Seabrook (N.H.).

Annual reports of the Town of Seabrook, New Hampshire (Volume 1989) online

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(Not Recommended by the Budget Committee)

Article 49: On petition of Marilyn Erickson and twelve (12)
other legal voters of the town: To see if the town will vote to
raise and appropriate the sum of One Hundred Ninety-five Dollars
and Thirty-six Cents ($195.36) for the cost of two street lights on
pole #'s 5-1665 and 10-1670 on Cross Beach Road. There is no
charge for the installation of these lights as they are only leased
by the town from the electric company. The bulbs are 100 watt vapor
at $8.14 per month each.

(Not Recommended by the Budget Committee)

Article 50: On petition of Rosemary H. Eaton and thirty-one
(31) other legal voters of the town: To see what action the town
meeting will take to allow elected part-time town employees to join
the Town of Seabrook's group health insurance plan and the employee
to pay the premiums at no expense to the town.

Article 51: On petition of Warner B. Knowles and twelve (12)
other legal voters of the town: To see if the Town Meeting will
vote to accept Hess Lane, so called, as a Town Road and to
maintain, plow, and supply other services normally associated with
a Town Road for the same.

Article 52: On petition submitted by Charles H. Teague and
eleven (11) legal voters of the town: To see if the town will vote
to accept Kimberly Drive, so-called, as a public way for ploughing
and maintenance.

Article 53: On petition of Joseph L. Demars and twenty-one
(21) other legal voters of the town: To see if the town will vote
to accept Zagarella Circle, so-called, as a town road and to
maintain and plough said road.

Article 54: On petition of Diane E. Garand and ten (10) other
legal voters of the town: To see if the Town of Seabrook will send
a message to the Legislature and Governor calling for a
comprehensive toxics law requiring coordinated programs of
planning, research and development, education, enforcement, and
economic incentives to achieve toxics reduction by substitution

21A



with safer substances.

Article 55: To see if the town will vote, pursuant to
authority under RSA 80:42 and RSA 80:42-a, to retain and hold all
real property located within the marshlands and to authorize the
Board of Selectmen to sell all other tax title property, in the
first instance to former owners of the property, or the
grandparents, parents, children, and spouses of said former owner,
for a sum not less than the outstanding taxes owed plus accrued
interest to the date of tax deed; or failing such sale, then by
advertised sealed bids or public auction, at the discretion of the
Board of Selectmen.



Article 56: On petition of Rosemary H. Eaton and twenty-six
(26) other legal voters of the town: To see if the town meeting
will vote to sell by selectmen's deed a certain parcel of land
taken by a tax collector's deed for non-payment of taxes and being
described as: Lot 68, Map 16, of the Town of Seabrook's official
assessing maps; and that said title to the property be conveyed to
Nancy Eaton upon payment of all unpaid taxes and costs to the Town
of Seabrook.

Article 57: On petition of Marion P. Eaton and nine (9) other
legal voters of the town: To see if the town meeting will vote to
sell a certain parcel of land which is tax titled to Marion Eaton
known as lot #68 on map 16 of the official tax maps and assessing
records of the town of Seabrook. and the selectmen's deed to be
conveyed in the name of James and Bella Janvrin.

Article 58: To see what sums of money the town will vote to
raise and appropriate for the expense of the general government for
the protection of persons and property, for health and sanitation,
for highways and bridges, for the support of the town poor and for
all necessary expenditures for the ensuing year.

Article 59: To transact all other legal business that may
come before this meeting.



Given under our hands and seals this
the year of our Lord One Thousand//Nine Hu



BOARD OF SELECTMEN



lames S .




f February, in
inety.



Asa^. Knowles, Jr. ;\
Eliiiibeth A. Thibpde^u



A true copy of warrant - Attest:



BOARD OF SELECTMEN




aton. Chairman

\Ia^.v /t 7VT\^-1,■:,'^A^;JV>

Asa^ KnoWles , *' Jr . .^ i \ '
Eli^^eth A. Thibodeau



22A



We hereby certify that we gave notice to the inhabitants,
within named, to meet at the time and place and for the purpose
within named, by posting an attested copy of the within Warrant at
the place of meeting within named, and a like attested copy at the
Post Office and Town Hall, being py^lic plac;^s/^2y said town on the
;7/,,y -'day of February, 1990.



