Copyright
San Francisco (Calif.). Board of Supervisors.

The municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) online

. (page 70 of 84)
Online LibrarySan Francisco (Calif.). Board of SupervisorsThe municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) → online text (page 70 of 84)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


a fire trap, Fitzgerald declares, this
building was erected in 1858, prior to
the Civil War, he says.

Steps are already being taken to
transfer woman prisoners, averag-
ing twenty to forty in number, to a
new fireproof jail now being com-
pleted downtown as part of County
Jail Xo. 1, the Sheriff added.

With the passage of the Jail Bond
Issue and the erection of the new
jail on a jail farm of approximately
150 acres, located in San Mateo
county — a plan made possible by
the legislature last year, Sheriff
'i")ick" Fitzgerald argues:

"It would give the prisoners
healthful outdoor exercise, keep
them from brooding and plotting,
make them more cheerful and easier
to handle and would fit them both in
training and in improved physical
condition to take jobs when they
leave the jail."



270



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



September



an Francisco Must Vote




"An Airport to

Match Our

Seaport^^



ON Novemlier 4th the voters of
San Francisco will decide defi-
nitely what will be the future of
their city in the newest and greatest
of the fields of commerce, the com-
merce of the air. On that day by a
two-thirds vote endorsing the $4,-
000,000.00 airport bond issue, they
will insure San Francisco her right-
ful position as a leader in air trans-
portation with an airport unsur-
passed in the world in facilities and
area, or by rejecting the bonds force
"the metropolis of the West" to re-
main an inferior city in this respect,
a city ten years behind the times in
aviation. To those who boast that
San Francisco is "the city that
knows how" those who believe in
the progress and greatness of their
city there can be no choice. The
airport bond issue must go over !

The plans drawn up by Mr. Ar-
cher of the City Engineer's office
will fulfill the Department of Com-




E. JACK SPAULDING
Chairman, Airport Committee



merce requirements for an AlA
rating. The airport will aflford room
for 2,000 planes which could come
and go at all times without interfer-
ing with one another.

The field will be of the two imit
])lan and will be' so situated so as
to take advantage of the prevailing
wind conditions. This will make it
])ossible for planes to take off into
the wind, and when landing to land
with the wind which is very neces-
sary in insuring safe flying. There
will be twelve runways each 400 feet
in width and totaling in length, 31,-
580 feet. There will be ample hangar
space for both land and sea planes
and an administration building com-
plying with the needs of the airport.
Space is provided for a restaurant,
aero repair shops, sales and exhibit
space, a public garage, a hotel, fire
department and emergency station,
a freight shed, and also facilities for
recreation, including tennis courts.



The airport will extend to the water
front, allowing seaplanes easy ac-
cess to the port. Adequate parking
space for automobiles are provided.
Provisions are made to allow for fu-
ture expansion on two sides of the
field, the land to be acquired in the
bond issue inirchase. Plans also in-
clued a yacht harbor off the soutli-
east part of the field.

The part of the Mills Estate to be
purchased which lies on the side of
the Bay Shore Highway opposite
the present airport will be developed
for home sites, for industrial sites,
for easements to railway companies
or what ever the airport committee
decides to be for the best interests
of San Francisco. The airport com-
mittee to date has done nothing
definite in regard to this land al-
though several corporations have
signified their desires for leases. The
committee has decided to do nothing
until after consulting the Chamber



Sepumber



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



271



of (."oiiiinerce, the City Planning-
Commission, the Down Town As-
sociation and other prominent civic
organizations as to what is the best
use that this land can be used for.
Whatever the decision there can be
no doubt that if San Francisco does
develop its airport along the lines
of the proposed plans this area will
be of immense value to the pul)lic
and will bring in large revenues.

