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San Francisco (Calif.). Board of Supervisors.

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At the start every member was pres-
ent with a badge. When the party
arrived at Eureka that badge with
the name Rolph on it was equiva-
lent to a key to the city. It was im-
possible for any member of the
party to spend money. Everything
was free. Every home in the city
was open to the guests. It was one
of the finest tributes that has ever
been paid by a community to the
executives of a great city.

Best Known Executive

Rolph is probably the be.-^t known
executive in the world. It would be
difficult to find a city where the
name of James Rolph, Jr., is not
known. It was in 1915, the year of
the Panama-Pacific Exposition, that
his fame began to spread. As the
city's chief executive he naturally



headed the reception committee. As
a matter of fact, he was the re-
ception committee. He greeted
every notable who arrived during
the year, and when they left the
personality of "Sunny Jim" Rolph
was stamped indelibly upon their
memory. When one thought of
San Francisco they thought of
Mayor Rolph. When they thought
of Rolph they thought of San Fran-
cisco. He was as indigenous to San
Francisco as the roses he cultivates
in his Mission garden, which is his
principal hobby.

Result of Activities

As a result of his activities in
welcoming notables arriving for the
exposition, His Honor has medals
and decorations enough to cover his
stalwart chest and give him the ap-
pearance of a South American gen-
eral on parade. If he chose he could
wear any or all of the following
decorations :

Chevalier of the Legion of Honor
of France.

Officer of the Legion of Honor of
France.

Commander of the Order of Leo-
pold I of Belgium.

Commander of the Royal Order
of George I of Greece.

Officer of the Crown of Italy.

Commander of the Order of
Orange-Xassau of the Netherlands.

The story of the progress of
James Rolph, Jr., is the story of
San Francisco. The two are insep-
arable. Previous to January 8. 1912.
when "Sunny Jim" first entered the
City Hall, civic progress had been
largely a matter of individual ef-
fort. Reconstruction after the fire
was largely a matter of individual



effort, with the city, because of
finances, playing a minor part.
Mayor James Rolph looked over the
situation, thought about it and then
decided to act. Streets were paved
with cobble stones and basalt block.
The fire department was antiquated
and horse-drawn. Only temporary
buildings housed the city's business
oflSces. He acted. He started the
ball rolling and before long asphalt
was replacing the cobble stones.
The antiquated fire department was
replaced with the most modern
equipment. A high pressure fire
system was installed. Never again
would the lack of water cause a con-
flagration such as that of 1906.

One of his first acts was to lav
the groundwork for what is now the
Civic Center of San Francisco. He
advocated it from the start, and
while there was plenty of opposi-
tion, he convinced opponents that it
was for the betterment of San Fran-
cisco, and it stands today as an
everlasting monument to his far-
sightedness.

Will Not Brook Delays

Jim Rolph is not one to brook
delays. Consequently every matter
that he entered into was rushed.
That is the way the Twin Peaks and
the Stockton Street tunnels were
completed in record time, the former
opening a new residential district
to San Francisco, and the latter re-
lieving traffic congestion in the
downtown area. Just two more
monuments to the memory of
Mayor James Rolph, Jr.

The list of civic and public im-
provements advocated and accom-
plished by Mayor Rolph during his



382



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



November-December



five terms as Mayor would be to list •
everything that San Francisco has
done during the past twenty years.
Not the least of them are the
improved and modernized public
school system and the program of
the establishment of public play-
grounds for children in all parts of
the city. Both are linked with the
Rolph policy for public betterment.

Another step in the Rolph mile-
stone of progress is the Hetch
Hetchy project. This is a project
which has long been dear to the
Rolph heart, and when completed it
will give San Francisco clear, spar-
kling, crystal water direct from the
high snows of the Sierra. It will be
one of the major accomplishments
of the Rolph regime, and when the
final credit for the project is given
it will bear the name of Jim Rolph.

San Francisco loves Jim Rolph.
When he was elected for the fifth
time, making him the dean of Amer-
ican Mayors, the flowers that his
friends sent him overflowed his of-
fice. They literally flooded the
Civic Center. Telegrams, cable-
grams and wireless messages were
received from all parts of the globe.



