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San Francisco (Calif.). Board of Supervisors.

The municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) online

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State Harbor Board, and others in-
terested in the project.




JAMES E. POWER
Chairman, Committee on Streets. Board of Supervisors



"Members of the Chamber of
Commerce Industrial Committee
have long realized that it is abso-
lutel}- necessary that we make the
San Francisco industrial district
physically attractive to major indus-
tries, if we are to secure them," Mr.
Baen states, "and we have therefore
successively advanced projects for
the development of the Islais Creek
industrial area, the building of a new
Third Street Bridge, and now the
Illinois Street widening as coordi-
nated parts of a major industrial de-
velopment plan. When this entire
plan is completed, San Francisco
will then be in a position to take best
possible advantage of the industrial
district south of the channel, and in



the not far distant future, we con-
fidently e.xpect to see our system of
wharves extended southwards to Is-
lais Creek."

Those present at the meeting in-
cluded Supervisors James E. Power,
Andrew J. Gallagher, and Victor J.
Canepa : .Assistant Engineer W. H.
Oilmen representing .Assistant City
Engineer Clyde E. Healy, who has
been active in forwarding the devel-
opment of the project; C. E. Baen,
chairman of the Chamber's Third
Street Bridge and Illinois Street
Widening Committee, Harry J.
Moore, and Manager C. A. Fleming
of the Chamber of Commerce Indus-
trial Department.



198



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



J"Vi



A Notable Achievement



SECTIONS "A" and "B" of the Alemany Boulevard
Storm Drain, erected for the City and County of
San Francisco, under the direct supervision of Chief
Engineer M. M. O'Shaughnessy, who is undoubtedly
the'^foremost authority on hydraulic engineering works
in the United States.

This gigantic drain presented many unusual difficul-
ties in its construction, and in order to insure perma-
nency and materially expedite construction, Paris
TRANSIT System Mixed Concrete was used on this

job.

The Golden Gate-Atlas Materials Company of San
Francisco, equipped with a great fleet of Paris TRAN-
SIT Mixers, placed all the concrete on this job without
delay or interruption of any character, and in exact
accordance with the specified designs laid down by
Dr. C. L. Cook, City Chemist, and his field assistant,
F. b. Brown, who supervised the placing and made the
required tests.

Paris TRANSIT System Mixed Concrete, the prod-



uct of Paris TRANSIT Mixers, has for a number of
years been successfully used on many of the nation's
most important structures, including the New York
Subway, the New York Telephone Building, the
Chrysler Building, Federal Government buildings in
Washington, D. C, and other noteworthy construction |
projects throughout the nation.

In San Francisco Paris TRANSIT System Mixed I
Concrete was extensively employed in the construction
of the new Medical Dental Building at 450 Sutter
Street, the new Stock Exchange Building, the Shell
Building and other monolithic type edifices.

This high-grade "specification" concrete is now L
available in practically all the principal cities through- H
out the United States and Canada. The growth of this U^
modern concrete system has astonished the construe- V
tion world, and fleets of Paris TRANSIT Mixers are ■''
now available practically everywhere for every type of
construction where high strength and uniform quality Wf
concrete is an absolute requisite.



GEORGE E. FANNING OF WATER
DEPARTMENT IS VETERAN



ONE of the oldest employes of the City and County
of San Francisco in point of service is Mr. George
E. Fanning of the water department, where he has
served for more than twenty years.

Mr. Fanning was born in North Dakota and became
a resident of San Francisco soon afterwards. He was
educated in its public schools, graduating from the Hor-
ace Mann Grammar School and the Mission High
School. Following graduation Mr. Fanning was em-
ployed as a draftsman in the engineering department
of the Spring Valley Water Company.

Two years later in 1912 he was promoted to take
charge of the newly established photography depart-
ment. In this capacity Mr. Fanning has done all the
photographing of the water department projects and
the photostating of all the records and other important
documents, which are kept in a file at his office. Upon
the acquisition of the Spring Valley Water Company
by the city, Mr. Fanning has continued in charge of
the Water Department photography with his offices
at the Water Department building on Mason and Geary
streets.

One of Mr. Fanning's outstanding achievements
was the photographing for the Pipe and Gate Book
used extensively by the employees of the Water De-
partment. In this book, which is a reproduction of the
map of the City and County of San Francisco, are
photographs of all the pipe and gate valves of the
water works. Mr. Fanning is the only photographer
to have done this work, which is of great value to San
Francisco.



