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San Francisco (Calif.). Board of Supervisors.

The municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) online

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ROOM



The MiUs Field Lunch Room
opened August 18 under new-
management. H. Waters and
E. Miller, the new proprietors,
promise tasty, well-cooked food
to employees and visitors of
the municipal airport and also
to the tourists along the newly
improved highway.

Waters and Miller are well
known to San Francisco food
lovers, having served them for
more than a decade. Their
long experience insures the
public of the type of food and
service desired.

Waters had charge of the
dining room in the U. S. A. T.
for the five years before 1919.
He then opened a lunch room
on Sixteenth Street. He has
also been in charge of the con-
cessions at Kezar Stadium, un-
der Mr. W. V. Belding, super-
intendent of restaurants for the
Park Commission.

Miller supervised the restau-
rant at the Presidio for many
years and also was in charge of
the food at a number of police
dances at the Municipal Audi-
torium.

The new management invites
the public to visit the Mills
Field Lunch Room and try
their delicious food and cour-
teous service.



The .\rt Department of the pub-
lic schools has offered to teachers
on a voluntary basis courses in
color, illustrations, costume, clay
construction. These courses' are to
be given from 4 to 5 p. m. More
than three hundred teachers have
expressed their desire to take the
courses. This number is five times
greater than was expected and
shows a fine progressive attitude on
the part of many teachers.



286



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



September



Progress in the San Francisco

Public Schools



By Robert Floyd Gray

Director, Department of Educational Research and Service



THE San Francisco j) u b 1 i c
schools have progressed. The
progress has been made not only in
an increased average daily attend-
ance and modern buildings, but in
reduction of retardation, raising of
the standards of achievement, provi-
sion for pupils who do not profit by
regular classroom instruction, prep-
aration and professional advance-
ment of teachers, teaching aids, and
curriculum revision.

During the last decade, 1919-20 to
1929-30, the total average daily at-
tendance has increased 38.6 per cent.
The high school attendance has in-
creased 239 per cent, the evening
high school attendance 197 per cent,
the kindergarten attendance 214 per
cent, and the elementary attendance
9 per cent.

Fifty new schooLs have been built
in the last ten years. These are
modern schools including the ap-
proved facilities for carrying out a
modern school program. Old build-
ings have been replaced. The num-
ber of school bungalows has been
materially reduced.

Retardation has been reduced.
Out of every one hundred public
school children in San Francisco in
1915-16, there were twelve accel-
erated, forty-one at grade, and forty-
six retarded ; in 1929-30 twelve were
accelerated, fifty-six were at grade,
and thirty-one were retarded. The
improvement shown by the 1929-30
figures is considerable, for in 1929-
30 there were fifteen more children
per hundred at grade and fifteen less
children per hundred retarded than
in 1915-16.

A comparison of the acceleration
and retardation report of all public
schools of California for the year
1928, the last year for which such a
report is available, with the accele-
ration and retardation in the San
Francisco public schools for the
year 1930 places San Francisco in a
favorable position. The age-grade
figures for the state and for San
Francisco are as follows:

State S. F. DilTer-

1928 1930 ence

Per cent accelerated 12.64 12.1 .54

Per cent at Krade... 48.31 .Sr).3 7.99

Per cent retarded.... .39.0.S 31.6 7.4.S



The standard of achievement of
our schools is worthy of consider-
ation. Standardized tests are given
at the time the child enters the first
grade and at frequent intervals initil
the pupil reaches high school. Men-
tion might be made of the recent
testing in grades three to six.

At the close of last term, all pupils
leaving the third, fourth, fifth and
sixth grades of the San Francisco
public schools were tested in read-
ing and arithmetic. The Stanford
Achievement test was administered.
This is a test which has been stand-
ardized by having been given to
hundreds of thousands of pupils in
every section of the United States.
By such a test we are able to com-
pare our pupils with pupils of the
same age and grade elsewhere.

The most usable norm or stand-
ard is the chonological or life age of
the pupils. If the median age of pu-
pils leaving the high third grade is
nine years, the reading and arith-
metic achievement to be expected of
them is also nine years. If in a
standardized test these pupils
should e-xceed an arithmetic or read-
ing age of nine years, they are con-
sidered above the norm for pupils
of their age.