Since the present airport commit-
tee came into office Mills Field has
been developed into a first class air-
port of its class. However it is not
a great airport because it needs more
land development, new runways, ad-
ditional hangar space, school and in-
struction space, and facilities for sea
planes. All these will be provided
under the present plans of the com-
mittee. The objections have been
raised that Mills Field, or the San
Francisco Airport as it is proposed
to be called, is too great a distance
from the business district of the city,
and that the meterological condi-
tions at the present field are not
suitable. These two objections are
unfounded and can be easily be
proven not applicable. A survey
made of the airports of the twenty-
five largest cities in the United
States shows that the average dis-
tance from the business districts is
thirty-five minutes while Mills Field
can be reached over the Bay Shore
Highway in less than twenty min-
utes. Moreover the development and
future growth of San Francisco, due
to its location on the end of a pen-
insular, must be in the direction of
the airport.

Mr. Sullivan in charge of the me-
terological department of the United
States Department of Commerce
stationed at Mills Field who made a
study of all the airports around the
Bay area over a period of the last
four years stated and illustrated on
graphs displayed at a public meet-
ing of the airport committee that
the meterological conditions at Mills
Field were the best of any possible
locations in proximity to San Fran-
cisco and moreover that these con-
ditions surpassed those of any other
airport in the Bay area. Mr. Sulli-
van found in his studies that in the
summer period of prevalent ocean
fog considerably more is found over
the Oakland and other Bay airports
than over Mills Field. He found that
the yearly average wind velocity at
Mills Field is but five miles an hoin'
which compares favorably with ain
airport in the world. Another sig-
nificant fact discovered in Mr. Sul-
livan's study is that the wind direc-
tion over Mills Field is for about
three-(|uarters of the year between



southwest aiul northwest. Sullivan
and other authorities on airport con-
ditions stated that these conditions
at Mills Field entirely warrant the
proposed improvements. In addi-
tion the Chamber of Commerce, the
airi)ort committee, the United States
government and other organizations
after an exhaustive study of the air-
]iort problem and all available sites
that Mills Field in every respect is
the Ijest location.

The passage of the bond issue in
the November election will result
in $4,000,000 being spent in San
Francisco, buying from San Fran-
cisco firms, employing San Fran-
cisco men, at a time when employ-
ment is Ijadly needed, and in devel-
oping real estate values to a very
great amount. .All this will add to
the prosperity and growth of San
Francisco. A great airport in San
Francisco must result in an im-
mense tourist flow^ to this citv, and



to a huge volume of commerce. Na-
ture has put San Francisco 500
miles nearer Hawaii and the Far
East and with the unquestioned
growth of air commerce across the
Pacific, San Francisco must be pre-
pared to take advantage of this na-
tural gift. San Francisco will also
accrue a great deal of fine publicity
from such an improved airport.
Other Bay cities have received con-
siderable publicity all over the w-orld
from outstanding world flights or-
iginating in their ports. There is no
reason to doubt that a majority of
such flights should originate from
San Francisco if the proposed de-
velopment of Mills Field is under-
gone.

It will give this city a great air
terminus worthy of its reputation
and its ambitions. A survey made
under the direction of the Saturday
Evening Post by expert research
(Turn to Page 291)




272



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



September




EAST-WEST SHRINE GAME, KEZAR STADIUM



PROMISE OF EXCITING

FOOTBALL AT KEZAR

STADIUM



A SCHEDULE o£ more than forty
games at the San Francisco mu-
nicipal stadium offers local football
fans three months of exciting enter-
tainment. Joseph R. Hickey, direc-
tor of ])ublic recreation for the
Board of Park Commissioners,
prophesies much more closely con-
tested games than in previous years
since teams formerly weak have
been built up and will offer greater
competition. Out>tanding games to
be played at Kezar Stadium include
five of the Olympic Club schedule,
eight of St. Mary's College, and five
of St. Ignatius College. The season
closes as usual with the famous
East- West Shrine game.

