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San Francisco (Calif.). Board of Supervisors.

The municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) online

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proper time. We have received a few more applica-
tions for membership from employees of the company.
but extend a hearty welcome for the others to come in.
Come in and help us help you. That is the proper
spirit, and especially so at this time of the year. Send
all applications to the writer, who is secretary of the
Association, at 2940 Sixteenth Street. Entrance fee
is $3.00, which includes the first month's dues, which
are $1 per month thereafter.

In closing let us remind the clerical and semi-cler-
ical workers that this is the only organization of city
employees which is of any material help to you. No
other organization is interested in your wages or
working conditions. We are. We will fight to main-
tain your civil service standing at all times. We de-
liver to you in the pay envelope rather than with hot
air conveyed by printer's ink. Our Association is one
for all and all for one. We cannot conceive of the
idea of all for a few. Get in where you belong. We
need you and you need us to make this year one that
will count for all of us.

that advertise with us



February



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



31



The Election of 1928



(Continued from Page 10)

The voting niacliine is sometimes criticized and a
l>reference expressed for the paper ballot because the
L-ritic feels he has some advantage in this particular
ver the voting machine.

In no secret system of voting, whether with paper
!<allots or voting machines, is it possible for the voter
;o see his vote counted. If the voter could see it
L-ounted and recognize it as his own, then someone
L-lse can see it counted and by the same identifying
-ign recognize and identify it, thus destroying the
luality of secrecy.

What the voter wants to know is, that his vote has
'>een counted ; and, the method of voting and counting
his vote, which gives him the strongest assurance that
lis vote will be counted exactly as he casts it, ought
:o win his approval and support.

In voting with paper ballots — the voter goes to the
polls and receives a paper ballot which he must mark
n a prescribed fashion under penalty of losing his
;ntire vote. Assuming he has so marked it, he hands
t to an election officer, and, if he is a cautious voter,
he may wait long enough to see it go into the ballot
>ox; then, he loses sight of it forever.

It contains, though often imperfectly, the indication
to election officers as to how they shall count the vote
tor him in his absence. He must trust entirely to their
ability and honesty to do it. He cannot see it counted
nor can he know that it will be properly counted ex-
ept to the extent of his confidence in the ability and
ntegrity of the men and women who do the counting,
and, how often has experience shown his confidence
to have been utterly abused.

With voting machines, the voter stands in front
of the machine which cannot be operated or its rec-
ord otherwise changed except by his own act. Even
f all the people in the room are corrupt, his vote — or
the vote of any voter who preceded him — cannot be
changed without positive detection.

Whenever a voter pulls down the pointer over a

andidate's name, that candidate receives the vote

:tfter he moves the red lever over to the left. The vote

is instantly counted — not by an election officer but by

the voter himself.

How does he know it is counted? When the ma-
chine is opened, at the close of the polls, the votes
appear in unchangeable figures, properly accredited
to each and every candidate of all the parties.

There will be no drawing out and destroying of e.x-
cess ballots, as is done with paper ballots, because it
is mechanically impossible for the aggregate vote for
an office to exceed the number shown on the total
counter. In other words, the vote for each candidate
will be there in unmistakable, unalterable figures and
in plain sight but out of the reach of either honest or
dishonest election officers.

At the election on November 6, 1928, in precincts
where paper ballots were used, election officers, with
but two exceptions, abandoned the canvass. New of-
ficers had to be sworn in to finish the long and tedious
count.

Since 1923 I have conducted all the elections for
fficers of the student bodies of all the Junior High
Schools with success, and in about two years we will
have educated voters on voting machines, in fact, they
will know what an election means and how it is con-
ducted.



