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San Francisco (Calif.). Board of Supervisors.

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Low, Frederick F. .


Union


Sept.


2, 1863


Dec. 10,1863


Representative in Congress, 1861-1863.


Haight, Henry H


D.


Sept.


4, 1867


Dec. 5, 1867


Member of 2d constitutional convention.


Booth, Newton ^


R.


Sept.


6, 1871


Dec. 8, 1871


Resigned Feb. 27, 1875. U. S. Senator,
1875-81.


Pacheco, Romualdo .


R.







Feb. 27,1875


Lieutenant-Governor succeeded Booth.


Irwin, William


D.


Sept.


1, 1875


Dec. 9, 1875


Harbor Commissioner, 1883-1886.


Perkins, George C .


R.


Sept.


3, 1879


Jan. 8, 1880


U. S. Senator, 1893-1903.


Stoneman, George


D.


Nov.


7, 1882


Jan. 10,1883


Transportation Commissioner.


Bartlett, Washington


D.


Nov.


2, 1886


Jan. 8, 1887


Railroad Commissioner.


Waterman, Robert W.


R.






Sept. 13, 1887


Lieutenant-Governor succeeded Bartlett. »


Markham, Henry H.


R.


Nov.


4, 1890


Jan. 8, 1891


Representative in Congress, 1885-1887.


Budd, James H.


D.


Nov.


6, 1894


Jan. 11,1895


Representative in Congress, 1883-1885.


Gage, Henry T


R.


Nov.


8, 1898


Jan. 4, 1899


Minister to Portugal December 21, 1909.


Pardee, George C


R.


Nov.


4,1902


Jan. 7, 1903


Regent of University' of California, 1899.


Gillett, James N


R.


Nov.


6,1906


Jan. 9, 1907


Represenutive in Congress, 1903-1906.


Johnson, Hiram W.


R.


Nov.


8, 1910


Jan. 9, 1911


Re-elected Nov. 3, 1914. Elected U. S.
Senator Nov. 7, 1916. Resigned as
Governor March 15, 1917.


Stephens, Wm. D. ..


R.






Mar. 15, 1917


Member of Congress, 10th Dist., 1910-






1916. Appointed Lieutenant-Governor
July 19, 1916.


Stephens, Wm. D.


R.


Nov.


5, 1918


Jan. 7, 1919


Elected 1918.


Richardson, Friend Wm.


R.


Nov.


7, 1922


Jan. 9, 1923


State Treasurer, 19151922.


Young, C. C. -


R.


Nov.


2, 1926


Jan. 4, 1927


Lieutenant-Governor, 1919-1927.


Rolph, James, Jr


R.

«


Nov.


4, 1930


Jan. 6, 1931


Mayor San Francisco, 1912-30.



372



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



November-December



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?7?



OFFICIAL PROGRAM

for the %plph Inaugural Celebration

SACRAMENTO, JANUARY 4, 5, 6, 1931



SUNDAY, January 4, Reception and Music

9 A. M. to 12 Noon — Reception.

I P. M. to 4 P. M. — Pilgrimage to landmarks, public buildings, etc. Music, orchestras, bands, musical
societies, at Sutter's Fort, Crocker Art Gallery, State Capitol, Capitol Extension, Hotel
lobbies, etc.

6: 30 P. M. — Governor Rolph in farewell radio program in San Francisco.

MONDAY, January 5, Pioneer Day

9 A. M. to 12 Noon — Reception.

I P. M. to 4 P. M. — Pioneer Parade, to consist of delegation from all counties desiring to participate.
Floats, covered wagons, prairie schooners, oxen, miners. Harry Peterson, curator of Sutter's
Fort, Chairman, and Edgar Simpson of Hood, Marshal.

6:30 P. M. to 8 P. M. — Banquet of California Mayors, ex-Mayors, and their wives and the San Fran-
cisco Board of Supervisors and wives. Will Rogers to be invited to preside.

6:30 P. M. to 8 P. M. — Legislative Banquet.

8 P. M. to 10 P. M. — Memorial Auditorium. Movie colony entertainment by Southern California
delegation.



TUESDAY, January 6, INAUGURATION DAY

9 A. M. to 10 A. M. — Reception — U. S. Army airplane flights over city by planes from Mather

Field, Crissey Field and Rockwell Field.

