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Annual reports of the Town of Seabrook, New Hampshire (Volume 1986) online

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11A



BUDGET FORM FOR TOWNS WHICH HAVE ADOPTED THE
PROVISIONS OF THE MUNICIPAL BUDGET LAW

STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE

DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE ADMINISTRATION
Municipal Services Division

BUDGET OF THE TOWN



OF SEABROOK, N.H.

Appropriations and Estinnates of Revenue for the Ensuing Year January 1, 1987 to December 31, 1987 or for
Fiscal Year From 19 to 19



THIS BUDGET SHALL BE POSTED WITH THE TOWN WARRANT

RSA 31:95 and 32:5

February 15, 1987
Budget Committee: (Please sign in ink) /? Date



Duaget oomminee: (riease sign in inK; /? udie _ — -




12A



PURPOSES OF APPROPRIATION

(RSA31:4)
GENERAL GOVERNMENT



Actual

Appropriations

1986

(1986-87)

(omit cents)



Actual

Expenditures

1986

(1986-87)

(omit cents)



Selectmen's
Budget

1987

(1987-88)

(omit cents)



Budget Committee



Recommended

1987

(1987-88)

(omit cents)



Not

Recommended

(omit cents)



1 Town Officers Salary



109,284



101 jOnf,



1??,3B5



1?? .^8q



2 Town Officers Expenses



90,778



-^ 5, 841



118,005



117,8ns



3 Election and Registration Expenses



14,650



10,691



8,550



8,550



4 Cemeteries



'^^^3^



20,g4l



56,001.



56,001



5 General Government Buildings



151,608



140,468



219,579



?i?,n?3



6 Reappraisal of Property



7 Planning and Zoning



20,110



11,621



15,820



i5 , H?n



8 Legal Expenses



33,000



76,213



75,000



75,000



9 Advertising and Regional Association



10 ^<^rmmsfWP< CLERK5



-^^^



■i4



03,521

il.go4



-1^



129,343



11 Art. ?^. 86 Art. 5.87



1:000



loc



12 Art.?4



Art. 6.87



L. 500. 000



44.800



6.125



6,12'



13 Art. ^'S,86 Art. 13.87



100.000



32.674



7.860.924



.860.92



14 Art. ^6,86 Art. 1^.87



165.000



2.280



7.500.000



7,500,000



PUBLIC SAFETY



15 Police Department



798,371



819 , 3 0(^



882, 8?6



) 1 , 6 79



16 Fire Department



489,980



467,503



555,125



555, 1 25



17 Civil Defense



27,6 8 5



23,002



27,787



27,685



'8 ^'y^^'yy'yyyy'??^ police htrf.



45,620



24,156



26 . 446



26,446



Art . 37, i



Art. 16,87



50,000



1,167



62,500



62,500



Art. 38,86 — Art . 17,87



7,400



7,400



17,000



21



-Aj^



-A rt . 1 ^



132,000



110.700
6



10 ,000



20 , 000



22 Art.



10



Art. 1'



