Sidney A King.

The Story of the sesqui-centennial celebration of Pittsburgh, July 4, September 27 to October 3, and November 25, 1908 : illustrated with portraits of prominent men and women and views taken during the sesqui- centennial, of marine parade, Greater Pittsburgh day, University of Pittsburgh and Memoria online

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Online LibrarySidney A KingThe Story of the sesqui-centennial celebration of Pittsburgh, July 4, September 27 to October 3, and November 25, 1908 : illustrated with portraits of prominent men and women and views taken during the sesqui- centennial, of marine parade, Greater Pittsburgh day, University of Pittsburgh and Memoria → online text (page 1 of 23)
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UNIVERSITY
OF PITTSBURGH



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THE STORY OF
THE SESQUI-CENTENNIAL




HON. GEORGE W. GUTHRIE
First Mayor of Greater Pittsburgh, Chairman General Committee of the Sesqui-Centennial



#
THE STORY OF THE



SESOUI-CENTENNIAL

CELEBRATION OF PITTSBURGH

JULY 4, SEPTEMBER 27 TO OCTOBER 3, AND NOVEMBER 25, 1908

ILLUSTRATED

WITH PORTRAITS OF PROMINENT MEN AND WOMEN AND VIEWS
TAKEN DURING THE SESQUI-CENTENNIAL, OF MARINE PARADE,
GREATER PITTSBURGH DAY, UNIVERSITY OF PITTS-
BURGH AND MEMORIAL HALL DAY, ETC.



EDITED BY
W^ H. STEVENSON AND BURD S. PATTERSON

riTTSBURGH'S SESQUI-CENTEXMAL

DR. SAMUEL B. McCORMICK

FOR SUNU.AV AND UN1\"ERSITY OF PITTSBURnH HAY

COL. SAMUEL HARDEN CHURCH

I'OK MONDAY, BLOCIC HOUSE DAY

H. D. W. ENGLISH

FOR GREATER PITTSBURGH DAY

A. J. KELLY, JR.

FOR ANNI\ERSARY DAY

COL. WILLIAM T. PATTERSON, MAJ. H. H. BENGOUGH,
COL. S. W. HILL AND JUDGE CHARLES F. McKENNA

FOR SOLDHvRS' MEMORIAL HALL DAY

SIDNEY A. KING

NL\NAG1NG EDITOR AND COMPILER

R. W. JOHNSTON

ART AD\TSER



PUBLISHED BY

THE R. W. JOHNSTON STUDIOS, Inc.
1910



CO p , (



Clll'VKUailKI) liY

SIDXKV A. KING
iqlO



Clit laktjiHt yrrsB

ONNKI.I.KY * SONS COMPANY
CHICAGO



II



K



TO THE

PUBLIC SPIRITED MEN AND WOMEN OF PITTSBURGH

whosp: portraits appear herein,

who, by giving their time and money, made

it possible for

PITTSBURGH'S

ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTIETH BIRTHDAY

TO BE THE MOST GLORIOUS DAY

IN THE HISTORY OF

THIS CITY,

WE RESPECTFULLY DEDICATE

THE STORY OF THE SESQUI-CENTENNIAL



ANNOUNCEMENT



IN presenting this work, "The Stor\^ of the Sesqui-Centennial," to our frienels, the pub-
Hshers beg to say that it is not a "cut and dried history," but a readable story of what
took place during "Pittsburgh's Greatest Birthday," and we desire to thank all who have so
kindly helped us.

Much credit is due Mr. W. H. Stevenson, Chairman, and Mr. Burd S. Patterson,
Secretary of the Executive Committee; Mr. H. D. W. English, Chairman (jreater Pitts-
burgh Day Committee; Mr. A. J. Kelly, Jr.. Chairman of Anniversary Day Committee;
Dr. S. B. McCormick, Chairman of Pittsburgh University and Clergymen's Committee;
Colonel Samuel Harden Church, Orator at the Bk)ck House; Mrs. Edith Darlington
Amnion, President of Daughters of American Revolution; Captain James A. Henderson
and George M. Lehman of Marine Committee; Judge Charles F. McKenna, Colonel
William T. Patterson, Colonel S. VV. Hill, Colonel Charles Otto Smith, and Major H. H.
Bengough, of the Soldiers' Memorial Hall Committee, who made the work possible.

