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DUl i ON S WORLD Al WORK SERIES



FISHING AN
HUNTING




BERKELEY

LIBRARY

UNIVERSITY OF
CALIFORNIA




WORLD AT WORK SERIES

EDITED BY SAMUEL T. BUTTON
Teachers College, Columbia University



FISHING AND HUNTING



BY

SARAH M. MOTT

TEACHER IN THE ETHICAL CULTURE SCHOOL, NEW YORK CITY
AND

MAUDE BARROWS DUTTON



NEW YORK-:- CINCINNATI : CHICAGO

AMERICAN BOOK COMPANY



COPYRIGHT, 1905, BY
SAMUEL T. BUTTON.

ENTERED AT STATIONERS' HALL, LONDON.
WORLD AT WORK. I.



PREFACE

THIS book is written for the youngest children in
school. Its stories are about people who are interesting
because they are in a certain sense children of the race.
Their sports and their work are more simple than those
of the people who are about us.

It is believed that these stories will aid the child in
understanding better what he sees from day to day, and
that he will make instructive comparisons. This little
book is the first of a series which has as its purpose to
describe in a somewhat comprehensive way the activities
of the race through the several stages of culture to the
time when men became explorers and discovered and
settled the American continent. The later volumes will
show how geographic conditions have affected life in the
colonies and how the same conditions have determined
the industrial development of the nation. The aim of
these stories is therefore twofold : first, to provide good
reading lessons, and second, to lay the foundations of
social training.

If the pupils have read one standard reader before
undertaking these stories, they will not seem too difficult.

No suggestions are made as to method, excepting that
here, as elsewhere, the use of phonics will be found help-
ful, and the more difficult words should be specially
taught.

3



The hand work suggested at the end of the book should
be regarded as an important feature. Such correlation
gives more meaning and value both to the reading and
the hand work. In selecting the illustrations great care
has been taken to have them authentic as well as in har-
mony with the text. In order to make the environment
of these primitive people still more vivid, the use of the
stereopticon and the stereoscope is recommended.

Acknowledgments are due to Miss Lucy H. Weiser, of
Teachers College, for assistance in outlining the hand
work ; to Dr. Hermon C. Bumpus and his associates in
the American Museum of Natural History, New York,
for the illustrations on pages 8, 9, 11, 20, 22, 23, 27, 32, 36,
39, 40, 41, 81, 89, 91, 96, 98, 100, 102, 107, 108, 111, 112,
116 ; and to Dr. Otis T. Mason, Curator of Anthropology
in the United States National Museum, for valuable assist-
ance in securing illustrative material, including the pic-
tures on pages 14, 15, 16, 24, 38, 53, 58, 59, 60, 67, 90, 97.

S. T. D.



CONTENTS

PAGE

IN ESKIMO LAND WITH HANS 7

IN THE WOODS WITH RED FEATHER 43

IN THE PHILIPPINES WITH TONDO ...... 69

IN ALASKA WITH OLA 93



IN ESKIMO LAND WITH HANS



IN ESKIMO LAND WITH HANS









m



7








Seven little snowbirds,
Sitting in the snow,

Live in the far North,
Where the winds blow.



Seven little snowbirds,

Singing soft and low,
" Come, little boys and girls,

To the land of snow."

2

Here we are in snow land.

" Good morning, Hans. Are you a little
snow boy ? "

" No ; I am a real, live boy.

A snow boy melts in the sun.

I do not melt.

A snow boy has a white face.

My skin is brown.

My cheeks are red.

A snow boy cannot run.

I can run and jump.

So I am not a snow boy.

But I live in snow land.

I live where it is very cold.

There is snow and ice nearly all the year.

That is why I wear a fur suit.

My fur suit keeps me as warm as a snow-
bird."

9





Hans has a fur hood.
He pulls it over his
head.

He pulls on his sealskin
boots.

Hans's mother made
them.

She made his fur mit-
tens, too.