.000



55,300



HIGHWAYS, STREETS & BRIDGES



23 Town Maintenance



281 ,5^*^



206,686



268,265



237.265



24 General Highway Department Expenses



25 Street Lighting



40.000



38.74^



•^8,000



38.000



26 Art. 4?, 86 Art. 20,87



50,000



_Q_



^5,000



27 Art. 4^,86 Art. 21. 87



24,000



11, ^i



11,380



28 Art. 45,86 Art. 22,87



29 Art. 47,86 Art. 2^,87



11,700



12,500



11,06^



200.000



11 7. 200



30 Art. 4 8



Art. 24.87



23.000



_Q_



20,000



SANITATION



31 Solid Waste Disposal



255,990



231,795



250,806



250,^06



32 Garbage Removal



33 A r t. 49 .'



A rt. 25, 87



40,000



30.2 50



15 ,000



15, 000



34 Art. 50,86 Art. ?6,87



74,000



65,744



76.671



76,671



35 A-pt-. ■ 51,86 Art. 27,87



36 A rt, 52,8 6 Art . 2*^ , 87



17,000



1.5,^14



?o,nnn



50,000



5,000



5,000



HEALTH



37 Health Department



20 ,3 00



10 , 013



20,70 5



20,705



38 Hospitals and Ambulances



39 Animal Control



11 ,075



8,744



14,4?3



14,423



^° ^^e^^.^'H Mosquito Control



24,932



18,916



24,831



-2-4, 831



Human S e rvices



^a^^



38,656



38.069



40,619



42 Art. 5^,86 Art. ^0.87



>2.50(



i:i66



5, 000



43 Art. 54.86



45,000



5,078



WELFARE



44 General Assistance



^1.595



16.733



22.896



22,925



45 Old Age Assistance & ATPD



5.000



3 , 230



1.000



1,000



46 Aid to the Disabled

47 Art. 55,86

48 Art. 56,86



Art. 31,87
Art. 33,87



50,000
12,410



10.625







9,980



13A



PURPOSES OF APPROPRIATION

(RSA31:4)
CULTURE AND RECREATION



49 Library



50 Pa^k^StS^F^^



51 Patriotic Purposes g , pi d Home Day



Actual

Appropriations

1986 ,

(1986-87)

(omit cents)



-. 57,01-4



34,0?0



,000



Actual

Expenditures

1986

•(1986-87)

(omit cents)



57,n iiL



31 ,52 6

1 0,9;



Selectmen's
Budget

1987

(1987-88)

(omit cents)



6 9,9 68



hh,HH 2



14,726



Budget Committee



Recommended

1987

(1987-88)

(orn it cents)

_59,968 1
44,44?



14,726



Not

Recommended

(omit cents)



52 Conservation Commission



.000



1,000



1 ,oon



53 Art. 57,



Art. 35.87



28.265



2.581



4,642



4,642



54 Art. 58.86 Art. 36.87



2.250.000







35,000



35,000



55 Art. SQ.



Art. 37.87



56 Art. 60,86 Art. 38.87



^.500.000



3.500.000



6.000



192











6,000



35,000



DEBT SERVICE



57 Principal of Long-Term Bonds & Notes



75.000



75.000



75,000



75,000



58 Interest Expense - Long-Term Bonds & Notes



44.588



44.587



39.15(



39,150



59 Interest Expense - Tax Anticipation Notes



50.000







50,000



5o,nno



JO__gs^l^{S!Sg§£S.gSStfiE£_HEATXQlL



J3S-M1-



128.61 2



Ar^t. 61^ 86 Art . 3 9, 87



62 Art. 6?, 86 Art. 40,87



38.486.



38.493



175.657







157,597



500.000



500.000







7,000



2,1 4



CAPITAL OUTLAY



63 Ar^f-. ■ ^3^86 Art. 41, 87



100,000



100.000



1,00c



Art . 4 3, 87



-5iir



Art . 44,87







7,son,nno



66



Art . 48,87



29.000



?9 , 000



OPERATING TRANSFERS OUT



67 Payments to Capital Reserve Funds:



68



Art. 49,87



6 8,000



Art. 50,87



-^^^



Art. 51 ,87



1 7,150



Art. 52,87



)0 ,000



Art. 53,87



JL



12,000



Art. 54,87



^,^00



5,500



Art . 55 , 87



2,500



Art. 56,87



JL



9,500



1,500



MISCELLANEOUS



76 Municipal Water Department



276,697



261 , 3 66



271 ,566



271,566



77 Municipal Sewer Department



78 Municipal Electric Department



182,054



79 PICA, Retirement & Pension Contributions



180,044



178,8 3 2



1 8?, 054



452, 3«4



80 Insurance



391,058



440, ?3?



45 2,3 84



81 Unemployment Compensation



82



Art. 57.87







IQ.qoo



83



Art. 58.87



2,000



1 ,000



1 ,000



84



Art. 59.87



2.000



2 , 000



TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS



13,071,67



i,l6'^ ,qOO



20,421,440



^0,011,563



8,559,061



Less; Amount of Estimated Revenues, Exclusive of Taxes (Line 1 33) .