A paid attendance of over three
hundred thousand persons last year
and expectations of an even larger
number this season more than
proves true the optimistic state-



Model Sports Director




JOSEPH R. HICKEY

Director of Public Recreation for Hoard of

Park Commissioners



ments of the sponsors and founders
of San Francisco's famous munici-
pal stadium. Kezar Stadium, one
of the outstanding municipal sport
centers of the world, has a capacity
of 63,000 spectators. Its success and
nation-wide fame is a tribute to the
progressiveness of the leading mu-
nicipality of the West.

Masten and Hurd, leading archi-
tects of San Francisco, drew the
plans of this great stadium and
Thomas F. Chace was the consult-
ing engineer, under whose direction
it was built. Mr. Joseph Hickey is
the director of athletics at Kezar
Stadium and the man responsible
for the outstanding programs held
there.

The complete schedule follows j

below :

(Turn to Page 293)



September



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



273



Success to the Bonds



PHIL C. KATZ



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR



W. EDWARD GLAESER,

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEO
OflScc: 196 Guerrero Street


M. D.

N

for a NEW
will all vote


I am heartily in favor of the bond issue
COUNTY JAIL, and hope my friends
in favor of these bonds.



JAMES H. HJUL

Construction Engineer



128 RUSS STREET



By Block Service, Inc.

251 Kearny St., San Francisco
TELEPHONES iGArfield 3251



BY BLOCK SYSTEM

CAN SERVE YOU BETTER

Engineers for Building Main-
tenance for Office Buildings,
Business Houses, Factories, etc.

Manufacturers of

GuRV-AcTioN Floor Dryer
and GuRV-AcTioN Dustless
Sweeper ....




LEWIS p. WHITE

Manager

Atljustincnt Department



GEO. M. GUTHRIE
Attittant Manager
Adjustment Department



ADJUSTMENT DEPARTMENT

Retailers Credit Association

OF SAN FRANCISCO, INC.

A merchant owned institution
for the protection of retail credit



RETAILERS BUILDING



15 STOCKTON ST.



The H. D. Lee Mercantile Co.

GARMENT MANUFACTURERS



KANSAS CITY, MO.
TRENTON, N. J.



Factories



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.
SOUTH BEND, IND.



MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.



S. T. ROLLMAN, Manager
San Francisco Office 718 Mission St.



DINKELSPIEL & DINKELSPIEL

A ttorneys-at-Law

HENRY G. W. DINKELSPIEL

MARTIN J. DINKELSPIEL

JOHN WALTON DINKELSPIEL

Pacific National Bank Bldg. 333 Montgomery St.

PHONE GARFIELD 8650



LEO A. CUNNINGHAM

Attorney-at-Law

Phone DOuglas 1960

Room 612, Hunter-Dulin Building
1 1 1 Sutter Street San Francisco



Have an Allen Automatic Pure Drinking
Water Purifier installed in your office.

Endorsed by leading health authorities of
the world. Rental only ^2.00 per month in-
cluding monthly service.

MOSELEY-HOUDLETTE CO.

25 CALIFORNIA ST.
SAN FRANCISCO

PHONE KEARNY 1146



Buv from firms that advertise with us



274



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



September



MARKED

PROGRESS

SHOWN

IN CITY

ENGINEER'S

ANNUAL

REPORT




M. M. O'SHAUGHNESSY
City Engineer, San Francisco



CITY Engineer O'Shaughnessy
today transmitted to the Board
of Public Works, the annual report
of the Bureau of Engineering for
the fiscal year 1929-1930. The re-
port treats of the approaching com-
pletion of the boulevard system
built under the recent bond issue,
calling attention to the high excel-
lence of construction and the ex-
tremely wide type of roadway used.
Note is made of the progress on
the two joint highways, one being
the extension of Junipero Serra
Boulevard into San Mateo County,
the other the beginning of the Ocean
Shore Highway planned to reduce
the distance from San Francisco to
Santa Cruz from ninety-one miles
to seventy-four miles.

The street lighting condition is
fully described with explanation of
the controversy about the delay of
the Board of Supervisors in adopt-
ing boulevard lighting standards.
The activity of the Traffic Engi-
neering Division, resulting in de-
crease of deaths due to traffic causes
is brought out by tabulation.