The summary of reading abilities
shows San Francisco pupils to be
superior in reading to the extent of
eight months in the third grad-e, ten
months in the fourth, and eight
months in the fifth grade. Only one
((uarter falls below the standard or-
dinarily expected of half the pupils,
or it might be said that three-quar-
ters of our pupils are doing better
than the average pupils of their age.

In arithmetic, the same gratifying
results are found. Pupils exceed
their median chronological age by
six months in the third grade, eight
months in the fourth grade, and si.x
months in the fifth grade. As in the
case of reading, more than three-
fourths of San Francisco pupils ex-
ceed the ability to be expected of
pupils of their age.

The achievement of the San Fran-
cisco pupils, consistently above the
chronological ages of pupils in two
tool subject throughout three



grades, indicates that the pupil.^
have received superior training.

An analysis of the factors and
educational measures adopted in the
last decade and responsible for the
satisfactory condition shows them
to be as follows :

1. Improved buildings and ma-
terial equipment.

2. An improved and modernized
curriculum.

3. More highly selected teachers.

4. Closer supervision of instruc-
tion.

5. Special supervision to assist
the probationary teacher.

6. An accurate grouping of chil-
dren in classes according to their
capacities and abilities.

7. Elimination from the regular
classes of children who for various
causes need special educational fa-
cilities.

8. The adoption of diagnostic aids
to assist teachers in directing and
correcting difficulties peculiar to the
individual children in their classes.

9. The adoption of supplementary
practice and drill material.

10. The adoption of visual aids.

11. The placing in the larger
schools of Opportunity or Special
Helping teachers who assist chil-
dren who have missed the work of
their grade through illness, travel,
or other irregularities.

12. The organization of a school
health service by the Public Health
Department. This service furnishes
the school nurses, the school den-
tists, and the school oculists. The
school nurses examine the children
for general health, weight, nutrition
and contagious diseases. They also
treat cuts, bruises, and minor in-
juries.

13. A special milk service fg
underweight children.

San Francisco teachers are wfl
prepared. Of the ninety-four kir
ergarten teachers, over ninety p|
cent have credentials for teaching]
the higher grades. Aii])roximate
one-fifth of the elementary teache_
also have credentials for teaching in
the junior or senior high schools.
Over eighty per cent of the junior

(Turn to Page 290)



leptember



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



287



FRANK E. LAWSON, Prop.


THE LAWSON ROOFING COMPANY


Contractors for the Application of


ASPHALT ROOFING


3318 17th Street, Near Mission


PHONE UNDERHILL 8245 SAN FRANCISCO



W. T. KAVSALKOVCSKI. Manaser

ART TILE AND MANTLE CO.

Dealers and Contractors of

TILES

Mantels and Grates of All Description

Office: Phone HEmlock 0646
Builders' Exchange: Phone SUtter 6700, Between 1-2



221 OAK STREET



SAN FRANCISCO



WOODWORKING MACHINERY

for all purposes



THE EBY MACHINERY CO.



2334 East 8th Street
LOS ANGELES, CALIF.



35-41 Main Street
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF,



Manufacturers of

Electric, Hydro- Electric and Hydraulic

Elevators for Every Conceivable

Purpose

Elevator Repair Work
Elevator Service

Inquiries Invited

Spencer Elevator Company

166-180 Seventh Street, San Francisco, Calif.
Telephone MArket 2500



.^/A/^^CQ




KRAFTILE MI^IH FIEEID
FAIENCE TILE

JLn plain colors and designs, used in Park-Presidio and Roosevelt
Junior High Schools. For walls and floors and exteriors and interiors.

Made by an exclusive monohthic method that fuses the body and
enamel of the tile, Kraftile is proof against cracking, crazing, wear,
fading, temperature changes and acid.

KEAFTILE COMPANY

Main Office and Plant: Niles, California
San Francisco Office and Display Room: 55 New Montgomery St.