BOARD OF SELECTMEN




Eli-ZaiKeth A. Thibodeau



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE



February , J I , 1990



Personally appeared the above named Selectmen of the Town of
Seabrook and swore that the above was true to the best of their
knowledge and belief.

, Before me.

Justice of the Peace /No;l?ary Public

ffly Commission t;:p:,-e3 February 25, 1993



23A



BUDGET FORM FOR TOWNS WHICH HAVE ADOPTED THE
PROVISIONS OF THE MUNICIPAL BUDGET LAW

STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE

DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE ADMINISTRATION

Municipal Services Division




BUDGET OF THE TOWN



Or .sKARRnnK^ N.n.

Appropriations and Estimates of Revenue for the Ensuing Year January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990 or for Fiscal Year
From 19 to 19



THIS BUDGET SHALL BE POSTED WITH THE TOWN WARRANT

RSA 31:95 and 32:5



j^et Committee: (Please sign in, irrf^) / Date_







%{ xk fig i\ c Zl




24A



PURPOSES OF APPROPRIATION

(RSA 31:4)

GENERAL GOVERNMENT



1 Town Officers' Salary



2 Town Officers' Expenses



3 Election and Registration Expenses

4 Cemeteries



_ 5_General Government Bu ildings
6_Reappraisal of Propertif

_7_P[anning and Zoning

8 Legal Expenses

g




^im — 154,059



Actual

Appropriations

1989

(1989-90)

(omit cents)



I5fi,7?i



jjXjs^



7,P9?



3 R,48R



?43,lR 3



1 4 . 404



56.421



Actual

Expenditures

1989

(1989-90)

(omit cents)



175 , 9?5



64,003



6,R5 9



-^3-,192

2 3 1 , 1 . 9 9



8, 95 1



-9a^^2^



147,9^8



Selectmen's
Budget

1990

(1990-91)

(omit cents)



189 , ?^!



11?, 030



11 .35n



38,374



262, 074



14,580



70,000



182,305



Budget Committee



Recommended

1990

(1990-91)

(omit cents)



189 , ?41



112,580



11 ,350



3 7 ,874



261,174



14,580



-70, 000



178,305



Not

Recommended
(omit cents)



900



4 ,00



10 Contingency Fund
11



4 ,69 4



4 ,69 4



J.g. A rt ,ip.lR,-13-l-8S-

JL3 AjTiiolfi-JL 4,185-

JJ AzLtxcae- 1 6 ' 89



1 8;oon



?n,noo



13,850



-5SB



500



PUBLIC S AFETY

15 Police Dep ar tment



8 2 7,6 4



90 6, 945



-940,804



940 ,80 4



Rre Departm ent
Civil Defense



J_6„
17 _

_ 18 Buildin g Inspection
J9_
20
21
22



Police Hire



584,70



30,336



639 . 869



?9.io:



684,65?



34,7^



68 7, 652



34.733



11. 3i



10.000



10,000



Article 17'89



30.000



29,061



Arti cle 18 '
Article 19'



15,000



25,500



14.292



25,500



HIGHWAYS, STREETS & BRIDGES



23 T own Maintenance

24 General Highway Department Expenses

2 5 Street Lighti ng

26

_27_

_28
29
30



220,352



210,973



250,367



242,167



8,200



38,102



43,021



45,000



45,000



-ArJ^cle 21 '1



11,000



11,000



-^Ar ticle .2^



500



-^



Article 24 '89



il lre H i re



:L2-,-5£)-0-,-aaOJL2,500,000



5,000



5,000



SANITATION



3jt^ Solid Waste Disposal

32 Garbage Removal
_33

34

_35

36



302,600



316,807



382,878



382,878



HEALTH



37 Health De p artment

38 Hospitals and Ambulances

39 Animal Control

40 Vital Statistics

41
42
43



44 General Assistance

45 Old Age Assistance

46 Aid to the Disabled

47

48



?n,7?3



15.805



?6,335



?6,335



18,6R6



17,713



?5,094



?5 , 094



M o squito Contro l



?7,6l6



?8^486



33,028



33,0??



Human Services



40,064



4n,o64



38,925



41 ,73 1



24,054



32,04l



31,835



36,835



25A





1


2


3


4


5


PURPOSES OF APPROPRIATION

(RSA31;4)

CULTURE AND RECREATION


Actual

Appropriations

1989

(1989-90)

(omit cents)


Actual

Expenditures

1989

(1989-90)

(omit cents)


Selectmen's

Budget

1990

(1990-91)

(omit cents)


Budget Committee {


Recommended

1990

(1990-91)

(omit cents)


Not

Recommended

(omit cents)


49 Library


8q,.7^R


8q,7^8


100,340


109,899




50 Parks and Recreation


4? . no?


