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San Francisco (Calif.). Board of Supervisors.

The municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) online

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resilient characteristics that win
high favor among the turf advo-
cates. The absence of the necessity
to construct expansion joints for
asphaltic concrete is a desirable fea-
ture, but the light absorption char-
acteristics of a black pavement
necessitate the painting of white
strips to define the axis of the run-
way while taking off or alighting
under night floodlights. Cement
concrete is gaining more favor
among the pilots as they "become
acquainted with the feel of it." Al-
though first costs are higher than
perhaps any other comparable pave-
ment, maintenance costs are negli-
gible.

Friction burns caused by alight-
ing on this type of pavement have
caused some concern. These burns
result when alighting with landing
wheels in a non-revolving state. A
plane landing at 60 miles an hour
with a wheel say of 40 inches, re-
quires a correpsonding instantaneous
speed of about 500 R.P.M. at the
moment of contact with the ground.



,/. 6AN F^^^'^^^'^^"^




Fig. J. f^'ind Rose Record, extending
over a period of nearly three years

The wheel cannot start spinning at
that rate instantly as it requires a
fraction of time to overcome the mo-
ment of inertia. On account of this
retardation of revolution, the wheels
are skidded for a fractional distance
which results in a burned tire.




Fig. -f. Initial Plan of Development



Tests Demonstrate

Current tests demonstrate the ad-
visability of impact allowances of
around three times the weight of
the loaded planes for 5000 to 10,-
000 pound airplanes, and about
twice the weight for planes weigh-
ing from 10,000 to 30,000 pounds.

The initial development (Fig. 4)
provides a hard surface pavement,
iOO feet in width, centrally placed in
the runway with a lOO-foot width re-
silient type pavement flanking this
strip on each side for landing planes.

Drainage

Adequate drainage is most im-
portant in insuring a safe and stable
flying field. Water must be re-
moved quickly to prevent destabili-
zation of surface soil.

A very satisfactory drainage sys-
tem has been installed in the present
used field, consisting of gravel hack-
filled mains paralleling and at the
edge of each crowned runway, with
gravel backfilled laterals spaced at
50-foot centers connecting into the
mains.

A Million Majority for Ralph



It is proposed to construct the fu-
ture system much along the same
design, and of sufficient capacity to
remove the runoff from an average
maximum rainfall within two hours
after the end of the storm.

Administration Building

The Administration Building is an
important, and frequently a neg-
lected part of the airport. A rail-
road company would little think of
proposing the construction of a pas-
senger station for a large city as
part of an engine roundhouse ; yet
that is the situation often found at
many of our American airports. It
is a reflection upon our highest
priced passenger transportation ser-
vice.

It is planned to construct an Ad-
ministration Building at the San
Francisco Airport, of pleasing and
substantial design, with special re-
gard to the eflScient placement of
facilities.

The general plan of the structure
calls for a two-story building sur-
mounted by the field control tower.



326



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



Ortobe




CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS

BUREAU OF ENGINEERING

M. M. o'shaushncsst City Encinecii



DEVELOPMENT PLAN



SAN FRANCISCO AIRPORT.



mmd^.



sEPtiijifl I.-9273



Fig. 5. Ultimate Development



with an overall height not to exceed
50 feet. The basement provides space
for a heating plant and storage ; the
first floor furnishes facilities for
waiting rooms, ticket ofiices, air
transport offices, rest and conven-
ience rooms, express rooms, post
office, dining room, first aid station,
barber shop, telephone booths, news
stands, telegraph room, airport su-
perintendent's office, police depart-
ment ; and the second floor accom-
modates the meteorological office,
pilots' lounge, radio room, tea room,
administration offices, and air trans-
port offices. The field control office
in the roof tower will command a
view of the entire landing area.
From here signals can be given
regulating the traffic to and from
the landing area. The meteorologi-



cal equipment will be mounted on
the roof.

Hangars

It is important that the hangar
offer reasonable fire protection,
safety from storms, good day and
night light, proper ventilation, easy
access and egress for planes, con-
venience rooms, storage space for
spare parts, and telephone connec-
tions. Adequate protection against
fire cannot be stressed too much.
The Department of Commerce re-
ports that during the first three
months of 1930, eighty-seven planes
were destroyed in hangar fires caus-
ing a property loss of $700,000.

The initial plan of development
proposes the construction of one
hangar in the vicinity of each side
of the Administration Building.