Hans's ten brown fingers
hide in the fur mittens.
They are hiding from Jack Frost.
Hans runs out
to play in the
snow.

"Ha, ha!" he
laughs. "Jack
Frost cannot find
my fingers.

Jack Frost cannot find my toes.
Eun away, Jack Frost.
I will throw snowballs at you."
But Jack Frost runs after Hans.

10




He sees Hans's brown nose.
He takes one little bite of Hans's nose.
Oh, naughty Jack Frost !
Run home, Hans, or Jack Frost will bite
you again.




4

Hans runs home to his snow house.
Down he goes on his hands and knees.
He crawls in like a little bear.
Did you ever make a snow house ?
Hans's father built his house.
He built it of cakes of ice.
Do you know why he did not build it of
wood?

11



He built it of ice because there are no trees
in snow land.

He had no glass for the windows.
So he made the windows of ice.
Hans lives in the snow house all winter.
It is warm inside the snow house.
Jack Frost cannot come in.



" Mother ! Mother ! " calls Hans.
" Jack Frost bit my nose."
" Oh, poor nose/' says his mother. " Come
in and warm it."

There are no chairs in the snow house.
But there is a long ice bench.
It is covered with sealskin.
Hans climbs up on the bench.
He pulls off his fur rnittens.
How cold his ten fingers are !
His mother pulls off his wet boots.
She hangs them by the lamp to dry.
Hans smells meat cooking.
It is seal meat.
Hans likes seal meat.

12




He forgets his cold nose.

How hungry he is !

He watches his mother cook dinner.

You may see her in the picture.

She has no wood to burn.

She has no coal.

She has no stove, and so she must cook
dinner over a lamp.

Did you ever see
such a queer lamp ?

It does not look like
the lamps we use.

It looks like a big stone dish.

The lamp is filled with seal oil.

13




6

The lamp wick is made of moss.

Hans digs under the snow for the moss.

Sometimes he feeds it to his reindeer.

That is why it is called reindeer moss.

The lamp keeps the snow house warm.

It cooks Hans's dinner, too.

He watches his mother turn the meat.

When it is done, Hans eats
it with his fingers.



" Guess who I am.
No ; I am not a little boy.
I am a little girl.
Hans calls me 'Baby Naka.'
I am Hans's little sister.
Here comes my carriage to
take me to ride.

My carriage is my mother's
fur hood.
I ride on my mother's back.
The hood is just big enough for me.
I sit in it, and my mother carries me."

14




8



Naka peeps out of the hood and laughs at
Hans.

" See my top/' cries Hans. " Watch me
spin it ! "

He spins it between his brown hands.

Eound and round it
spins.

Naka's black eyes
watch it spin.

Then her little head
grows heavy.

Hush! she is fast
asleep.

Fast asleep in the big
hood.

9

Many winters passed.
Naka grew to be a
big girl.

To-day she is five years old.
She cannot ride in the hood any more.
Happy birthday, little Naka.

15





10

What do you think Naka did on her birth-
day?

She woke up very early.
" Oh ! Oh ! Oh ! " she cried, " Wake up,
Hans.

See the new dolly.
I found it sleeping here
beside me.

Oh ! I love my new dolly.

% It has a dress just like mine.

1 Mother, did you make my

doll's pretty dress ? "

" Yes, little Naka, and papa
made the dolly.

He carved her out of bone."
"I have a present, too, for Naka," said
Hans.

He took something out of his fur pocket

11

It was the soft, gray skin of a mouse.
" I caught the mouse myself, Naka.
Now you can make a hood for your doll."

16




Naka ran to get her thimble.

What do you think it was made of?

It was made of sealskin.

She brought her fur needlebook.

Then she took out her bone needle.

Her mother threaded it with reindeer
sinew.

Naka cut holes in the mouseskin with a
little awl.

In and out went the bone needle.

" It is dolly's birth-
day, too," said Naka.

" She must have a
birthday present ; so I
will make her a fur
hood."

Hans played beside Naka on the ice
bench.

He played with Blackie.