?4,R80


50,450


53,450




51 Patriotic Purposes


17,830


15,?17


iq,?7^


19,273




52 Conservation Commission


aya


?6l


555


475


80-


53


Ifit^ , ^7^^


1^3, 3iq


21?, 50?


iqR,584


13,918


54












DEBT SERVICE












55 Principal of Long-Term Bonds & Notes


7^,000


7S.000


75.000


75,000




56 Interest Expense— Lonp-Ierm Bonds & Notes


28.27S


28.275


22.838


22,838




57 Interest Expense— Tax Anticipation Notes


47,444





50.000


50.000




58 Interest Expense— Other Temporary Loans












59 Fiscal Charges on Debt













60










CAPITAL OUTLAY












61 Article #27-lQqn Tran;^ Vj


n.








20,000


62 Article #S8-lqqO T.^rigp Rri .






75,000




75 000


63 Article #42-iqq0 Add Poll


;e








Rfi^nnn


64 Article #4l-iqqo Lib. Cap.


={es.








100,000 -..-


65 Article #44-1990 Pol. Soft


Ware








12,691


66 Article #47-1990 Dredging










118, nnn


67 Article #48-R.R. Brldee










17 nnn


68 Article #49-St. Lights










^"W


OPERATING TRANSFERS OUT












69 Payments to Capital Reserve Funds:












70












71












72












73












74 General Fund Trust












75












MISCELLANEOUS












76 Municipal Water Department


258. q?8


32^,5qq


^?n,qn5


318,645


1?,?60


77 Municipal Sewer Department












78 Municipal Electric Department












79 FICA, Retirement & Pension Contributions


0Q2_ •siS


217,765


2^q,1?^


239, T23




80 Insurance


555'321


544.530


676,??fi


fi7fi ,3?fi




81 Unemployment Compensation












82












83












84 Total Special Articles (line 166, p.5)






442. q58


RnP. 0^9.




85 TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS


_7.n64 .6^8


1 7 J 3q ^45


5,683,875


5,658,232


468,244


Less: Amount of Estimated Revenues, Exclusive of Taxes (Lin


P. iaii


1 ,860,300
3,797,932


(line 170)


BUDGET OF TH

BUDGET FOR T0\
OF


ETOV

IVNS WHICH Hi
THE MUNICIP


/N OF

WE ADOPTED
AL BUDGET L/


Seabroo

THE PROVISIC
VW


., , N.H.

>NS



26A



SOURCES OF REVENUE



Estimated
Revenues

1989

(1989-90)

(omit cents)



Actual
Revenues

1989

(1989-90)

(omit cents)



Selectmen's

Budget

1990

(1990-91)

(omit cents)



Estimated
Revenues

1990

(1990-91)

(omit cents)



86 Resident Taxes



87 National Banl< Stock Taxes



88 Yield Taxes



89 Interest and Penalties on Taxes



23,00C



26.5?E .



?6,nnn



?6 , oon



90 Inven tory Penalties



91 Land Use Chan ge Tax



92



INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVENUES-STATE



93 Shared Revenue-Block Grant



176^000



176 . 004



176,005



176,005



94 Highway Block Grant



7?, 97?



7?, 972



70,853



70,853



95 Railroad Tax



96 State Aid Water Pollution Projects



97 Reimb. a c State-Federal Forest Land



98 Other Reimbursements



99 Civil Defense



16.000



16,676



17,000



17jOOO



100 Grant Recreation Food Progr am



2.500



5.528



3,^^00



3,500



INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVENUES-FEDERAL



LICENSES AND PERMITS



108 Motor Vehicle Permit Fees



600,000



647,618



645^000



645,000



109 Dog Licenses



?,?00



-2,449



2,500



;^^



110 Business Licenses, Permits and Filing Fees



17,00(



19,008



19,0 00



19 POO



111 Yankee Greyhound Raclnp;



QO, nnn



100 ,2 50



qo;ooo



90,000



112 Building Permits/Planning Board



7,000



8,285



1 2,000



12,000



113 Marriage Lie. /Death/Cert . TitlPB



7,850



-9^



10,000



10,000



CHARGES FOR SERVICES



114 Income From Departments



22. 35 0,



40,4fi?