California for Ralph by a Million Votes



Estimate

The cost estimate of airport ac-
quisition and initial construction and
equipment, as shown by Figure IV,

is as follows :

1. Purchase of 1002 acres of
land from the Mills Estate,
Inc., which is the remainder
of this estate which may be
acquired by the terms of the

recent purchase agreement..? 945,000

2. Purchase of 1080 acres of
tidelands adjoining the Mills
Estate purchase on the east-
ward 108,000

3. Construction of 11,000 lineal
feet of riprap protected

earth dike 440,000

4. Reclaiming tidelands and
elevating present used field
with 13,510.000 cu. yds. of
hydraulic fill 1,351,000

5. Construction of 2,200,000 sq.

ft. of runways 308,000

6. Top dressing, grading, and
seeding 100 acres 270,000

7. Construction of 338,000 sq.
ft. of reinforced concrete

taxi and apron strips 101,400

8. Construction of 400,000 sq.
ft. of roadways and parking

areas 56,000

9. Construction of 30,000 sq.

ft. of hangars and shops 90,000

10. Construction of administra-
tion building 100,000

11. Installation of subdrains,
construction of pump houses

and installation of pumps.... 105,600

12. Night lighting of field and
hangars 125,000

Total Bond Issue $4,000,000

As requirements demand, further
improvements may be made to coin-
cide with the ultimate development
plan shown in Figure V.

Operation

It is proposed to control field traf-
fic by requiring taking off planes to
use the upwind half of the runway,
and landing planes the downwind
part of the runway. By this method
danger from collision and taxi-dis-
tances are held to a minimum.

An analysis of the wind record,
shown by Figure 3, applied to the
ultimate plan of development, Fig-
ure 5, shows that for 54 per cent of
the time a taxi distance of 460 feet
is required, 41 per cent of the time
a distance of 1710 feet, and 5 per
cent of the time a taxi distance of
4000 feet.

In Conclusion

Tentative plans attempt to antici-
pate the needs of the future, to exact
a practical layout for operation, and
to match proportionately and sup-
plement the other fine airports in
the San Francisco Bay region. To
accomplish this requires a bond is-
sue. The bond issue will provide
the golden coins, and the golden
coins will produce a Golden Gate
to the ships of the air.



October



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



327



GEO. OSTERTAG
CALIFORNIA INN

RATHSKELLER

Restaurant and Grill
BOWLING



Polk and Turk Streets



Phone ORdway 2044



WE Hope the Airport Bonds
Carry



HEINTZ AND KAUFMAN, Ltd.

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO



PURR'PULL

GASOLINE

Forms a "Dry" Gas . . . Prevents carbon trouble
Contains a REAL high-compression compound . . .
Sells for the same price as ordinary gasoline . . .
Backed with a money-back guarantee.

TODD L. FRANKLIN

Distributor for

UNITED STATES REFINING CO., Ltd.
San Francisco and San Mateo Counties



H. WATERS



E. MILLER



AIRPORT LUNCH ROOM

All Electrical Equipment
Electrically Percolated Coffee

Let Us Serve You at All Times
Prices Reasonable



MILLS FIELD



SAN FRANCISCO



Gas 8C Oil / Free Crank Case Service

"Where Seryice Is Paramount"

BILL NUTTER'S

Visttacion Valley Service Suttoa
Visitacion and San Bruno Avenue

REST ROOM



California Corrugated
Culvert Co.

armco culverts



818 Crocker Building
San Francisco



Phone DOuglas

4457



A GOOD PLACE TO EAT

METROPOLITAN GRILL

Phone So. S. F. 565
261 Grand Avenue South San Francisco, Calif.



Western Engineering Company

INDUSTRIAL AND MARINE
EQUIPMENT

58 Main Street

SAN FRANCISCO



Telephone 408

SANITARY BAKERY

UNGARETTI 8C CO.
312 GRAND AVE. SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO



Buy from firms that advertise with us



328



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



October











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CapL Duncan Matheson, Treasurer of the City
and County of San Francisco



Captain Duncan Matheson, treas-
urer of the city and county of San
Francisco, was born in Nova Scotia
in 1865. Coming to San Francisco
in 1881, he spent the remaining
years of his boyhood here. He then
moved to Humbolt County, where
he was employed in the construc-
tion of the Elk River railroad.

He left Humboldt County and
spent some time in visiting Aus-
tralia, New Zealand and India. He
returned to California in 1887 and
entered the service of the Southern
Pacific, being engaged in construc-
tion work. He was awarded a gold
medal by the company for having



the best roadmaster's district on the
system.

He was appointed a police officer
in 1900 and passed through every
rank of the department and was al-
ways number one on the promotion
lists.

He served for twelve years as
captain of detectives, and under his
supervision and control became the
most efficient on the continent. His
work with the Better Business Bu-
reau stands out as the most con-
structive in the country.