4,789,9^6



Amount of Taxes to be Raised (Exclusive of School and County Taxes) 15.221. 6l7



BUDGET OF THE TOWN OF



. SEARRnOK,



N.H



BUDGET FOR TOWNS WHICH HAVE ADOPTED THE PROVISIONS
OF THE I^IUNICIPAL BUDGET LAW



14A



SOURCES OF REVENUE



TAXES



86 Resident Taxes



87 National Bank Stock Taxes



Estimated
Revenues

1986

(1986-87)

(omit cents)



50,aoo



Actual
Revenues

1986

(1986-87)

(omit cents)



50.740



Selectmen's
Budget

1987

(1987-88)

(omit cents)







Estimated
Revenues

1987

(1987-88)

(omit cents)







88 Yield Taxes



inn



3 ?9



100



100



89 Interest and Penalties on Taxes



?5,nnn



3n,639



?5 .nnn



?5,nnQ



90 Inventory Penalties



91



INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVENUES - STATE



93 Shared Revenue -Block Grant



17S.000



176.004



175.000



175.000



94 Hlghvi^ay Block Grant



58,000



55,817



55.000



55.000



95 Railroad Tax



IL



102



100



100



96 State Aid Water Pollution Projects



97 Reimb. a/c State-Federal Forest Land



98 Other Reimbursements



5,nnn



-o;



5,000



5.000



99 CIVIL DEFENSE



10 ; 000



13,000



13,000



r.KJP gRANT/CZM



50.000



50,000



50,000



.SKWKR PiRANT



10.000











INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVENUES - FEDERAL



03



04



LICENSES AND PERMITS



08 Motor Vehicle Permit Fees



46 0.000



5^2.373



550.000



550.000



09 Dog Licenses



2,500



3.001



2.500



2.500



10 Business Licenses, Permits and Filing Fees



in, 000



10,638



10.000



10.000



11



YANKEE GREYHOUND



Q^jOnn



Q1 ,^00



92.000



92.000



^^ BUILDING PERMITS/PLANNTNf} ROARD



12.0 00



21.542



15.000



15.000



Marriage Lie/Death Cert/ T i t l es



1 n.nno



10. 765



10,000



10.000



CHARGES FOR SERVICES



Income from Departments



?5 . nno



30.51i



25.000



25.000



Rent of Tov>/n Property



_Q_



47?



_Q_







16



RECREATION
17 Police Hire



]?,QQn
45; 680



in£_



m



M



193



19



MISCELLANEOUS REVENUES



20 Interest on Deposits



400,000



409



21 Sale of Town Property



3.000



9.496



350.000



3.000



350,000



3,000



^^ PARKING FINES/DOG FINE ?



4,500



3.530



4.000



4,000



23 REIMS. TOWN POOR



8,non



7,670



6.000



6.000



^'^MISC . RECEIPTS



?n,noo



8.852



10.000



10,000



INTEREST UNEMPLOYMENT FUND



3 . Boo



JL











"OTHER FINANCING SOURCES



26 Proceeds of Bonds and Long-Term Notes



27 Income from Water^^^€^y/gr Departments



310.000



300.599



300,000



300,000



28 Withdrawal from Capital Reserve



















29 Revenue Sharing Fund



50.000



50,000



50,000



50,000



30 Fund Balance



mra"



Z7T



3 ,000;>000



3,000,000



31 INTEREST CEMETERY TRUST FUND



KJir



32



1,856,869



4,789,946



4,789,946



33



TOTAL REVENUES AND CREDITS



1,852.320



15A



POLICE REPORT FOR 1986
PATROL DIVISION

Number of calls assigned to police units 6412

Number of alarms activated 648

NiMber of assists to motorists locked out of vehicle 431
Number of assists to Fire Department including ambulance 195

Number of assists to motorists 309

Number of assists to other police agencies 229

Number of accidents reported 470

Number of vehicles towed 349

Number of animal related calls 458

SERVICES DIVISION



1985


1986




1985


1986


3


2


Robberies










Loss


$ 55,444.50


$ 990.25


87


56


Burglaries










Loss


71,668.35


41,035.45


222


200


Thefts










Loss


87,549.02


126,061.94


31


13


Auto thefts










Loss


114,860.00


78,420.00






Total losses


329,521.87


246,507.64






Total recovered


111,628.11


76,412.10


Criminal


mischief


191




48,041.08


Assaults




20






Arson




3

REPORT OF ANIMAL


CONTROL DIVISION





Dog conplaints answered 95

Other animal conplaints handled 49

Dog bites investigated 20

Dogs picked up by ACO's 49

Aniitals destroyed 47

Dogs brought to kennel 33

Warnings issued to owners 92

Conditional simmonses issued 21

Total amount of monies turned in: $290.00

Animal Control Unit went into operation on May 16, 1986,



45



OFFICE OF THE PROSECUTOR



This was a year of progressive changes. A prosecution policy was de-
veloped with three things in mind: improving the quality of arrests
and cases brought before the Court, maintaining fair and consistent
sentence reconmendations , and upholding the power of the Court by
bringing forth abused suspended sentences.