30,000



30,000
5J10-



115 Rent of Town Property



500



654



-^OO-



116 Recreation



6,400



6,738



6,500



6,500



117 Police Hire



11,386



9,31^



10,000



1 , 00



118 Ambulance/Decals



1 6 , 00



26.576



25.000



25,000



MISCELLANEOUS REVENUES



120 Interests on Deposits



400.000



6?6,filR



400,000



400.000



121 Sale of Town Property



,000



15.*447



10,000

3;ooo



10,000



122 Parking Fines/Dog 'PinPF^



3,3 15



3,000



^^^ Mfil["^"^'^gggnj^ Town Poc



124 Misc . Receipts



13.000



5.802



21,429



720



- 15.00



720



i'^,ono



OTHER FINANCING SOURCES



125 Proceeds of Bonds and Long-Term Notes



126 Income from Water and Sewer Departments



260, 0(



-260.7^



280 ,000



280,000



127 Withdrawals from Capital Reserve



12,500.000



2, 514 , 557



128 Withdrawals from General Fund Trusts



129 Revenue Sharing Fund



130 Fund Balance



131 Interest Cemetery Trust Funds



132 Cablevision Royalties



800



6,155



829



100.



TOTAL REVENUES AND CREDITS 14. 263,613



,1'S'S



La,



4,623,S2^



6,9?? 6,9??

,860, 300 ,860,^00



27A



SUPPLEMENTAL SCHEDULE

Selectmen's Budget Committee

SPECIAL WARRANT ARTICLES: Budget Rec. Not Rec.

2-^9 Art- #24 Old^FH .Lease ^ 6,300 , 6,300 ,

150^ AH. ^: ^25 Scholarship $ Is'oyH 41 $ 13,n7H.4l $

26 Pol. Cruisers $ 47,800 $ 47,800 $

28 Pistols $ 20,280 $ ?0,?80 $

33 Backhoe $ 30 , 000 s 3n^nnn $

29 Dump Truck $ (i5>000 $ 65,nnn $

31 Ambulance £ f^R^nnn $ 6R,nnn $

32 Bucket Truck $ 3R,nnn £ 38,nnn $

36 Refuel Station $ I5^nnn s, iR^nnn $

37 Master Plan $ ^,onn £ ^^nnn $

39 Red Cross £ ^nn £ rod $

40 Woodland Ave. £ R.nnn £ R^npo $

30 DPW furnace £ 6,nnn £ fi^nnn $

35 Sewer 286 Bridges pn^nnn £ pn^npn $

34 Water 286 Bridge £ 100, onn £ inn^nnn $

43 Ol.So.Mtg.Hse. .1; $ i ?^ nnn $

45 Drug Tsk. Force $ $ ?5 nnn $

l65AArt.# 46 Dam $ $ 28,300

166 Total Special Articles

Enter on MS-7 line 84 3; ijU?^QSR. 4l £ 5 n R , ? 5 R . 4 1 $



151


Art. /':


152


Art. #:


153


Art. #:


154


Art. #:


155


Art, #;


156


Art. #:


157


Art. ff:


158


Art. #:


159


Art. #:


160


Art. #:


161


Art. #:


162


Art. #:


163


Art. #:


164


Art. ff:


165


Art. #:



10% Limitation per RSA 32:8

170 Total Amt. recommended by Bud. Comm. (line 85 Column 4) 5,558.232
LESS EXCLUSIONS:

171 Principal: Long Term Bonds & Notes (line 55) £ Y'^^OOO

172 Interest: Long Term Bonds & Notes (line 56) £ 22,838

173 Capital Outlays funded from Long Term Bonds & Notes

per RSA 33:8 & 33:7-b (line 61 thru 68) $



174

175

176

177 Mandatory Assessments

178

179

180



Amount Recommended less Exclusions 5 ^560 ,394



182 10% of Amt. Recommended less Exclusions $ 5*16, 039

183 Add Amt. Recommended by Bud. Comm. (line 85 column 4) ^5 .658^232-

184 MAXIMUM AMOUNT THAT MAY BE APPROPRIATED BY TOWN MEETING 6 .?i4^97T_



28A



CONSERVATION COMMISSION

The Conservation Commission was re-organized during the
1988 year as the Selectmen appointed four new members. At
the present time there are five active members on the
Commission, with a chairman, secretary-clerk and three
other members.