Old friends do not forget Jim
Rolph.

The flowers caused him the great-
est joy. He loves flowers and culti-
vates them in his garden. As one
writer recently expressed it: "Jim
Rolph would rather have flowers
now when he can smell them."

Mayor "Sunny Jim" Rolph is al-
ways democratic. He has been
known to stop his car on a highway
to aid a distressed motorist. He has
been known to pick up some hiker
and give him a lift as far as possible,
and even, when the occasion war-
ranted it, to pass a crumpled bill
into the hand of the wayfarer "just
in case of emergency." He is known
to thousands and loved by every
one of them. He is one man that
has never had a real enemy. Politi-
cal opponents he has had, but let
any one of them express their per-
sonal opinion of Jim Rolph and the
words will be words of love and
affection.

Mayor Rolph's principles — of pol-
itics and action — are the best an-
swer to why he has been so uni-
versally loved and respected by the
people of San Francisco.



He likes to hunt deer, and when-
ever the exigencies of his office per-
mit he will slip away for two or
three days to hike over mountain
trails. He doesn't smoke, play
bridge or carry a cane.

He is the delight of newspaper-
men. He likes them and they like
him. During the Democratic Na-
tional Convention he took the entire
corps of correspondents to his home
down the peninsula and the party he
gave them will never be forgotten.
Just ask Sam Blythe, Irvin S. Cobb,
H. L. Mencken or any of the rest.

Yes, San Francisco will miss Jim
Rolph. We'll miss him, for he is a
man and for what he has done for
San Francisco. He is as much a
part of San Francisco as Golden
Gate Park, the Ferry Building or
Twin Peaks. He goes to Sacra-
mento to carry on on a wider,
greater scale. And when the day
comes for him to step out of the
Capitol at Sacramento, some writer
will tell of his accomplishments as
Governor of California, and they
will be as great, or greater, than the
multitude of benefits he has brought
to San Francisco.



Senator Bradford S» Crittenden
20th Senatorial District



Assemblyman, Nineteenth Dis-
trict; born January 20, 1876, Cuya-
hoga County, Ohio; son Samuel O.
and Lemira D. Bradford Critten-
den ; educated grammar school,
CaHfornia ; Academy, University,
Pacific B. L. ; University of Cali-
fornia, LL. B.; Pacific University,
M. L. ; married Edith M. MacChes-
ney, July 17, 1907, San Jose, Cali-
fornia. Member County Exemption
Board.

Chairman local committee War
Relief Drives; 1917 City Attorney.
Tracy, California. 1921-23-25-27-29.
elected to Assembly of California
Legislature ; member California Re-
publican State Central Committee ;
member special committee. Legisla-
ture, to investigate Railroad Com-
mission, 1921.

Special Committee on Election
Expenditures, 1923. Member Spe-
cial Committee on Teachers Col-
leges, Chairman Joint Legislative
Committee investigating Water
Resources of California, 1927. Chair-
man of same committee 1929, au-
thor of Bill for a State Departhient
of Commerce, 1929.




Author of State Constitutional
amendment modifying the rule in
regard to water rights. Nineteen
thirty, elected to the Senate of Cali-
fornia Legislature, Twentieth Dis-
trict. Member: Masons, Elks, I. O.
O. F., K. of P., M. E. Church.
Clubs : California Commonwealth,



Lions. Residence: 145 East Hard-
ing Way, Stockton, California. Of-
fice: 305 Bank of Italy Building.



CITY PROPERTY VALUE
TOTALS 227 MILLIONS



The fortune that taxpayers have
invested in the properties of the
city and county of San Francisco
reaches a grand total of $227,114,-
681.99.

That total does not include prop-
erties of the Spring Valley Water
Co., acquired this year by the water
department at a cost of over $40,-
000,000.

The figures were compiled today
from the books of the auditor.

The city owns $42,482,913.51 of
land, $130,271,195.60 of improve-
ments and has $13,835,677.18 worth
of equipment.

Hetch Hetchy Leads

Hetch Hetchy water development
leads the individual classifications
with a valuation of $38,031,351.72.

