Scotland. Treasurer.

Accounts of the Lord High Treasurer of Scotland = Compota thesaurariorum Regum Scotorum online

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a small chapel erected near the
lists for shriving the intending
combatants.

Chargeouris, 510 ; ramrods.

Chawmei*s, 458; chambers or cabins.

Cheifls, 452 ; sheaves or blocks for
the tackling of a ship. The
method of cutting a sheave hole
in a mast or yard is to mark off
at the required place a rectangle
the length of the diameter of the
sheave pivs a clearance at each
end equal to the diameter of the
rope intended to pass, and in
breadth the thickness of the
sheave. An auger or womyll
is then used to bore through the
wood within the boundaries of the
rectangle. The " cheisellis " some
into play and " dicht " or clean
away the remaining wood and make
it fair for inserting the sheave.

Cheise, 302 ; to choose.

Cheissellis, 368 ; chisels.

Chekker, 28 ; exchequer.

Chekkert, 235 ; chequered.



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GLOSSARY.



541



Chenje, 21 ; a chain.

Chenge, 330 ; change, alter, in this

instance apparently to reduce

rent.
Chereis, 353 ; cherries.
Cipir, 436 ; usually cypress, but

perhaps here for copper.
Clathing, 483 ; light wood lining.
Olengeand, 510; clengeing, 513;

cleaning.
Clock, 200 ; cloak.
Clois carts, 513; ammunition

waggons.
Cobill, 280 ; a flat-bottomed boat, a

coble.
Cod, 227; cushion.
Cod lases, 125; laces for cushiong

or pillows.
Codwaris, 211 ; pillowslips.
Coft, 200; bought.
Coges, 186; wooden vessels for

holding liquids.
Coist syd, 352 ; coast side, part of

the sea sliore.
l^[, Cok, X79; the hull of a ship. />.,

coqT
Colar of hir stay, 473 ; a spliced eye

for attaching the stay to the mast

head.

Colleges, 321 ; colleagues, com-
panions.
Complices, 443 ; companions, fellows
Comptgevar, 371 ; comptroller.
Condukkit, 277 ; conducted, trans-
acted.
Confectionis, 341 ; confections,

drugs.
Contrariit, 337 ; was contrary.



Conje, 140 ; coin, but perhaps in
this case the mint.

Coppis, 399 ; cups.

Cordalis, 288 ; the cables of a ship,
the gret cordalis were anchor
cables.

Corf, 483 ; a basket.

Corkit schone, 29 ; shoes with cork
heels.

Con-eckand, 523 ; repairing, putting
in order.

Courtingis, 64 ; curtains.

Covertouris, 321 ; here apparently
dish covei-s.

Cowbrig, 463; a deck erection of
light material placed on the royal
or upper poop at the extreme
after end of the ship, its beams
passing from side to side of the
ship, thus making a "bryg."
Below it was a house, in Englisli
termed cuddy, in Scottish, cow-
slied or sheiling. It was the place
of honour for the principal oflScer
of the ship, and corresponded
to the Thronu^ in the Roman
galleys.

Cowngee, 114. Fr, cong^, a permit ;
" cowngee of the quhet " would
mean a permit to ezpoi-t a certain
quantity of wheat for himself and
his horse during the voyage to
Scotland.

Coyis, 114 ; cabins.

Craarfull, 484 ; the load of a craar
or small coasting vessel.

Cradill, 290; a ship's cradle. The
timber placed under it tempor-



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542



GLOSSARY.



arilj to enable it to be launched

into the water.
Crane, 303 ; a machine for lifting

weighta
Crangilt, 305 ; crane fees — so used

constantly in Andrew Haly-

burton's Ledger.
Crannis, 102 ; cranes.
Crapis, 205 ; French crape.
Crate, 181 ; a wicker basket used

for packing.
Croisy 515; grease.
Cressens, 205 ; perhaps for '^ excre-
scence," or addition to the coat of

mail.
Croce, 398; cross.
Crocis, 297 ; crosses.
Crosat ducatis, 196 ; the crossed

ducat, a gold coin, here of the

value of 19s.
Crosatis, 210 ; crossed ducats.
Crukis, 523; the iron hooks in a

door-post which form part of the

hinges.
Cunjeart, 275 ; coiner.
Cuppillis, 283 ; rafters.
Curait, 103 ; curate, parish priest.
Cures, 122 ; a cuirass.
Cursour, 31 1 ; courser, horse.
Cwnyngis, 183 ; coneys, rabbits.