Blackie is Hans's toy bear.

Hans was making a harness for Blackie
from some pieces of sealskin.

" By and by," he said, " I will make a sled
for Blackie.

WORLD AT WORK I. 2 17




Then dolly shall go to ride."

Hans worked hard on his harness.

Naka sewed fast on dolly's hood.

Their mother was sewing, too.

" Listen, children," she said. "I will tell

you a story.

12

" Once upon a time a little baby bear was
lost in the waod.

He hunted and hunted, but could not find
his way home.

At last a good woman found him.

She took him home to her snow house.

She gave him a bowl of reindeer milk.

Many years the little bear lived with the
old woman.

He grew to be a fine large bear.

Every day he went to the woods to hunt.

Every night lie brought back food.

Sometimes it was a wild duck.

Sometimes it was a seal.

So the &ld woman had plenty to eat.

But the men in the village did not like the
bear.

18



The bear could hunt better than the men
could.

' We will kill him/ they said.

But the woman heard them.

She waited till the bear came home.

Then she whispered in his ear and said to
him :

6 You must run away, my good bear.

The men will kill you if you stay here.'

Big tears rolled down the bear's cheeks.

But at night he went away.

13

" He went back to live with the other bears.

But he never forgot the good woman.

Sometimes he came back at night to the
snow house.

He would creep in softly.

He did not wake the old woman.

But in the morning she would find some
seal meat on the table.

She knew the good bear had been there.

She lived many, many years.

But the bear never forgot her."

19



14

Hans has a sled.
It is not red like your sled.
It is made of bone.
His father made it for Hans.
Hans and Naka slide down hill.
They have a pair of reindeer antlers.
Sometimes they set them in the snow.
Then they get on their sled.
Away flies the sled across the snow.
Do you think they will slide between the
antlers ?







15

" Bow-wow, bow-wow."
" Good morning, little dog ; who are you ? "

20



" I am Hans's little dog, Sammie.

I am just as old as Hans.

When Hans was a baby I was a puppy.

I slept in the snow house, too.

Now I am a big dog.

I sleep with the other dogs.

We have a bed in the snow house tunnel.

I take care of Hans.

I draw his sled for him.

I love my little master, bow-wow."

16

" Wake up, Hans, breakfast is ready. 1 '
Hans rolled out from under the bear-
skin.

Ooglit was eating his breakfast.
Ooglit is Hans's father.
Out in the snow the dogs were barking.
Ooglit had thrown them some meat.
" Just > hear them bark, Naka," cried Hans.
" Each dog wants the biggest piece."
Ooglit finished his breakfast.
He pulled on his long, fur boots.
Beside him lay his harpoon.

21



" Oh, father, are you going hunting ? "
" Yes, Hans, bring me my whip.
Now come, my boy, and help harness the
dogs."

Ooglit's sled stood ready outside.

It was covered with a black bearskin.



17

Ooglit put his harpoon on the sled.
Then he whistled to the dogs.




The ten little dogs trotted to the sled.

Each one stood in his place.

Pete was the leader.

He stood proudly at the head.

Ooglit and Hans put on the harness.

Then Ooglit jumped on the sled.

He snapped his whip.

" Away, Pete," he cried.

And away thev went across the snow.

X i/

Hans watched them out of sight.

22



Then he ran in to breakfast.

He wished he, too, could go hunting.



E



18

Ooglit rode far across the snow.

It was very, very still.

The stars were shining.

The sun does not shine in winter in snow
land.

It was a long, long ride*

At last Ooglit stopped the dogs.

They were very tired.

Their red tongues hung out of their mouths.

Ooglit turned his sled over.

There was a pair of antlers fastened to the
sled.

Do you know what antlers are ?

They are the horns of a reindeer.

23



Ooglit dug the antlers into the snow.
They held the sled there.

Now the nine little dogs
could not run away.

Ooglit took Pete with
him.

Pete ran about over the
snow.

At last he gave a short
bark.

