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Digitized by the Internet Archive

in 2010 with funding from

San Francisco Public Library



http://www.archive.org/details/policepeaceoffic19321933sanf




Official Review of

olice Progress and Activities





NOVEMBE



1932




I Till



ANNUAL REVIEW OF SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT

CIVIC CENTER, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 29

Reviewed by Mayor Rossi, Police Commissioners; Chief William J. Quinn in Command



Official Publication
San Francisco Police Department-Bay Countit



tee Of f i<



/'..,,/



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL



November, 1932



Service You'll Like



Phone UNderhill 0263



DREW'S GARAGE



EXPERT REPAIRING AND BRAKE SERVICE

Tires, Gasoline, Oils, Accessories, Battery Service, Washing and Greasing



Special Inducements Offered Police Officers



1840 Market Street




THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK

SAVING9 COMMERCIAL TRUST

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY IOTH, T86B

One of the Oldest Banks in California, the Assets of which have never
been increased by mergers or consolidations with other Hanks.

MEMBER ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal.
June 30th, 1932

Assets $153,777,898.51

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Fundi $6,200,000.00

The following accounts stand on the Books at $1.00 each, viz,:

Bank Buildings and Lots (Value over $2,125,000.00)

Other Real Estate (Value over $460,000.00)

Pension Fund (Value over $780,000.00)

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets

PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave.

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St.

Dividends on Deposits as declared quarterly by the Board of

Directors, are Computed Monthly and Compounded

Quarterly, and may be withdrawn quarterly.




WANTED!

RICHARD COOMBS



48 years, 6 ft. 1 inch, 220 lbs. Nativity, Australia, bald, wearing
wig, false teeth, blue eyes, talks with Australian accent, will be ac-
companied by wife (not wanted), bleached blonde, blue eyes, 45
years, 5 ft. 3 in., 110 lbs., very talkative, very proud to state that
she is the daughter of a Kentucky judge.

Grand Jury Indictment on file.

This man is a promotor in the Real Estate business and will
handle second mortgages on the side.

Ponzi operation.

If located, arrest this man and notify the Chief of Police of
San Francisco and officer will be sent immediately with proper
papers to return him to this city.

WILLIAM J. QUINN,

Dated: November 10, 1932. Chief of Police.



November, 1932



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL



Page 3



COLLONAN Electrical '&> Manufacturing Co.

3201-11 Mission Street Electrical Work in All Its Branches Phone Mission 7282



&,



Featured in This Issue



PAGE
Annual Police Inspection and Review. 5

Junior Traffic Patrol Review 6

Widows' and Orphans' Aid Association 7

Our Honored Dead 8

Protecting the Crowds 9

On the Air With Chief William J. Quinn 10

Policing the Civic Center .11

Bay Counties' Peace Officers' Association 12

John F. Hanley Retires As President .13

Heroes of the Department .14

Use Firearms With Care 15

Citations for Bravery Feature

of Police Review 17

Arterial Streets and Stop Signs

To Be Reduced in Number 19

The Galloping Tunas Are Organized 19

Recognition of Good Work 21

Sleuths Guard Opera Against Crooks 21

"Officer 666" Has Namesake on

S. F. Roster of Police 25



Chief Quinn Says Every Officer Will
Aid in Drive



.26



Directory



SAN FRANCISCO POLICE DEPARTMENT

Hall of Justice, Kearny and Washington Streets

Telephone SUtter 2020

Radio Short Wave Call KGPD



BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS

Regular Meeting, Monday, 7:30 P. M., Hall of Justice.



Theodore J. Roche, President Mills Tower

Dr. Thomas E. Shumate 86 Post Street

Frank J. Foran 369 Pine Street

Charles F. Skelly, Secretary. ...Room 104 Hall of Justice



CHIEF OF POLICE

William J. Quinn
Stations Commanding Officer Company

CHIEF CLERK— Captain Horace McGowan H. Q.

