Sheldon B. (Sheldon Brainerd) Thorpe.

North Haven annals : a history of the town from its settlement, 1680, to its first centennial, 1886 online

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46. Adolphus F. Hunie — Of German birth. Living
in North Haven at breaking out of war. Enlisted in
Company K, Fifteenth Conn., August 9, 1862. Served
term and mustered out with regiment, 1865. P. O.
address, New Haven, Conn.

47. Charles W. Jacobs — Son of Washington and
Mary (Mansfield) Jacobs. Born in North Haven.
Enlisted in Company F, First Conn. Heavy Artillery,
February 25, 1862. Promoted sergeant May 24, 1864.
With 400 of the First Conn, was detailed for sixty
days' service as infantry under command of Captain
Tidball, Fourth U. S.' Light Artillery. His first battle
was at Gaines Mills under McClellan. Succeeding
this came the battles of Malvern Hill, Bermuda
Hundred and Savage Station. With the advent of
General Grant in command, Jacobs fought at the
siege of Yorktown, in the battles around Petersburg,
and in fact, in all the engagements of his regiment
until the expiration of its service. P. O. address, Ber-
lin, Conn.

48. John T. Jacobs — Son of Washington and Mary
(Mansfield) Jacobs. Born_ in North Haven, 1830.
Enlisted in Company A., Twenty-seventh Conn., Sep-



35°



NORTH II A VEN AXNALS.



tember 9, 1862. Mustered out 1863. P. O. address.
North Haven, Conn.

49. Marcus A. Jacobs — son of Deforest and

(Brockett) Jacobs. Born in North Haven. Enlisted
in Company A, Tenth Conn., September 27, iKoi.
Discharged for disability, February 22, 1S63. P. O.
address, Southing-ton, Conn.

50. Truman O. Judd— Son of Rev. Truman Judd.
Born in Butternuts, N. Y. Removed to North Haven
in 1852. Enlisted in Company F, Twenty-seventh
Conn., September 9, 1862. At Fredericksburg, Chan-
cellorsville and Gettysburg. Mustered out with regi-
ment in 1S63. P. O. address, Montowese, Conn.

51. Adam Lamm — Of German birth. Removed
to North Haven 1847. Enlisted Company B, Twenty-
seventh Conn., September i, 1862. At the battle of
Fredericksburg. Captured at the battle of Chancel-
lorsville and paroled. Mustered out with regiment,
1863. Drowned at Lewis' bridge. New Haven.

52. Jacob F. Linsley — Son of Alfred and Polly
(Frisbie) Linsley. Born North Haven 1S46. Enlisted
Company F, First Conn. Heavy Artillery March 12.
1862, but discharged without serv ce April i, 1862.
Enlisted, second. Company K, Fifteenth Conn., August
9, 1862. Died at Washington, D. C. March 3, 1S63.
Buried in North Haven.

53. Samuel 'SI. Linsley — Son of Alfred and Polly
(Frisbie) Linsley. Born, North Haven, 1839. Enlisted
Company K, Fifteenth Conn., August 9, 1862. Died
Fairfax seminary, Va., November 19, 1862. Buried
in North Haven.

54. Nathan H. Marks — Son of Riley and Julia
(Eaton) Marks. Born, North Haven. Enlisted Com-
pany K, Fifteenth Conn., August 9, 1862. Discharged,
disability. May 13, 1863. P. O. address Montowese.
Conn.

55. John McCormick — Of Irish birth. Removed
with his father's family to North Haven previous to



NORTU II A VEN ANNALS. 35 i

i860. Enlisted Company D, Fifth Conn., July 22.
1861. Killed at battle of Peach Tree creek, Ga., July
20, 1864. Buried on the field.

56. George Morgan — Son of George W. Morgan.
Born, Orange, Conn., 1S37. Removed with father's
family to North Haven. Enlisted Company D, Fif-
teenth Conn., August 11, 1862. Captured at battle of
Kinston, N. C, March 8, 1865. Sent to Libby prison
and paroled. Exchanged and returned to regiment.
Mustered out 1865. P. O. address, Soldiers' Home
Noroton, Conn.

57. Augustus G. Morse — Son of vSamuel and Betsey
(l)oolittle) Morse. Born, North Haven, 1841. Enlist-
ed Company K, Fifteenth Conn., August 11, 1862.
Died in hospital Portsmouth, Va., August 20, 1863.
Buried in Wallingford, Conn.