10 A. M. to 12 Noon — Inaugural ceremonies west side of State Capitol.
2 P. M. to 4 P. M. (or earlier) — Military parade.

8 P. M. to 10 P. M. — Governor Rolph pubUc reception, rotunda State Capitol. Orchestra in balcony.

8 P. M. to Dawn — Inaugural Ball. Central point, Memorial Auditorium. Music by San Francisco
Municipal Band. Fifteenth Street, I to K Street to be closed, music by loud speaker system
from Auditorium to streets and dancing in streets. J. H. Stephens, Chairman. (Formal to
11:45 P. M. on dance floor.)

11:30 P. M. — Grand March in Auditorium led by Governor Rolph.



374



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



November-December



Congratulations and best wishes to
all of our new state officials

Particularly do I wish to commend our

GOVERNOR JAMES ROLPH, JR.

upon his selection of

COL. WALTER GARRISON

as Director of Public Works

and

CHARLES S. PURCELL
as State Highway Engineer

May your Administrations Be Most Successful

CLYDE W. WOOD

ENGINEER & CONTRACTOR

Builder of
HIGHWAYS AND AIRWAYS

STOCKTON, CALIF.



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November-December



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



375




FROM MAYOR
TO GOVERNOR



HISTORY OF THE CAMPAIGN



By Frank B. Anderson

Editor and Publisher, "Sausalito News'



FOR nearly half a century there
had never been a Governor re-
elected in California with the single
exception of Hiram Johnson. San
Francisco had gone on in the mean-
time re-electing its internationally
famous Mayor, James Rolph, Jr..
until finally there came almost a
state-wide demand that he be ele-
vated to the position of Governor.
He had served his city well, and in
so doing had been an important fac-
tor in the development of California
as a whole. Therefore, the people
of the State generally insisted that
he become their chief executive.

Had Been a Candidate

Rolph had been a candidate for
the position once before. He nar-
rowly lost out for the Republican
nomination back in 1918, but car-
ried the Democratic. So far as pop-
ular vote in the primary election of
that year was concerned, he was the
choice of the majority, which were
the voters who registered under
the heads of the respective parties.
As a registered Republican, James
Rolph, Jr., could not accept the
gubernatorial nomination tendered
him by the minority party, so he
continued to administer the affairs
of the City and County of San Fran-
cisco. Every four years since that
time he was spoken of as a poten-
tial candidate. He graciously de-
clined the pleadings of his friends
from all over California, evidently
preferring to complete the cycle of
twenty years as Mayor of San
Francisco.

While the twenty years is not
quite rounded out, James Rolph,



Jr., is going to Sacramento with the ica. He saw his home town arise

background of the longest period of from the ashes ; pass through the

useful service that any man has ever Exposition period ; build one of the

given a metropolitan city in Amer- most outstanding Civic Centers of

ROLPH TURNS FIRST SHOVEL OF EARTH FOR
HAYWARD CITY HALL




Left to right: Mayor J. If. De Cou of San Leandro, Judge Jacob Harder, Jr.,

Mayor James Rolph, Jr. .vslio turned the first shovelful of earth; Sheriff Michael

B. Driver of .llameda County, and Mayor John Lee H'ilbur of Haya-ard.



376



any city in the land, and conducted
an administration free from the
scandals that had only a few years
before his first election kept the
municipal g-overnment on the front
pages of the press for many months,
mostl}' in an unfavorable light.

Rolph turned out to be such an
able municipal executive that the
time was not far distant when he
would be drafted into a broader
field. There were those who doubted
the wisdom of his becoming a can-
didate for the more important post.
They wanted to keep him to them-
selves as San Francisco's Mayor,
not that they were fearful of 'the
outcome of a state-wide battle for
i-otes, but because they did not
want to lose his services.

In the meantime Rolph had been



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



November-December



traveling around the state for years.
"The lifeblood of the State' ebbs
and flows through San Francisco
Bay," according to an old saying.
R.olph did not take this particular
view of the importance of his own
city because he was well aware that
there are other harbors and other
places where commerce, as well as
the tides, flow in and out. He studied
his native state and met its people
as well as people from other shores
and other countries. He became a
national and international figure.
Mayor Rolph put San Francisco on
the map quite as effectively as
San Francisco was putting Mayor
Rolph on the map of political pres-
tige.

