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San Francisco (Calif.). Board of Supervisors.

The municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) online

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public necessity as the disposal of sewage. The
incineration method is favored by health author-
ities of the federal, state and city governments. It
is a definite protective measure against the spread
of disease and the dangerous possibilities of
pestilence that any seaport must face.

Vote "YES" on 39.



Toronto, Canada, and New York City are strik-
ing examples of successful garbage disposal by
burning. Though the incinerator plants are lo-
cated near hospitals and school buildings in both
these cities, they have been operating for years
without neighborhood complaint.

The voting of bonds for this incinerator does
not make it mandatory for the city to operate it.
The Board of Supervisors, in conjunction with
the Board of Health, when the bond money b
available, will determine whether it will be most
advantageous to operate by the city itself, or grant
the privilege to some company engaged in the
incineration of garbage.

Vote "YES" on 39.

San Francisco is an unusually healthy city. The
shocking conditions at the condemned burning
place now in use are a , c,onstant menace to its
reputation.

The new incinerator is not a luxury but a dire
necessity. Protect your fellow citizens and your

own family.

Vote "YES" on proposition 39 on November 4.

BOARD OF HEALTH,
By Wm. C. Hassler, M. D.,

Heallh Officer.

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS,
By Health Committee,

Dr. J. Ml. Toner, Chairman
James B. McSheehy,
Alfred Roncovieri.



Let's Make It Ralph by a Million



m.



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



Ortober



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ESTABLISHED 1860
A -NfATtONXt' iNSTtrbTION



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MANAGER

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Exterminators of Rats and Insects
GENERAL EXTERMINATORS





488 Pine Street
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA



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Are being used in all City Institutions as well as all
Leading Hospitals

They are sold by

Panama Lamp & Com. Company

815 Howard Street



THOMAS PORCARO, Pres.
Telephotie GArfield 5063

814 Montgomery Street

■ ^i; , -

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Largest Organization of Chain
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GOFFIN-REDINGTON GO.

Wholesale Druggists

Importers and Jobbers of

Drugs, Chemicals and Druggists' Sundries

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SUPERIOR LINEN TOWEL SERVICE
MINIMUM COST

Phone MArket 0060 3840 Eighteenth Street

SAN FRANCISCO



W. T. KAWALKOWSKI, Manager

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Dealers and Contractors of

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Builders' Exchange: Phone SUtter 6700, Between 1-2



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>



October



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



JI?



"LINDY" LEAGUE
MEMBERS WIN HONORS



San Francisco Junior

Aviation Enthusiasts

Bring Credit to

Playground

Commission



»*-*^



By Veda Beresford Young

Secretary^ Playground Commission



ft



Sf*-^



NATIOXAL and Pacific Coast
Records were broken in the re-
cent aircraft meets held under the
auspices of the Playground Com-
mission.

The Lindy League, named in
honor of Colonel Charles A. Lind-
bergh, America's beloved "Lindy of
the Air," was organized by the San
Francisco Playground Department
in June, 1927. For three years the
members have made creditable rec-
ords with their planes, but never be-
fore have they brought such honor
to San Francisco as in the recent
meets.

At the indoor meet in the State
Armory on August 23 and the out-
door meet at Funston Playground.
August 30, hundreds of interested
spectators attended and many new
records were made. The tiny planes
powered with rubber motors re-
mained in the air from one to over
seven minutes. Some were launched
by hand, others rose from the ground
and some took off the water.

Robert Bonner, of 1400 Washing-
ton Street, received the distinction
of winning the Junior Champion-
ship of the Pacific Coast, while
Glenn Hainer of 2866 Sacramento
Street received the Senior Cham-
pionship.




Bt-lty Hind, of 1930 Pint- Street, San Francisco, only girl in the I'niteJ States to

qualify for the national meet held in Atlantic City. Winner of Amelia Earhart

Trophy for girl luinning highest number of points in Sational Playgrounds

Miniature Aircraft Meet.



As a result of the splendid rec-
ords made, San Francisco won the
Pacific Coast Championship, receiv-
ing 34 points, while Los .-\ngeles re-
ceived 21, and Pasadena 8.

Eight entrants, i. e., Robert Bon-
ner, Tomatsu Shimazaki, Betty
Hind, Thomas Robins, Glen Hainer.
Paul Tescher, Robert Kemp and
Arthur Johnson qualified to com-
pete in the National Playground
A Million Majority for Rolph



Miniature Aircraft Tournament in
Atlantic City in October. 1930.