He is a member of the Common-
wealth Club, Down Town Associa-
tion, California State Automobile
A Million Majority for. Ralph



Association, California Safety Com-
mittee, Advertising Club, secretary-
treasurer Peace Officers Associa-
tion, International Association of
Chiefs of Police, and past president
of the California Branch of Crimi-
nal Law and Criminology.

His Masonic affiliations are: mem-
ber of California Lodge No. 1, a
Royal Arch Mason, Knight Tem-
plar, Thirty-second Degree and K. C.
C. H. He is a member of Islam
Temple and Royal Order of Jesters.
He is one of the trustees of the
Widows and Orphans Fund of the
Shrine.



October



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



J^



Treasurer Duncan Matheson
Completes Year of Service



A YEAR has passed since Duncan
Matheson became treasurer.

We all remember the turbulent
times of the previous regime, the
resignation of Treasurer John H.
Thieler and the appointment by
Mayor Rolph of the well known
captain of detectives.

It was great reading and the pub-
lic was intensely interested. You
do not hear quite so much about the
treasurer's office these days. "Happy
the country that has no history" ;
you remember the old saying.

Afforded an Opportunity

This magazine has been afforded
an opportunity to make a survey of
the treasurer's office, and we are
going to tell our readers something
about the doings of this important
arm of the city government. Our
text will be, "A year of Matheson."

The name and reputation of Dun-
can Matheson has long been a syno-
nym in this community for hon-
esty and keen intelligence and we
all know that he has lived up to his
reputation during the conduct of
the office of city treasurer. When
selected for this important post one
year ago, September 4, his appoint-
ment by his Honor, the Mayor, was
hailed as a most excellent one, re-
ceiving universal commendation,
and the mayor himself used the
phrase — now we have a real "Watch
Dog of the Treasury."

Proved Himself Master

The treasurer has been such and
much more. He has proved himself
a master of the situation, grasping
the technical features of finance, ac-
countancy and administration, and
lost no time after assuming office
in adjusting, remedying and correct-
ing many of the practices and
methods that had been subject to
more or less criticism by the grand
jury and the press.

Treasurer Matheson appeajrs to
have been a money mascot to the
city.

The bond market had been dull
and dead and practically nil for
many months, the last city sale hav-
ing taken place September, 1928. In



December, 1929, the Bank of Italy
purchased $4,000,000 bonds and
shortly thereafter took the great
Spring Valley issue of $41,000,000.
Fifty million, three hundred six
thousands dollars in bonds have
been sold over the counter and the
proceeds deposited in city banks,
drawing interest at 3 per cent per
annum.

The fiscal year 1929-30 report
shows that $523,920 interest was
earned on such deposits. The treas-
urer points out that this ratio of
earnings cannot be expected the
coming year, as bond moneys have
been used in municipal construction
works of great magnitude and the
general funds of the city are now
nearing the point of practical de-
pletion, anticipatory to the tax
money due in large amounts in No-
vember and December.

Bond Issues by City

Bond issues by the city and the
condition of the money market are
the prime factors in bringing about
earnings of interest, which materi-
ally help in reducing the tax rate.

Treasurer Matheson favors issu-
ance of bonds at this time, believing
necessity exits and the market war-
rants. 'The $4,000,000 Memorial
Bonds should be placed on the mar-
ket, affording funds to expedite this
great work.

Treasurer Matheson states that
under the present city charter there
is no provision to care for the city
finances during the lean periods —
toward the end of tax periods — and
that this feature of city finances
must receive major attention from
the Board of Freeholders in framing
the new charter. Only by the op-
portune use of bond moneys in the
past has the city avoided the un-
pleasant necessity of registering de-
mands. This has not been done for
twenty years.

Cashier Smith States

Cashier Sidney Smith states that
while the large amounts available
for bank loans contributed mainly
to the large earnings, that the same
were very materially increased by
California for Rolph by a Million Votes



the methods introduced by the new
treasurer, viz., "minimum money in
office, maximum in banks, more pro-
fit for city." Special funds of San
Francisco water department and the
Islais Creek reclamation district are
maintained se])arately, in active and
inactive funds, receiving proper in-
terest thereon.

Supported by Staff

Treasurer Matheson is well sup-
ported by an active and loyal staff.
Sidney S. Smith, cashier, and
Thomas K. McCarthy, bank deputy,
are veterans of more than twenty
years service in the treasurer's of-
fice, rising froms the ranks, and pro-
moted by Treasurer Matheson. W. J.
Buttgenbach, chief bookkeeper, with
John F. O'Shaughnessy, assigned as
financial bookkeeper, with a staff of
fourteen members extremely busy
with very responsible work.