E. N. Hawkins J. R. McKay


Edward Glass


Appraisal and Tax Valuation


Company


APPRAISAL ENGINEERS < DEPRECIATION


San Francisco Analysts




57 Post Street


DOuglas 0212



A. J. Horstmann

Architect

no SUTTER STREET SAN FRANCISCO



E. J. MORSER

Former Chief Assistant City Engineer of San Francisco
Directing All Surveys for Fifteen Years

40 Years' Experience — Licensed Surveyor

LOTS SURVEYED
Subdivisions y Tract Development

ROOM 978, MONADNOCK BLDG. DOUGLAS 3632



G. ALBERT LANSBURGH

Architect

140 Montgomery Street

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

937 Consolidated Building, Sixth and Hill Streets

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA



Samuel Lightner Hyman

and

A. Appleton

Architects, A. I. A.
FOXCROFT BUILDING SAN FRANCISCO



Joseph A. Kitts




Lewis H. Tuthill


KITTS


&


TUTHILL


CONCRETE TECHNOLOGISTS




KEARNY 7892 1


Mills Building




San Francisco



Buy from firms that advertise with us



32



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



February



CLASSIFIED

BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL CARDS



CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS



AGENTS



AFFILIATED AGENCIES

"Purchasing and Sales Service"

Professional Buyers Who Double

Your Savings

511 Phelan BIdg. 760 Market St.

SUtter S460



ARCHITECTS



GEO. A. APPLEGARTH

ARCHITECT



Bakewell & Weihe

ARCHITECTS

John Bakewell, Jr. Ernest E. Weihe

251 Kearny Street
SAN FRANCISCO



W. H. Grim, Jr.

Architect
425 Kearny



Edwards & Schary

ARCHITECTS
605 Market Street
Phone KEarny 4297



BERNARD J. JOSEPH

Architect
74 New Montgomery Street



MASTEN & HURD

Architects
210 POST ST. SAN FRANCISCO



J. R. MILLER

AND

T. L. PFLUEGER



ARCHITECTS



Joseph Rankin

ARCHITECT
57 Post Street



25 Years Designing Schools

HENRY C. SMITH

ARCHITECT

Telephone KEarny 1745
HUMBOLDT BANK BUILDING

785 Market Street San Francisco



J. Harry Blohme



Clarence R. Ward



WARD & BLOHME

Architects

310 Sansome Street San Francisco, Calif.



ARCHITECTS — ENGINEERS



O'Brien Bros.
W. D. Peugh, A. I. A.

ARCHITECTS r ENGINEERS



CAFE



OLD DRAGON CAFE

47 Eddy Street f 920i/^ Market Street

Best Chinese Food in Town

CHOP SUEY & NOODLES



Palm Garden Grill

Frieda Schmidt-Brauns, Proprietor
F. W. Kracht, Manager

Good Foods Best Cooking

LIGHTNING SERVICE

Tel. KEarny 4633 931 Market Street



CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT



BULLOCK, KELLOGG
&. MITCHELL

1018 RUSS BUILDING
Kearny 0465



Hicklin and Redmond

C. p. A.
Accounting < Auditing < Tax Service

941 Russ Building Sutter 208S

SAN FRANCISCO



Hood & Strong

425 Standard Oil Building

SUTTER 0793



ROBINSON, NOWELL & CO.

Certified Public Accountants

DOUGLAS 1868

Crocker Bldg. San Francisco



COACHING — CIVIL SERVICE



CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS
Special Coaching Courses

In the past eight ye.irs 95% of my applicants
were successful. Thorough drills in all subjects.

MABEL BOX, Teacher

Graduate San Jose State Teachers' College

S12 Van Ness Avenue, Apt. 202

For information. Phone Hemlock 7675. 6 to 7 p. m.



COFFEE



Golden Eagle CoflFee Co.

Coffee, Tea and Spices
718 Harrison St. San Francisco



CONTRACTOR — ELECTRICAL



Motor Maintenance



Hemlock 7380 - 7381



W. B. BAKER fli CO., INC.

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS

Ventilating Engineers and Manufacturers
Motor Fans and Blowers

W. B. BAKER San Francisco, Calif.

270 6TH STREET



MORTUARY SERVICE



JULIUS S. GODEAU, INC.

41 Van Ness Ave. San Francisco

Phone Market 711

OAKLAND , STOCKTON

"Independent of the Trust"

COMPLETE MORTUARY SERVICE

AT A COST WITHIN YOUR MEANS

Our understanding service tightens

your burden of grief



SERVICE STATIONS



Gas & Oil — Free Crank Case Service
"Where Service Is Paramount"

BILL NUTTER'S

Visitacion Valley Service Station

Visitacion and San Bruno Arenue
REST ROOM



TYPEWRITERS



VARITYPER

A New Writing Machine
Without Typewriter Limitations

Varityper Incorporated



593 MARKET ST.



SUTTER 1521



WELDING



Brown Bros. Welding Co.