During all this time of attaining
prestige for his native city — to-



gether with his native state — Mayor
Rolph could not escape the political
preferment that was accumulating
in his favor as a logical candidate
for the Republican nomination for
Governor at the primary election
last August. The people were
clamoring for a change and he
measured up as the ideal man for
the job.

As the new year of 1930 opened,
Rolph headed the Tournament of
Roses parade in Pasadena, where
he was hailed with enthusiastic ac-
claim. From that time on there was
no alternative. He simply had to
become an aspirant for guberna-
torial honofs. He was pressed on
every side for engagements that
took him to many places about the
state. In other words, he was being




INSPECTING THE NEW INIFORMS OF THE SAN FRANCISCO POLICE MOTORCYCLE PATROL



November-Decembt r



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



377




SAN FR.\NCISCOS BEAUTIFUL CITY HALL



given careful scrutiny, or the "once
over," as they say, to see how he
would measure up as a popular can-
didate for Governor.

Leaders in Every Community

Leaders in every community, who
do not ordinarily synchronize in
their political views, were of the
same accord by agreeing that San
Francisco's Mayor was just the type
of man needed as the State's Gov-
ernor. Rolph was given a thorough
cross-examination wherever he went
during these days of "feeling out."

Needless to say, he measured up
100 per cent. He possessed the
background of business and polit-
ical ability which one must have in
these days of the direct primary.
In fact, his campaign was made for
him. He was a "natural set-up," as
they say in the parlance of political
observers.

It was not until along in April,
however, that Rolph "threw his hat
into the ring.'' When he did decide
to yield to p>opular demand he set
out upon a campaign such as the
State of California has never seen.
One of his early commitments was
that he would visit each of the fifty-
eight counties in the state.

As publicity director during the



last month or so of the primary
campaign, the writer can frankly
state that Rolph appeared to be sac-
rificing votes for a principle. South-
ern California was crying for his
presence in that sector, yet he was
in the north winding up his tour of
the counties. He was carrying out
his promise to the Republican vot-
ers of California that he would visit
every one of their counties. He
wanted to meet the people of the
state, study their local problems and
thereby become better equipped to
handle their affairs upon becoming
their Governor.

Traveled by Airplane

\\'hile Rolph was making his tour
of counties, traveling by airplane,
railroads and automobile, he had a
host of friends working for him
throughout California. .\ faithful
little band of an office force (not
office seekers) was looking after his
campaign headquarters in the larger
towns of the state. A committee on
finance was "sweating blood" trying
to raise enough money for the mea-
ger e.xpenses to carry "The Boss" —
as his official family knows him —
through to victory. This finance
committee, concentrating its efforts
chieflv in San Francisco, had an ex-



tremely difficult task. Rolph would
not permit acceptance of a dime
that had a string attached to it.
Where there were willing contrib-
utors to help his re-election as
Mayor of San Francisco, they were
just as unwilling to see him move to
the larger job of Governor.

Kept Up Enthusiasm

Nevertheless, the Rolph forces
managed to keep up enthusiasm all
over California. The modest adver-
tising budget was spread as far as
it could go. for which the country
dailies and weeklies were duly ap-
preciative. The statement has been
made by newspapers publishers that
the Rolph primary campaign treated
the smaller papers more equitably
than they had ever heretofore fared
at the hands of any candidate for
Governor.

However, regardless of other in-
fluences, it was Rolphs own per-
sonality that was the most impor-
tant factor in gaining the Repub-
lical nomination last August. The
November election was only a rati-
fication — and what a mighty one it
was! San Francisco's Mayor car-
ried his fight directly to the people
It was the man's frankness and sin-



378



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



November-December



cerity that won for him the support
of voters from one end of the state
to the other.

He will never admit it, but he was
confronted with more indignities
than were ever heaped upon a man
accustomed to lending the hand of
goodfellowship. These abuses were
hurled through the press, over the



radio and otherwise. But, broad-
minded man that he is, James
Rolph, Jr., went right on, making a
clean, gentlemanly campaign, free
from vilification of any kind.