Buy from firnif that advertise with us



288



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



September



- - ^ Builders of ^-^

San Francisco^s Beautiful Schools




ROOSEVELT JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL



BRICK WORK

on

Roosevelt Junior High School

hy

LARSEN & LARSEN

CONTRACTORS

Russ Building San Francisco

DAVENPORT 8937



"Build with Port Costa Brick"

All Brick and Hollow Tile

used on

Roosevelt Junior High School

furnished by

Port Costa Brick Works

6th and Berry Sts.
MARKET 2437



M. H. GNBCCO

Res. 2265 Broadway

Fillmore 2718



A. FILIPPI

36 Wood Street

WEst 4899



M. H. GNECCO & CO.

CONTRACTORS
Terrazzo, Mosaic, Concrete Work
36 Wood Street Phone WEst 4899

Builders' Exchange, 666 Mission Street
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.



W. K. IRVINE



HENRY JACKS



Jacks 8C Irvine, Inc.

General Contractors

74 New Montgomery Street

Phones KEarny 1536 :: KEarny 1537

SAN FRANCISCO



REINFORCING STEEL

Furnished and Installed by

W.S.WetenhallCo.

REINFORCING STEEL BARS

Iron and Steel Products

Office and Warehouse

17th and Wisconsin Streets

PHONE HEMLOCK 1480



Art Stone Mantels, Cast Stone
Plaster Ornament

AUGUST DACKERT
& COMPANY

Architectural Modelers
and Sculptors

1450 15th Street, corner Shotwell
PHONE HEMLOCK 6768



Telephone SUtter 1642-1643

LUMBER

furnished by

Rolando Lumber Co.

Fir - Spinice - Redwood

Yard and Mill

5th and Berry Streets San Francisco



ALL PLASTERING

on

Roosevelt Junior High School

by

JESSE SHAY

PLASTER CONTRACTOR

Safety, Speed and Satisfaction

Builders' Exchange, SUtter 6700

PHONE HEMLOCK 1074-1075

725 Tehama Street San Francisco, Cal.



WESTERN
SHEET METAL WORKS

MANUFACTURERS AND JOBBERS
1911 Mission Street, Phone MArket 2988



Automatic
Temperature Control

Installed by

Johnson Service
Company



KITCHEN TABLES

Roosevelt and Park-Presidio Schools

by

Braas 8C Kuhn Co.

Bank, Store and Office Fixtures

Special Furniture, Show Cases and

General Mill Work

PHONE MARKET 2776

1917-1919 Bryant St. San Francisco



Buy from firms that advertise with us



September



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



289



' — ^ Builders of ^ — ^

San Francisco^s Beautiful Schools




PARK-PRESIDIO JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL



L. Ph. Bolander 8C Sons

MILLWRIGHTS

FLAGPOLES AND ACCESSORIES

Phone UNderhill 1337
954 Bryant Street
SAN FRANCISCO



LA BOUR SELF PRIMING

CENTRIFUGAL PUMPS

Westco "The Ideal" Circulation Pumps

Installed in
Park-Presidio High School

Westco-Chippewa
Pump Co.

951 Folsom Street
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.



PARK PRESIDIO HIGH SCHOOL
ROOSEVELT JR. HIGH SCHOOL
and fifty-five other public schools in
California have been equipped with

TELECHRON ELECTRIC
CLOCKS

The F. A. THOMAS
Co., Inc.

SUtter 0809 47 Second St.



Automotive Equipment, Replacement

Parts, Garage, Machine Shop and

Blacksmith Supplies, Steel Products,

Trimmings, Body Materials and Supplies

Waterhouse-Weinstock-
Scovel Co.

540 Howard Street San Francisco

TELEPHONE GARFIELD 4040



LATHES AND WOOD
WORKING MACHINERY

Furnished by

Jenison Machinery
Company

58 Fremont Street
SAN FRANCISCO SUTTER 0952



H. C. WOOD
MACHINE WORKS

Manufacturers of and Agents for

High Grade Woodworking

Machinery

Special Machinery Built to Order

Phones GArfield 0736, GArfield 0737
514 Bryant Street San Francisco, Cal.