Manufacturers of
"National" Welding & Cutting Equipment
Distributors of Electric Welding Machines
Electric Welding y Oxy-Acetylene Welding
Boilers, Tanks, Drums, Pipe, Marine Work
Aluminum, Auto Parts and Portable
Electric Welding
223 Main Street DAvenport 0653



Buy from firmi that advertise with us




£in^((^|ee



issmsx'-WBawcsc^oo-cmeATim



Twenty-five Cents



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA, MARCH, 1929



Vol. Ill, No. 3




1



Proposed Health Building to be erected in the Civic Center. Architect's drawing by John Reid, Jr.




PATRONIZE

YOUR

HOME

FIRM

WE ARE
PROGRESSIVE

The Burdick

Standard

Aif-Cooled

Mercury Arc

Lamp for
Ultra Violet

Radiation

Ultra Violet
Lamps may
be obtained

upon Rental

Information
upon request



BUSH ELECTRIC CORPORATION

334 Sutter Street 1205 West 6th Street

San Francisco, Calif. Los Angeles, Calif.

sutler 6088 VAndike 3361



Telephone GRAYSTONE 4730

KELLEY KAR CO.

specializing in
BRAND NEW 1929

CHANDLERS
at a TREMENDOUS discount



Model "65"
Model "75"
Model "Big 6"
Model "85"



^895.00

to

^1795.00



Discounts up to $800.00
THESE CARS MUST BE SOLD AT ONCE

HURRY!

1595 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco



FERRO BROTHERS CO.
Telephone MISSION 2162




The Largest Italian Bakery on the Pacific Coast



2801 Twenty-Third Street

Cor. York Street

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.




M



ANY auto-
mobile companies
lose interest in the
owner when the
new car is delivered. . . .

With us, it is just the opposite. Our
period of owner-service starts when the
new car clicks off its first mile.

We pride ourselves that Chrysler
owners are not only satisfied — they're
enthusiastic !



H. O. Harrison Company

Post and Van Ness Avenue

Chrysler and Plymouth Distributors for Central
and Northern California



Mention This Magazine When You Patronise Advertisers







SEBSl(S-lEnaMGr-CO-QHBKATION



PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY



MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE PUBLISHING COMPANY

1095 Market Street Phone Market 8438



Philip P. Levy
Business Manager



Herbert B. Gee, Editor

M. B. Bothwell

Advertising Manager

George H. Allen, General Manager



John D. Gibson
Assistant Business Manager



Volume III



MARCH. 1929



No. 3



CONTRIBUTING EDITORS



Assessor's Office Louise M. O'Hara

Auditor's Office J. Everett Sharp

Board of Education

D. P. Hardy and Mrs. Harriet Leaman

Board of Health Edward M. Coffey

Board of Public Works Sid Hester

Bureau of Engineering N. A. Eckart

Bureau of Supplies Ivy Perkins Cerkel

City Attorney's Office Edmond P. Bergerot

Civil Service Commission James J. Maher

Civil Service Association Edward M. Coflfey

Coroner's Office Jane Walsh

County Clerk Howard Gudelj

Dept. of Electricity Joseph P. Murphy

District Attorney Henry Goldman

Engineers' Union J. L. Slater, Jr.