58. William J. Morse — vSon of Samuel and Betsy
(Doolittle) Morse. Born North Haven 1839. Enlisted
Company K, Fifteenth Conn., August 9, 1862. Mus-
tered out with regiment 1865. P. O. address, Walling-
ford, Conn.

59. Thomas O'Brien — Of Irish birth. Enlisted
Company B, Twenty-seventh Conn., September 5,
1862. Captured at battle of Chancellorsville and
paroled. Mustered out with regiment 1863. P. O.
address, Montowese, Conn.

60. Merwin E. Palmer — Son of Jasper and jMaria
(Wblcott) Palmer. Born North Haven. Enlisted in
Company B, Fifteenth Conn., August 2, 1862. Wound-
ed (lost arm) at battle of Kinston, N. C, and taken
prisoner. Carried to Richmond, Va., thence to Golds-
boro, Salisbury and Raleigh, N. C. Paroled. Mus-
tered out with regiment, 1865. P. O. address, Fair
Haven, Conn.

61. Nathan A. Palmer— Enlisted in Company B,
Twenty-seventh Conn., September 10, 1862. Absent
from command without leave. Transferred to Four-
teenth Connecticut to finish nine months' service.
P. O. address. Fair Haven, Conn.



352



NORTH HAVEN ANNALS.



62. Milton B. Pardee— Born in East Haven, Conn..
1844. Living with Justus F. Brockett, North Haven,
previous to war. Enlisted Company K, Fifteenth
Conn., August 9, 1862. Died in hospital, Fairfax sem-
inary, Va., January 23, 1863, and buried there.

6t,. William P. Phelps — Son of Uri Bryan and
Eunetia (Thorpe) Phelps. Born in North Haven,
Enlisted Company K, Fifteenth Conn., August 14.
1862. Mustered out with regiment, 1865. P. O.
address. North Haven, Conn.

64. Horace Riggs — Son of Joshua and Orra (Rob-
inson) Riggs. Born in North Haven. Enlisted Com-
pany F, First Conn. Heavy Artiller}^, February 25,

1862. Sent 'to general hospital, July, 1862. P. O.
address, North Haven, Conn.

65. Riley A. Robinson — Born in North Haven.
Enlisted Company A, Twenty-seventh Conn., Septem-
ber 14, 1862. Captured at battle of Chancellorsville.
paroled and exchanged. Mustered out with regiment

1863. Enlisted second, Company K, Fifteenth Conn.
August 26, 1864. ^Mustered out with regiment, 1S65.

66. Leverett M. Rogers— Son of Russell Rogers.
Enlisted Company F, First Conn. Heavy Artillery,
May 23, 1861. Died at Hagerstown, Md., July 23, 1S61,
and buried there.

67. William A. Rogers — Son of Josiah and Sally
(Thorpe) Rogers. Born in North Haven. Enlisted
Company K, Fifteenth Conn., August 9, 1862. Served
term and mustered out with regiment 1865. Died at
Soldiers' home, Dayton, Ohio, March 25, 1862, and
buried there.

68. Elbert J. Smith — Son of Julius and Rebecca
(Eaton) Smith. Born in North Haven, 1844. Enlisted
Company B, Twenty-seventh Conn., September i.
1862. Discharged, disability, January 19, 1863. Died
February 2, 1869. Buried in North Haven.

69. Merton L. Smith — Son of Julius and Rebecca
(Eaton) Smith. Born in North Haven, 1841. Enlisted



NORTH HAVEN ANNALS. t^^^

Company K, Fifteenth Conn., August 9, 1862. Died in
hospital Bedloe's Island, N. Y. harbor, April 8, 1863.
Buried in North Haven.

70. George W. Smith— Son of Jude B. and Eliza
(Goodyear) Smith— Born in North Haven. Enlisted
Company K, Fifteenth Conn., August 9, 1862. Mus-
tered out with regiment in 1865. During the terrible
yellow fever scourge at Newbern, N. C, 1864, :\Ir.
Smith rendered the most efficient aid in caring for
the sick. Himself and Asahel Andrews, of Wallmg-
ford, volunteered as hospital nurses. During the
forty days the fever raged, or from September 10 to
October 20, fifty-five members of the regiment died of
this dread di'sease. P. O. address. North Haven, Conn.