MILWAUKEE DRILL PRESSES

(WITH ENCLOSED GEARS)

uere installed in

the Park'Presidio and the Roosevelt Junior

High Schools by

F. O. STALLMAN

MACHINE TOOLS AND SUPPLIES

Agent for
Richards Machiner>' Co. of Milwaukee, Wis.

Phone MArket 2805 2180 Folsom St.



Architectural Recut Cast Stone

"TRAVERTITE"

Manufactured by

P. GRASSI & CO.

"TRAVERTITE" WORKS, INC.

Mosaic and Terrazzo Work

ATWATER 6184-6185

1945 San Bruno Avenue



MISCELLANEOUS IRON

FAIR MFG.
COMPANY

617 Bryant Street
SUTTER 5001



OAK FLOOR
COMPANY

PHONE DELAWARE 3951

325 Arlington Street
SAN FRANCISCO



San Francisco
Elevator Co., Inc.

ELEVATORS

Automatic. E lectric. Hydraulic^ Automatic

Dumbwaiters and Handpower Machines

Push Button Passenger Elevators a Specialty

TELEPHONE KEARNY 2443

860 Folsom Street San Francisco



Buy from firms that advertise with us



2QO



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



September



SCHOOLS PROGRESS



(Continued from Page 286)

high teachers have credentials to
teach in the high schools.

San Francisco's educational pro-
ducts compare favorably with those
of the most progressive cities. All
objective evidence points to remark-
able growth in achievement during
the past ten years. With our pres-
ent organization, we are safe in as-
suming that we will achieve a still
higher standard in the near fture.

Among the factors contributing to
the high standards of our schools in
addition to the high preparation of
our teachers, are the aids to teachers
in terms of :

1. Providing differentiated educa-
tion for pupils who do not profit by
regular classroom instruction.
Those receiving special educational
treatment are the:

a. Mentally deficient.

b. Socially maladjusted.

c. Deaf and hard of hearing.

d. Extreme cases of defective
vision.

e. Crippled.

f. Cardiac cases.

g. Neurotic and psycopathic
cases.

2. Providing tests to supplement
the teachers' judgment for purposes
of:



a. Classification of pupils.

b. Diagnosis of pupil difficulties.

3. Providing devices by which the
results of teaching can be measured :

a. Charts.

b. Scales.

c. Norms.

4. Providing supplementary ma-
terials for use of pupils :

a. Work books.

b. Drill cards.

5. Providing visual aids through
circulation of:

a. Lantern slides.

b. Illustrative material.

6. Providing service to schools in
form of:

a. School secretaries.

b. Opportunity teachers.

c. School nurses.

d. Clinics.

7. Providing for home contacts
through :

a. Mothers' clubs.

b. Parental education.

All of these added facilities func-
tion together in producing superior
achievement. Every service ren-
dered to a teacher increases her
time for teaching and thereby adds
to the possibilit}^ for the success of
each pupil.

The work of curriculum revision
in San Francisco has been de-
veloped and carried out on a con-
stantly enlarging scale for the past



six years. The activity since 1924
has been characterized especially by
the extensive use of teacher commit-
tees. Over six hundred teachers
have served on curriculum revision
and related committees since 1924.

The curriculum revision has not
been limited to any division of the
school system. Courses have been
revised or planned for each division.
Between 1920 and 1928 eight differ-
ent courses were revised or made
for grades in the kindergarten, pri-
mary, and elementary school divi-
sion. In 1927, eleven courses of
study were revised for the junior
high schools. In 1928 the thirteen
high school courses of study were
revised.

The widespread participation of
San Francisco teachers in the pro-
gram of curriculum revision has
been most successful. It has re-
sulted in bringing to the course of
study work, the practical classroom
viewpoint and also has stimulated
and developed leadership and pro-
fessional growth in a substantial
number of the most progressive
teachers.

It is gratifying to be able to state
that eight of the San Francisco
courses of study have received dis-
tinguished ratings by the Curricu-
lum Construction Laboratory,
Teachers' College. Columbia Uni-
versitv.