Chief's Office, Hall of Justice

CENTRAL— Captain Arthur D. Layne A

63 5 Washington Street

BUREAU OF INSPECTORS— Captain Charles Dullea D.B.

Hall of Justice, Room 105

SOUTHERN— Captain Thomas Hoertkorn B

360 Fourth Street

HARBOR— Captain Arthur DeGuire C

Northeast Corner Drumm and Commercial Streets

MISSION — Captain Frederick Lemon D

3057 Seventeenth Street

BUSH STREET— Captain William T. Healy E

1422 Bush Street

STANYAN— Captain John J. O'Meara F

Golden Gate Park, Stanyan, opp. Waller Street

RICHMOND— Bernard J. McDonald G

451 Sixth Avenue

INGLESIDE— Captain Peter M. McGee H

In Balboa Park, near San Jose and Ocean Avenues
POTRERO— Captain Henrv J. O'Day I

2300 Third Street
NORTH END— Captain John J. Casey J

2475 Greenwich Street
TRAFFIC BUREAU— Captain Charles Goff K

635 Washington Street
WESTERN ADDITION— Captain Stephen V. Bunner L

2119 O'Farrell Street
BAYVIEW— Captain Robert A. Coulter M

1676 Newcomb Street

TARAVAL — Captain J. Henry Lackmann N

2360 Twenty-fourth Avenue

PARK STATION— Captain Michael Riordan O

Fulton, opp. 36th Avenue
HEADQUARTERS— Captain Patrick Herlihy H. Q.

Hall of Justice, Room 111



Stark-Rath Printing
W & Publishing Co.



547 Mission St. ■*■ San Francisco

Telephone GArfield 8744




Publications

Commercial Work

House Organs

Pamphlets

Blotters



Page 4



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL



November, 1932



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Regular Lunch, 50c
Special Lunch, 65c
Regular Dinner, 90c
Sundays and Holi-
days, #1.00
A la Carte at all hours




Two Woods-Drury Hotels
at the Civic Center, San Francisco

HOTEL WHITCOMB
WILLIAM TAYLOR HOTEL



JAMES WOODS. President



ERNEST DRURY. Manager



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Telephone MArket 7906

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84 NINTH STREET

San Francisco, Cal.




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Puccini— Crazzini 5641 Ceary St.. San Francisco



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PJ-1 I 1-1 132



Owned ■ Operated - Managed
by Calijorniam-



November. 1932



" Efficient Police

Make a City of

Peace"

(Established 1922)



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL
! San Francisco =



Page 5




A Police News

and Educational

Magazine

(Trade Mark Copyright)



Vol. X.



NOVEMBER, 1932



No. 11



Annual Police Inspection and Review



HThe annual police inspection and review is one of the
highlights in the official routine of the San Francisco
Police Department. The inspection and review, held in
accordance with the rules and regulations of the depart-
ment, took place in the Civic Center, on October 29, at
10 o'clock.

To the average citizen, the police inspection and review
is merely an occasion for several hundred members of our
local department to parade in military order in front of
the City Hall, where the paraders are reviewed by the
Mayor of San Francisco and the members of the Board
of Police Commissioners.

But to those having an intimate knowledge of police
department affairs, it has an entirely different import.
This annual inspection and review is really the outstand-
ing gesture which stamps our San Francisco Police De-
partment as a semi-military organization. In fact, for
over forty years our local department has been a notable
example of a metropolitan police department modeled
strictly along military lines.

It has been so since its very organization, at a time
when the maintaining of peace within the limits of this
city and county was transferred from the old Spanish
regime to the strictly American form of government.

The early chiefs of police in this city were nearly all
men of military training. Thus they sensed the necessity
of drill and military discipline within the department.
Colonel William Sullivan of the Third California Regi-
ment was one of the chiefs of police who, as far back as
the early nineties, insisted on the members having weekly
drills. These weekly drills were held on streets on which
vehicular traffic was light in those days, such as on Van
Ness Avenue or at Powell and Post Streets.