The purposes of the Conservation Commission are:

- To protect and encourage proper use of local

resources,

- To protect watershed areas

- To conduct research on use of local land and

water areas

- To coordinate local unofficial conservation

groups

- To establish an index of open space and wetlands

areas with information as to their proper and
best use, and to file an annual report
describing Commission activity during the
year.

The year 1989 brought many new projects before the
Conservation Commission, including a Conservation Easement
Deed containing approximately 15.5 acres, more or less,
from Seabrook Investment Properties. At this time the
easement deed is in the review process.

The Conservation Commission members have an annual
budget which allows each person to become a member of the
N.H. Association of Conservation Comssission. On November
4, 1989, the Conservation Commission members attended the
19th Annual Meeting of the N.H. Association of Conservation
Commissions at the Rundlett Junior High School in Concord,
N.H. We attended two workshops which included the Wetlands
Mitigation Theory and Practice with Dr. Frank Richardson,
Senior Inspector, N.H. Wetlands Board Coastal Program and
a workshop on the Powers and Duties of The Conservation
Commission with Cynthia Ivey, Chairman.

In December of 1989 the Conservation members were given
a tour of N.H. Yankee by Community Relations Manager James
E. Martin which turned out to be a very interesting and
educational tour of Seabrook Station.

The Commission was well represented at the Wetlands
Board hearings in Concord and our participation was well
appreciated .

The Conservation Commission holds monthly meetings at
the Seabrook Town Hall every 2nd Thursday of each month at
7:30 p.m. Our goals for the coming year include a
membership drive. Earth Day, recycling and a library for
public use.

41



It is a pleasure to make this report to the citizens
and taxpayers of the Town of Seabrook.

Respectfully submitted,

Charles H. Felch, Chairman

Marilyn C. Erickson, Secretary

Timothy Willis

Alice Eaton

Mary Eaton —



Town of Seabrook Scholarship Funds Committee Report

The Committee has held regular meetings this year.
After checking the applications, awards were made to
thirteen (13). Seven (7) of these were presented at Awards
Night at Winnacunnet High School and six (6) recipients
were notified by mail.

Respectfully submitted,

Vernon Small, Chairman
Leon Clark, Vice Chairman
Arnold Knowles, Secretary



42



Mosquito Control Year-End Report

Field work began on April 11th with surveillance of
freshwater mosquito breeding sites created by snow melt
and heavy spring rains. Treatment of areas found to
support mosquito larvae ( larvaciding) commenced a week
later. Salt marsh surveillance and larvaciding began on
April 20th. Treatments of fresh and salt marsh breeding
sites continued throughout the summer after heavy rainfall
which kept these areas active. After a prolonged search
and interview procedure, Donald "Mac" Larson was hired as
Field Assistant on May 18th.

The adultidicing phase (evening spraying of the town
with the spray truck) got underway on June 2nd and
continued through Sept. 13th. Scourge (tm) adulticide
(active ingredient: resmethrin) was used in the Leco ULV
18HP sprayer. Due to the high number of mosquitoes all
summer, adulticiding was done more often than in past
years - 22 times on the east side of town and 21 times on
the west side. Larson and mosquito control vetern Derek
Griggs shared the adulticiding duties.

1989 brought the highest mosquito populations in the
last six years. Heavy and consistent rains kept mosquito
breeding sites active all summer. Adult mosquito
population monitoring was accomplished using 3 CDC light
traps baited with CO2. As in the past five years,
specimens were trapped, counted and identified. The three
highest weeks of mosquito counts since 1984 occurred this
year. Spring mosquito species were high throughout June,
peaking the week of the 27th. The highest trap week on
record occurred on August 18th with extremely high
numbers of Aede s,„sp 1 lie i t an s and cantator (salt water
marsh breeders) and Aedes vexans (siimmer freshwater). 75%
more specimens were caught and identified than in 1988,
the previous record year.

Using Larson's pick-up truck, 90 greenhead fly box
traps were placed along the perimeters of the salt marsh.
The vicious-biting greenhead fly is attracted to the shade
of the trap, flies up inside and is trapped in the
screened in section where it dies of dehydration.
Approximately 4000 or more greenheads are caught per trap;
therefore, a conservative estimate of 360,000 flies are
trapped each season in these boxes.