San Francisco qualified more than
any other city in the L'nited States.
As a result of these splendid rec-
ords the San Francisco Examiner
and the P!ayground Commission
sent the Senior Champion, Glen
Hainer, and the Junior Champion,
Robert Bonner, together with an es-
cort, to the National Meet.



336



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



October



The only girl qualified to com-
pete in the national meet was Betty
Hind, who is to receive the Amelia
Earhart trophy for having received
the greatest number of points for
any girl entered in the United States.

On Saturday, September 20, Cap-
tain Roy N. Francis, superintend-
ent of Mills Field, gave an interest-
ing talk to the Lindy League par-



ticipants and presented the the
awards to the winners in the meet-
ing room of the Board of Super-
visors.

The two boy champions have just
returned from a tour of the country
and participation in the Atlantic
City meet. Opportunity was af-
forded them to take several airplane
rides and also to visit Aircraft



classes in Detroit, Washington and
Los Angeles. Bonner won the Ail-
Round Junior Chamnionship of the
United States, while Hainer placed
fourth as the All-Round Champion
in the Senior Division.

The future looks very bright for
the miniature aircraft activities of
the San Francisco Playground Com-
mission.



Some Books in Popular Demand

at Public Library



By Anne M. Farrell

In charge of Fiction Department, Public Library



GREAT rejoicing is always in
the air when publishers send
forth the advance sheets of their
autumn output of books, for there
is certain to be found among so
many volumes, one or two really
worthwhile stories.

If you have read J. P. Priestley's
"The Good Companions," you will
want to read "Angel Pavement,"
and if you have not, you will want
to read it anyhow. Like the annual
Christmas box of an indulgent
grandmother, it is filled to the brim
with good things, gentle humor,
pathos, delightful chuckles and a
tear or two. After a surfeit of the
slightly tarnished wit of the sophis-
ticated modernists, "Angel Pave-
ment" is as refreshing as a moun-
tain stream to a weary traveler.

Dull Little District

Into the dull, respectable little
district, just around the corner from
busy London, known as Angel
Pavement, comes one Mr. Golspie.
He is a dynamic whirlwind, and
like an invigorating tonic, pours
new life into the humdrum offices
of Twigg and Dersingham. He gives
hope to an elderly disgruntled clerk
who is afraid of losing his job, and
to a young worker he brings ro-
mance, in the person of his own
lovely daughter. His hearty joy of
living reaches even into the homes
of the weary inhabitants of Angel
Pavement, making life a bit of
glamour for the moment, and pov-
erty but the prelude to adventure.

If you are going to read but one
book this winter, that book must be
"Angel Pavement." Someone has
said, "without doubt this new book



is the most important novel on Lon-
don in fifty years," and while this
may be a bit exaggerated it does not
hit too wide of the mark.

"Adam's Rest" by Sarah Ger-
trude Millin, is a depressing book.
In her new novel, Mrs. Millin does
not reach the literary heights that
she achieved in her previous works,
particularly in "God's Stepchildren"
and "Coming of the Lord." There
is nothing extraordinary in the new
book, either in its plot development
or character delineation, unless it is
the definite note of confused hope-
less, despair that prevails through-
out the book.

Miriam and Janet

Miriam and Janet, sisters, have
been raised in a little Capetown vil-
lage b)' their aunt, Laura, who is a
strange creature that has l:)een dis-
figured early in life by an accident.
The two girls grow up ever con-
scious of the warning that the
blacks and whites must not mingle.
On all sides are the sad, little yel-
low-eyed girls and boys, constant
reminders of the white men who
have succumbed to the fascinations
of the black women.

Janet is happy enough, a girl with
not much imagination, she is con-
tent with a few material things, but
Miriam is made of finer stuff. She
suflFers poignantly, until she is in a
desperate state, not knowing just
what she does want, and being
hopelessly unal)le to make any defi-
nite pattern of her life. The novel
dramatizes the uneventful, and in
that at least is successful.