Exposition Auditorium James L. Foley

Fire Department Lieut. Fred Jones

Justice Courts Robert W. Dennis



Mayor's Office Edward Rainey

Municipal Railway Eugene W. Clisbee

Municipal Carmen's Union Edward D. Vandeleur

Office Employees' Assn William T. Bonsor

Parks and Museums W. M. Strother

Per Diem Men's Assn F. J. Ferguson

Playground Commission Veda B. Young

Principals' Association Susie A. Ward

Public Library Anne M. Farrell

Public Administrator Henry Boyen

Recorder's Office Daniel McGloin

Registrar's Office George L. Sharp

Retirement Board John W. Rogers

San Francisco Hospital Mrs. Mae H. Noonan

Sealer of Weights and Measures Mrs. M. Dolan

Sheriff's Office W. J. Martenson

Superior Courts Henry J. McGrath

Tax Collector's Office Homer Warren

Treasurer's Office I. A. Richardson



In This Issue



PAGE

Official Endorsements 1

Editorials 5

Frank J. Klimm 6-7

Health Department's Program 9

By Dr. M'ilUam C. Hassler

Some Noted Autobiographies 10

By Anne M. Farrell

San Francisco's 16-Mile Aqueduct Tunnel 1 1

By L. B. Cheminant

Highway Program Speeded Up 12

All on the Wing at Mills Field 13

Municipal Civil Service Association 14

By Ivan Flamrn



PAGE

Playgrounds 15

By J'eda Beresford Young

Got Your Golf Clubs Ready? 16

Not All Bovs and Girls Are Bad 17

By J. C. Astredo
Auditor's Department 18

By J. Everett Sharp
Easter Just Around the Corner 19

By Anita Day Hubbard

Educators Attend Eastern Convention 20

Blame the Mayor! 21

Schools 22

Impatient Youth and Marriage Licenses 26

The Flowers That Bloom in the Spring 28

By W. M. Strother




wmimmwi^i^rwrwwimwfWrwmmsM^M'mM^!nM^M^swr^^^



4 THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE March




Boosters for the San Francisco Hospital








LOEFFER & GREULE

BELVEDERE BAKERY

Phone MArket 8895
1668 Haight Street, opp. Belvedere




LIBERIY BAKERY AND
COFFEE SHOP

GEO. HEEG

142 6TH STREET








Phone Mission 7975 Lithwin & Waegell, Props.

THE CASTRO
BAKERY AND CONFECTIONERY

QUALITY CAKES, PIES AND PASTRIES

Wedding and Birthday Cakes Made to Order

531 CASTRO STREET SAN FRANCISCO




Telephone Mission 2948 ERNST SCHUDEL

Out Motto— "Quality and Cleanliness"

MAJESTIC BAKERY

QUALITY CAKES, PIES AND PASTRIES

Fresh Bread and Rolls Daily at 2:00 P. M.

3109 Twenty-fourth Street, near Folsom Street

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.








CHESTNUT BAKERY AND
CAKE SHOP

2161 CHESTNUT STREET
Phone Fillmore 2261




MOCHA BAKERY

BREAD r ROLLS

Specialty in Coffee Cakes
A fine line of Cakes for all occasions

2808 24th Street Phone VAlencia 7615








PHONE VALENCIA 7866 MINNIE NELSEN

EL CAPITAN BAKERY

2335 Mission Street
SAN FRANCISCO




MITY NICE BAKERY '

3394 Mission Street

ATWATER 3056 GEO. ZENGLER, Prop.



WM. E. GOETZ

BAKERY

and

CONFECTIONERY



2935 24th Street



San Francisco



Frankfurter Rolls a Specialty

OAK STREET BAKERY

J. C. HESCHELE, Proprietor

Bread, Buns, Pies and Cakes

Phone MArket 6035
298 Oak Street Corner Octavia



OLDEN'S BAKERY AND COFFEE SHOP

Quality Cakes < Home Cooking / Fountain Service

2209 POLK STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. Phone GRAYSTONE 3521



Buy from firms that advertise with us



.March



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



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EDITORIAL PAGE



.^iiMuiiniiMmiiniaiiiiiiiiiiiiDiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiciiiiiiiiiiiiioiiiiiiiiiiMciiiiiiiMiiiiDiiiiiiiiiiiiuuiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiaiiN



What Progress Are We Making?

IT IS interesting to review from time to time the
achievements of the governing administration
and to consider, from a purely constructive
standpoint, its plans for San Francisco. Greater
than all other issues, in the final judgment of our
citizens, is this: What progress is San Francisco
making?

As this issue of The Municipal Employee is
devoted partly to the Health Department, it may
be noted at the outset that no Mayor has taken a
deeper interest in the public health and welfare
than Mayor James Rolph, Jr., and that it has
been with his heartiest cooperation that so great
progress is to be made at the San Francisco
Hospital and that plans for the future fast are
materializing.