71. Henry E. Smith— Son of Henry P. and Julia
(Blakeslee) Smith. Born 1839. Enlisted Company K,
Fifteenth Conn., August 9, 1862. Promoted to ser-
geant. Served term and mustered out with regiment
1865. Died April 27, 1878, and buried in North
Haven.

72. James E. Smith— Son of James and Emily
(Bassett) Smith. Born in Wallingford, Conn., 1835.
Removed with father's family to North Haven.

^Enlisted Company E, Seventh Conn., September;, 1861.
Was engaged in the following battles : Port Royal,
Johnson's Island, Fort Pulaski, James Island, Pocotal-
igo, St. John's Bluff, Fort Wagner, Fort Gregg, Fort
Sumpter, Bermuda Hundred, Drurys Bluff, Deep Bot-
tom, Deep Run. Wounded in foot at latter place and
discharged for disability May 22, 1865. P. O. address
North Haven, Conn.

73. Oliver T. Smith - Son of Hiram and Patty
(Smith) Smith. Born in North Haven, 1839. Enlisted
Company C, Tenth Conn., October 22, 1861. Re-
enlisted as veteran January i, 1864. Served with his
regiment at all the battles in which it was engaged up
to his death. Was wounded at the battle of Kinston.
Killed at the battle of Darbytown Cross Roa;is October



354



NORTH HAVEN ANNALS.



13, 1864, and by his previously expressed wish buried on
the field. He met his death on the picket line. Smith
knew no. fear. While he might have protected him-
self in a measure, he stood up for a moment and was
struck in the forehead. He was killed outright, and
buried in his blanket with five others a short dis-
tance from where he fell, by his comrade, E. L. Good-
year. A board was set to mark the place. It is not
known whether the government ever removed his
body to a national cemetery. A brownstone monu-
ment was erected to his memory in North Haven.

74. Sanford B. Smith— Son of James and Emily
(Bassett) Smith. Born in North Haven. Enlisted in
Company K, Fifteenth Conn., August 12, 1862. Served
term and mustered out w4th regiment in 1865. P. O.
address. New Haven, Conn.

75. Ezra L. Stiles — Son of Ezra and Mary (Bris-
tol) Stiles. Born in North Haven. Enlisted in Com-
pany A, Thirteenth New York cavalry (" Harris
light"), May 5, 1864. Mustered out July 13, 1865. P.
O. address, North Haven, Conn.

76. Henry H. Stiles — Son of Isaac and Lois
(Cooper) Stiles. Born in North Haven. Enlisted and
commissioned captain Company K, Fifteenth Conn..
August 9, 1862. Resigned account disability August
17, 1863. Placed on ,detached service at Providence.
R. I., until April, 1864. Transferred to command ot
Veteran Reserve corps, with headquarters at Albany..
N. Y., until March 1865, when he was mustered out
for increasing disability. Died in North Haven,
April 2, 1879.

Captain Stiles reflected honor upon the town by his
connection with the army. It was never claimed that
in a technical sense he was a " military man." Aggres-
siveness and rough adventure were distasteful to him ;
moreover, he attached too high a value to human lite
to see it sacrificed in war. ^ As a local military leader
he had attained reputation as the commanding ofi^icer



NORTH UA VEN ANNALS. 355

of "the Blues'" an independent military organization.
Further, in i860 he was made the captain of the
"Wide-awakes" in the political campaign of that
year. Afterwards it was in this organization that
many of the veterans in the civil war learned their
first lessons. In camp and at the front he was a most
valued and respected officer. With character above
reproach, grave in demeanor, few in words and of
commanding appearance, both field and line officers
came to recognize him and Captain Harvey Bassett, of
Meriden, as the "fathers of the regiment."

In the care of his men he manifested the sincerest
interest. He did not believe, as did too many a com-
mander, that -enlisted men were clods or brutes, to
be kicked into duty. The illness of any one of them
gave him grave concern, for he seemed to feel respon-
sible for the safety of each individual of his com-
mand, and was inclined to reproach himself for
mishap to any of them. The first death in his com-
pany (Hobart A. Bassett) had a most depressing effect
upon him. Many of the men were down with the ter-
rible fever that raged at Fairfax seminary. Linsley,
Ives, ;Munson, died in quick succession. Concern at
the loss of these, and the consequent exposure of
camp life, aggravated a slumbering disease in his sys-
tem (a bronchial trouble), which threatened prostra-
tion. Then came the long expected orders for the
more active theatre of war. The hard seven days'
march to Acquia Creek, the succeeding battle at
Fredericksburg, the wintry quarters at "camp mud,"
all made a combination calculated to try the hardiest
nerve.