All of the streets in the city are
worth $37,514,536.21 and the schools
$33,943,195.44; Hetch Hetchy power
plants and transmissions lines, $21,-
010,814.54 ; sewers, $16,277,920.38.



November-December



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



383



MY ESTEEMED FRIEND




JAMES ROLPH, JR.



By Louis B. Mayer

Vice-President, in Charge of Production , Metro-Goldwyn-Xlayer Studios
Vice-Chairman of the Republican State Central Committee



I COUNT as both a pleasure and
honor the invitation of the City
and County of San Francisco ^lu-
NiciPAL Record to address the men
and women who have been for so
long the "official familj^"' of that
great public servant, and my es-
teemed friend, James Rolph, Jr.

I could talk about picture-making,
about prosperity, etc., but it is more
fitting that I should make "Jim"
Rolph the sole subject of this mes-
sage to you.

All over the state we know how
much all of you are regretting that
"Jim"' is to leave San Francisco to
fill the Governor's chair at Sacra-
mento. I know, however, that deep
as that regjet is, you rejoice with



all of your fellow citizens that this
splendid man is to go to a larger
sphere of usefulness.

I have known James Rolph, Jr..
for many years, but during the past
campaign I came in very much
closer touch with him. I have seen
him in all sorts of emergencies, and
I have never seen him lose his poise,
his shrewd common sense, or his
good humor. I further have the
highest admiration for the man's
personal courage, for I saw him ful-
fill engagements during his swing
through the state at grave risk to
his own health.

I am highly gratified over the
enormous vote Governor Rolph re-
ceived in Southern California, where.



of course, he is not as intimately
known as he is among you. Our
friends below the Tehachapi. how-
ever, are not slow in their recogni-
tion of real genius. The great to-
tal of their ballots speaks for itself.

With Rolph in the saddle we can
expect a coming administration
which is honest, human, economical
and, above all, progressive.

One thing is certain — the pledges
Governor Rolph made during his
campaign he will keep, religiously.
Through all his years of political
activity "Jim" Rolph's name has
stood for spotless integrity. He will
govern this state for all the people
all of the time.



Rolph Has Encouraged Building Modern Schools




The ncv: Portola Junior High School, a 1928 Board of Works accomplishment



384



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



November-December



A LIFE OF MUNICI



ROLPH'S STORY

IS A HISTORY

of the

PROGRESS

of
SAN FRANCISCO




IAN FRANCISCO'S record of
civic development during the
eighteen years during which James
Rolph, Jr., has served as chief
executive clearly emphasizes the
fact that her mayor has been a man
born with a genius for public ser-
vice.

He has been rightly called "Rolph
the Builder," for under his leader-



ship a vast construction program
has been carried out making San
Francisco a more beautiful, a more
modern, and a more healthful city
in which to live. A matchless city
hall, its "dome 47 feet higher than
the dome of the capitol building in
Washington"; the greatest munici-
pal railway in the world ; a school
system second to none ; a park sys-



tem which is an outstanding ex-
ample of man's power of accom-
plishment ; these are but a few of
the achievements in which James
Rolph, Jr., during his splendid ca-
reer as the mayor of San Francisco
has been the leader.

His regime has seen the de-
velopment of playgrounds famous
throughout the country. Our streets



Leading Firms and Individuals Who Have Assisted

This Testimonial Edition



W. B. BAKER ELECTRIC CO.
270 Sixth St.

BELL BROTHERS
792 Mills Building

CALIFORNIA SCREW CO.
74 Clementina St.

COFFEE DAN'S
196 O'FarreU St.

DR. WM. W. HOAGLAND
908 Market St.



FRANK FOOD CO.
974 Howard St.

GILLE SHOW PRINT CO.
818 Mission St.

STANDARD BRANDS OF CALIF.
245 Eleventh St.

JACK JOHNSON CO.
3365 Army St.

E. K. WOOD LUMBER CO.
Fife Building



H. B. MILLS CO.
310 Sansome St.

DAVIS EMERGENCY EQUIP. CO.
1268 Mission St.

LAWSON ROOFING CO.
Seventeenth St.

