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MONTANA
STATE




This "cover" page added by the Internet Archive for formatting purposes



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• 027.5
A3f
1982



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MONTANA STATE LIBRARY

S027.5A3(1982c1 Clack
Feasibility ol consolidating e»eITANA STATE LiiiKARY

1515 E. 6' AVE.
HEIENA, MONTANA 59620



FEASIBILITY OF CONSOLIDATING

EXECUTIVE BRANCH LIBRARIES AND

THE MONTANA STATE LIBRARY



h^l



Sib Clack, Management Analyst



f



y Barbara Martin, Wlanigement Analyst



Consulting Services Bureau
Department of Administration
August, 1982



m"^



TABLE OF CONTENTS

Executive Suinmdry i

Preface ii

Acknowledgements iv

Introduction 1

Overview of Existing System 3
Consolidation Options

Variables 10

Impact Areas 12

Assumptions 17

Option 1 - Physical, but no functional, consolidation 18

Option 2 - Physical and functional consolidation 20

Option 3 - No physical, but functional coordination 22

Option 4 - No physical and no functional consolidation 24



Recommendations 25

Appendices

A. Current System Summary A-1
Staffed Collections

Montana State Library A-2

Research and Statistical Services A-6

DHES Reference Library - DHES Film Library A-9

DNRC Research and Information Center A-13

Training Resource and Information Center (TRIC) A-16
Sample of Unstaffed Collections

Department of Highways - Three Collections A-19

Department of Institutions - Two Collections A-22

Department of Labor and Industry - Four Collections A-24

B. Montana State Library Time Studies

C. Glossary of Acronyms and Abbreviations



EXECUTIVE SUMMARY



In mid-May of 1982, David M. Lewis, Director of the Governor's Office of Budget and Program
Planning, requested that the State Library Commission study the feasibility of consolidating State
agency libraries with the Montana State Library (MSL) when it occupies its new location at Sixth anc^fc
Sanders. The State Library Commission contracted with the Consulting Services Bureau to study the^^
feasibility of consolidation within the context of "determining the optimum mechanism for managing
library services to State government". The contractual agreement became effective July 1, 1982.

The scope of the service agreement limited the study to examining the feasibility of consolidating
some Executive Branch information collections and the MSL. Other collections were excluded due to
statutory authorit/ for the separate status of both the Montana Historical Society Library, and the Law
Library, and the autonomy of the functions of elected officials, such as the Office of the Superintendent
of Public Instruction, and of the Legislative Branch. Agency legal collections and the collections within
the university system were also omitted from the study.

The collections of seven Executive Branch agencies were studied in addition to the MSL itself.
Four of the agencies have staff assigned to manage their collections and to provide specialized reference
and research services to the agency staff and to the public: Administration, Health and Environmen_ta|
Sciences, Natural Resources and Conservation and Social and Rehabilitation Services. Nine collections
in the three other agencies studied did not have staff specifically assigned: Labor and Industry, Institu-
tions and Highways. The Department of Highways had three known collections within its location,
even though its official library collection had been incorporated in the MSL in 1973.

The nature of the collections, the services provided, the financial investment in staff and information
materials and the extent of duplication of ongoing subscriptions were evaluated. The collections serve
special information needs of the host agencies for all but one collection. Without any formal review of
subscription acquisitions in place, only 2% of the total subscriptions costs of the agencies studied are
duplicated paid subscriptions. Funding sources of information collections were also examined.

Four consolidation options were examined for fiscal and programmatic impact. Two were considered
not to be feasible, one was given qualified feasibility, and one option was recommended.

Not Feasible



- Physical, but not functional, consolidation of agency collections and the MSL.

- Physical and functional consolidation of agency collections and the MSL.

Qualified Feasibility

- No physical, but functional coordination among agency collections and the MSL.

Feasible Option Recommended

- No physical and no functional consolidation of agency collections and the MSL.

The option currently recommended is that of maintaining the status quo of separate agency collections,
staffed at agency discretion. This option is recommended because it:

- Maintains access to materials currently needed by staff carrying out agency functions.

- Maintains specialized reference and research services to agency staff and to the public.

- Involves no added expense to the State to catalog agency collections without Statewide
commitment to development of an information management system. ^^

Planning for the development of a Montana State government information management system involving
Executive, Legislative and Judicial Branches is strongly recommended.