With the transfer of the regiment to Newport
News he hoped to regain something of his old
strength. From there the command was ordered to
Suffolk, taking active part in the protracted siege of
that place. Then came the famous " Blackberrv
raid." fruitless in everything but the disabling of a



356 NORTH HAVEN ANNALS.

large number of men. It was at this point naturt.-
gave out, and with great reluctance he asked to l)c
relieved of such severe duty. The request was
promptly granted and transfer to Providence made,
as stated in the beginning.

77. Edwin A. Thorpe— Son of James and Caroline
(Flint) Thorpe. Born North Haven, 1840. Enlisted
Company E, Fifteenth Conn., July 31, 1862. Examined
for promotion January 9, 1S64; commissioned captain
Company K, Twenty-ninth Conn, (colored), February
2, 1864. Engaged at battle of Deep Bottom, Va., and
at the siege of Petersburg. Wounded in assault on
Fort Gilmore and confined in hospital six months.
Returned to' command and entered Richmond at its
surrender with his regiment. Recommended for pro-
motion to rank of major. Mustered out at close (if
war. P. O. address. Custom House, Philadelphia.

78. Rufus Thorpe— Son of Jacob and Alma (Kas-
sett) Thorpe. . Born in North Haven. Enlisted Com-
pany K, Fifteenth Conn., August 9, 1862. Detailed in
ambulance corps. Discharged for disability June 8.
1863. P. O. address, North Haven, Conn.

79. Sheldon B. Thorpe — Son of Dennis and
Elmina (Bassctt) Thorpe. Born North Haven, 183S.
Enlisted Company K, Fifteenth Conn., August 9, iS6j.
Appointed Sergeant. Discharged for disability April
27, 1863. P. O. address, North Haven, Conn.

80. Henry D. Todd— Son of Orrin and Aurclia
(Clinton) Todd. Born North Haven. Enlisted Com-
pany B, Twenty-seventh Conn., September i, 1S62.
Mustered out with regiment. P. O. address. North
Haven, Conn.

81. Kirtland Todd— Son of William Todd. Born
North Haven. Enlisted Company B, Twenty-seventh
Conn., September 9, 1862. Captured at Chancel lors-
ville. Paroled and mustered out with regiment.
Settled at Wallingford, Conn. Died 1S81 and buried
there.



NORTH HA VEN ANJSfALS.



357



82. Dennis W. Tucker — Son of Samuel Tucker.
Born Northford, Conn., 1835. Resident North Haven
at enlistment. Enlisted Company F, Twenty-seventh
Conn., October 18, 1862. Wounded at battle of Fred-
ericksburg. Mustered out with regiment. P. O.
address. Fair Haven, Conn.

83. Henry F. Tuttle— Son of Allen and Caroline
(Tuttle) Tuttle. Born North Haven. Enlisted Com-
pany K, Fifteenth Conn., August 12, 1862. Served
term and mustered out with regiment 1865. P. O.
address, North Haven, Conn.

84. Justus Voght. German birth. Removed to
North Haven 185S. Enlisted Company K, Twenty-
seventh Conn., September 3, 1862. Wounded at battle
of Fredericksburg. Mustered out with regiment. P.
O. address. Soldiers' Home, Noroton, Conn.

85. Horace Waters — Son of Jesse and Betsy ( )

Waters. Born North Haven, 18 14. Enlisted in reg-
ular army (Fourteenth U. S.) Details of service
unknown. Waters was of dissipated habits. He was
enlisted by Elizur C. Tuttle, who, it was claimed,
placed him in the regular army, instead of the Four-
teenth Connecticut. Died and buried in Elmira, N. Y.

A brief resume of the foregoing volunteers may be
made as follows :

Total enlistments, 8?