The Islais Creek Reclamation
District, on which construction is
now beginning, is treated in sev-
eral pages of the report as is also
the proposed South Basin-South
Basin Canal Reclamation District.



Certain other studies of the City
Engineer's Office are noted, as for
example, San Francisco Bay Bridge,
Sunset Tunnel Station, Sunnyvale
Naval Air Base site. Peninsula
Grade Crossing Conference, atlas of
municipally owned lands, major
traffic plan, etc., as well as a brief
history of the garbage disposal
question. There is also a statement
of sewer construction progress un-
der the recent bond issue.

Due to the business depression,
the street work performed under
contract is again slightly less than
for the preceding year.

The street railway situation is
described in considerable detail and
tabulations are introduced showing
the decrease in passenger revenue
and increase in total operating ex-
penses which is going on year by
year on our Municipal Railway and
also on other street railways. At-
tention is called to the lack of suf-
ficient cars on the Municipal Rail-
way and to deplorable lack of ga-
rage facilities for maintaining the
busses of the Municipal Railway.

The Hetch Hetchy portion of the
report touches on the general fea-
tures of the Hetch Hetchy project,
noting that at the end of the fiscal
year over thirteen miles of the
twenty-eight and one-half miles of



Coast Range Tunnel had been
driven and one mile of the tunnel
lined with concrete. The Foothill
Division Tunnel, sixteen miles long,
was completed during the year. The
Hetch Hetchy Power system con-
tinues its successful operation. In
March of this year the aggregate
income since beginning operation in
August, 1925, had topped the $10.-
000,000 piark. The total number of
employees on Hetch Hetchy work,
including construction and power
operation, increased to 1,467 at the
end of the fiscal year.

Considerable progress is reported
in relations with the United States
Department of the Interior, certain
lands having been transferred and
trail surveys made. At the present
time the city is constructing the
trail along the north slope of Hetch
Hetchy reservoir, as required in the
Raker Act. The location of the pro-
posed road from Mather to White
W'olf, which the city is required to
construct, has been altered at the
request of the City Engineer so that
the road now keeps on the south
side of Smith Peak, off the Hetch
Hetchy watershed and avoids the
])recipitous canyon walls of the
grand canj'on of the Tuolumne
River.

During the year the Moccasin

(Turn to Page 277)



September



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



iZ?



WHOLESALE
PACIFIC COAST FOREST PRODUCTS

FIR

HEMLOCK

SPRUCE

CEDAR

REDWOOD

WHITE PINE

SUGAR PINE

REYNIER LUMBER CO.



112 Market Street



San Francisco, California




San Francisco Gravel Co.

INDEPENDENT DEALERS

ROCK :: SAND :: GRAVEL :: CEMENT

Office and Bunker
552 Berry Street at 7th San Francisco



TROJAN



Explosives and Blasting Supplies



Service - Safety - Satisfaction



O. G. PETERSON

(Independent Dealer) Phone TRinidad 4879

511 Diehl Avenue, San Leandro, Calif.

Magazine Phone: TRinidad 7527
San Francisco Office: GArfield 3114



BETHLEHEM STEEL
COMPANY

IS HERE TO HELP THE FABRICATORS

AND JOBBERS IN THE UPBUILDING

OF SAN FRANCISCO

Specify Bethlehem Plates and

Shapes for your Buildings

and Bridges

PACIFIC COAST OFFICES:

SAN FRANCISCO:

Mataon Building

Lot Angeles: Portland, Ore.: Seattle:

Pacific Finuic* Bldf . Northwestern L. C. Smith Bldg.

Bank Bldg.



JOHN FINN, President



ROBERT B. FINN, Secrelary



JOHN FINN METAL WORKS

SAN FRANCISCO and SEATTLE

Babbitt Metals and Solders • Type Metals and Zinc Dust
Galvanizing and Sherdardizing

372-398 SECOND STREET

Telephone SUTTER 4188



Phone BAyvicw 3817



"It's the Seryice thai counts"



DEVINCENZI BROS. 8c CO.