It is a red-letter daj' in the liter-
ary calendar when a book by Leon-
California for Ralph by a Million Votes



ard Merrick finds its way to the
publishers. Although Merrick has
been termed "the novelist's novel-
ist," on account of his expert style
and vivid characterizations, the lay
man is ever certain to find genuine
pleasure in the charming tales of
this excellent craftsman. In his new
collection of short stories, called
"The Little Dog Laughed," Mer-
rick again weaves the threads of
humor and pathos into a fabric of
delicate gossamer. Reading Leon-
ard Merrick is like juggling with
bubbles, it is great sport, very hu-
morous, indeed, but when one leasts
expects, the bubble bursts quickly,
and one's eyes smart for the mo-
ment. Rose C. Feld, writing in
the New York Times, sums up the
charm of Merrick. It is, she says,
"something that lies hidden be-
tween the lines of laughter and gay-
ety and makes you remember the
author long after you have forgot-
ten the story."

Name Associated

The name of Holworthy Hall i!
almost always associated with th(
short story, though he has, ol
course, written a novel or two o
minor importance, but it is in th(
shorter type of fiction that he has
achieved his most pronounced sue
cess. However, in his latest work
"Colossus," he seems to have beei
able to put into a novel the ingredi'
ents that have been so powerful ii
making his short stories so verj
popular. "Colossus" is the story o
Bryan Stinson, an all-Americai
halfback, the great football hero of
his college. Unlike the average col-
lege story, "Colossus" is a serious



October



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



J12



book, with some clever character
sketching, particularly that of the
three wonjen who use all their femi-
nine wiles to capture the heart of
the football hero. The question of
professionalism in college sports is
the central theme of the story, with
the love interest of minor impor-
tance.

Followers of Helen Martin's
Pennsylvania Dutch stories will en-
joy her new book, "Tender Talons."
While Mrs. Martin makes no play
for great literary effects in her
novels, there is always something
intensely fascinating about her tales
of the quaint characters that inhabit
the little Dutch towns in Pennsyl-
vania. In "Tender Talons" we have
again the stern husband, the young
wife, who wants to break away
from the Dutch traditions, and their
son. Lute. Lute grows up, and it
is around him that most of the ac-
tion of the story takes place. He
goes to college, and comes under
the influence of Dr. Hargate, who
loves and rules his familv with an



iron hand. Lute falls in love with
the doctor's daughter, and attempts
to rescue her from the domination
of her father. There is not a dull
moment in the book, and while not
meriting the distinction of a great
novel, is at all times an interesting
one.

For the devotees of the detective
story, and the ranks are increasing
rather than decreasing, the fall out-
look is resplendent with a goodly
supply of gorey deeds and chilling
crimes.

Vincent Starrett, who knows a
great deal about really worthwhile
books, when he is not needed in
books, when he is not steeped in
mystery making, offers, "The Blue
Door." This is a collection of ten
long stories, the titles of which read
like a police day-book, everything
from lusty kidnapping to foul mur-
der is covered, and will be enjoyed
in the proper spirit by all members
in good standing in the Crime Club.

"The Trail of Scotland Yard" by
Stuart Martin again puts that au-



gust body of men in the limelight.
.■\fter reading this tale of intrigue
and mysterious happenings, one
wonders just what Scotland Yard
thinks of the enormous amount of
free publicity it has received in re-
cent jears from the authors of the
detective story.

"The Silver King Mystery" by
Ian Greig, and "The Crime in the
Dutch Garden," by Herbert Adams,
are two other thrillers possessed of
sufficient blood-and-thunder to sat-
isfy the most exacting mystery
reader. .

Although the ranks of the lovers
of \Vestern stories have been sadly
depleted by the desertion of the
members in favor of detective tales,
the publishers offer for their ap-
proval, Harold Bindloss' "Rancher
Jim." a fast-moving tale of Alberta,
and "Red Bill" by A. M. Chisholm,
also a story of Canada, with the
stalwart hero bidding for a bridge
contract, while romance awaits in
the person of Alicia, after the vil-
lain hag 'been deftly routed.



DINNER DANCE HELD FOR
POLICE ATHLETES



SULLIVAN ELECTED DIREC-
TOR OF SAN FRANCISCO
ART ASSOCIATION



On October 8 a dinner dance was
held at the Elks' Club in honor of
the athletes of the San Francisco
police department. William J.
Quinn, chief of the police depart-
ment, was the speaker of the eve-
ning and Captain and Chief Clerk
Horace McGowan was toastmaster.

Mayor James Rolph Jr. was rep-
resented by Supervisor Angelo J.
Rossi, who paid a tribute to the
athletes of the department. The fire
department was represented by
Chief Charles J. Brennan, who spoke
of the fine competition between the
athletes of both departments and of
the extremely good feeling existing
between them. Chief of Police Wil-
liam J. Quinn, who also addressed
the gathering, told of the benefits
being derived from the athletic com-
H petition and encouraged the men to
continue.