LEROY OLSEN CO.
170 Hooper St.

PEERLESS WELDING CO.
155 Tenth St.



\



November-December



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



Jh



AL ACHIEVEMENTS




BERNAL CUT— A MAJOR ACHIEVEMENT
Vie<ws shoiuing magnitude of construction operations



and highways compare favorably
with the best in the world. Our po-
lice and fire departments, both in
equipment and personnel, are mod-
els of efficiency and accomplish-
ment. The acquisition of the
Spring Valley properties and the
Hetch Hetchy water S3^stem makes
San Francisco one of the best sup-
plied cities in the world with refer-
ence to this most important of com-
modities, water.

Perhaps one of the most impor-
tant achievements during the ad-
ministrations of Rolph as mayor of
San Francisco is the construction
of the Hetch Hetchy project. Active
construction began in 1914. This
consisted of preliminary work such
as building roads and trails and in



the construction of 68 miles of rail-
way from Mather to Hetch Hetchy.
Damsite. This part of the work was
completed in June, 1918.

Following this, surveys were
made for the Early Intake Aqueduct
power house and the dam at Lake
Eleanor. Soon after, construction
was actually begun. On June 18,
1919, Early Intake power house
started generating energy with the
water from Lake Eleanor, and elec-
tric power was provided for all con-
struction activities.

The next step was the building
of a large nineteen-mile aqueduct,
450 million gallons a day capacity,
and a power house at Moccasin
Creek. These were put into ser-
vice on August 21, 1925. This one



unit alone produces about 100.000
horsepower, or one and one-third
million kilowatt hours of energy per
dav. It also vields a gross income
of '$2.300,000 'a year to the tax-
payers.

Considering an expense for opera-
tion of $300,000 per year the power
crop yields a net of $2,000,000 per
vear, which is 5 per cent on $40.-
000.000 or 4y2 per cent on $45,000,-
000.

The Foothill Division from Moc-
casin Power House to the San
Joaquin Valle}' involves sixteen
miles of pressure tunnels for a ca-
pacity of 470,000,000 gallons daily.

Another interesting feature of the
work was the construction of the
transbay pipe line from Irvington



SUDDEN LUMBER CO.
1950 Third St.

ROSENBERG BROS. 8C CO.
334 California St.

R. A. McNEIL
25 Taylor St.

JNO. MOORE 8C SON
106 Golden Gate Ave,

GENERAL STEAMSHIP CO.
240 Battery St.

JOHN H. BLAKEWAY

EDGAR WALTERS

105 Beale St.



J. H. KRESS CO.
935 Market St.

SEVILLE OLIVE OIL CO.
623 Sansome St.

MOR-JELL FOOD CO.
355 Eighth St.

MICHEL 8i PFEFFER IRON WKS.
Harrison at Tenth St.

LEVI STRAUSS 8C CO.
98 Battery St.

San Francisco Bar Pilots Association
Bulkhead Pier No. 7



IRVINE ac JACHENS
1068 Mission St.

GENERAL MACHINERY CO.
39 Stevenson St.

G. F. BISHOP CO.
821 Howard St.

BUCKINGHAM 8C HECHT
25 First St.

JOSEPH T. CAVANAUGH
340 Eleventh St.

ARTHUR A. GOEPP, Inc.
70 Twelfth St.



386



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



November-December



Northwest Engineering Company

23 Main Street
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.

The World's Largest Exclusive
Builders of Gasoline and Electric
Shovels, Cranes and Draglines



Office Phone 3362



Res. Phone 276329



Cornwall Construction Company

ENGINEERING CONTRACTORS
Excavating, Paving and Road Work

219 East Mason Street
SANTA BARBARA, CALIFORNIA



LEAD



BUNKER HILL BRAND LEAD PRODUCTS

99.99% PURE

Sheet Lead / Lead Pipe i Lead Wool i Pig Lead
Lead Fittings < Calking Lead

Lead Burning Contractors

BUNKER HILL SMELTER
NORTHWEST LEAD CO.