He is now California's Governor,
and, as such, will live up to his cam-
paign assertion that he will be Gov-
ernor for all of the people of Cali-



fornia. And he won't even ask how
you voted in August or November.
Politician, they might call him, but
Rolph is a builder, and building a
business administration for all of
California is exactly what he is
going to do these coming four
years — and thereafter as long as we
can keep him with us.



We're Going to Miss

Jim Rolph



By John J. Whelan

Business Manager, South of Market Journal



WE'RE going to miss Jim
Rolph. We, of San Fran-
cisco, who have known him so long
and so intimately, are going to miss
his portly figure, the carnation that
always graces the lapel of his im-
maculate coat, his boots, his high
topper and his contagious smile.
We're going to miss the gracious
tributes that endeared the heart of
every world traveler to "the City by
the Golden Gate,'' and we're going
to miss the honor and distinction
that he has brought to his beloved
city during five terms as Mayor of
San Francisco.

San Francisco's loss is Califor-
nia's gain. We're proud that Mayor
James Rolph, Jr., a San Francisco
boy from "south of Market" is to
be California's next Governor. We're
proud that we are to share his abil-
ity, his personality and his worth as
a man and an executive with all the
people of California for the next
four years. We're proud that the
people of California have bestowed
the highest honor in the State upon
him, but we'll miss him from San
Francisco.

It was down on Minna Street,
south of Market, that James Rolph.
Jr., was born on August 23, 1869.
In those days it was a residential
district, now a commercial one. It
was the heart of the "south of the
slot" district that has now been per-
petuated in everlasting memory by
the South of Market Boys. It was



in this district that he spent his boy-
hood, and from where he emerged
to become San Francisco's foremost
citizen.

Will Rogers, the ex-mayor of
Beverly Hills and noted humorist,
calls Mayor Rolph the "hereditary
Mayor." Will boasts about his In-
dian ancestry, but if Mayor Jim
Rolph wanted to be half as loqua-
cious he could go Mr. Rogers one
better, for Mayor Rolph is a direct
descendant of Pocahontas. There is
no need to go into the Captain John
Smith story, but the fact that the
noted Indian beauty went from Vir-
ginia to England and there became
the bride of John Rolf is recorded
in the pages of history. The Rolph
family tree goes right back to Poca-
hontas.

This is one of the reason that vis-
itors to the Mayor's office in the



San Francisco City Hall are greeted
by a wooden Indian that once
graced the front of a long departed
cigar store. Those wooden Indians,
once so common, are now antiques,
and the one the Mayor possesses is
a gift from his friend, Joseph J.
Tynan. Mr. Tynan found it in a
Philadelphia warehouse. It has been
identified as the father of Pocahon-
tas. The gift fulfilled a long-felt
wish of his honor.

James Rolph, Jr., is a mixture of
English and Edinburgh Scotch. His
father was born in London, his
mother in Edinburgh.

Young Jimmy Rolph played base-
ball on the sand lots of the Mission
district and attended the old Valen-
cia Street Primary School. From
there he went to the old Horace
Mann School. After school hours
he sold newspapers. He graduated




Janitor Frank Rajarl,
Police Captain Charley
Goff and Head Janitor
ll^iUiain Carriuishing
the Mayor happy
returns.



November-December



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



379



from Trinity College on May 24,
1888. He is a typical product of the
Mission district.

Sea in Blood

His first job was as a cash boy in
the dry goods store of Keane Broth-
ers. Later he became an office boy
in the brokerage firm of S. B. Wake-
field & Co. It was in this job that
he secured his business start.

The sea got into "Jimmy" Rolph's
blood early. He heeded the call
when he left the brokerage firm to
join the shipping firm of De Witt,
Kittle & Co. as an office boy. His
salary was $4.50 a week. His rise
in the business world was not spec-
tacular. But it was steady. He be-
came cashier at a salary of $150 a
month.

In those days that was a lot of
money. It was more than sufficient.
Young Rolph decided to get mar-
ried. So he took the matter up with
Miss Annie M. Reid and she said
"Yes." She will go with him to
Sacramento next month. Theirs
has been a happy and successful
wedded life. Three children have
been borne to them : Annette, now
Mrs. John P. Symes ; James Rolph
III, and Georgina, now Mrs. Rich-
ard Crossley Willitts, of Berkeley.