FREE CALCULATOR SCHOOL

Did you know that the Monroe Calculator Com-
pany operates a school at which employees of firms using
their machines may receive free instruction in the use
of their machine? ITere is an excellent opportunity to
master the use of this remarkable machine ; to learn
how to use it in your everyday work ; to prepare your-



self for a better position at the cost of a few hours of
your spare time.

The school is located in the Monroe building, 62 Ht,
Main Street, and is open every Monday, Wednesday
and Friday evening from 5:00 to 8:30 P. M. The in-
struction is individual, so there is no need to review
what you already know about the machine. Start
when you can, go as often as you like, and stay as long_
as vou like.






NEWS ITEMS OF MILLS FIELD

Captain Roy N. Francis is at present preparing
data of all the money spent by cities comparing with
San Francisco in size, for the development of aviation
and airports. This material will be of great value to
the public in determining the need for the new Airport
bond issue. M

* * * 5

A new enclosed and sheltered grandstand has been
constructed for use of those visiting Mills Field. From
the grandstand an excellent view can be had of the
flying field and maneuvers of planes. The seats are
comfortable and the wire enclosure insures absolute

safety to the spectator.

* * * J

As usual. Mills Field displays itself to the visitor in
fine shape, with all buildings painted, well kept gar-
dens, lawns and hangars conspicuous with their clean-
liness.

* * *

With an appropriation of $18,000 granted by the
Board of Supervisors, work will start immediately on
the first of the three new additions to the airport. This
will be a building to house repair shops for the main-
tenance, equipping and repair of the planes. As there
is a law requiring that all airplanes be repaired at the
local airport, this building becomes very necessary.
Space will be rented to companies doing this type of

work and already many firms have applied for quarters.

* * *

The Standard Oil Company of California has re-
cently acquired three new Ford airplanes, which will
soon be housed at Mills Field.






July



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



199



SAN

FRANCISCO

WATER



SAN FRANCISCO WATER DEPARTMENT

425 Mason Street

Telephone: PRospect 7000

NELSON A. ECKART, General Manager and Chief

Engineer.
JOHX D. SHAROX, Auditor.
WILLIS O'BRIEN, Supervising Accountant.
T. \V. ESPV, Engineer Water Production.
I. E. FL.\.^, Hydraulic Engineer.
GEO. W. PRACV, Superintendent City Distribution.
G. J. DAVIS, Superintendent Peninsular System.
A. W. EBRIGHT, Superintendent .■\Iameda System.
V. E. PERRY, .Manager Water Sales Department.
W. D. RYDER, Supervisor Consumers Accounts.
H. TEMPLEMAN, Manager Docks and Shipping.
J. H. LePL.\, Purchasing .Agent.
GEO. E. FANNING, Photograph Department.



j npHE report of Xelson A. Eckart,
JL manager of the San Francisco
Water Department, issued this
week, shows a net profit to the city
of $80,356.13 over and above all ex-
penditures since the acquisition of
the Spring Vallev Water Company
on March 3. 1930.

The net earnings for Tune were
$20,791.02 which was $311.38 less
than the previous month.

The gross earnings for June were
$628,321.55 of which sum water



sales in San Francisco contributed
8572,951.51 with sales outside the
city amounting to $49,683.86.

The total expenses amounted to
$356,463.28 of which the two prin-
cipal items were operating expenses
to the amount of $115,952.14 and
bond entries of $153,750.00.

$53,973.10 was paid in taxes and
$20,833.34 for. rentals of Hetch
Hetchy aqueducts.

The above expenditures left a net
income of $271,858.27 from which



$111,000 was appropriated for addi-
tions, $59,705.89 for construction,
and $51,294.11 for other expendi-
tures authorized.

The force of men employed in the
operating division increased from
463 in May to 492 for June, and in
the construction division the in-
crease was from 107 to 122.

The detailed report as handed in
bv !Mr. Eckart is shown below.



CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO

San Francisco Water Department^ Department of Public Works

EARNINGS, EXPENSES AND CONSTRUCTION EXPENDITURES

June 30, 1930



Earnings — This month

\Vater sales— S. F $572,951.51

Water sales — Outside of

San Francisco 49,683.86

Rents from lands and

buildings 3,992.07

Interest on fund balances 1,694.11
Misc. non-oper. revenues

Total earnings §628,321.55

Expenses —

Operating e.xpenses §115,952.14

Uncollectible water
bills 646.68

Depreciation 5.000.00

Ta.xes 53,973.10

Hetch Hetchy aqueduct
rental 20,833.34

Misc. land rental 65.00

Bond interest 153,750.00

Amortization of debt
expense 3,899.12

Walnut orchard expense 83.72t

Agricultural division ex-
pense 2.427.62

■ Total expenses §356.463.28

Net income §271,858.27



Increase over
last month
§ 17,615.81


Total since

March 3
§1,925,273.76


19,970.20


106,191.50


2,166.83
680.41
70.50t


10.346.71

3.297.53

202.22


§ 40,362.75


§2,045,311.72


§ 5,838.07


§ 431,744.45


159.50


1,264.15
20,000.00




211,547.44


.01

s.oot


81,597.23

192.09

604,750.00


158.24t
466.43t


16,071.20
2,912.55



644.23



6,070.01



§ 6,012.14 §1.376,149.12



§ 34,350.61 § 669,162.60



Appropriations for addi-
tions and betterments.. 111,000.00 444.000.00

Balance for profit and

loss §160.858.27 § 34.350.61 § 225,162.60

Construction Expenditures —

Previously Total since

This month reported March 3

Budget authorizations §111.000.00 §333.000.00 §444,000.00

Expenditures — ■

Normal extensions § 16,006.34- § 80,587.71 § 96,594.05

Upper Alameda Tunnel 41,949.98 56.260.28 98.210.26

Sunset Wells 867.85 31.818.59 32.686.44

Pleasanton Wells 487.23 19.88 507.11

General Equipment 394.49 2.073.11 2.467.60

Total constr. expend § 59.705.89 §170.759.57 §230.465.46

To be expended under
authorizations $ 51.294.11 §162.240.43 §213.534.54

Employees — This month Last month

Construction division 122 107

Operation division 492 463

* Does not include value of
water furnished free to
other departments of the
city S 20,791.02 § 311.38t § 80,356.13

■f Losses.



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



J"ly|



BONDED

General Accounting of Authorized Issues of



Line
No.