Daktr, 430 ; a dakyi* of hides con-
sisted of ten.

Dalis, 291 ; deals, planks.

Diambra, 317 ; a very complex
mixture used in stomachic dis-
orders. See Diapensatorium Phar-
maceuticwm Viennense, 1765.



Debtu'sat, 177 ; disbursed.

DemyoBtage, 242 ; a kind of
woollen stuff.

Dichteyne, 200; dichting, pre-
paiing, cleaning, curing.

Diocy, 408 ; diocese.

Disjonit, 105; breakfasted. /V.,
dejeuner.

Distrenye, 341 ; to distrain.

Doubill, 335 ; a duplicate.

Double nekket bonettes, 198; bon-
nets with double flaps at back.

Doule straikes, 514.

Dowbill naill, 451 ; apparently very
large nails.

Dragalanga, 317; perhaps a com-
pound of Oalanga, the root stock
of Alpinia GfJanga, an aromatic
stomachic confection.

Di-eg lx)itis, 476 ; boats for tow-
ing.

Drogoryis, 90; drugs.

Dublar, the, 464 ; probably the deep
bay near Inverkeithing.

Dur, 87 ; door.

Dwir nails, 451 ; probably door
nails.

Dyis, 493; dice, iron missiles for
guns.

EoE, 212 ; to edge, trim.
Efiorhand, 380; beforehand, in

advance.
Eik, V. to add to.
Eirlederis, 515; traces.
Eit, 103 ; eat.
Elimose, 177 ; alms.
Embaxatour, 408 ; ambassador.



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GLOSSARY.



543



Entray silvii-, 182 ; perliape equiva-
lent to arles, or monej given at
the entry to service.

Erding, 116; Hterally earthing,
burial. •

Ermyt, 122. Fr.^ armet, a kind of
hehnet : when worn with a beaver
and visor it was called armet
grandy when without these and
supplied with an open triple-
barred face-guard it was called
avTMipetU,

Everilkane, 402 ; each or every
one.

Ewar, 328 ; a ewer or water jar.

Excrescence, 257 ; addition, an
extra.
« Extreisy 511 ; axle trees.

Fabs play, 330 ; a farce.

Fassone, 197; fashion.

Feast of All Relique, 191. The

feast of Relics was September 15.

Here it may refer to a payment

for Relic Sunday, which in 1511

would be 13th July.
Fence, 347 ; the arrest of goods or

lauds so that no creditor could

obtain undue preference.
Fent, 32, pi, fentis ; an opening in a

sleeve, shirt, coat, petticoat, <&c.

Modem Fr.y fente, a slit.
Fering, 531 ; valuing.
Ferme quhyt, 330; quit rent, or

abatement of i-ent.
Fermej, 330 ; rents.
Fertur, 176 ; a chest in which relics

of saints were kept.



Fessonyng, 121 ; fashioning, mak-
ing.
Firlot, 42 ; a measure of grain, the

fourth part of a boU.
Firryn, 608 ; made of firwood.
Fithelar, 115; fiddler.
Flacatis, 86 ; flasks.
Flatouris, 298; flotouris, floaters,

pennants for a ship.
Floit boat, 317 ; the longboat.
Flokkis, 116, 284; cloth with the

nap raised.
Flory, 90 ; a blue powder used for

painting.
Floting, 263 ; fluting of a dress.
Flotis, 286 ; rafts.
Flukis, 357 ; Jounders.
Flurs, 83 ; floors. *
FocaU, 274; fuel.
Fog, 523 ; moss.
Forebowis, 518 ;
Foregeris, 119 ; probably fore gears,

pieces of armour for protecting

the chest.
Fi-auch, 48 ; freight.
Frenjeis, 31 ; fringes.
Fres, 50 ; frieze.
Fulje, 90 ; foil.

Fund barne, 182 ; a foundling.
Funjeis, 18, 199 ; the fur of the

polecat or fitch. /V., fouine,

the foyne, polecat.
Furm, 109 ; a mould.
Fyre, 123; perhaps the plate for

the touch-hole of a culverin.
Fysche8,y85 ; fish bolts.