PREFACE

On May 17, 1982, David M. Lewis, Budget Director of the Governor's Office "^
of Budget and Program Planning, requested that the Library Commission study the
feasibility of consolidating State agency libraries within the State Library
when it occupies its new location at 1515 East Sixth. It was requested
that the feasibility study be submitted with the Commission's executive budget
request by September 1, 1982. The request included the following:

Some of the state agency libraries the state Librarian should investigate
are: DNRC Research and Information Center, Office of Public Instruction
Resource Center, Health Planning Resources Library, Legislative Council
Library, Department of Administration Research and Information Systems
Bureau, Developmental Disabilities Division Training Resources and Information
Center, and the Safety and Health Bureau Library.

The State Library Commission elected to contract with the Department of Adminis-
tration's Consulting Services Bureau to perform the feasibility study of consoli-
dation within the context of "determining the optimum mechanism for managing
library services to state government" (memo of June 14, 1982). The contractual
agreement became effective July 1, 1982. Approval was granted by the Office of
Budget and Program Planning to fund the study with General Fund monies.

The scope of the service agreement limits the study to examining the feasi-
bility of consolidating only some Executive Branch collections with the State
Library for the following reasons:

Statutory authority exists for the separate status of the Montana
Historical Society Library and the Law Library of the Judicial Branch
The libraries of an agency headed by an elected official other than
the Governor, i.e., the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruc-
tion, and the Legislative Branch, i.e., the Legislative Council, were
not considered appropriate for inclusion in current consolidation
options. . .



11



In addition to the exclusion of these specific information collections, the
collections of the attorneys of each State agency with resident counsel, the
collections of the Governor's offices and of the University System were
omitted. All Executive Branch agencies known to have made a commitment of
staff assignment to an internal information collection were included. A
sample of the collections within agencies with no staff formally assigned
v/as also included. Due to the time constraints of the study, not all unstaf-
fed Executive Branch collections were included.



m



ACKNOWLEGEMENTS

The following individuals have contribute^ information and their per-
ceptions of the issues involved in this study. Their cooperation and candor
are appreciated. This report is not presented as having been endorsed by
any of the individuals listed below.



Contributor



Agency



Janice Bacino
John Bartlett
Cheri Bergeron
Keenan Bingham
Doug Booker
Phil Brooks
Katharine Brown
Bret Brunner
Harold Chambers
Alene Cooper
Tom Grosser
Gary Curtis
Victoria Gabriel
Bob Garber
Ed Gatzemeier
Beth Givens
James ^aubein
Dennis Hemmer
Ray Hoffman
Sherrie Hoffman
Cheryl Hutchinson
Bob Jensen
Terry Johnson
Marlene Kennedy
Helen Kittel
Charlotte LeVasseur
David Lewis



Legislative Council

Department of Health & Environmental Science

Office of Public Instruction

Department of Highways

Office of Budget & Program Planning

Department of Administration

Montana State Library

Department of Highways

Montana State Library

Montana State Library

Office of Budget & Program Planning

Department of Labor and Industry

Montana State Library

Department of Highways

Department of Labor and Industry

Montana State Library

Department of Institutions

Department of Natural Resources & Conservatioi

Department of Health and Environmental Scienc(

Department of Highways

Lieutenant Governor's Office

Department of Labor and Industry

Office of Budget & Program Planning

Department of Social & Rehabilitation Service

Office of Budget & Program Planning

Montana State Library

Office of Budget & Program Planning



IV



Contributor



Agency



David Martin
Nancy McLane
Mike Muszkiewicz
Tom O'Connell
Donna O'Leary
Jim Oppedahl
Bill Palmer
Bob Person
Carol Phelan
Phil Powers
Bob Rafferty
Patricia Roberts
Chet Rusek
Bill Salisbury
Eileen Schubring
Beth Smith
Bob Solomon
Ted Spas
Millie Sullivan
John Thomas



Montana State Library

Department of Natural Resources & Conservation

Department of Social & Rehabilitation Services

Department of Administration

Montana State Library

Legislative Council

Department of Labor and Industry

Legislative Council

Department of Labor and Industry

Department of Institutions

Department of Labor and Industry

Department of Administration

Department of Labor and Industry

Department of Highways

Department of Health & Environmental Sciences

Department of Health & Environmental Sciences

Department of Health & Environmental Scie^s

Department of Social & Rehabilitation Services

Department of Natural Resources & Conservation

Department of Institutions



3



INTRODUCTION

Information has exploded within the last fifty years. Scientific, technical,
and social research has been expanding exponentially. Keeping current with the
latest information has become a tremendously difficult task for public and
private sector professionals. Most professional people have neither the time
nor the specialized skills to access this body of information efficiently. For
this reason, professionals in industry and government are relying more and more
on the assistance they receive from resource persons with information management
skills, both within their own organizations and between entire sectors of enter-
prise and government.