Ooglit ran to him.
Pete was standing by a
little mound of snow.
" Have you found a seal, Pete ? "
Pete wagged his tail.
Ooglit dug down into the mound.

19

Soon he came to a hole.
He could see the water below.
He knew it was a seal hole.
He tied Pete with the other dogs.
Then he went back to the hole.
He put back the soft snow.

24




Then he waited a long, long time.

He knew the seal was in the water.

By and by the seal would come back to its
hole.

This was its air hole, where it would come
to blow for air.




Ooglit stood very still by the snow
mound.

He stood watching for the seal.
He held his harpoon ready.
At last the seal came back.
Ooglit heard it blowing.
He threw his harpoon hard.
Down it went through the snow mound.

25



20

It hit the poor seal.

The seal tried to swim away.

But Ooglit held fast to the harpoon cord.

He pushed away the soft snow again.

Then he pulled in the seal.

That was the way Ooglit caught the
seal.

The little dogs barked.

" We will have a good supper/' they
said.

Ooglit put the seal on the sled.

He covered it with the bearskin.

Then he sat on top himself.

" Home, Pete," he cried.

The ten little dogs jumped forward.

There was no road to follow, but Pete knew
the way.

So Ooglit came home with his seal.

21

Hans saw the dog sled coming.
He ran into the snow house.
" Father is coming," he cried.

26



His mother put more oil in the lamp.
She began to cook the soup.
" Father will be very hungry," she said.
" He must have a warm supper."
Hans cut up some meat for the dogs,
" They will be hungry, too," he said.







" Here they are now.
I can hear Pete barking."
He ran to the door.
" Mother, mother," he called.
" Father and the dogs are here.
Father has killed a seal.
I can see it on the sled."

27



22

What do you think Ooglit did with the
seal?

First, he took off the skin.

Have you ever seen a sealskin ?

It is very soft and warm.

Ooglit gave it to Hans's mother.

" Our little Hans is growing fast," he
said.

" His old suit is too small.

This will make him a new suit.

Here is meat, too, for us all."

He cut off the big pieces of seal meat.

Then he dug a hole in the snow.

He hid the meat there.

Wasn't that a funny ice chest ?

" Can Sammie have some meat, too ? "
asked Hans.

" Yes ; Sammie and all the little dogs shall
have plenty to eat.

And here is fresh oil for the lamp."

" I like the nice seal," said Naka.

" We get so many good things from him.

How could we live without the seal ? "

28



23

Ooglit went out to see his reindeer.

You should see what a large herd of reindeer
he has.

Hans cannot count them.

The reindeer are very good to Ooglit.

They give him milk.

They give milk for Hans and Naka, too.

Sometimes Ooglit eats reindeer meat.

Do you remember what he does with the
antlers ?

Do vou remember what Hans and Naka do

%>

with them ?




Naka has a little spoon.
It is made of reindeer bone.
Is it not a pretty spoon ?
Naka's father carved it for her.
He carved a picture on it.
Can you guess what the picture is ?
It looks like reindeer moss.

29



24



" Where are you going, little Naka ? "
" I am taking a ride on my reindeer."
" But are you not afraid ? "




" Oh, no ; father will lead the reindeer.

Hear the bell jingle.

The bell is on the reindeer's neck.

Go along, reindeer.

I will not fall off.

I will sit quite still.

The reindeer will not go very fast.

Good-by."

30



25

Ooglit went hunting very often.
He caught so many seals that he could not
use all the skins.

" I will go to the trader's," he said.
" He will buy the sealskins."
He tied the sealskins to the sled.




He tied on his trunk, too.
Can you guess what his trunk was ?
It was a baby sealskin.
Ooglit's dinner was in the trunk.
He would be hungry before night.
Then he harnessed a reindeer to the
sled.

On he jumped.

The skins made a soft seat.

31



" Good-by, Naka and Hans/' he called.
He rode a long way across the snow.



M







At last he came to the trader's house.

The trader bought the skins.

He filled Ooglit's trunk.