H
Gait, 457 ; i-oadway.



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544



GLOSSARY.



Gait skjnnis, 276; goatskins used

for the bellows of organs.
Galay, 290 ; galley.
Gallna quhet, 219 ; probably for

Gallua quhet, perhaps white wool

from Galloway.
Galre, 276 ; gallery.
Gur, 437 ; to cause, make.
Garron nails, 526 ; large nails of

different sizes, spike nails.
Gawbert, 25 ; a gaberdine or short

cloak or mantle.
Gawelokis, 460 ; iron handspikes or

crowbars.
Geistis, 473 ; joists.
Gemma bands, 527 ; some kind

of bands which were put up in

pairs.
Genjeis, 327; bolts or arrows for

crossbows.
Gesting, 283 ; joisting, putting

joists into a building.
Geys, 132; geese.
Girls, 484 ; grilse.
Girth stingis, 295; see Gyrth-

styngis.
Glaspes, 523 ; clasps.
Goisehalk, 317; goshawk.
Granellis, 418; probably garnet*.
Grant, 250 ; gray. "Tanne grant "

may mean a dusky gmy.
Greis, 30, gris, greys ; probably the

fur of the grey squirrel. (See '

Glossary to vol. i.) I

Grose, 303 ; large.
Grottis, 528 ; groats, oats with the

husks off.
Grume, 262 ; gioom.



Gudlinis, 306 ; guilders,* Flemish
money.

Gyrding, 83 ; putting hoops round
pitchers or other vessels.

Gyrthstyngi>(, 395 ; wands for split-
ting into hoops. {See Glossary,
vol. i.)

Gys, 126 ; a goose.

Habre^oun, 101 ; habergeon, a piece
of afmour defending the neck.

Hadir, 111; heather.

Hakbusches, 511; arquebuses, the
musket of the day.

Hamys, 514; the part of a horse
collar to which the traces are
attached.

Hanyng, 523 ; enclosure, field.

Hardis, 45, herdis, 451 ; the refuse
or coarse parts of flax or tow, used
to make oakum for caulking.

Harroltis, 519 ; heralds.

Hemmys, 357; edges of stone or
any other material.

Herbry, 350; literally harbouring
or lodging.

Heremyt, 105 ; hermit.

Hevit, 317; literally heaved; in
this instance it may signify that
the mast was cast overboard or
perhaps it is only a way of datin<r
the storm which occurred on the
day' when the Pansi/ hoisted her
mast on board.

Hew, 328. See under " Ymery."

He wis, 22 ; colours, hues.

Hiiris, 224, hers; her own.

Hispanjee, 270; Spanish.



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GLOSSARY.



545



Hogtoun ooit, 197 ; a kind of quilted
jacket. Gf, Fr., hoqueton.

Holmej fustian, 204 ; a kind of
fustian probably from Norwich,
and made in some one of the
places named Holm in Norfolk.

Hors bred, 342; bread for horses
made of beans, bran, <fec., still in
use in many parts of the Con-
tinent and till recently in Eng-
land.

" On that condition I'll feed thy devil
with hone bread as long oa he
ItTes, of free cost."

Marlowe » " Dr. Faustus."

Housouris, 22 ; housings or capari-
sons, coverings for horses.

Howis, 356 ; hoods.

Howk, 334 ; a hulk, or large ship.

Hudis, 29 ; hoods.

Hurle stule, 33 ; probably a kind of
child's go-cart on wheels.

Hyid, 251 ; hide, deerskin.

Ilb, 274 ; oil.

Intymmer, 479 ; the technical term

for the internal lining of the hull

of a ship.
Irisch gamyn, 101 ; backgammon,

or a similar game.
Ischear, 251 ; usher.

Jak, 140; a loose coat or tunic of
stout leather, or of many folds of
cloth quilted and covered with
leather.

Jaquet cottis, 367 ; jackets.

Juncturis, 196 j joinings, metal
fastenings used in saddlery.
I2



Justifyit, 123; executed, put to
death.

Kames, 87 ; combs.

Kannis, 298 ; cans.

Eastein, 280 ; casting, digging.

Keching, 188; kitchen.

Megger, 343 ; a cadger, carrier.

Keljmg, 489 ; large codfish.