The personnel of the Board of Health — all
devoted civic workers — includes: Frank J.
Klimm, president; Dr. Alex. S. Keenan, Dr.
James W. Ward, Dr. William W. Wymore;
Laurence Arnstein, Jr., Arthur H. Barendt,
Arthur Sharp; Dr. William C. Hassler, health
officer; Edward M. Coffey, chief clerk and statis-
tician; Dr. Arthur A. O'Neill, city physician;
Dr. T. D'Arcy Quinn, city physician; Dr. Joseph
F. Poheim, city physician; Dr. Edmund Butler,
chief surgeon. Central Emergency Hospital; Dr.
Leon M. Wilbor, superintendent San Francisco
Hospital, and Charles M. Wollenberg, superin-
tendent, Laguna Honda Home.
* * *

"Blame the Mayor"

MEN in public life always are subjected to
criticism, much of it unfavorable and most
of it unwarranted. No man in public life escapes
the harpings of malcontents, the ravings of dis-
gruntled politicians. The great Mayor of a
great city is no exception to the rule; in fact, it
seems to be the favorite indoor and outdoor
sport to "blame the Mayor" for everything. You
will find some of the things for which the Mayor
is "blamed," if you turn to page 21.

Assessor Russell L. Wolden, always on the job,
is to be congratulated for having established
throughout San Francisco branch offices of his
■department where citizens may file their annual
personal property returns. As a result of his fore-
thought taxpayers have been saved considerable
time and monev.



A Beneficial Move

A"> NOTED elsewhere in this issue of The Mu-
r\. NiciPAL Employee, members of the San
Francisco Municipal Civil Service Association,
at a recent joint session of local and transbay
civil service executive committees, took steps to
organize a state-wide association of civil service
employees. THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE believes
this is a move in the right direction; a move that
will be of inestimable benefit to the organizations
concerned. At present there are too many ways
to circumvent the laws affecting employees with
civil service standing. With the various civil
service organizations coordinated into one asso-
ciation there will be a better understanding all

around.

* * *

A Greater Hospital Service

SAN Francisco readily recognizes its own
needs as attested by the voters in approving
at the last November election the $3,500,000
bond issue for betterment of Health Department
needs, and so it is only to be expected that there
are already prepared plans for the kind of future
hospital unit of which any city may be proud.
x\nd to Dr. William C. Hassler, Health Officer,
is due the thanks of this city's citizenry for
formulating with his colleagues plans for a
greater hospital service. An article in this issue
of The Municipal Employee tells of the
various hospital units as proposed under the
$3,500,000 bond issue.

* * *

FOR THE sake of economy in election costs, as
well as to serve the convenience of voters, a
permanent registration law is to be introduced
in the Legislature. The proposed statute has the
backing of the election officials of California's
largest municipalities. Under the proposed law
a voter once registered would be registered for
life or until removal to another locality, or
change of party declaration would require cor-
rection of the record. The cost of making such
corrections, according to J. Harry Zemansky,
Registrar of Voters, would be nominal. Under
the existing registration law it is imperative that
California voters be registered anew every two

vears.

* * *

Some of us fit in — others butt in.



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



March




LOEFFER 8C GREULE

BELVEDERE BAKERY

Phone Market 8895
1668 Haight Street, opp. Belvedere



Phone Mission 7975



Lithwin 8C Waegell, Props.



THE CASTRO
BAKERY AND CONFECTIONERY

QUALITY CAKES, PIES AND PASTRIES

Wedding and Birthday Cakes Made to Order

531 CASTRO STREET SAN FRANCISCO



CHESTNUT BAKERY AND
CAKE SHOP

2161 CHESTNUT STREET
Phone Fillmore 2261



PHONE VALENCIA 7866



MINNIE NELSEN



EL CAPITAN BAKERY

2335 Mission Street
SAN FRANCISCO



WM. E. GOETZ

BAKERY

and

CONFECTIONERY



2935 24th Street



San Francisco



LIBERTY BAKERY AND
COFFEE SHOP

GEO. HEEG
142 6TH STREET



Telephone Mission 2948 ERNST SCHUDEL

Our Motto— "Quality and Cleanliness"

MAJESTIC BAKERY

QUALITY CAKES, PIES AND PASTRIES

Fresh Bread and Rolls Daily at 2:00 P. M.