Number killed in action, 5

Number wounded, ...... 8

Died from wounds, i

Died from disease in service 14

Captured and imprisoned, g

Discharged for disability 14

Commissioned at enlistment, .... 4

Promoted from ranks and commissioned, . 4

Deserted, i

Mustered out with regiment, .... 52

During the summer and fall of 1865 the soldiers
arrived home from the front. Not one could say that
his service had benefited him; on the contrary, if he



358 NORTH HAVEN ANNALS.

did not feel it then, he came afterward to know that
war strikes with other weapons than sword or bullet.
Life was never quite the same to the veteran at the
laying down of his arms, as when he took them up.
The ordeal of camp, march, giiard duty, battle, ill-
ness, hunger, thirst, cold, swept away many a youth-
ful dream and aged him by many years. Neither
could it be claimed he had been commensurately paid
in dollars and cents for his labor. Previous to the
fall of 1862, the town granted no bounty. In the lat-
ter part of that year, the following schedule shows
what a volunteer received :

Town bounty $100 00

U. S. advance bounty, . . . . . 25 00
State bounty, enlistment, .... 50 00

First installment yearly state bounty, . . ■ 10 00
Officer's enlistment bounty (usually allowed), 2 00

Month's advance pay (for private), . . 13 00

$200 00

This was his financial outfit. Pay days in the
army were uncertain occasions, occurring anywhere
from two, three, four, and even more months apart.
The pitiful sum of thirteen dollars, less clothing
account, for a month's service, went but a little way,
no matter how carefully expended.

With the arrival of the veterans the town was
awakened to something of the enthusiasm that char-
acterized it three years before. July 4, 1865, the
. Fifteenth Connecticut reached New Haven for final
muster out. As this regiment contained more of the
townspeople than any other, it was thought fitting
that its return should be made the occasion of a
public ovation. On the following Sunday (Jnly 9)
the national colors were displayed in the Congrega-
tional church and the Rev. W. T. Reynolds, its acting
pastor, preached a discourse suitable to the event.
The next day a public meeting was held in Academy
hall. A plan was agreed upon for a demonstration.



NORTH MA YEN ANNALS.



359



On July 14 another meeting was held, at which
S180.00 was reported as raised for expenses. At this
time it was decided to include in the reception all
returned veterans in town, as well as all members of
Company K, of the Fifteenth Connecticut, and that
July 19 should be the occasion.

The latter date brought its triumph to the little
band of heroes. The historic " old green " was chosen
as the place of assemblage and the town literally
transferred itself to this spot. At 2 o'clock a proces-
sion formed near the Congregational church under
the marshalship of Whitney Elliott. In this was
included about fifty veterans under command of
Captain H.-H. Stiles. Headed by the Centerville Cor-
net band, the gallant company moved up and around
the old cemetery and thence to the lower clump of
oaks on the green where the speaker's stand had been
placed. On arrival there Willis Tuttle was made
president of the day and the following order of exer-
cises was observed ;

1. Music Band

2. Welcome President Tuttle

3. Response for the Soldiers General E. D. S. Goodyear

4. Report of Enlistments . . Rev. W. T. Reynolds
5- Dirge Band

6. Address . . . Rev. Leverett Griggs, D.D. .
7- Poem Whiting S. Sanford

5. Oration . ' . . . . Reir. J. J. Woolley
9. Music Band

Adjournment was now made for dinner. This
was a superb donation, the like of which was never
laid before in North Haven. It was served under a
huge tent decorated with flags and flowers for the
occasion. The Rev. Mr. Gilbert of Wallingford pre-
sided. An incident of the afternoon will be remem-
bered in the breaking of the topmast of the liberty
pole erected on the green in 1S61.

A slight rain fell between 6 and 7 o'clock and at
its close the veterans ifgain formed and preceded by



36o NORTU UAVEN ANNALS.

the band marched to the cemetery and strewcci
flowers on the graves of their comrades. This
was the first decoration service, held in North
Haven.

Twenty-five years later, or on July 25, 1890, the
quarter-century recurrence of the above noted recep-
tion was celebrated. At the preceding town meeting,
October, 1889, a committee consisting of

David L. Clinton, district No. I, Frederick W. Jacobs, district

Robert N. Barnes, district No. 2, No. 6

Robert O. Eaton, district No. 3. Henry W. Elliott, district No. 7.

George J. Merz, district No. 4, William B. Roberts, district No.