Joseph J. Cusack, assisted by
Lawrence Cames, attends to the im-
portant section of inheritance tax
matters. Messrs. Denney, Quinn,
Hewlett and McDevitt are noted as
efficient paymasters, disbursing the
city's millions through their respec-
tive money cages. As high as S500,-
000 has been paid out in one pay
day by these tellers, representing
3200 warrants.

Specialist on Bonds

Louis Claveloux, specialist on
bond coupons, has probably handled
more of these tiny magic slips than
any one on the Pacific Coast, hav-
ing been engaged in this detail for
the past twenty-five years, \\illiam
E. Logan, receiving teller; John J.
Goodwin, general clerk, and Mrs.
Florence Hickox, treasurer's sten-
ographer, complete the force of the
office.

The treasurer submitted figures
showing that a grand total of S211,-
944,693.67 (receipts and disburse-
ments) had been handled by the of-
fice during fiscal vear 1929-30. He
challenges any financial institution
anywhere to cover this work with as
small a force and at the expense
incurred, viz., $51,197.31.



330



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



October



Health Officer Hassler Urges Passage
of Proposition No* 39




Proposed incinerator for City and County of San Francisco. A tii-o-thirds majority vote for Proposition No. 39 will solve San

Francisco's grave garbage problem.



October 13, 1930.
To the Citizens and Tax Payers of San
Francisco :
You are again being called upon
to exercise your judgment on a
number of issues that will appear on
the ballot on November 4. As
Health Officer of this citv, I appeal
to you to give serious reflection and
thought to the importance and ne-
cessity of assisting;^ in maintaining
the general health and welfare of
this city, which has always ranked
first among all of the cities of the
United States of population over
500,000.

Continued Deplorable Conditions

For many years we have con-
tinued with a deplorable condition
in the final disposal of the garbage
and waste of our city, and the time
has now arrived when the existing
incinerator must close down either
as a result of a court order or per-
haps because of a tragedy that
might result from its generally di-
lapidated condition.

It is not generally known to the
people of this city that more than
four tons of ash and dirt goes into
the atmosphere from the stack of
our garbage incinerator every twen-
ty-four hours, which is both unnec-
essary and preventable, and un-
doubtedly a factor in the causation
of disease, the extent of which we
will concede it is difficult to prove,




On Dr. William C. Hassler,
Health Officer for the City
and County of San Francisco,
was conferred, on October 29,
the highest honor afforded a
health officer of the United
States when he was elected
President of the American
Public Health Association at
its annual convention held in
Fort Worth, Texas. Dr.
Hassler has been nationally
prominent in medical activities
for many years.



but even if it were not so, all
authorities agree that a city's health
depends upon the purity of the air
and the freedom of the air from dust
and dirty particles, smoke and other
products of combustion. Where
these exist, it is naturally difficult
for the health authorities to fix the
blame for specific incidence of dis-
ease. They are, however, prevent-
able nuisances and should be abated.

Two Waste Products

In my judgment, there are two
waste products of a city that should
be cared for by the people of the
city, namely sewage disposal and
garbage and other waste and refuse
disposal.

Any bond issue that promotes the
health and welfare of the people of
the city deserves more than a pass-
ing consideration. In fact it comes
under the class of an emergency and
necessary expenditure and should
have the support and approval of
everybody, principally because it is
economical and it is for the protec-
tion and safety of yourself and your
family. Economically it is also im-
portant.

In the great epidemics of plague
in the past caused by rats, the city
has expended more than a milHon
dollars in addition to large sums
expended by the Government, and
during the interim of eradication the



Let's Make It Ralph by a Million



October



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



33'



Success to Incinerator Bonds

Rosenthal's Sales Stores

JOSEPH ROSENTHAL, President

2415 Mission Street



Phone KEarny 7213



San Francisco, Calif.



Certified Laboratory
Products

Nitrous Oxide Oxygen Ethylene

Carbon Dioxide



Phone MArket 4227
1379 Folsom Street San Francisco, Calif.



Santa Rosa Branch

328 South A Street Phone 1430-J

P. TESTA, Manager

San Jose Branch

484 North 17th Street Phone Ballard 3119-R

T. BARRACO, Manager



Pompeii Macaroni Factory, Inc.

Manufacturers of

HIGH GRADE ALIMENTARY PASTES
Long Cut and Fancy



Oakland Branch
501 Franklin Street Phone LAkeside 1246

Main Office
2987-89 Folsom Street, near Twenty-sixth

Phone Mission 5744

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA



WESTERN CALIFORNIA
PRODUCTS CO.