Lee G. Brooks,
Supervisor



43



ANNUAL REPORT - 1989
BROWN LIBRARY



Nineteen eighty-nine has proven to be a year of monumental decision for
Brown Library. The Trustees of the Library, Evelyn A. Fowler,
Chairperson; Stanley A. Hamel, Treasurer- Charlotte K. Marshall,
Secretary; Elinor P. Mawson; and Eric N. Small; along with Elizabeth G.
Heath, Director, and the entire library staff, have all unanimously
resolved to pursue a course of expansion for the library. This
determination has come about not without much discussion and with a
most careful examination of all other possible options.

Brown Library will be one hundred years old in 1992. The building as
it now stands is basically unchanged from the original design. This
edifice, which has served Seabrook so well for close to a century, is
now far too small for the demands which are currently placed on it and
which are projected to increase at an even more rapid rate as the years
progress.

There are no operating statistics dating back to the very early years,
but simply considering the time span from the year 1976 to 1989,
circulation has increased from 3,017 to 19,391 - a jump of 543%. From
last year to this year alone the increase was 12%. Patron counts also
have gone up dramatically; from 1985 to 1989 the figures show a rise of
7,694 to 13,536 or 80%. From last year to this year the increase was
18%. Similar increases have been occurring yearly for a decade or
more. With growth like this, it is no wonder that the library is in
desperate need of more space.

Yes, the library has indeed come a long way since its tentative
beginnings in 1892/3 - at which time it held only 400 volumes and was
maintained by a staff of one. Now, with a staff of five and containing
well over 13,000 volumes, an upgrade of the physical plant is a
definite necessity. Therefore, the Trustees of the library are
requesting that a capital reserve fund be established, the monies from
which will be used to expand Brown Library as soon as is feasible.
Additionally, the Trustees have adopted as a goal for the upcoming
year: to plan an orderly transfer of the library building to the town.

Nineteen eighty-nine has indeed, then, been a year of transition - of
charting a course for the future - and, consequently, it was a very
exciting time to be associated with Brown Library. We, of the library,
eagerly anticipate that this is but the beginning of a brave new era in
library service in Seabrook. Everyone is cordially invited to come to
visit Brown Library soon to see what all the commotion is about. The
library is open six days a week: Monday. Wednesday, Friday, 12:00 PM -
8:00 PM; Tuesday, Thursday, 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM; and Saturday 9:00 AM -
1:00 PM.

Charlotte K. Marshall,
Trustee



44



ESTABLISHED 1892



TELEPHONE 603/474-2044



BROWN LIBRARY

THE PUBtlC LiBRARV OF SEA8ROOK

636 LAf AYETTE ROAD
SEABROOK, NEW HAMPSHIRE 03874

1989 FINANCIAL REPORT

Balance January 1, 1989

RECEIPTS

Town appropriation 89,738.00

Interest 2,876.58

Copier 1,285.00

Other 1,145.43

EXPENSES

Books and periodicals 13,506.75

Operating supplies 2,553.87

Postage 612.99

Grounds ' 1,110.00

Cleaning 2,125.00

Maintenance 233.40

Fuel 1,081.65

Electricity 2,212.45

Telephone 930.25

Insurance 1,350.00

Payroll, taxes, benefits 63,961.42

Wilson P. Dennett, auditor 425.00

Dues, meetings, mileage 939.46

Equipment 887.42

Children's Room: special programs and supplies 609.99

Microfilms 1,480.00

Reference book cataloging 338.12

Miscellaneous 417.50



$ 1,066.21



95,045.01



94,775.27



Balance December 31, 1989



$ 1,335.95
Stanley A. Hamel , Treasurer



45



PLANNING BOARD

This has been a busy year for the Planning Board. Two sessions a
month were scheduled to keep up with the many requests to be heard.

Three members resigned, two were appointed to these positions. We
also appointed two alternates for the first time.

Tom Morgan of Piscataqua Planning was hired to assist us with the
update of our Master Plan. Approximately -^,000 questionnaires were
mailed to local residents. Those returned gave interesting comments
and suggestions that we will incorporate in the updated Master Plan.
We hope to complete this in 1990.

It has been a difficult year with numerous site plan reviews, lot


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Online LibrarySeabrook (N.H.)Annual reports of the Town of Seabrook, New Hampshire (Volume 1989) → online text (page 7 of 12)