Manufacturers

F. A. HAMMERSMITH, District Sales Manager
Crocker Building San Francisco

LOS ANGELES OAKLAND SACRAMENTO SPOKANE

SEATTLE SAN DIEGO SALT LAKE CITY



Best Wishes to


GOVERNOR JAMES ROLPH, JR.


and


His New Staff of Officers


H. H. PETERSON


GENERAL CONTRACTOR


SAN DIEGO CALIFORNIA



OFFICE AND PLANT

1999 Third Street, San Francisco



TELEPHONES

MArket2016 / MArket 6909



MONTAGUE

PIPEi^^^ STEEL



SanFi



an rranasco




or ma •



Manufacturers of

Riveted and Welded Steel Pipe, Well
Casing, Tanks, Boilers and Stacks,
Montague Hot Water Type Heaters,
Montague Siphons. ^ ^ ^

A GENERAL LINE OF SHEET STEEL AND PLATE WORK



Buy from firms that advertise with us



November-December



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



387



Start of a Great Achievement

















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il



SIGNING THE CONTRACT FOR SUNSET TUNNEL



to Crystal Springs Lake, south of
Dumbarton. The line is twenty-
two miles long. It extends from
Irvington to Crystal Springs Reser-
voir. It goes under the waters of
the bay by means of submarine pipe
2700 feet long and emerges onto a
bridge 3800 feet long. It passes
through Redwood City and goes
westerly through the Pulgas tunnel
into Crystal Springs Reservoir.

One of the most unique and diffi-
cult operations of the mountain
water supply project is the con-
struction of the tunnel which will
carry the Hatch Hetchy water from
the San Joaquin Valley to the val-
lev of the San Francisco Bav.



Tunnel Begins

The tunnel begins at Tesla Portal
at the base of the foothills, seven
miles south of Trac}', runs in a gen-
eral westerly and southwesterly
direction for 25.1 miles and emerges
to daylight at Alameda East Portal
in Sunol Valley about two miles
south of the well known Water
Temple. Pipe 0.6 mile in length will
be laid across this valley to Ala-
meda \\'est Portal, the beginning
of "a second unit of tunnel, 3.6 miles
long, which ends at Irvington Por-
tal, near the historic old Mission
San Jose.

The twenty-five-mile single tun-
nel is the longest tunnel ever at-
tempted by man, and overcoming



of the many difficulties encountered
in its construction is reflecting great
credit on the men engaged on the
work. A great many of these men
are seasoned veterans who so suc-
cessfully drove the nineteen-mile
and seventeen-mile tunnels between
Hetch Hetchy and the San Joaquin
Valley.

The Hetch Hetchy project has re-
ceived favorable comment from
American. European and Austral-
ian engineers and is a splendid
monument to the achievements
James Rolph, Jr., as mayor of San
Francisco, and M. M. O'Shaugh-
nessy, city engineer.

The highway system of San Fran-
cisco has been improved during the
years of Rolph's administration un-



CHRISTENSON LUMBER CO.
Fifth and Hooper St.

CHAS. R. McCORMICK LBR. CO.
215 Market St.

THE ROBERT DOLLAR CO.
311 California St.

CLARK SC HENRY CONST. CO.
564 Market St.

STERLING MOTOR TRUCK CO.
1190-1198 Howard St.

McDonnell sc co.

633 Market St.



C. G. CONN, Ltd.
47 Kearny St.

LINDAUER & CO.
35 Oak Grove St.

KINDEL & GRAHAM

782 Mission St.
KRAFTILE COMPANY

55 New Montgomery St.

GEO. HERMAN CO.
300 Front St.

California Stevedoring & Ballast Co.
311 California St.



CALIFORNIA FILTER CO.
981 Fokom St.

STATE FINANCE COMPANY
582 Market St.

DIAMOND SPRINGS LIME CO.
1642 Russ Building

L. PH. BOLANDER & SONS
954 Bryant St.

SAMUEL S. BREWER
Hobart Building

THE NORMAN F. HALL CO.
148-150 First St.