Character and Energy

The character and energy of Jim
Rolph asserted itself immediately
after the devastating fire of 1906.
Thousands upon thousands of San
Franciscans were made homeless by
the flames. The Mission district es-
caped the flames, and homeless
thousands fled there for relief. The
day after the earthquake a fire
broke out at Thirteenth and Valen-
cia streets, leaped to Dolores street
and began to creep south. Thou-
sands fled from the path of . the
flames which, however, were stopped
at Twentieth Street.

Young Rolph leaped into the
breach. He saw that organization
was necessary for relief. He se-
cured a deputy marshal's star,
climbed upon his horse and rode
through the district calling upon
leaders and influential citizens to
meet and lay plans for relief of the
homeless thousands. Here, in the
Rolph barn at Twenty-fifth and
Guerrero streets, the Mission Relief
Committee was born with "Jim"
Rolph as chairman. Under the able
guidance of the young chairman, the
committee functioned without a
flaw. Food began to arrive — where



it came from is a mystery to this
day — but arrive it did. More than
7000 refugees were cared for and all
through 1906 "Jim" Rolph directed
the committee.

It was during these stirring days
that attention was focused upon
young Rolph. His fellow citizens
recognized him as a leader and an
executive. Maj^be he thought of
politics ; maybe he didn't. But in
an}' event he was recognized as a
dependable, efficient young man
whom it would be wise to watch.

When the emergency had passed
and a new San Francisco was rising
from the ashes, other civic matters
began to find their way to the desk
of young Rolph. When, in Sep-
tember of 1900, the Mission Relief
Committee was merged with the
Mission Promotion Association, its
first president was James Rolph, Jr.
Then followed active and energetic
participation in the Islais Creek In-
land Harbor Association, a director-
ship in the Shipowners' Association
of the Pacific Coast and trusteeship



in the San "Francisco Chamber of
Commerce.

The habit of being returned to of-
fice was already beginning to make
itself shown, for Rolph served three
consecutive terms as president of
the Merchants' Exchange and was
active in unifying the commercial
interests of the present San Fran-
cisco Chamber of Commerce, an
outgrowth of the Merchants' Ex-
change and the Merchants' Asso-
ciation.

He turned his attention to bank-
ing in 1903 when he established the
Mission Bank at Julian Avenue and
Sixteenth Street ; in 1906 a separate
banking institution, the Mission Sav-
ings Bank, was organized and
opened at Sixteenth and Valencia
streets with Rolph as president.
This is now the Mission Savings
Bank, office of the American Trust
Company.

It was at this time that Jim
Rolph turned seriously to politics.
He was persuaded to enter the may-
oralty race in 1911. He was elected




Photo by Californians, Inc.
SAN FR-^NCISCOS BEAITIFIL CITY HALL
An Unusual I'ievi



38o THE MUNICIPAL RECORD November-December



BASICH BROTHERS CONSTRUCTION CO.

(INCORPORATED)

20550 South Normandie Avenue
Torrance, California



Compliments of

GEORGE DALEY

SAN DIEGO



Compliments of

HENRY G. FENTON

GRADING AND GENERAL CONTRACTOR

Office and Yards: Dewey and Main Streets
Phone MAIN 3073

SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA



Buy from firms that advertise with us



November-December



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



381




CALIFORNIA PALACE OF THE LEGION OF HONOR



by a majority of 16.007. In 1915 he
was again elected, this time with a
majority of 9,444. In 1919 his ma-
jority was 23,931, and in 1923 it to-
taled 28.030. In 1927 his majority
was 31,024. The majority in the
gubernatorial race is of too recent
date to need comment.

The Rolph Navigation and Coal
Company was organized in 1914.
In 1917, when ships were needed
like they have never been demanded
in history, Rolph and a few asso-
ciates took over the old Bendixen
shipyards at Eureka and began to
build wooden ships.

The launching of the first vessel
completed at Eureka will live long
in the memory of Mayor Rolph.
members of the Board of Super-
visors, newspapermen and a host of
friends who were present. Mayor
Rolph never does anything by
halves. On this occasion he en-
gaged a special train for the party.



Online LibrarySan Francisco (Calif.). Board of SupervisorsThe municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) → online text (page 80 of 84)