Kest, 127 ; cast, distributed.

Kill, 465 ; kiln.

Eittis, 123 ; cates, or kits of butter.

Knapscaw, 101 ; usually an iron
bonnet or helmet of the shape of
a bowl or basin ; in this instance
probably used for a basin itself.

Kneys, 466 ; angled pieces of timber
cut out of the solid, generally from
the fork of a tree branch.

Knop, t;. 88; to put on tufts or
tassels.

Laid, 99; load; here used as the
plural, loads.

Laider, 526 ; leader or loader.

Lair silvir, 116; money paid to
secure the right of sepulture in
a churchyard.

Lam, 19 ; lamb.

Lambart steile, 273; Lombardy
steel.

Lame, 85 ; earthen, crockery ware.

Lamper elis, 123; lampreys.

Larg, 28; large.

Last, 48 ; a measure which seems to
have varied in its capacity accord-
ing to the article measured. A
last of tar or pitch equalled



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546



GLOSSARY.



twelve barrels ; a last of ale con-
tained 120 gallons.

Lateis, 215. See Letteis.

Latron, 100 ; a privy, latrine.

Lattoun, 111 ; a white mixed
metal.

Lawar, 330 ; laver, washing dish.

Lawborowis, 415; lawburrows;
letters passing under the signet,
running in the sovereign's name,
and obtained at the instance of
one who has, or thinks he has,
reason to apprehend danger to his
person or property from the acts
of another.

Lawd, 188;lad, boy.

Lechit, 83 ; leeched, attended medi-
cally.

Lede, 116; load.

Lederis, 129 ; leathers.

Ledingy 526 ; carrying.

Leid, 274 ; lead.

Leid, 343 ; a load.

Leifes, 120 ; leaves.

Leit de camp, 201 ; a travelling or
camp bed.

Leopardis, 18; figures embroidered
on king's coat.

Lesarais, 18; figures embroidered
on king's coat.

Letteis, 215 ; a kind of grey fur.

Levand federis, 202 ; feathers from
the Levant.

Liar, 15 ; a carpet, rug, or mat.

Litting, 40; litteyne, 185; dyeing,
colouring.

Losanis, 321 ; lozenges.

Louch, 44^ loch.



Lumm3mg, 379 ; limning, illuminat-
ing. See oho •• Alummyng."

Lyar mortclaith, 354 ; a mortclotb
or coffin pall used at burials.

Lyard, 75 ; grey.

Lymmaris, 508 ; limbers ; the beam
of wood which forms the support
for a gun running on wheels, and
having a hook at its extremity for
attachment to the ammunition
waggon.

Lymningy 340; illuminating or
engrossing.

Lyn bote, 396; perhaps a fishing
boat with long lines.

Lyne jarne» 304 ; spun yam.

Ma, 498 ; more.

Maill, 25 ; armour, original of chain.

iV., maille, a ring.
Mais claitht, 297 ; perhaps for mers

cloth, a hanging for the faers of a

ship. {See Glossary to vol. iii.)
Male, 84 ; rent.
Mandis, 292 ; broad baskets in the

shape of corn sieves, generally

made of straw and willows plaited

together.
Mantand, 49 ; stammering.
Mantil, pi, mantillis, 18 ; a certain

number (probably a hundred) of

skins of fur. {See Glossary to

vol. i.)
Marchand, 200 ; merchant.
Maredge, 296 ; marriage.
Marow, 65, companion; fellow

servant.
Martrik, 356 ; a marten.



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GLOSSARY.



547



Marykyne skinnis, 196 ; Morocco

leather. Fr,^ Maroquin.
Maskis, 111; perhaps mashes.
Madtis, 296 ; in many instances this

word merely implies large trees.
Mawmer ledderis, '455; leather

wasliera for ships' pumps, or

perhaps leather buckets for chain

pumps.
Mendis, 286 ; additions, extra sup

plies.
Mermuset of Caljecut, 117; a

marmoset that had been brought

home from Calicut, the first

Indian port vifited by Yasco de

Gama in 1498.
Mertrikis, 20 ; fur of the marten,

sable.
Mer5» 284; mares.
Mesure, 137 ; measure, probably in

this instance a measure for a

charge of gunpowder.
Met salt, 307 ; measured salt, used

in this case for ballast.
Mis buik, 322 ; mass book.
Misteris, 481 ; necessaries, probably

used in the sense of latrines.
Monte Tumba, 177; Mount St.