Date and Name of Bonds



Authorized



Denom-
ination
Symbols



Cancelled

and
Not Issued



Authorized

Less
Cancelled

and
Not Issued



Sold



Unsold



Issue of June 30, 1904, lYzfc



10



County Jail and Hall of Justice

Golden Gate Park & Presidio Extension

Hospital

Library

Mission Park

Playground

School

Sewer

Street

Issue of July 1, 1908, 5%
Fire Protection

11 Garbage System

12 Hall of Justice

13 Hospital '.

14 School

15 Sewer

Miscellaneous, 4}/2%

16 Water Supply Jan. 1. 1909

17 Polytechnic High School....Jan. 1, 1910

18 Geary Street Railway July 1, 1910

19 Market Street Railway July 1, 1910

Water July 1, 1910

Hospital-Jail April 1, 1913

22 School March 1, 1918

23 Memorial Halls July 1, 1927

24 Bernal Cut Ju!y 1, 1927

25 Boulevard Nov. 1, 1927

26 Hetch Hetchy July 1, 1928

27 Spring Valley July 1, 1928

28 Sewer Bonds 1929 Jan. 1, 1929

29 Hospital Bonds 1929 Jan. 1, 1929

Miscellaneous, 5%

30 Exposition May 1, 1912

31 City Hall & Civic Center....July 1, 1912

32 Municipal Railway Dec. 1, 1913

33 School March 1, 1923

34 Relief Home March 1, 1923

35 Hetch Hetchy Water Jan. 1, 1925



20
21



1

$ 697.000

330,000

1,000.000

1,647,000

293,000

741,000

3,595,000

7.250.000

1,621,000

5,200,000
1,000,000
1.000,000
2,000.000
5.000.0130
4.000.000

600.000

600,000

1,900,000

120,000

45,000,000

1,700,000

3,500,000

4,000,000

1.400,000

9,380,000

24.000,000

41,000.000

2,200,000

3,500,000

5,000,000
8,800,000
3,500,000

12,000,000
2,000.000

10,000,000

1215,574,000



C-D-M
C-D-M
C-D-M
C-D-M
C-D-M
C-D-M
C-D-M
C-D-M
C-D-M

M
M
M
M

M
M

M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M

M
M
C-D-M
M
M
M



$ 418.600

2.000

750.000

3.000

1.000

1.000

1.978.600

5,256,800

649,000



* 112,000



38,000



278,400

328,000

250,000

1,644,000

292,000

740,000

1,616,400

1.993,200

972,000

5.200,000
888,000
1,000,000
2,000,000
5,000.000
4.000,000

600,000

600,000

1,900,000

82,000

45.000,000

1.700,000

3.500,000

4,000,000

1.400,000

9.380,000

24,000,000

41,000,000

2,200,000

3,500,000

5,000,000
8,800,000
3,500,000

12,000,000
2,000,000

10,000,000



278,400

328,000

250,000

1,588,000

292.000

740,000

1,616.400

1,993,200

972,000

5,200,000
888,000
1.000.000
2.000.000
5.000,000
4.000,000

600,000

600,000

1.900,000

81,000

45,000,000

1,700,000

3,500,000

1,400,000
8,036,000
8,000,000
41,000,000
1,520,000
750,000

5,000.000
8.800,000
3.500,000

12.000.000
2.000,000

10.000.000



6 f



56,000



1,000



4,000,000

1,344,000
16,000,000



680,000
2,750,000



19,210,000 $206,364,000 $181,533,000 $24,831,000



Bonds sold to June 30, 1930 $181,533,000

Bonds redeemed to June 30, 1930 40,801,500



Bonds outstanding June 30, 1930 $140,731,500



• — Not Issued.

ti — Amount of bonds due to be redeemed as
of July 2, 1929.
C-D-M— $100. $500 and $1000 denominations.
M — $1000 denomination.

Exposition bonds not Included in Charter

limitation.
Water bonds not Included in Charter
limitation.



Compiled in the Auditor's Office under the direction of

BENNING WENTWORTH,

Auditor

RECAPITULATION

Bond Redemption Fund June 30, 1930 $ 2,856,

RECONCILIATION

Bonds outstanding as of July 2. 1929 ! $ 91,669.

Bonds sold during fiscal year 1929-30 (Col. 9) 50.306.



151.68



500.00
OOO.OO



$141,975,500.00



?!



July



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



INDEBTEDNESS

Bonds to June 30, 1930, and as of July 2, 1930



Bonds
Outstanding
Redeemed June 30, 1929



Due to be Bonds

Redeemed Bonds Redeemed Outstanding

Sales During During Outstanding as of as of Annual Serial Line

Year 1929-30 Year 1929-30 June 30, 1930 July 2, 1930 July 2, 1930 Redemption Maturity Xo.