Following the talks the different
athletes were introduced, each of
whom gave a brief acknowledge-
ment. A fine duet. "Porpoipose
Blues," was rendered by Johnny
Dolan and Les Rosa.

Sergeant Thomas Mclnerney and
Officer Walter Harrington com-
prised the committee which was re-
sponsible for the arrangements and.
details of the dinner, and are the
men to whom much of the credit for
the success of the meeting is due.



Noel Sullivan, prominent as a
musician and art connoisseur, has
been elected a director of the San
Francisco Art Association to suc-
ceed his uncle, the late Senator
James D. Phelan, who had been a
member of the association for half a
century.

William Gerstle, president of the
association, announced October 27
that Sullivan had accepted the post.



$33,376,621 TAX TOTAL IS
2 PER CENT GAIN



The total of city and county
taxes to be collected this year, S33,-
376,621.60, represents an increase of
2 per cent over last year, according
to comparative figures released re-
cently by Benning Wentworth,
auditor.

Last year the total was $32,510.-
110.32. The comparison also shows
that assessed valuations have in-
creased more than 8 per cent, from
51,196,439.062 to SI. 303.025,065.
Normal Increase Offset

"This," \\'entworth explained, "is
due to the fact that most of the
increased valuations are those of
solvent credits and stocks and bonds,
which are taxed at onlj' 10 cents
and 20 cents per SI valuation, re-
spectively.

"The valuation of real estate and
Let's Make It Rolph by a Million



improvements does not differ greatly
from that of last year, owing to the
fact that the normal increase of the
roll was offset by the city's purchase
of the Spring Valley Water Com-
pany' properties.

"The total operative roll, after
equalization by the state board, is
S4(H,545.828.

Reduction by Board

"A reduction of $34,060,468 in the
value of solvent credits, stocks and
bonds was made by the board in
order to bring these valuations to
an amount which would furnish a
correct basis for the computation of
the state refund to the city for bond
interest and redemption on bonds
outstanding prior to November 8,
1910, when the operative roll was
excluded from taxation for city and
county purposes."



CITY PLANS BIG CELEBRA-
TION FOR ROLPH ON EVE
OF ELECTION



According to the recent announce-
ment of Harry Sperb, secretary of
the state Republican committee,
San Francisco will stage a great
celebration for the Republican nom-
inee for Governor of California on
the evening of November 3. The
festivities will be held at the civic
auditorium and will include music,
dancing and several other interest-
ing features to be announced. The
celebration will be open to the
public.



338



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



October



BOHEMIAN GARAGES

LARRY BARRETT, Proprietor

FRANKLIN 1760 SAN FRANCISCO



No. 1 Garage..
No. 2 Garage..



.-375 O'Farrell Street
415 Taylor Street



No. 3 Service Station Cor. O'Farrell and Taylor S:reets

No. 4 Wash Rack & Service S:a. ..Cor. Taylor 8c O'Farrell St.
No. 5 Garage 49 Mason Street



EXPERT WASHING AND
LUBRICATING



Distributors
KELLY Springfield TIRES



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INC.



Commercial Collections
Everywhere

A National Institution for Thirty Years



58 Sutter Street



SAN FRANCISCO

Rms. 509-521



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The Largest Chain of Dollar Stores iti the World

NATIONAL DOLLAR STORES

Selling Merchandise Nothing Over a Dollar

STORES IN

San Francisco, Sacramento, Oakland, San Bernardino, Long

Beach, San Diego, Pasadena, Monterey, San Jose, Stockton,

Fresno, Modesto, Vallejo, Ogden.

Executive Office: SAN FRANCISCO



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MAJESTIC

San Francisco's Most Restricted Ball Room

Especially Featuring Old Fashioned Dancet

Sociability Our Watchword

Phil Sapiro's Orchestra

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Otto Knock, Mgr. — Phone WA Inut 0537



Vote "NO" on 7

The "Daylight Saving" Measure— BECAUSE :



1. It wakes you up an hour earlier. 10.

2. It puis you to bed aa hour 11.
earlier. 12.

3. Gives no "extra hour" in the
24. 13.

4. Has been abolished by 63,000 14.
out of 65,000 American com- IS.
tnuniiies af:er a triaL

5. Is opposed by farmers.

6. Is opposed by labor. 16.

7. Is opposed by dairymen.

8. Is opposed by the movies. 17-

9. Is opposed by clergymen. 18.



Demoralizes personal schedules.
Disarranges recreational life.
Puts the kiddies to bed in day-
light.