Continued attendance at the New Hampshire Police Prosecutors Associa-
tion, in-sejTvice schoolina at Northern Essex Ccanmunity College for
paralegal courses, and attendance at various seminars sponsored by the
New Hampshire Police Standards and Training Council has aided in keep-
ing abreast of changes in the law, legislative action, and courtroom
techniques and actions. An integral part of learning is teaching.
This office offered seminars to newly-hired officers, Amesbury High
School seniors, N.H. Police Cadet Academy Corps of Cadet, and a small
group of Town enployees.

The following is a statistical synopsis of the year's activities:

1985 1986

Total cases presented to Court

Guilty findings

Found not guilty

Cases scheduled for trial

Continued to another date for hearing/

disposition

Defaulted by defendant

Cases nolle prosequied or dismissed to plea

bargaining, altering of charges. Grand Jury

indictments, civilian witnesses not available

for Court, etc.

Disposed of without findings

Probable cause hearings

Extradition hearings

Miscellaneous hearings

Grand Jury indictments



2,480


3


,151


1,572


1


,982


23




16


345




534


283




312


130




112


62




67


55




74


2




1


5




3


3




39
23



Respectfully submitted,

Melissa G. Walker
Prosecutor



46



REPORT OF YOUTH SERVICES DIVISION

1986 witnessed a new beginning and separate apprcach in the Youth Di-
vision. In August of this year the transferral of officers within the
depairtment brought many changes v^ich began with a coitplete reorgan-
ization of all files and records with the result being a more efficient
and controlled system v\^ich is conputer ready should that need arise.

This office gained access to intrastate Juvenile Associations as well
as Prosecutorial Associations, thus, allowing it to remain updated on
the ever-expanding and changing Juvenile Justice System procedures,
Leaislative actions, courtroon techniques and methods. The Youth Ser-
vices Officer has been actively involved in a local group of Judges,
Juvenile Officers, Attorneys and Social Seirvices personnel y^o are
attertpting to establish a local emergency placement for children in
need within our own area. A review of the rising number of toruancy
difficulties within our schools has mandated a need for more court
intervention as well as adult prosecution vdiere applicable.

Delinquency - handled in court 88

Delinquency - handled out of court 36

CHINS: Children in Need of Services 34

Neglect Petitions 16

Truancy handled in Court 29

Sexual Assault Investigations 12

Runaways 6

Adult Arrests (Juvenile matters) 5

ExPartes /Placements 21

Crisis Intervention 14

Total cases to Court (Juvenile) 182
Total cases to Court (Adults) 5

Investigations 39

Meetings with parents 51

School visits 148
Coordination/ Information meetings

with DCYS and Social Services 67

Meetings with Attorneys 28

Programs for Court Diversion were tried on several occasions, inclusive
of daily or weekly reporting to the YSO, homework assignments, labor
at P.D. A few days is maximum for any child placed within that system.

We take this opportunity to thank teachers and merchants and recrea-
tional personnel for their support in programs that have been done and
will be done with our youth's safety and welfare in mind. When one
considers the statistic that at least 70% of all crime actively is
perpetrated by juveniles or touches a juvenile victim, may we state
that it is oiir duty as parents and civic minded people to afford our
town's children any and all possible avenues by viiich they may avoid
becaning another STATISTIC.

Respectfully submitted,

Carlene Thompson
Youth Services Officer

47



REPORT OF THE POLICE STATION BUILDING COMMITTEE

On October 19, 1985, work was started to clear the building site.
Maxam Company began work on April 7, 1986, and Leonard DiBartolomeo
assumed his duties as Clerk of the Works on April 14th. There was an
official ground-breaking ceremony shortly after 9:00 a.m. on April 30,
1986.

Although progress has been slow, we can be assured that the
station will be of good quality and one that the townspeople can be
proud of. Delays have been caused by shortages and delays in delivery
of materials, shortage of help, and bad weather.

In February of 1987 the project was 55% complete. The original
completion date was October 30, 1986, and the anticipated date of
completion now is April 30, 1987. The building is being completed
within the budgeted amount and there haven't been any change orders on
the contract.