CONTRACTORS
Grading and Teaming
LOAM and FERTILIZER

150 COLLINS STREET

SAN FRANCISCO



PHONE KEARNY 2623



F. J. CARROLL, Prop.



San Francisco Brass Foundry

Esubliibed 1880

BRASS, BRONZE AND ALUMINUM CASTINGS



48-50 Clementina St.

Bet. First and Second
SAN FRANCISCO



MrnnufmctuTtTt of

SUPERIOR BRONZE BUSHINGS

COMET BRONZE BEARINGS



Buy from firms that advertise with us



276



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



September



Casperson's Brand Eggs
PHONE MISSION 3713



O. CASPERSON & SONS

Eggs, Butter and Cheese



359 Twenty-ninth Street
SAN FRANCISCO



E. SCARLATTI



SAMBUCK'S GRILL

213 Washington Street



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.
Phone GArfield 9039



Boss of the Road
OVERALLS



UNION MADE



Product of

NEUSTADTER BROS.

San Francisco - Portland, Ore. • New York - Los Angeles



far I \ ^-^ /I J*ouniain

SUTTEH^72 352 GJ^Nt AVENUE
SAN FRANClSCO.CAUf.




THF

MAJESTIC

San Francisco's Most Restricted Ball Room

Especially Featuring Old Fashioned Dance«

Sociability Our Watchword

Phil Sapiro's Orchestra

CORNER GEARY AND FILLMORE STS.

Ott* Knock, Mgr. — Phone WA Inat 0537



BEST WISHES TO ROLPH



THE SPLENDID GRILL

"One of San Francisco's Old Landmarks"
now at

1111 MARKET STREET, ABOVE 7TH

Rear Entrance - 620 Stevenson Street Free Parking

45 Private Booths :: 2 Banquet Halls
FRANCO BROS. PHONE MARKET 2682



Phone SUtter 8936 Banquets Solicited

JULIO'S RESTAURANT

SPECIAL CHICKEN AND RAVOLI DINNERS

1331 Grant Avenue
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.



SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO
PACKING & PROVISION CO.

Wholesale Butchers and Pork Packers



1510 Galvez Avenue



San Francisco, Calif.



Buy from firms that advertise with us






September



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



277



ENGINEER'S REPORT



Continued from Page 274)

Dam was completed. This is the
sixth dam on the Hetch Hetchy
Project and forms a reservoir which
serves to regulate the flow of water
passing from the tail race of Moc-
casin Power House after its con-
stancy of flow has been disturbed
by the demands for power opera-
tion.

Stress is laid on the exceedingly
low storage in the local reservoirs



of the Water Department, which on
June 30, 1930, was only 19 per cent
of total capacity of the reservoirs,
as evidence that nothing must be
allowed to interfere with the con-
struction of the Hetch Hetchy
Aqueduct because the mountain
water is very badly needed to in-
sure continuity of the city's water
supply.

Another matter which is briefly
touched upon in the report, is the
necessity of constructing within the
city limits, three large storage re-



servoirs to safeguard the popula-
tion, both from fire and from short-
age of drinking water should the
city be stricken with a disaster simi-
lar to that of 1906.

The large amount of detail work
done by the engineer's assistants,
necessary in connection with the ac-
quisition of the Spring Valley
Water Company's system by the
city, is described in some detail.

The report concludes with a copy
of the Auditor's report of expendi-
tures on the Hetch Hetchy project.



WHY WAIT?
BRIDGE THE GATE!



"Wray wait? Bridge the gate!"
W This is the snappy slogan
adopted by advocates of the $35,-
000,000 bond issue for the construc-
tion of the Golden Gate Bridge, to
be voted upon by the electors of San
Francisco and five other northern
counties at the election November 4.