Then Ooglit drove home very fast.

26

Hans was playing on the ice bench.

Suddenly he saw Ooglit crawling in the
door.

He saw the trunk was full.

" Oh, father, is there something for me ? "
he cried.

Ooglit drew out a knife.

" Oh, it's mine ! it's mine ! " cried happy
Hans.

32



" Now, Naka, put in your hand," said Ooglit.
" Draw out something hard and round."
" Oh, a new bell for my reindeer," said
Naka.

" And here is some red worsted for mother.
Oh, father, you are just like Santa Glaus."




27

What a big white bear !
" Tell us, good bear, do you live in snow
land?"

" Yes, I live in snow land,

I live in a cave under the snow.

There are four little bear cubs in the cave.

WORLD AT WORK I. 3 33



I have long white hair to keep me warm.

See my big paws.

They are covered with long hair.

I do not slip on the ice.

Now I am going hunting.

I must find some breakfast for my cubs."

28

One day Hans was outdoors.

He was playing in the snow.

He saw a bear.

At first he thought it was a snowdrift.

Then he saw it come nearer and nearer.

Hans was afraid.

He ran home to the snow house and crawled
in very fast.

" A bear ! a bear ! " he cried.

Ooglit was not afraid.

He caught the bear.

But he did not kill him.

He sold the bear to some strange men.

They took the bear away in a big ship.

For many weeks the bear sailed and
sailed.

34



He was coming to America.

Do you know what the men did with
him?

Perhaps you have seen him in Central
Park.

The bear does not like to live in a cage.

He wishes to be back in snow land.

29

Spring is coming.
The ice is melting.
Ooglit can go sailing now.




He has a light boat.
Ooglit calls it a " kayak."
He can carry it on his back.
He carries it down to the water.
He has his lance too.
Ooglit is going hunting.
He will hunt for a walrus.
The walrus lives in the sea and on the ice.

35



What is this funny balloon ?

It is not a balloon. It is a float.

Ooglit made it from a baby-seal skin.




It is full of air, so that it can float in the
water.

Ooglit takes it with him in the boat.
Wait and see what he does with it.

30

Ooglit puts the kayak in the water.

He sits in the opening.

He buttons the sealskin around him.

He will not get wet.

Off he sails.



There are big blocks of ice in the river.
Ooglit sails among them.
At last he sees a black spot on a cake
of ice.

Nearer and nearer he sails.
It is a walrus asleep on the ice.
Ooglit hears the walrus snore.
He throws his harpoon quickly.




31

He hits the walrus and wakes him.
The angry walrus tumbles into the watei.
He tries to upset the boat.
But he cannot do it.

37



Ooglit kills him and then fastens him to
the float.




" Come, Mr. Walrus," he says, " I will tow
you home."

32

Naka was waiting for her father.

She watched him drag in the walrus.

The walrus had two long tusks.

They were as tall as Naka.

She put her little brown hands on
them.

How white and smooth they were.

Her father carried them home.

" Little Naka shall have a necklace," he
said.

"I will carve it for her."

" And will it be made of the walrus's tusks,
father?"

38




" Yes, little girl, I will make it of the walrus
tusks."

Naka looked at
the smooth, white
tusks.

"Oh, how pretty
it will be," she
cried.

" I must run home
and tell mother.

And what can Hans have V

Her father thought a mo-
ment.
" Hans shall learn to carve.

He can carve with his new
knife.

He shall learn to carve a
top."

33

It is not always dark and cold in the
north.

Summer comes, and the sun shines again.
It shines all day and almost all night.

39




The children have " to go to bed by
day."

The long winter night is over.
Slowly the snow house melts.
Where will Hans and Naka live now ?
Ooglit builds a tent of reindeer skins.
This is their summer home.




34

The green grass grows now for the rein-
deer.

The red poppies blossom for Naka.
Hans finds berries to eat.

40



Ooglit brings home nets full of fish.

At night the children hear the owl calling.

Hans and Naka are in the tent.

They are lying on their sealskin bed.