Boynton's Lane Extension was completed with a base asphalt course
and will have the finish applied in the spring. Landscaping, hot
topping and some exterior work will be done after April 30th. The
second floor of the building will be reserved for future expansion.
The station will be "fire-safe" and equipped with a sprinkler system.

Much credit should go to Leonard DiBartolomeo who has been
overseeing the project on the town's behalf. He feels the project
will be the envy of all police departments in the state.

We would like to extend to you a personal invitation to visit our
new station during open house. Specific dates and times will be
announced through the news media as well as cable television.

Respectfully submitted,

Paul J. Cronin, Chairman
Roy F. Cross! and
Earlene U. Locke
Marion B. Kinlock



48



POLLUTION CONTROL COMMITTEE

The committee worked ^^ery hard and had many meetings (some public)early
in the year.

We chose Wright's Island as the site for the treatment plant and put
articles in the warrant for the purchase of same and monies for the de-
sign. After much difficulty, the townspeople supported our efforts.

After March, 1986, town meeting, we tried to push the project along but
we didn't receive the support from the selectmen that we expected to
carry out the people's wishes. It was June before the selectmen asked
for more engineering proposals, as they didn't seem to be happy with
the committee's choice. It was July before we were asked to submit our
three preferences from the new list of proposals.

The committee submitted the names of E.C.Jordan, Kimball-Chase and
Underwood & Weston to the selectmen. We were quite astonished when the
selectmen not only waited until January to announce their choice but
they chose the firm that this committee would not even consider.

We feel that not only have we lost a whole year but the selectmen have
now by-passed us and are taking over the sewer project. We feel that
this board should continue to function as this is too big a project to
be left to the petty whims of politics.

Respectfully submitted,

Priscilla Palazzo, Secretary



STREET LIGHT COMMITTEE

The Street Light Committee, as in the past years, has reviewed all
applications and made recommendations to the Board of Selectmen. When
the committee has been out checking the areas for which the requests
have been made, several malfunctioning lights were noticed and requests
for their repair were made. At the request of a resident for a light,
we found that relocating an existing light to another pole illuminated
the area much better. Five additional street lights were added to
streets in various sections of the town in 1986. It is hoped that the
effort put forth by this committee has met the needs of the town and
its citizens and should anyone have any request or need assistance,
please feel free to contact us at any time.

Respectfully submitted,

E. Albert Weare, Chairman
Marion B. Kinlock, Clerk



49



1986 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SEABROOK RECREATION COMMISSION

The members of the Seabrook Recreation Commission are: Vernon Small,
Chairman; William Moore, Vice Chairman; Charlotte Dow, Secretary;
John B. Fowler, Jr., Parks Department; Earlene Locke, Selectlady;
Harry Knowles, Sr. and Salvatore Rubera. The administrative staff
of the Recreation Department are Sandra Beaudoin, Director of
Recreation and Edward Pickard, Assistant Director.

The Recreation Commission and Department continued to provide a wide
variety of program for residents preschool thru Senior Citizens. The
majority of the department's function during the past two and one half
years involved the operation and development of the Seabrook Community
Center. The Center continued to be open seven days per week, except
during the summer months when it is closed on weekends. Even though
the Center was closed on weekends during the summer, the Center's play
area and tennis courts were supervised and open on Saturdays.

Below displays the usage of the Community Center as well as the act-
tivities which occured during 1986.



sec AVERAGE DAILY ATTENDANCE PER SESSION



jy^MAR


APR- JUNE




JULY-AUG


SEPT-DEC


Structured














Programs


117


57






39


163


Gameroom


89


32






13


70


Drop-In


26


15






10


18


Multi-Purpose


14


7






12


10


Open Gym


48


40






15


37


Exercise Room


18


11






13


19


Daily Senior














Citizen Program


25


26






27


22


Summer Program


-


-






48


-


sec Tennis Courts -


12






8


2


sec Tot Lot


-


14






5


2


sec Guest


16


10






3


7


Average Daily














Totals


353


224






193


350






CENTER I.D.