Michel in Normandy.
Moppatis, 452 ; used in two senses

— mops of thrums for putting on

tallow after caulking ; gun sponges

of sheepskins.
More, 338 ; a Moor, negro.
Moris, 399 ; a Morris dance.
Mort claith, 195 ; mort cloth, a pall

for a coffin.
Mort stand, 43 ; probably a cata-



falque or stand for a coffin during
a funeral service in church.

Moyaine, 510 ; of medium size. Fr,^
moyen.

Muldis, 109 ; moulds.

Mullane fustiane, 205 ; fustian
made in Milan.

Mychkinnis, 113; mutchkins, the
mutchkin was equivalent to an
English pint.

Mykkis, 485 ;

M3md, 273 ; a mine.

Mynever, 29. (/V., menu vair. LaA,^
minutum varium.) The winter
belly fur of the squirrel, probably
imported from Russia. (&ee vol. i.,
Preface clzxxvii., ncfUy and Gloss-
ary to vol. ii.)

Mynkis, 215; a name for several
sptscies of PtUoriua esteemed for
their fur,

Na 8TEDE, 116; '^that maid na
stede " seems to denote coming to
naughty that did no good.

Nain, 251 ; none.

Nepet, 474 ; in aUusion to the
great ship having been aground
during a neap tide in the har-
bour.

New mylk and wattir, 245; pro-
bably a bluish grey tint of cloth.

Newjermese, 256 ; New Year
mass.

Novellis, 410 ; news.

Nowmer, 402 ; number.

Nuk, 281 ; nook, comer.

Nurice, 340 ; a nurse.



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548



GLOSSARY.



Nycht curchis, 193 ; kerchiefs for
night wear.

Odib, 424 ; other.

OflErej, 40 ; gold work on church
vestments.

Or, 116 ; ere, before.

Oratour, 298; an oratory, prayer
closet.

Ordand, 347 ; ordained, ordered.

Orknay skynnis, 245. Both Hector
Boece and Hollinshed state that
a great number of skins of ozen,
sheep, and goats, and martens were
exported from Orkney to Scotland.

Orlage, 324 ; a clock or watch.

Osteris, 313; oysters.

Ourehed, 335 ; overhead, on the
average.

Ouj^p, 451 ; a platform of planks
laid over the beams in bottom of
a vessel, usually at the eictremities,
leaving the hold clear.

Our jeir, 23 ; over year, referring
to stuff for dress remaining from
the previous year.

Outquittin^ 74.

Owkis, 32; weeks.

Pa 30UN, 23, j^, pailjounis;

pavilions, tents.
Paintre, 296 ; paint work.
Paitlat, 25 ; a kind of ruff.

Glossary to vol. iii.)
Pakkis, 305 ; packs, bales.
Pampilleoiin, 215; perhaps

trimming of spangles.

pampilette^ a spangle.



(See



some
Ft,,



Pannalit, 135; panelled.
Pardonar, 43; a seller of Papal

indulgences.
Parplait, 192.
Paswolentes, 487 ; small cannons.

Fr.y paflsevolent.
Patroun, 109 ; a matrix or mould.

463, a shipmaster.
Pauljonis, 515 ; see Pailjoun.
Pavasis, 473 ; pavisades, originally

shield placed above the bulwarks

of ships, but here probably used

for the bulwarks themselves.
Pechar, 108 ; a pitcher.
Pecharis, 83 ; pitchers.
Pegging, t;. 89 ; to place the rigging

stone or stones in the ridge or

roof of a house.
Pellok, 337 ; a porpoise.
Pellokis, 102, 301; cannon balls

weighing about 20 lbs.
Pendasis, 196; part of a buckle.
Pendele, 358 ; a kind of veil or

screen for covering the front of

an altar.
Peris, 35 ; pears.
Persing, 121 ; piercing.
Pewdar, 314; pewter.
Pik, 48 ; pitch.
Pik moyane, 517 ; the smallest size

of culverin.
Piljet, 221 ; a pillion.
Pinkis, 215 ; drops or ornaments.
Pinsalis, 295 ; small flags, penselles :

the standard was a very long flag

becoming narrower to the point,

which, except in the case of the

Royal Standard, wajs split; the



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GLOSSARY.



