to such points as
Chinese Gulch, Indian Rock, Smith's
Peak or the "ring" tree. For the
motorist, too, there are innumerable
trijjs to be taken. The O'Shaugh-
nessy Dam is but a few miles away.
Yosemite Valle}' is thirty miles dis-
tant, while Early Intake, Lake Ten-
aya, Tuolumne Meadows and Tioga
Pass never fail to interest the motor-
ist and tourist.

The days are filled with special
activities, games and sports, leaving
the evening free for the impromptu



Online LibrarySan Francisco (Calif.). Board of SupervisorsThe municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) → online text (page 57 of 84)