Changes babies' acheduUa.
Makes you carry two waicbes.
Was turned down by our S:ate
Legislature five times, for a
good cause.

Has never been adopted by
railroads or postoffices.
Increases highway accidents.
Opposed by parents.



California's All Right (As Is)
Vote "NO" on 7 and Keep It So



C. F. Bulotti Machinery Co.

Machine Tools -t Shop Supplies

Cranes and Foundry Equipment

Railroad Supplies

. 829 Folsotn Street

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.



DAVID T. BLAIR



CHAS F. BULOTTI



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AL NEILL SIGN COMPANY


SIGNS


OF EVERY DESCRIPTION


911 Folsotn St. at 5th San Francisco



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COMPLIMENTS
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October



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



339



U. S. MARSHAL ESOLA
BOOSTS JAIL BONDS



THE project for replacing the
present worn-out and inade-
quate county jail at Injjleside with a
new and modern structure is some-
thing I can endorse, not only as a
tax-payer, but as the Federal officer
responsible for the custody of United
States prisoners.

Since the Federal Government
maintains no prison of its own in
San Francisco, it is dependent on
the city and county for the accom-
modation of its prisoners. The
Government's contribution to the
local jail population, whether of
prisoners awaiting trial or serving
sentences, is considerable. The
number of prisoners committed by
the Federal courts in the last five
^•ears to the San Francisco county
jail ran to a daily average of 97 and
it is of interest to know that the
Government paid into the city's
treasury $106,041.60 during this pe-
riod for the support of its wards
in San Francisco. From it can be
seen that the county gets a sub-
stantial revenue from its jail and it
is evident that a portion of the cost
of maintenance is lifted from the
shoulders of the local tax-payer.

It is not pleasant to speculate on
the people of San Francisco should
be unanimous it is this one of build-
ing a new county jail. It is gen-
erally agreed that the jail at Ingle-
side has long outlived its usefulness.
Old and out-of-date in every respect,
an eyesore in a thickly populated
residential district, crowded, un-
sanitary and withal a fire-trap of the
worst kind, it is a menace to the
hundreds of human beings who are
compelled to stay within its walls.

It is not pleasant to speculate on
1 what would happen if a fire should
break out. We cannot afford to
chance a repetition of the horror
that took toll of scores of lives in the
Columbus, Ohio, penitentiary fire.
That prison was a model institution,
with the latest equipment for release
oi inmates in case of fire.

At Ingleside we might have a
^\•orse disaster because the cells, in-
stead of being arranged for locking
and unlocking automatically with
one operation, as in all modern pris-
ons, are equipped only with pad-
locks of an ancient type, each of



which must be opened with a key.
Under panicky conditions in a time
of fire one can imagine the probable
results.

Every citizen and tax-payer
should feel a personal sense of re-
sponsibility for the safety of our
prisoners, and support the project
for a new jail which will come be-
fore the voters at the November
election.

FRED L. ESOLA,

U. S. Marshal.



GARDNER-DENVER COMPANY
OCCUPY NEW PLANT



CHIEF BRENNAN
ENDORSES NO. 2

"I have studied the amendment
known as Proposition Number Two
on the November ballot which is
designed to use a portion of the
state's tax revenues as a contribu-
tion to firemen's pensions and bene-
fit funds. I have also studied many
systems throughout the country
and am convinced that utilizing
state money for the purpose of pro-
viding pensions for firemen is im-
proper; it being recognized that fire-
men are municipal employees over
which the state has no control. Us-
ing state money for such a purpose
can only mean increased taxation
regardless of the claims made by
the proponents of the measure to
the contrary. It is obvious that we
cannot use money needed for the
ordinary conduct of the state's af-
fairs without being compelled to
make it up some way.

"The small volunteer fire depart-
ments have no guarantee that they
will receive any benefits from
Amendment Number Two. Neither
has San Francisco any such guar-
antee despite the fact that San
Francisco is one of the largest con-
tributors to state taxes.

"Therefore, I am emphatically
opposed to the adoption of Amend-
ment Number Two. It is imper-
fect in its construction, is contra-
dictory in its phraseology', and
ambiguous. If adopted the fire



Online LibrarySan Francisco (Calif.). Board of SupervisorsThe municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) → online text (page 77 of 84)