549



guidon was similar, but less by a
third; the pennon was half the
size of the guidon, and the
pennoncelle or pensil was again
a diminutive of the pennon.

Pip, 302 ; a cask or pipe.

Plakkis, 475 ; Scottish farthings.

Playg, 135 ; playock, plaything.

Pleges, 347; pledges.

Plenjat, 329 ; complained, grumbled.

Pies, 48 ; please.

Pleyit, 126; pleaded at law.

Plummair, 456 ; a plumber.

Pointit cote, 21 ; a coat, the fasten-
ings of which were points or
ribbons.

Poldavis, 301 ; a kind of canvas
used for making sails.

Poldyr, 460 ; gunpowder.

Portuse, 340 ; a portforium or
breviary.

Powderingis, 29; probably black
tail tips. {See vol. i. Preface, p.
clxzxvii., note.)

Powpet, 466 ; the poop of a ship.

Powtis, 133; young moorfowl, or
the chickens or poults of any
domesticated fowl.

Poynd, 338 ; to poind, distrain.

Premissis, 207 ; the foregoing,
already mentioned.

Presonare, 348; prisoner.

Prewit, 356; proved.

Propinis, 238 ; presents.

Propinit, 237; given as a present,
or propine.

Propriete, 251 ; property.

Puilris, 215; should be Pinkis, q,v.



Pullan, 46.

Pulleis, 284; pulleys.

Punctis, 195, 367 ; points, laces.

Punschionis, 111 ; punches, patterns
for stamping metal.

Punsit, 128; punched, pierced or
hammered.

Purfele, 211; trimming.

Purphell, 32 ; the edging or border
of a dress.

Put to, 302 ; counted as.

Puyr, 215 ; fur.

Pynnalis, 376 ; probably for pensils,
pennants.

Pyot, 114; piebald.

Pyrne satyne, 253 ; satin striped
with different colours, inter-
woven or brocaded.

QuADRANTis, 110; quadrants, instru-
ments used by gunners in level-
ling, mounting, and lowering a
piece of ordnance.

Quailyess, 528 ; quails.

Quaris, 88 ; quires, here applied to
books of gold leaf.

Quavir, 327 ; a quiver.

Querell holis, 421 ; quarry holes.

Marie ! I lent my gossip my mear to

fetch hame coilb,
And he hir drounit into the qnerrell

holis.
—Lyndsay, "ThrieEstaitis," 1-8061.

Quheill graith, 377; wood with

which to make wheels.

Quhet, 114 ; wheat.

Quhissil, 196; a whistle.

Quyk, 131 ; quick, living.

Qweile wricht, 259 ; a wheelwright.

Qwereouris, 278 ; quarriers.



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550



GLOSSARY.



Ra, 456 ; the yard of a ship.
Racland gold, 90; Rattel gold,

113; perhaps broken gold. From

/v., racier, to strike.
Ram, 101 ; ramrod.
Raphele pojntLs, 200; laces made

of doeskin.

" Thair gluves wor of the raff el richt,
Thair schone wer of the straitis."
— *' Christ's Kirk on the Greea."
Scene 2.

Rattil, or Raccil, gold, 113; see

Racland gold.
Recurand, 325; recurring; in this

case annual.
Red, 125; clearance, settlement.

recovery.
Reistit, 489 ; cured, smoked.

. . . ye may get
A guid buffed hernng, reisted skate
And ingans, an' (though past its date)
A cut o' veal.
— " Chambers' Minor Antiquities," p. 10.

Relique, 32 ; case for a relic.

Remufis, 307 ; removes, a term still
used by farriers to denote the
alteration ''of a horse's shoes to
suit the growth of the hoof.

Rest^ 122 ; a rest for a lance fixed
to the cuirass.

Rest plait, 120 ; perhaps a plate (of
steel or iron) attached to the
saddle for laying a lance in rest.

Restit, 28 ; remained owing.

Reule, 293 ; to have in i-ule, to be in
authority over.

Revaris, 315 ; rovers ; shooting with
bow and arrows at marks at
uncertain distances, instead of at
a *' clout" or target at a fixed



j range. Sometimes, however, it
merely means shooting at long
range.