"Why wait?" There is no reason
for waiting longer. For the last fifty
years the proposal to bridge the
water barrier at the Golden Gate
has been discussed by people of San
Francisco and the prosperous coun-
ties to the north. Now is time for
action !

Those objecting to the bridge are
few in number, but they are endeav-
oring by an underhanded and whis-
pering campaign to defeat the
project.

But their every objection has
been defeated.

The story has been circulated that
"the bridge probably will cost many
millions more than covered by the
$35,000,000 bond issue." The direc-
tors of the Golden Gate Bridge and
highway District promptly put a
quietus upon this declaration. They
formally signed a pledge. This
pledge is important to remember.

In effect, the directors declared
that, if the $35,000,000 bond issue is
approved and the bids for building
the bridge exceed the present esti-
mates of the bridge engineers, the
whole proposition will be resubmit-
ted to the voters.



Then, another whispered "knock"
against the bridge was that the tax-
payers of the six counties would
have to dig into their pockets to pay
for the bridge.

The fact is that the bridge will
pay for itself out of tolls received.
The financial set-up and plan is be-
yond question the safest and the
best. The plan is the issuance of
forty-year, 5 per cent bonds, cover-
ing the cost of building the bridge,
and redeemed at five-year intervals.

Earnings would make the re-
demption of the bonds possible in
twenty years, but for greater sale-
ability the bonds will run for forty
years.

At the end of forty years the
bridge becomes a free bridge and re-
verts for operation to the state, at
the option of the state. Under this
plan of financing the taxpayers
carry no burden. The plan repre-
sents a thoroughly tested method of
bridge financing, established as
standard practice by leading cities
and states.

It substitutes a users' tax for a
direct tax, and thus not only elimi-
nates bridge taxation, but produces
revenues applicable to the lessening
of general taxation.

The entire Golden Gate Bridge
plan is the product of the coordi-
nated thought of bridge engineer,
geologist, traffic engineer, architect,
artist and statistician.

The unit prices upon which the



engineers" estimates of cost of the
bridge are based conform with the
actual contract prices paid for simi-
lar work on the Hudson River
bridge, a structure of comparable
magnitude on which the contract
prices came within the engineers'
preliminary estimates.

The plans permit award of con-
tracts soon after the approval of the
bond issue. The bridge can be in
operation early in 1935. The dis-
trict directors extend an invitation
to voters to visit bridge headquar-
ters in the De Young Building,
Third and Market streets, and there
inspect the plans of the bridge.

The project has been endorsed by
scores of large civic organizations,
by the Legislature of California, the
State Highway Commission and by
thousands of prominent individuals.

The Down Town Association of
San Francisco, composed of leading
men in various walks of life, unani-
mously is on record as favoring ap-
proval of the bond issue. War vet-
erans' organizations also solidly en-
dorse construction of the bridge.

It is pointed out that building of
the Golden Gate Bridge will be_a
means to lessen unemployment in
Northern California. The annual
payroll for the workmen who actu-
ally will be employed on the bridge
structure will be approximately
$750,000 a year and the construction
period will be four years.

Besides this, there will be great



278



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



September



increases in the payrolls of plants
where bridge materials are manu-
factured.

Further, the bridge will increase
property values more than suffi-
ciently to pay for its total cost. This
relates not only to property immedi-
ately adjacent to the lines of travel,
but also relates to the property



throughout the entire Golden Gate
Bridge and Highway District, be-
cause of the increased population
density the bridge will produce.

Striking examples of such in-
creases are furnished by the Twin
Peaks Tunnel in San Francisco.
The Philadelphia-Camden Bridge
increased pro])erty values seven



times in seven years, and other big
bridges have a like record.

Lack of arteries of traffic has been
San Francisco's greatest handicap.

A vote for the Golden Gate Bonds
November 4 will be a vote for bet-
ter times in this part of California.



Online LibrarySan Francisco (Calif.). Board of SupervisorsThe municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) → online text (page 70 of 84)