An information management system is an integrated system that functions to
provide efficient access to relevant information resources. Information
resources may be computerized databases, print media, microform, audiovisual
media, or persons with specialized expertise. Access may be streamlined to one
point of entry or involve multiple contact points for specialized types of
information. Usually, single point of entry involves considerable investment in
automation. An information management system also provides internal monitoring
of usage in order to generate data relevant to decision-making about its effec-
tiveness as a service system. As a result, it has an inherent capacity to
reduce unnecessary expenditures and to avoid duplication that has not been
determined to be necessary to ensure user access to information.

Montana's information needs are critical. As an energy-producing state in
a rapidly developing region, and as an active participant in the international
agricultural trade marketing of the United States, Montana will be under increasing
pressure to deal effectively with these and other issues that will have significant
impact on its citizens. Effective decisions can be made only when using the
best information available. It is incumbent upon the State's leaders to recognize
information as a critical resource and to take the steps required to provide for
its proper development and management.

The foundations of an information management system in Montana's State
government already exist. Several agencies have made a staff commitment to



managing highly technical materials that relate specifically to the functions
those agencies carry out within the State government organization. The staff /
resource persons have acquired substantial retrieval and research expertise in
the subject areas pertaining to the agency's staff functions. Other agencies
have not formalized their information management systems. Both types of agencies
are performing their functions, but perhaps not with comparable resources. The
Montana State Library (MSL) is currently providing access to a variety of informa-
tion sources for both public library patrons and for State government employees.
Informal cooperation exists between MSL staff and agency collection staff.
Cooperative agreements between agencies have resulted in efficient centralization
of specialized information media, e.g., the agreement between the Departments of
Health and Environmental Sciences and of Institutions in regard to film collections.

Informal cooperation exists between organized and staffed Executive, Legis-
lative and Judicial Branch information collections as well. The MSL routinely
refers information requests of a legal or public education nature to the Law
Library and to the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction, respectively.
The library of the Legislative Council provides reference service to State
agencies when time permits and Executive Branch staff routinely use the Law \,r'
Library.

Some agencies are currently considering adding lists of their information
holdings to their in-house computer systems (DNRC, SRS, DHES). If a statewide
information management system is to provide access to all information in State
agencies, compatibility of computer access should be addressed.

Although the foundations for the development of an information management
system exist through professional recognition of the critical need to share
information, a coherent policy and supporting organizational procedures do not
yet exist to maximize access to, and use of information by State government.
Consolidation of existing information resources in the absence of a coherent
approach to managing information may well be "throwing the baby out with the
bath water" and may eventually cost the State immeasurable loss of effective
response to rapidly changing world, regional, and national conditions.



OVERVIEW OF EXISTING SYSTEM

Whether formalized by statute, management pel icies or procedures, some
degree of an information management system will exist within any organization,
including an organization of the size and complexity of a state government. The
informal system that currently exists within Montana's State government serves
employees within agencies, shares information between agencies and accesses
information in other towns and states. Within the existing system, the MSL and
the agency collection staff persons provide complementary roles in meeting State
employee and public information needs. The MSL provides general reference
service and access to out-of-state databases, as well as to information in-State
that is housed in either Montana's public libraries or within the facilities of
the university system. Most agency libraries serve the specific functions of
their host agencies and provide specialized reference information to the public
v/ho contact their agencies. Insofar as the MSL staff are familiar with the
nature and specificity of any particular agency collection, they may refer
inquiries from the public and from State employees to the resource person of the
agency collection. However, because there has been no formal governmental com-
mitment to information management as a netv/ork, there exist serious impediments
to efficient access to information among agencies and between the MSL and
agencies. The primary impediment is the lack of standardized classification
of the materials in agencies and the resultant inability to access the information
throughout State government.

Table 1 presents fiscal year end expenditures reported through the Statewide
Budgeting and Accounting System (SBAS) by all State agencies for four types of
operating expenses and two equipment categories that have been selected to show
some comparative investment in information materials. Keep in mind that many
collections contain materials received at no charge from the federal government.
Also, some items traditionally cost more than others, e.g., hard bound volumes
compared to paperback monographs. Therefore, comparison of agency expenditures
on a dollar for dollar basis will not necessarily reflect agency commitment to
information acquisition. Finally, previous year expenditures have not been
examined and "inventory value" has not been addressed.



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Online LibrarySib ClackFeasibility of consolidating executive branch libraries and the Montana State Library → online text (page 1 of 5)