Revestre. 275; the vestry of a
chapel, where the vestments were
kept.

Ridaris, 21 ; a gold coin. The
I Scots rider was valued at about
23s. {See Glossary to vol. i.)

Rigwiddies, 514 ; chains which went
across the back of a horse to sup-
port the shafts.

Kispe, 272; a file.

Rokkaris, 33 ; rockei-s ; women who
rocked the cradle.

Rollis, 31 ; wheels, castors.

Romany huge, 16; black sheep-
skins imported from Lombardy
and Puglia. {See Glossary to
vol. i.)

Rosat, 111 ; rosin.

Roundis, 121 ; perhaps letters or
characters ; *' runes " which were
engraved on the king's sword.

Roundis, 375; probably circular
quarrels of stained glass.

Row is, 302 ; rolls, in this case rolls
of canvas.

Rowkouris, 470; oaken casks or
tubs.

Rubane, 221 ; ribbon.

Ruffyis, 87 ; literally ruffians ; in
- this instance employed to denote
the attendants on St. Nicholas
boy bishop.

Ruyf, ruf, 453 ; when the seym or
nail was driven through the
planking of a carvel-built ship it



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GLOSSARY.



551



had a rujf or washer (now called

routh) put over it and was

rivetted on this.
Ry, 42 ; lye.
Bynnar, 262 ; a runner, messenger,

running footman.

Sabilles, SO; fur of the sahle.

Sad, 25; a dull or neutral-tinted
colour.

Sadillis (for a ship), 463 ; pieces of
timber fitted to the masts and
bowsprit to support the weight of
the spars bearing on them.

Saip, 334 ; soap.

Sair, 77 ; sore, painful.

Sal aramomakle, 104; should be
Sal ammoniak, Sal ammoniac.

Sal-peter, 96 ; saltpetre.

Samony, 186 ; so many, as many.

Sandre, 192; probably the same
cloth as Burd Alexander or Bui-d
Sanders.

Sarris, 46.

Say, 93 ; assay.

Sayng, 274; assaying, proving,
testing.

Scaff, 373 ; skiff.

Scailje, 84; roofing slates, stone
shingles.

Scawbertis, 120; scabbards for
swords.

Schaiffronis, 210; chaffirone, 213;
schaiffer, 230; chaiffer, 230; a
kind of ladies' head dress, or part
of a hood often ornamented with
gold or precious stones. Fr.y
chaperon.



Schamvart, 192.

Schapioun, 205 ; a kind of hat. Fr.^
chapeau.

Scharpertynnys, 484; Bee Serpen-
tines.

Scholl, 119 ; shooting at the schell.

Schifl&s, 47 ; sheaves, blocks for the
tackle of a ship.

Schippil, 306; shipfuU or shipload.

Schoir, 292 ; shore.

Schor, 481 ; the shore.

Schure, 322 ; shore, sheared, cut.

Sclewij, 192; sleeves.

Scoile, 240; school.

Scolage, 240 ; scVooling, expense of
education.

Scorit, 482 ; chafed.

Scrapenis, 321 ; scrapings, refuse.

Scyoure, 523 ; a sewer, drain.

Segis, 297 ; seats.

Selch, 105 ; a seal.

Selk skyne, 201 ; a seal skin.

Sellar maill, 302 ; rent for a cellar
or warehouse.

Selkt, 101 ; in this instance a small
pan with a lid.

Sellatis, 119; salades, helmets of a
globular form with a neckpiece.

Semys leddir, 25 ; perhaps chamois
skin.

Sen^ 17 ; since.

Sence, 181 ; incense.

Serpentines, 486; Scharpentynnys,
484; guns formed by lashing a
number of barrels together and
connecting their touch-holes, so
that they could all be fired simul-
taneously.



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552



GLOSSARY.



Sersouris, 111; possibly saucers.

Set burds, 456 ;

Sett, 300 ; probably in this case

settled or disposed.
Seym, 452 ; a nail driven through

the overlapping portion of two

planks and clenched with a rivet.
Sicht, 121 ; probably the boss or



Online LibraryScotland. TreasurerAccounts of the Lord High Treasurer of Scotland = Compota thesaurariorum Regum Scotorum → online text (page 46 of 63)