10



; 278,400

205,000

250,000

1,027,500

182,500

462,500

1,616,400

1,993,200

972,000

1.820,000
846,000
900.000
1.700,000
3.200,000
1,500.000



131.200



601,600
116,800
296,000



3.510,000

84,000

150,000

400,000

2.000,000

2.600.000



8,200



41,100

7,300

18,500



130,000
42,000
50,000
100,000
200,000
100,000



11
123,000



12



13



14



15



560,500
109,500
277,500



3.380.000

42.000

100,000

300,000

1,800,000

2,500,000



$ 8,200 $ 114,800

41,100 519,400

7,300 102,200

18,500 259,000

130,000 3,250,000

t 42,000

50,000 50,000

100,000 200,000

200,000 1,600,000

100,000 2.400,000



1905-1920 1

8,200 1905-1944 2

1905-1914 3

41.100 1905-1944 4

7.300 1905-1944 5

18,500 1905-1944 6

1905-1922 7

1905-1915 8

1905-1928 9

130,000 1916-1955 10

1911-1930 11

50,000 1912-1931 12

100,000 1913-1932 13

200,000 1914-1938 14

100,000 1915-1954 15



600,000
424,000
1,425,000
54,000
9,999,000
1,500,000
1,400,000



3,196,000

2,600,000

1,200,000

900,000

300,000

250,000



200,000

570,000

29,000

36.005,000

312,000
2,275,000

1,400,000
5,000,000
4,000,000



S 3.036,000

4,000,000

41,000,000

1,520,000

750,000



2,008,000
6,400,000
2,401,100

11,400,000
1,800,000

10,000,000



24,000

95,000

2,000

1,004,000

112,000

175,000



204,000
200,000
101,000
300,000
100,000
250,000



176,000 1,000

475,000 95,000

27,000 4,000

35,001.000 1,001,000

200,000

2,100,000

1,400,000

8,036,000

8,000,000

41,000,000 1,000,000

1,520,000

750,000

1,804,000 1[ 4,000

6,200,000 200,000

2,300,000

11,100,000

1,700,000

9.750,000



175,000

380,000

23,000

34,000,000

200,000

2,100,000

1,400,000
8,036,000
8,000,000
40^00,000
1,520,000
750,000

1,800,000
6,000,000
2,300,000
11,100,000
1,700,000
9,750.000



25,000

95,000

t 4,000

1.000,000

100,000

175,000

§ 200,000

§ 70,000

§ 469,000

§ 600,000

1,000,000

§ 100,000

§ 175,000

200,000
200.000
100.000
300.000
100,000
§ 250.000



$40,801,500 $93,689,700 $50,306,000 $3,264,200 $140,731,500 $3,002,100 $137,729,400 $3,954,100



Bonds sold to June 30, 1930 $181,533,000

Bonds redeemed and due to be redeemed as of July 2, 1930.... 43,803,600



1910-1915
1914-1937
1915-1934
1915-1934
1920-1964
1916-1932
1925-1942
1932-1951
1932-1951
1932-1951
1938-1977
1930-1970
1934-1955
1934-1953

1915-1939
1917-1960
1918-1952
1928-1967
1928-1947
1930-1969



16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29

30
31
32
33
34
35



Bonds outstanding as of July 2, 1930 $137,729,400



LESS REDEMPTIONS:

Bonds redeemed during 1929-30, after deducting
||$2,020,200; anticipated redemptions as of July 2,

1929, included in Col. 10 $1,244,000

Bonds due to be redeemed as of July 2, 1930 (Col. 12)... 3,002,100



Bonds outstanding as of July 2, 1930..



4,246,100.00
$137,729,400.00



t— Cancelled fS.OOO (Columns 14 and 3).

f — Cancelled $2,000 (columns 14 and 3).

$4,000 redeemed for 1930.
§ — Not in total: redemptions beginning 1932-

34-38.
f, — Due May 1 — Exposition bonds.
- — Due April 1 — Hospltal-Jall.



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD July



PHONE 5-J



SUNOL WAREHOUSE

COMPANY



SUNOL, CALIFORNIA |



TRUCKING



J. H» CREIGHTON

Using New

FEDERAL

MOTOR TRUCKS

Hauling and Trucking

LIVERMORE, CALIF.



Buy from firms that advertise with us



July



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



203



CURRAN OF PUBLIC WORKS DEPART-
MENT WRITES HIGH GRADE POETRY



THE hours of hard work spent in the department of
Public Works b}' Thomas A. Curran do not hinder
him in the enjoyment of the higher things of life. Mr.
Curran, an employee in this department for over
eighteen years, has devoted much of his leisure time
in writing poetry and prose that is the envy of many
who devote their whole careers to this art.

Mr. Curran is a native Californian. born in Santa
Cruz in 1878. and a resident of San Francisco for the
past thirty-six years. Forced to leave the public schools
before his education was completed, nevertheless, Mr.
Curran has educated himself through wide reading. He
has read extensively in the field of English and Ameri-
can literature and is well acquainted with all the great
writers.

Through reading and study Mr. Curran has gained
remarkable command of the English language and the
art of writing, enabling himself to express his thoughts
in a literary manner. He has written many short stories,
some of which have been published in national maga-
zines and has also many poems which have been read
and enjoyed by his friends and fellow workers.

The poems printed below are examples of Mr. Cur-
Tan's art with his power of expression, knowledge of
rhythm and meter, and appreciation of beauty.

TO A WILD GOOSE

When ghosth' silence o'er the purpling white.

Heralds the swift advance of endless night,
Hard on the wake of the retreating light

Thy countless legions follow.

With phantom speed along thy path on high
Thy w-edge unbroken marks the threatening sky.