All down through the years members of the department
have held regular L'nited States Army drills and target
practice, in accordance with definite rules in this matter
set forth in our manual of rules and regulations. In this
way our department has always had much more of a mili-
tary complexion than the average metropolitan police
force. At the present time a knowledge of the manual
of the United States infantry drill is demanded in all our



department promotional examinations and even the en-
trance examination.

During the World War it was noticeable that mem-
bers of the department who entered the army immediately
secured the rank of commissioned and non-commissioned
officers, these promotions coming as a direct result of the
strict military training afforded in our department.

We have often heard the question asked : why do the
officers of the San Francisco Police Department have
military drill? Our reply is that military drill and dis-
cipline are really interchangeable terms, and in a large
organization like a metropolitan police department, the
strictest kind of discipline is necessary to achieve success.

In this connection we might draw attention to the fact
that many of our best citizens in every State in the Union,
sensing the value of military discipline, select military
academies for the education of their children. Military
drills in an organization like ours certainly makes for
obedience, alertness, poise and general appearance — and
in producing these results it is certainly well worth the
time and the effort spent upon them.

It is an oid army axiom that one can tell what kind of
officers a company has by looking at the members of the
company. If the men are neat and trim and well dresred,
one may rest assured that the commanding officers are
likewise; if they are slovenly or slouchy, it will be found
that the commanding officers are similarly careless. Now,
what holds for the army also maintains for the personnel
of the police department.

On the occasions of our annual parades it is strikingly
noticeable, as rank after rank marches by the reviewing
stand or along Market Street toward the Ferry Building,
that not a finer body of men could be found any place.
Military men who have viewed our parades have paid
our department heads the highest compliments on the ap-
pearance and military efficiency of the various marching
units, stressing the fact that in appearance and bearing
our men were flawless.

Speaking of personal appearance brings to mind the
fact that there is a psychological side to the matter of
( Turn to Page 16)



Page 6 POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL November

Junior Traffic Patrol Review



1932



QAN FRANCISCO tuok time out on the afternoon of
November 7 to pay a richly deserved tribute to the
boys of the School Traffic Patrol. The occasion was the
annual review of the patrol. Twenty-five hundred boys
marched at the Civic Center, stepping with military pre-
cision to the blare of school bands. Every unit received a
continuous salute of applause along the entire line of
march. In acknowledgment of the high civic service per-
formed by the young traffic patrolmen, the reviewing
stand at the City Hall was filled with city officials, heads
of the Police Department and Hoard of Education, repre-
sentatives of the California State Automobile Association,



boys. This record extends unbroken back to the rime the
patrol was organized in 1923 by the Police Department,
Hoard of Education and the Automobile Association. In
a series of talks at the Auditorium the patrol boys heard
this record praised and heard themselves commended for
their unselfish devotion to a duty that requires sacrifice of
much of their play time. Chief of Police William J.
Quinn was one of the speakers and said, in part:

"1 want to commend and thank you boys of the School
Traffic Patrol for the work you have performed during
the past year. Not a single accident occurred during the
year to mar the splendid record you have maintained dur-




Above, scene in Exposition Auditorium with twenty-five hundred bovs of the School Traffic Patrol listening to Mayor Angelo J.
Rossi following their annual review. Chief of Police William J. Quinn and other officials are seated on the platform. Bc'.ow, Patrol
squads in review formation at the Civic Center. Captain Charles Goff of the Traffic Bureau and Officer By/on J. Getcheil, official
instructor of the patrol, in the foreground.

various Parent-Teacher groups, and officers of the Thir- ing all the years your organization has been in existence.
tieth Infantry, who served as judges of the review. "Some time ago His Honor, Mayor Angelo J. Rossi,

Later, in the Exposition Auditorium, merit ribbons received a letter from the Consolidated Oil Companj of

were awarded to the various school units for marching. New York informing him of a nation-wide safet) contest

neatness and for efficiency in the line of duty. Two boys that was to be inaugurated for the year commencing Oc-

were presented with medals for acts of heroism. tober 1, 1932, and ending September 30, 1933, and in-

The review marked another year unmarred by the viting the city of San Francisco, through him, to partici-

death or injury of any child in a traffic accident at the pate in this contest. The mayor, sensing the possibility of
hundreds of crossings near schools patrolled daily by the (Turn In Pnye 20)



November, 1932



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL



Page 7



MEETS EVERY 2ND FRIDAY
Organized 1878



~~- ^v.