NOTICE TO CITY
EMPLOYEES



The city employees will hold an
election from September 30, 1930, to
October 10, 1930, both inclusive, to
select a member of the Board of Ad-
ministration of the Retirement Sys-
tem to serve the balance of the term,
expiring February 20, 1931, of [ohn
W. Rogers, who died July 14, 1930,
and a member to serve the five-year
term beginning February 20, 1931,
as successor of the occupant of the
short term.

Four members of the Retirement
System have been nominated and
have accepted the nominations, as
follows :

For the five-year term, expiring
February 20, 1936 :

Davlin, Grover C, elevator oper-
ator, Department of Public Works.

Drew, Daniel V., official phono-
graphic reporter. Municipal Court.

McClellan, Frank L., machinist,
Fire Department.

Roche, Stephen J., experienced
clerk, Department of Public Works.

For the short term, expiring Feb-
ruary 20, 1931 :



Drew, Daniel \'.. official phono-
graphic reporter. Municipal Court.

McClellan, Frank L., machinist.
Fire Department.

Roche. Stephen J., experienced
clerk. Department of Public Works.

The voting place will be the office
of the Registrar of Voters, Room
158 City Hall, except for the approx-
imately two himdred members of
the Retirement System who are em-
ployed on the Hetch Hetchy proj-
ect, in the Water Department, and
on the Health Farm outside the
City and County of San Francisco.
These employees will vote by mail,
blank ballots being mailed to them
to be returned to the Registrar of
Voters at the City Hall and to be
canvassed in such manner as to pre-
serve the secrecy of the ballot.

Approximately 8,325 members of
the Retirement System are entitled
to vote in the election.

The Board of Administration is
composed of seven members — the
chairman of the finance committee
and the auditor, both of whom are
members by virtue of their offices ;
a banker and a life insurance offi-
cial, both appointed by the Mayor,
and three active members of the
Retirement System.



SCHOOL LISTS INCREASE 4000
OVER LAST YEAR



\n increase of 2000 pupils in
San Francisco's high schools over
last year's enrollment was reported
to the Board of Education by Jo-
seph M. Gwinn, superintendent of
schools.

"There are 1000 more pupils in
the high schools than there were
last year and 1000 more children in
attendance at the junior high
schools," Gwinn informed the board
"The increase is the greatest in
years."

The superintendent also said that
housing conditions had improvec
considerably during the year an(
that as a result the schools wen
operating under favorable condi
tions.

Gwinn submitted another report
received from the State Board ol
Education which pointed out thai
200,000 children attending publi(
schools in California are either for-
eign born or of foreign parentage.

The total state public school en-
rollment is 1,200,000.



September



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



291



John Bakewell, Jr. Ernest E. Weihc

Bakewell 8C Weihe

ARCHITECTS

251 Kearny Street
SAN FRANCISCO



AIRPORT BONDS



O'Brien Bros.
W. D. Peugh, A. I. A.



ARCHITECTS
ENGINEERS



DAVENPORT 1176

Crim, Resing 8C M'Guinness
ARCHITECTS

ROOM 202
488 Pine Street



Edward A. Fames

ARCHITECT



HYMAN & APPLETON

ARCHITECTS

SAMUEL LIGHTNER HYMAN
A. APPLETON



68 Post Street



San Francisco



Charles F. Masten, A. 1. A.
Lester W. Hurd, A. 1. A.



Masten and Hurd

ARCHITECTS

T. F. CHACE, Consulting Engineer

1006 Shreve Bldg. DOuglas 6257



(Continued from Page 271)

men on a thousand mile tour of the
United States, the same men who
made a survey of the automobile in-
dustry in its infancy and predicted
its ma,y;nificent growth, have pre-
dicted that there will be more than
a <|uarter of a million privately
owned planes in the United States
inside of the next ten years. As a
third of the private flying in this
country takes place in the West
coast at the present time it is evi-
dent what the future of that line of
endeavor will mean to San Fran-
cisco. By far the greatest majority
of flights made to and from the air-
ports on the other side of the Bay
are of people coming to or leaving
from San Francisco flight all of
which should betong to the San
Francisco airport and which will go
to the airport if it is built to ac-
commodate such traffic. Over three-
fourths of the mail leaving and ar-
riving at the present air-mail port
across the Bay is to or from San
Francisco. The Post Office Depart-
ment has stated that San Francisco
is ten years behind the times in re-
sard to air commerce and that it
will receive air mail at its own port
only when facilities to handle it are
supplied.