And there's a message in your warning cry.'
Bidding the lambs to shelter.

What marshaling genius holds thy angle form
Against the midnight fur}' of the storm.

Matching the Greek's immortal phalanx swarm
In one communion?

Hail, peerless bird, my humble tribute pay,
Bon voyage, nomad of the open way.

Into the shoreless void with the parting day
I speed thy journeying.



THE CALL OF SPRING

Whispering Spring, I hear your call,
I can feel the joy of awakening earth.

And the purple drapes on yon ancient wall
Is the message you bring of the lilac's birth.

The humming bird crested in scarlet and blue
Is whispering love to the goldenrod.

And the patron elf of the morning dew

Is spreading his pearls where the fairies trod.

Down where the springy wood nymphs dance.

Under the heather bell's canopy.
The bumble bee's weaving a magic trance,

Droning his mesmeric symphony.



Down where "Aeolus" halts to kiss
The carmine lips of the blushing rose,
And the virginal clover learns the bliss

Of awakening love that her first bloom knows.

\\hispering spring! 'Tis an echoing knell,
I may trace your parting steps in vain

For once we may enter the fairy dell.
But never will springtime return again.



'NIG," THE CAR HOUSE PET



By P.^T ODo.SXELL

OLD XIG, the Car House Dog, is dead."
Xig, who for fourteen years has been the pet
of the Municipal Railway Employees at the Geary
Street barn, has passed away and gloom reigned all
along the Municipal Lines as the word went around
that Xig was dead.

X'ig was a bred spaniel, but a "stray." a "wanderer,"
a "canine hobo." One morning long, long ago he care-
lessly ambled by the Geary Street car barn, indifferent
and evidently unconscious of destination. Billy Ryan,
of the late night shift, happening to be on duty, called
to X'ig, "Where to?" Xig wagged his big tail and
barked his acceptance of the friendly overture. From
then on his name was Xig and he had chosen a per-
manent home.

So did Xig. the Car House Dog. come to live with
all the boys. For fourteen years he has been a fixture
to all the employees. The morning shifts usually met
him with a greeting, many brought him breakfast tid-
bits, while others romped with him. As the men
started to work he generally paid each department a
morning visit and after a friendly pat and a good morn-
ing response with his big tail, he was off to see another
bunch.

At lunch time he was usually looked for. while
every day the car crews brought him dainties. The
night shifts did their bit by getting him two fine bed
spreads and every night they attended to Xig's bedding
down.

He also had his favorites : Ed \\'ider and J. \\'illiams
of the Machine Shop and W. Ryan of the Repair De-
partment. They usually looked after Xig's welfare,
his yearly license and annual haircut and shampoo, and
a collar of the most expensive type was supplied him.
Of course, all the boys chipped in for everything he
needed.

On one occasion when Xig got too ambitious or
energetic (whichever you like) he was seriously hurt
by a car while chasing a rat.

Three months at Dr. Gustav Henno's Hospital was
a tussle for Xig. But. like the cat, he came back : not
as good as new, not broken up, but a little bent. Dr.
Gustav Henno refused remuneration for his services,
but the boys insisted and they all felt better to pay
for Xig.

At the doctor's beautiful home and kennels. Glen
Ellen, Sonoma. "In the Valley of the Moon." made
famous by Jack London, X'ig will be laid away and in
years to come, when we of now and those of then,
while wandering through that historic valley among the
whispering pinese. will find and read on that little stone
the simple inscription :

"NIG, THE CAR HOUSE PET."
Will they pause and think of man's Best Friend?



204



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



July



HYMAN & APPLETON

ARCHITECTS

SAMUEL LIGHTNER HYMAN
A. APPLETON



68 Post Street



San Francisco



Edward A . Eames

ARCHITECT



W. H. Grim, Jr.

Architect

Room 202

488 PINE STREET



BREAKFAST LUNCH SPECIAL DINNERS
Food of Quality Service Courtesy

The Embassy
Coffee Shop

Opposite Embassy Theatre

Phone MArket 4186

Gus Kalimos, Proprietor



1130 MARKET ST.



SAN FRANCISCO



Phone ORdway 9323

Golden Gate Macaroni



Online LibrarySan Francisco (Calif.). Board of SupervisorsThe municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) → online text (page 63 of 84)