HALL OF JUSTICE
Room 121



JOHN P. HANLEY
President



GEORGE F. KOPMAN
Recording Secretary



> Widows' and Orphans' Aid
Assn* of S, F, Police Dept*




JAMES W. BOYLE
Financial Secretary



THE GENERAL ELECTION ON DECEMBER 9

T Terewith is a list of candidates nominated for the
various offices of the Widows' and Orphans' Aid

Association :

PRESIDENT:

Peter S. Hinrichs Co. "B"

VICE-PRESIDENT:

John L. Dolan Co. "E"

Arthur D. Layne Co. "A"

TREASURER:

John R. Dower Co. "A"

RECORDING SECRETARY:

George F. Kopman H. Q. Co.

FINANCIAL SECRETARY:

James W. Boyle Co. "E"

TRUSTEES (5 to be elected) :

John Alpers Co. "D"

Albert L. Ballhaus Co. "G"

John O. Clasby Co. "O"

Sydney J. Desmond. H. Q. Co.

John A. Engler Bureau of Inspectors

William D. Flinn Co. "A"

Thomas A. Marlowe Co. "E"

George J. Sullivan Co. "K"

With the exception of the post of Vice-President, and
the five vacancies to be filled in the Board of Trustees,
there is really no contest this year.

However, for the post of Vice-President and for the
election of five Trustees it is expected the Association
will see one of the closest contests fought within its his-
tory. Each of the candidates for Vice-President is well
known throughout the department. Each is also well
known to be a systematic and ardent campaigner. There-
fore, this fight will be a case of Greek versus Greek.

From amongst the eight candidates for the post of
1 rustee it would be an unsolvable problem at the pres-
ent moment to select the five winning candidates. To the
casual observer there is not a single weak candidate in
this group of eight aspirants to the much sought position
of Trustee. A few of them have been through previous
campaigns, but the new entrants loom up very strong in-
deed, and it would not be at all surprising to see them
romp in ahead of the veteran campaigners.



Friday, December 9, 1932, will be a day of much ex-
citement in the Hall of Justice, and when the final vote
is counted, it is safe to say that the Widows' and Or-
phans' Aid Association of the San Francisco Police De-
partment will have as capable a set of officers for the
year 1933 as it has been its good luck to have had year
in and year out since its organization.



DRIVE AGAINST SIDEWALK

MERCHANDISE STARTED

J. C. Brandon, general manager of the Better Busi-
ness Bureau, announces that a campaign to enforce the
laws to eliminate the use of sidewalks for display and sale
purposes has been started. Police, women's clubs, repre-
sentatives of the Retail Merchants' Association, the Re-
tail Grocers' Association and others have promised coop-
eration. Plans by which Chief William J. Quinn is to
instruct members of the department to notify storekeepers
in their districts of the move to keep the sidewalks free
were discussed at a meeting recently held.



Help



to make the
Community
Chest Drive
a success



Give



Page 8



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL



November. 1 032



(§ur Ifonflrrii !e nb



Bernard M. Clancy February 2

Peter J. Smith February 4

Lewis C. Clark February 16

James Aitken March 1

Nelse Miller March 3

Angelo J. Rocca March 10

Timothy Cronin March 27

Clyde Weymann March 29

William W. Wilson April 5

James J. Farrell April 23

Russell Smith May 4

Robert McDowell June 4

Mervyn A. Reardon June 8

Maurice O'Dowd June 22

Hans H. Christiansen July 8

Joseph C. Lorenz July 26

Richard R. Smith July 26

John Ward Moffitt August 8

Frank H. Norman August 2 1

Jeremiah J. Hurley August 3 1

Percy D. McPartland September 7

James Francis Rooney September 8

Thomas Connolly September 30

Frederick J. Steaglich November 1 5



1932
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'November, 1932



POLICE AND PEACE OFFICERS' JOURNAL

Protecting the Crowds



Page 9



By Inspector Thos. F. Curtis



r "p , HE splendid work done by the members of the San
Francisco Police Department during the Shrine
Convention, held in this city last July, added another
chapter to the brilliant record of our department. In
looking back over my varied experiences as a member of
the bunco and pickpocket detail, I can say, in all sincerity,
that the noticeable absence of bunco and pickpocket men