Jared B. Bassett, district No. 5, 8,

was appointed to take charge of the celebration.
Elaborate preparations were made for so marked an
event. The exercises opened on the evening of July
23 with a children's concert in Memorial hall, under
the lead of Mr. CD. Robinson. July 25 was selected
as the appropriate day, but it opened stormy in the
extreme. A large tent arranged especially for the
music and addresses was pitched upon Pierpont Park.

Rain fell in torrents during the exercises there,
scattering the audienge and sadly marring the pleasure
of the gathering.

The following circular gives the main features of
the day.

* PROGRAM.

1. Sunrise, Salute of forty-four guns and ringing of church bells.

2. 10 a. m. Street parade. The line will form on Church street,

right resting on Memorial Hall. The route of march will be
up Washington avenue to Elmtree and countermarch to
Broadway, Broadway to State, to Broadway, to Pierpont, to
Trumbull square, to Church, to tent on Pierpont Park.
Citizens along the line of march are invited to decorate their
residences.

3. II a. m. Public meeting in tent.

1. Music Band

2. Roll call of the veterans . . Gen. E. D. S. Goodyear

3. Address of welcome .^ • . . Robert O Eaton

4. Response . . . * . .' . Sheldon B. Thorpe



NORTH HA VEX ANJVALS. 361

5. Music — children . . . " Star Spangled Banner "

6. Address . Major John C. Kinne}- of Hartford, Conn.

7. Music — Children . On, On, the 603-5 are Marching
S. Five minute addresses.

9. Music— Children .... Red, White and Blue
ID. Five minute addresses.
II. Music — Audience America

4. 2. p. m. Dinner to the veterans, members of old state militia,

and invited guests, in IMemo-.ial Hall. An ample collation
will also be served to all present.

5. 4 p. m. Athletics, including a base-ball gam.e by the veterans

vs. citizens.

6. 6 p. m. Salute of 13 guns and ringing of bells.

The weather continuing stormy, at the close of the
dinner the tables were removed in Memorial Hall and
the remainderr of the afternoon was devoted to brief
addresses. These were impromptu, but proved one of
of the pleasantest features of the gathering. Several
private residences were handsomely decorated, notice-
ably those on Washington avLMiue.

MEMORIAL HAY.

The institution of Memorial day was not recog-
nized here until 1868. At first it was the custom to
observe this occasion near the middle of June,
when flowers were the choicest. At such times Sun-
day afternoon was selected. With the possible omis-
sion of this service in the year 187 1 the day has been
annually kept since^ In later years May 30 has been
made the anniversary of the sacred event. The peo-
ple throughout the town have been attentive to it's
observance and their interest in it appears unabated.

VETERAN soldiers' ASSOCIATION.

In 1885 the veteran soldiers formed an organiza-
tion, the object of which is perhaps best expressed in
its constitution :

' ' The object of this Association shall be, first, to procure the
"erection of a Monument to the memory of all deceased soldiers
" and sailors of this town who served in the ^Va^ of the Rebellion.
" Second, to secure the proper observance of Memorial Day.
'■ Third, to promote and perpetuate as comrades the peculiar rela-
" tions we sustain toward each other."



362 NORTH HA YEN ANNALS.

In accordance with the above, the Association
appointed a committee to appear before the annual
town meeting in October, 1885, to ask for an appro-
priation of one and one-half mills on the grand
list, as provided by statute, for the erection of
soldiers' monuments, etc. The committee met with a
handsome reception, and the following- vote was
passed :

" Voted. That the sura of one and one- half mills on the dollar
" on the grand list of the town as last completed, be and the same
'^1 is hereby appropriated from the treasury of the town toward the
" erection of a public monument in memory, &c., &c."

Having received this encouragement, the Associa-
tion felt itself specially called to action. The sum of
$3,000 was named as a needed amount to be raised. It
had long been known that the late Captain H. H. Stiles
had devised $500 to assist in erecting a monument,
whenever the time was ripe. That time seemed to
have arrived; the veterans set about their work with
alacrity, and the long dreamed of tribute appeared
near at hand. The financial responses were liberal
and the amount assured.

The first mutterings of opposition to the move-
ment manifested themselves in a petition for a special
town meeting to repeal the appropriation. This meet-
ing was held November 3, 1885, but failed to carry its



Online LibrarySheldon B. (Sheldon Brainerd) ThorpeNorth Haven annals : a history of the town from its settlement, 1680, to its first centennial, 1886 → online text (page 27 of 32)