388



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD



November-December



Ho<w the Tuolumne River
looked in 1914; the
O'Shaughnessy Dam noiu
stretches across this nar-
roimi gorge.



til it is second to none. Among the
projects sponsored by him are the
Great Highway and the Ocean
Beach Esplanade, constructed at a
cost of $1,000,000, and considered to
be the finest highway system ever
completed. This project, which is
the widest stretch of pavement in
the United States, was dedicated in
1929 and connects the Sloat Boule-
vard, the Skyline Boulevard and
other heavy traffic arteries. Flanked
on both sides by ornamental grass
plots and seasonal flowers, and il-
luminated by modern type electro-
liers, this highway stands a marked
example of Ijeauty and usefulness.
Another of the achievements con-
tributing to the progress of San
Francisco was the construction of
the Stockton Street tunnel, ^which
extends from Bush to StoGkttsw
Street. This tunnel is 910 feet long.
50 feet wide and 19 feet in height
in the clear. It is the widest tun-




nel in America and not only ac-
commodates two sidewalks but has
a 36-foot roadway. The tunnel was
completed in 1914 at a cost of
$656,000.

A Great Achievement

Another great achievement was
the Marina Boulevard, completed in
1913. This has proved to be one of
the most popular drives in the city.
A like achievement was the building
of the Sunset Boulevard, made pos-
sible by the bond issue of $9,380,000
passed November, 1927, and spon-
sored by Mayor Rolph.

The Lagunda Honda Boulevard
was another progressive step. Tra-
versing the edge of the Laguna
Honda Reservoir, it is notable for
the height of the retaining v\'all
which protects it from drifting sand
from the high hill on the westerly
side of the road. Here is found the



Laguna Honda Home, housing the
city's poor, in an artistic, modern,
fireproof building. The Twin Peaks
Tunnel is another of the notable ac-
complishments of the Rolph admin-
istration. It extends southwesterly
from Seventeenth and Castro
Streets to Ulloa Street, and is 2.27
miles long, 25 feet wide and 25 feet
high, with a 15-foot net clearance
above the rail. It provides rapid
transit via a double track municipal
railway between the down town dis-
tricts and the southerly portion of
the ocean slope district, and makes
a saving in time over the other sur-
face lines amounting to twenty min-
utes. The work cost nearly four
and one-half million dollars, and
was financed by assessment on a
district comprising 660 acres east of,
and 4153 acres west of the tunnel.
Track construction was paid for out
of municipal railway funds. The
tunnel was completed on July 14,
1917. The method by which this
tunnel was successfully built forms
a course of study at Harvard Uni-
versity.

This tunnel was a precedent for
another tunnel, called Sunset Tun-
nel, which pierces this same ridge
about one mile north of Twin
Peaks. The northerly part of the
Sunset District had endured for
many years an inadequate street car
service. As a means of relief, a tun-
nel 4232 feet long, 25 feet wide and
23 feet high, was built. The cost of
$1,650,000 was financed by an as-
sessment district of 1129 acres, in
which the property owners paid
from 1>4 cents to 5 cents a square
foot of lands benefited. The tun-
nel was completed in 1928. A double
track Municipal Street Railway was
constructed out of earnings of the
railway, and now Municipal Rail-
way cars are running from the
Ferry to the beach, using this tun-



VULCAN MACARONI CO.

425 Broadway

ALTA ELECTRIC CO.
938 Howard St.

W. R. AMES
150 Hooper St.

A. P. JACOBS

101 Washington St.

H. Leopold Machine SC Gear Works
3350 Seventeenth St.

STEPHEN MALATESTA
333 Pine St.



A. G. SPALDING & BROS.
575 Mission St.

D. C. McCABE
309 Call Building

GEORGE WINDELER CO., Ltd.
Eighth and Hooper Sts.

INDEMNITY INS. CO. OF N. A.
206 Sansome St.

J. B. CROWLEY
86 Third St.

SUPERBA PACKING CO.
2501 Howard St.



A. OLIVER
2315-17 Mission St.

YOUDALL CONSTRUCTION CO.
215 Market St.

ROSENTHAL'S SALES STORES
2415 Mission St.



Online LibrarySan Francisco (Calif.). Board of SupervisorsThe municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) → online text (page 81 of 84)