With the growth in air commerce
progressing so rapidly due to the
advances in safety appliance and
methods of flying, the decrease in
cost of planes, the increased speed,
and power of the motors, San Fran-
cisco faces a new era in transporta-
tion. Blessed with the one of the
best harbors in the world, though
somewhat handicapped with the
lack of a satisfactory rail terminus.
San Francisco has advanced to the
position of a great commercial cen-
ter. In this new era San Francisco
should see the greatest advancement
of any other city providing its citi-
zens take advantage of the proposed
airport development. A government
1iombing base at Marin county, a
tremendous army base at Alameda,
a dirigible base at Sunnyvale, the
.A.lameda Airport on the other side
of the Bay, together with the Oak-
land Airport, and a magnificent air-
]iort at San Francisco; these great
terminals will make the San Fran-
cisco Bay area unsurpassed in air
commerce by any other district in
the world.

Once again San Francisco stands
at the crossroads of progress. From
the crossroads we find one road lead-
ing to airport development, activi-
(Turn to Page 292)



W. D. SHEA

ARCHITECT

454 Montgomery Street
SAN FRANCISCO
Phone SUtter 2084



HOOD & STRONG

Certified Public Accountants

425 Standard OU Building

and

Van Nuys Building

LOS ANGELES



Robinson, Nowell 8C Co.

Certified Public Accountants

GARFIELD 8119

Crocker Bldg. San Francisco



JOSEPH A. KITTS CO.

Concrete Technologists

Mills Building San Francisco

Telephone KEarny 7892



CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS
Special Coaching Courses

In the past eight years 95% of my applicants
were successful. Thorough drills in all subjects.

MABEL BOX, Teacher
Graduate San lost Slate Teachers' College

512 Van Ness Avenue, Apt. 202

For Information. Phone HEmloci 7675, 6 to 7 p.m.



CHARLES J. SIMON, M.D.

701-2 Elkan Gunst BuUding
323 Geary Street

San Francisco

Office. GArAeld 4886 Residence, SUtter 5700
Emergency. MArket 2100



292



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



September



Gas & Oil Y Free Crank Case Service
"Where Service Is Paramount"

BILL NUTTER'S

Visitacioo Valley Service Sudon
Viiiucion and San Bruno Avenue

REST ROOM



Phone WEsi 463}



Eslabliahed 1898



Joseph F. Hotter

Manufacturer of
WINDOW SHADES



1540 Fillmore Street



San Francisco



PHONE SUTTER 6255

CALIFORNIA SCREW
COMPANY

Manufacturers of

Screws and Screw
Machine Products

74 Clementina Street
A. C. MOHR San Francisco



TELEPHONE DOUGLAS 0974

AL. TODT

Locksmith - General Repairing

Manufacturers of
IMPROVED MECHANISMS
IN BUILDERS' HARDWARE

Brazing and Welding
Experimental Work

52 Second Street
SAN FRANCISCO



Trieste Cigar Store

SOFT DRINK PARLOR



Phone GArfield 9894

343 Columbus Avenue
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.





J. S. HILL


Cigars


Cigarettes




'♦




3591 20th Street



AIRPORT BONDS



(Continued from Page 291)

ties, and industries. This road, a
little further along runs into the
road of airport prosperity. The road
to airport development is paved and
if San Francisco follows it she will
draw to herself air commerce and
industr3^ Those who profess a faith
in San Francisco and her future
greatness should vote for the $4,-
000,000 airport bond issue and
should urgue their friends and asso-
ciates to do the same.

San Francisco has the second fin-
est harbor in the world and there
is no reason that she should not
have the finest airport in the world.



Online LibrarySan Francisco (Calif.). Board of SupervisorsThe municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) → online text (page 72 of 84)