Inspector Thos. F. Curtis

from our city during that busy week was a wonderful
tribute to men of our Inspectors' Bureau who have spent
so many years waging an unceasing warfare against this
class of criminals.

For very many years, in fact, high class pickpocket and
bunco men, in a jocose manner, have been telling their
co-workers in various parts of the country, who would
happen to mention San Francisco, that there is a great
big sign above the Ferry building on which is written in
large electric letters: "Pickpockets and bunco men keep
out." Evidently it is a current belief among this class of
criminals throughout the United States that San Fran-
cisco is a very good place to keep out of, because, in the
main, we are very rarely troubled with pickpocket or
bunco mobs.

Detectives know that wherever there is a large gather-
ing of people there is almost sure to be a scattering of
thieves to prey upon the merrymakers. These thieves are
usually organized in a "mob" with their leader. Very
often a mob will travel all over the country, following a
carefully laid out itinerary which takes in all the cities
and towns in which celebrations are being held. Thus,
peace officers in cities playing host to large gatherings
must, in addition to their heavily increased burden of
keeping the peace, match their wits against the cleverness
of these wily bunco-men and pickpockets, who have the
business of stealing down to almost a fine art. Small won-
der, then, that many police departments feel inadequate



to cope with the situation, and call in outside help —
detectives from other cities who have made a specialty of
familiarizing themselves with the operations of these
"mobs."

In the old days, the traveling circus was accompanied
by a "mob" of bunco-men and pickpockets, and peace offi-
cers in the cities visited by the circus were busy indeed
protecting the crowds from these leeches. However, when
such men as the Ringling Brothers and that grand old
"Roman," Otto Floto, of the Sells Floto show, came in-
to the circus business, they began a battle against the
thieving gentry who victimized the patrons the circus
attracted. These alert circus operators took care to en-
gage their own detectives, who traveled with the show and
worked in close co-operation with the authorities in the
various cities and towns to which they went. Thus, bunco-
men and pickpockets found the opposition to their activ-
ities too fierce and have almost entirely given up follow-
ing circus routes.

Political gatherings also drew their full share of at-
tention from these thieves. "Mobs" were known to at-
tach themselves to parties campaigning all over the
country, for the sole purpose of preying upon the huge
crowds collected to have a glimpse of or to hear a few
words from the campaigning candidates.

I am reminded in this connection of an incident in-
volving the late President Theodore Roosevelt. President
Roosevelt, by the way, was deeply interested in police
work, and was well aware that on his trips around the
country he was followed by professional thieves who in-
tended to prey upon the citizens gathered to greet the
Chief Executive. He gave the problem serious consider-
ation, and, indeed, in his conferences with his associates,
he seemed more concerned with the safety of the citizens
than with his own personal safety, and at his request
particular stress was laid upon the protection of the
crowds from buncomen and pickpockets.

Thus, when the Presidential party was expected in
Cheyenne, Wyoming, the police there felt that the sit-
uation might be beyond their control. They therefore
called on the police authorities of Denver, Colorado, for
aid in protecting the crowds and the distinguished vis-
itors from thieves. My good friend, George Sanders of
the Denver police, and his partner, Ed Carberry, were
detailed to Cheyenne.

I might state here that George Sanders — who is now



Online LibrarySan Francisco (Calif.). Police DeptPolice and peace officers' journal of the State of California (Volume Nov. 1932-Oct. 1933) → online text (page 1 of 73)