Manufacturers of

TALLOW - GREASE - MEAT SCRAPS
FISH MEAT MEAL - FISH OIL



Factory:
DAVIDSON AVENUE and LANE STREET

Office: Southeast Cotter Evans Avenue and Third
Street — Phone Mission 5600



SAN FRANCISCO HOG COMPANY

Dealers in
LIVESTOCK
A. DALBESIO

Davidsoii SC Newhall



E. PARDUCCI, P. DOMENICI & CO.

SAN FRANCISCO SAUSAGE
FACTORY

Telephone DAvenport 8589

505 DAVIS STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.



C GROLEMUND




C RUI'lIMANN


STAR


SAUSAGE


COMPANY




Telephone


KEamy 3135


275


MINNA ST.,


SAN FRANCISCO



Buy from firms that advertise with us



332



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



Oaober



LAUNDRY AND

DRY CLEANING

MACHINERY

1.N six big manufacturing plants, cov-
ering 1,000,000 square feet of space.

The AMERICAN LAUNDRY MACHINERY CO.

produces equipment for the Laundry and Dry
Cleaning industry the world over. "American"
service representatives are stationed from Coast
to Coast.

Western Headquarters:

921 Howard Street
SAN FRANCISCO



'•Til I !•(•,'



SEATTLE



LOS ANGELES



BUSH ELECTRIC
CORPORATION

COMPLETE X-RAY

and

ELECTRO-THERAPEUTIC LINE

Personal Service Featured
PHONE SUTTER 6088



334 Sutter Street



f.JI'-i



San Francisco



Gough Furniture Company

2141-2133 Mission Street, bet. 17th and 18th

Telephone HEmlock 1442

SAN FAANCISCO, CALIF.




LTILITy-BEALTy

%UELLER CO.

1072-1076 HOWARD STREET




Jusi Good Wholesome
Milk and Cream-



Telephone Market 3776

A-1 Butter, Eggs dC Cottage
Cheese

Del Monte Creamery

M. DETTLING, Prop.

Pure Pasteurized and Certified
Milk

Family Trade a Specialty



375 POTRERO AVE.
Near 17th St.



San PrancUco
CalUomU



PIllSBURGH— DES MOINES




INCINERATOR




Pittsburgh, Pa. Des Moines,


la.


SAN FRANCISCO





KE:WAN££,

BOILERS 8C GARBAGE BURNERS

For HOSPITALS and SCHOOLS

C. U. MARTIN, Agent

637 Minna Street San Francisco



To rest comfortably, have your mattress renovated at

GALANT

Sanitary Mattress Corporation

Best Work and Service at Lower Prices
Phone MArket 4622 3074 17th Street



Buy from firms that advertise with us



October



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



12i



business interests of the city lost
perhaps an equal sum.

If the garbage incinerator is shut
down, it means that the waste and
garbage must be disposed of by the
"Fill and Cover" method, which the
citizens of this city have already
condemned and disapproved. A re-
turn to that method, even during the



period of time necessary to con-
struct a new incinerator would mean
a tremendous increase in the rat
population, which is now of such
proportions that every district in the
city is complaining. The transfer of
squirrel plague to the rats of this
city is an imminent menace which
would be increased if we do any-



thing that tends to enlarge the rat
pest, which is the carrier of this
disease.

Bear these things in mind when
you consider the stand you are
going to take on the bond issue
questions. It is cheaper, safer and
saner to prevent a condition than to
remedy it after the damage has oc-
curred.



VOTE "YES"
Garbage Incinerator Health Bonds

PROPOSITION 39 ON THE BALLOT



San Francisco must have a new incinerator. The
one in use was built in 1897, and was declared to
be a nuisance by a Superior Court writ, issued by
Judge Mogan. The present disgraceful structure
is only operating by tolerance. Should Judge
Mogan issue a restraining order preventing opera-
tion of the old incinerator — and we cannot see
how he can defer such action much longer — the
only alternative left to the City will be to dispose
of its garbage by the fill-and-cover method, which
is a grave health menace and which the people
have already decisively disapproved of.

Vote "YES" on 39 and end this dangerous
health menace.

In the election of November 5, 1929, the voters
decided that the city garbage must be disposed of
by burning. Plans and specifications have been pre-
pared by the city engineer's oflSce for a modern in-
cinerator plant to carry out this mandate of the
voters of San Francisco. Funds must be provided.
A small bond issue of ^1,200,000 will take care of
this.

Vote "YES" on 39.

The sanitary disposal of garbage is as much a



Online LibrarySan Francisco (Calif.). Board of SupervisorsThe municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) → online text (page 76 of 84)