3109 Twenty-fourth Street, near Folsom Street

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.



MOCHA BAKERY

BREAD i ROLLS

Specialty in Coffee Cakes

A fine line of Cakes for all occasions



2808 24th Street



Phone VAlencia 7615



MITY NICE BAKERY

3394 Mission Street

ATWATER 3056 GEO. ZENGLER, Prop.



Frankfurter Rolls a Specialty

OAK STREET BAKERY

J. C. HESCHELE, Proprietor

Bread, Buns, Pies and Cakes

Phone MArket 6035
298 Oak Street Corner OcUvia



OLDEN'S BAKERY AND COFFEE SHOP

Quality Cakes f Home Cooking -f Fountain Service

2209 POLK STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. Phone GRAYSTONE 3521



Buy from firms that advertise with us



March



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



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EDITORIAL PAGE



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What Progress A re We Making?

IT IS interesting to review from time to time the
achievements of the governing administration
and to consider, from a purely constructive
standpoint, its plans for San Francisco. Greater
than all other issues, in the final judgment of our
citizens, is this: What progress is San Francisco
making?

As this issue of The Municipal Employee is
devoted partly to the Health Department, it may
be noted at the outset that no Mayor has taken a
deeper interest in the public health and welfare
than Mayor James Rolph, Jr., and that it has
been with his heartiest cooperation that so great
progress is to be made at the San Francisco
Hospital and that plans for the future fast are
materializing.

The personnel of the Board of Health — all
devoted civic workers — includes: Frank J.
Klimm, president; Dr. Alex. S. Keenan, Dr.
James W. Ward, Dr. William W. Wymore;
Laurence Arnstein, Jr., Arthur H. Barendt,
Arthur Sharp; Dr. William C. Hassler, health
officer; Edward M. Coffey, chief clerk and statis-
tician; Dr. Arthur A. O'Neill, city physician;
Dr. T. D'Arcy Quinn, city physician; Dr. Joseph
F. Poheim, citv' physician; Dr. Edmund Butler,
chief surgeon. Central Emergency Hospital; Dr.
Leon M. Wilbor, superintendent San Francisco
Hospital, and Charles M. Wollenberg, superin-
tendent, Laguna Honda Home.

"Blame the Mayor"

MEN in public life always are subjected to
criticism, much of it unfavorable and most
of it unwarranted. No man in public life escapes
the harpings of malcontents, the ravings of dis-
gruntled politicians. The great Mayor of a
great city is no exception to the rule; in fact, it
seems to be the favorite indoor and outdoor
sport to "blame the Mayor" for everything. You
will find some of the things for which the Mayor
is "blamed," if you turn to page 21.

Assessor Russell L. Wolden, always on the job,
is to be congratulated for having established
throughout San Francisco branch offices of his
department where citizens may file their annual
personal property returns. As a result of his fore-
thought taxpayers have been saved considerable
time and money.



A Beneficial Move

As NOTED elsewhere in this issue of The Mu-
l\ NiciPAL Employee, members of the San
Francisco Municipal Civil Service Association,
at a recent joint session of local and transbay
civil service executive committees, took steps to
organize a state-wide association of civil service
employees. THE MUNICIPAL Employee believes
this is a move in the right direction; a move that
will be of inestimable benefit to the organizations
concerned. At present there are too many ways
to circumvent the laws affecting employees with
civil service standing. With the various civil
service organizations coordinated into one asso-
ciation there will be a better understanding all

around.

* « *

A Greater Hospital Service

SAN Francisco readily recognizes its own
needs as attested by the voters in approving
at the last November election the $3,500,000
bond issue for betterment of Health Department
needs, and so it is only to be expected that there
are already prepared plans for the kind of future
hospital unit of which any city may be proud.
And to Dr. William C. Hassler, Health Officer,
is due the thanks of this city's citizenry for
formulating with his colleagues plans for a
greater hospital service. An article in this issue
of The Municipal Employee tells of the
various hospital units as proposed under the
$3,500,000 bond issue.



Online LibrarySan Francisco (Calif.). Board of SupervisorsThe municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) → online text (page 9 of 84)