They hear the hoot, hoot of the owl.

" Oh, mother, what does the owl say ? "
asks Naka.

" She is telling you a story," says their
mother.

" Oh, mother, what is the story? "

41



This is what the owl is saying.

"Listen and I will tell you.

Once upon a time I was a little girl.

I played with dolls like Naka.

But a wicked fairy changed me to a bird.

She gave me a long beak.

Oh, how frightened I was !

35

" I flew here and there very fast.

I flew so fast that I could not see where 1
was going.

I flew against a snow house.

The ice wall was very hard.

It broke off my long beak.

Now all owls have flat beaks.

Hoot, hoot, hoot.

Good night, Naka.

Good night, Hans."



42



IN THE WOODS WITH RED FEATHER



43



IN THE WOODS WITH RED FEATHER




Copyright, 1903, by Detroit Photographic Co.



Let us go and play in the woods.
Perhaps we shall find a playmate there.

44




We will ask the squirrels about him.

" How do you do, pretty squirrel?

Does a little Indian boy live in these
woods ? "

"Oh, yes, Eed
Feather lives here.

He is our little
playmate.

Red Feather
sleeps in a little
cradle.

Sometimes his mother hangs the cradle on
our oak tree.

The winds blow and rock the little cradle.

High and low swings Red Feather.

We have holes in the tree.

They are full of acorns.

We found them last fall.

Now we show them to Red Feather.

Then Red Feather laughs.

He is a jolly playmate.

See, his mother brings him now.

We are glad to see you, little play-
mate."

45



Every day Red Feather played out of
doors.

The little cradle was soon too small, for he
grew very fast.

He had many playmates in the woods.




Little robins sang to him.

" Ghee, chee, chee," called Red Feather.

Then the robins sang another song.

They told Red Feather that they had a nest
in the tree.

"I. laid four blue eggs in the nest," sang
one robin.

46



" By and by there will be four baby
birds.

That is a secret.

Do not tell, little Red Feather."




" Chee, chee, chee," said Red Feather. " I
will not tell."

A little rabbit ran by.

" Oh, come and play with me," said Red
Feather.

But the rabbit jumped across the path.

He would not play with Red Feather.

47



3

He ran into the woods.

Red Feather ran after him.

Jump went the little rabbit into the
briars.

All Red Feather could see was his white
tail.

He jumped into the briars after him.

But they pricked his bare feet.

They scratched his hands.

Red Feather did not cry.

His mother had told him there were bears
in the wood.

There were wild foxes and wolves.

If Red Feather cried they might hear.

Perhaps they would come and find him.

They would eat him up.

So Red Feather never cried.

He was a brave little Indian.

" Good-by, White Tailed Rabbit. I am
going home," he said.

" I do not like to play in the briars.

I am going home to my mother.

I will see you again, some day."

48



Red Feather did not live in a house*

He lived in a big tent.

Red Feather called it his wigwam.




He knew how to make a wigwam.

He had watched his father make one.

He had watched his father cut down the
trees for the poles.

He had watched him cut off all the
branches.

The poles must be straight and smooth.

They must be very long, too.



WORLD AT WORK I. 4



49



Eed Feather watched his father drive the
poles into the ground.

He drove them in very hard.

5

" Watch, little Eed Feather," he said.

" Some day you will be a man.

Then you will have a wigwam.

You must learn to set it up.

The wind blows hard in winter.

You must drive the poles down hard.

If you don't, the wind will blow the tent
over.

Now the poles are ready.

Mother will cover them with deerskin.

To-night we will sleep in our new wig-
wam.

Blow, winds, blow!

You cannot blow our tent over."

6

Do you know where Red Feather's mother
got the deerskin?
Red Feather knows.

50



One day he saw a live deer in the
woods.

The deer was drinking in the river.

Red Feather came out of the wood.

He came very softly, but the deer heard
him.




He lifted up his head from the water.
He looked at Red Feather with two pretty
eyes.

For a long time he stood very still.


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