CARDS


ISSUED








1984


1


,243










1985




333










1986




195










Total


T


,771








AVERAGE ATTENDANCE


FOR SPECIAL EVENTS





1 Youth Halloween Party 250

9 Rollerskating Nights 50-250

7 Teen Dances 50-150

8 Youth Dances 80-115
1 Youth Awareness Workshop 600
1 Football Banquet 85
1 Karate Demonstration 25
6 Youth Contests 15-40



1 Basketball Banquet 185

1 Drug Education Movie/Concert 150

1 Easter Egg Hunt 225

1 Christmas Tree Lighting 35

1 Youth Christmas Party 240

3 Pool Tournaments 12-30

4 Summer Program Trips 40-60
1 Disney Movie Showing 55



50



TYPES OF PROGRAMS OFFERED IN 1986



Pee Wee Gym

Recreation Games

Basketball

Volleyball

Indoor Soccer

Creative Dance

Cheerleading

T-Ball

Games on Wheels

Self Defense

Aerobics & Fitness

Exercise Equipment Room

Gameroom Activities

Jr. Frisbee Competition

OTHER GROUPS WHO USED



Tumbling

Youth Cooking

Arts & Crafts

Floor Hockey

Summer Recreation Program

International Cooking

Youth Fitness

Kickball

Wiffleball

Track & Field

Senior Citizen Trips

Senior Citizen Activities

Flag Football

Contests



Ice Skating

Skiing

Line Dancing

Karate

B.M.X. Racing

Pepsi-Hot Shot

Baseball

Softball

Football

Line Dancing

Tennis

Bridge Club

Open Gym



Trips
OR HELD ACTIVITIES AT THE CENTER IN 1986



Town Voting

Town Meetings

B.M.X. Racing Meetings

Happy Senior Meetings & Drop In

Little League Booster Meetings

SFAS League Meetings

Old Home Day Committee Meetings

Cub Scout Meetings

Ski Club Meetings

Lioness Special Meetings

Lioness Follies Show

Lioness Health Clinic

Police Department Testing



Seabrook Churches Drug Movie/Concert
Winnacunnet High School CPR Class
Church of Christ Sleepover
Exeter Hospital Health Workshops
Seabrook Employees Association Meetings
Sea Pac Special Meetings
Seabrook Police Dqjartment /Youth Awareness Prog.
Seabrook Elementary School Graduation
Seabrook Elem. School Basketball Teams
Seabrook Elem. School Christmas Play
Seabrook Elem. Christmas Concert
Women's Softball Meetings
Rockingham County Nutrition Program



TOWN COMPETITIVE SPORTS PROGRAM IN 1986



Youth Basketball (4 Teams)
Basketball Cheerleading (4 Squads)
Teen High School Basketball (1 Team)
Little League Basketball (6 Teams)
Pony League (2 Teams)
Youth Girls Softball (3 Teams)
Football Cheerleading (1 Squad)



Teen Girls Softball (1 Team)

Women's Softball (1 Team)

Youth All-star Basketball (2 Teams)

Mens Baseball (1 Team)

Track & Field (1 Team)

Youth Football (1 Team)



OTHER GROUPS SUPPORTED BY THE SEABROOK RECREATION DEPARTMENT



BMX Raceway, Inc.
SFA Softball League
F.O.R.S. Activities
Miss Seabrook Pageant



Little Warriors Football Program
Little League Boosters
Rams Football Boosters
Jr. Miss Seabrook Pageant



RECREATION VAN USAGE IN 1986
Below listed are the groups who utilized the van for transportation of
youth to outside activities. During these first 11 months of usage
the total mileage recorded was approximately 5,500 miles.

Ski Club



Ice Skating Club

Recreation Maple Sugar House Trips

Track & Field Team

Seabrook Elementary School

BMX Association

Youth Basketball Teams

Teen Basketball Team



Pony League Teams

Bobcats

Wildcats

Rams Football Team

Rams Cheerleaders

Summer Recreation Program Trips

Annual Center Ski Trip



51



THANKS TO SEACOAST COCA-COLA WE HAVE MORE
The local Seacoast Coca-Cola Bottling Co. has become the largest co-
sponsor for many of the town's programs. They have assisted in providing
uniforms, T-shirts, beverages, banners, patches and other donations
for many of the following programs: Youth Basketball League, Youth
Basketball Cheerleading Squads, Rams Football & Cheerleaders Program,


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Online LibrarySeabrook (N.H.)Annual reports of the Town of Seabrook, New Hampshire (Volume 1986) → online text (page 6 of 11)