To the daily papers, who gave us the choice of all the views taken with articles from
their pages, we thank the "Dispatch," "Post," "Sun," "Press," "Ciazette-Times," "Chron-
icle-Telegraph," "Leader," and Walter C. Jarrett, Photographer.

We have spared neither time nor expense in making this the most valuable artistic book
ever published about Pittsburgh; plates, paper and binding are of the finest quality. We
also desire to thank our friends for their liberal patronage.

THE R. W. JOHNSTON STUDIO, INC.. Pi BLISHERS.

Pittsburgh, Tulv i, iqio.



PITTSBURGH'S SESQUI-CENTENNIAL



Edited by W. H. STEVENSON and BURD S. PATTERSON



THE MAYOR'S PROCLAMATION

On June 21, 1908, Hon. George W. (}uthrie,
acting as mayor of Pittsburgh and chairman of
the city's Sesqui- Centennial Committee, issued a
proclamation and appeal which was published
in the daily papers of the next day. The docu-
ment read as follows:
"To the Citizens of Pittslnirgh:

"On November 25, 175S, the British and
Colonial troops, under the command of General
John Forbes, took possession of the smoking
ruins of Fort Duquesne, which had been aban-
doned the day before by the French and Indians.
As the sun was setting, the British flag was raised
by the brave Pennsylvanian, Colonel John Arm-
strong, in the presence of Washington, Forbes,
Bouquet, Mercer and other noted American and
British soldiers, and the name of the great Pitt,
whose genius had conceived the expedition, thus
signally crowned with success, was conferred
most appropriately upon the site between the
Forks of the Ohio, which was long thereafter
known as the 'Gateway of the West.'

" This marked the beginning of the first perma-
nent white settlement of the spot upon which
our great city is located, as well as the conferring
of its name, for the attempt of the Ohio company
to establish a fort and a trading post at the Forks
in February, 1754, had been rudely terminated
by the advent of an overwhelming force of French
and Indians two months thereafter, while the
troops of Forbes, a little more than four and a
half years later, compelled the French garrison
to destroy its defenses and habitations, and
abandon forever the attempt to make the place a
French settlement.

"On November 25th of the present year will
occur the 150th anniversary of the permanent
founding and naming of Pittsburgh, and it is

(1



most fitting that the event be celebrated in a man-
ner appropriate to the city's important history
and its great growth and achievements in many
lines. To that end Councils appointed a com-
mittee to co-operate with the general committee
of citi/xms in arranging for a suitable program
of ceremonies. These committees, having united
their efforts, have now advanced the work to a
point where the personal and financial co-opera-
tion of all citizens is needed.

"In view of the fact that the city's birthday
anniversary occurs at a season when the weather
is likely to be too inclement for an outdoor cele-
bration, it was tliought best to have the chief
program during the week, September 27th to
October ,vl- As the first important act of General
Forbes and his army, after taking possession of
and naming the site of Pittsburgh, was to hold a
thanksgiving service, so it is very appropriately
contemplated to begin the week of celebration with
suitable religious services in all the churches.
It is proposed to utilize only the evenings of the
next three days for the appropriate ceremonies
and functions. The last three days of the week
wUl be occupied with outdoor demonstrations,
parades and displays. One day will be particu-
larly known as 'Greater Pittsburgh Day.'

"The industrial, commercial, artistic, educa-
tional, musical and literary growth and progress
of the city will be properly illustrated during
the week, and great historic events of the com-
munity will be fittingly commemorated and
reproduced. There will be military, marine
and civic pageants. A special effort will be made
to induce all former Pittsburghers, now living
elsewhere, to visit their old home at this time.
The President of the United States, and other
distinguished Americans, will be asked to be the
city's guests, and representatives of the Pitt,

I)





(I2)



PITTSBURGH'S SESQUI-CENTENNIAL



F'orbcs, and Schcnley families will be invited from
abroad. There will be an exhibit at the Car-
negie Art Galleries of paintings of distinguished
Pittsburghers and of old Pittsburgh scenes, while
a special effort will Idc made to have the Western
Pennsylvania Exposition this year more thor-
oughly representative of Pittsburgh industries
than ever before.

"As it was deemed proper that the usual
Independence Day celebration should be held
this year, and it was not thought desirable, in
view of the existing financial situation, to make
two appeals for funds, the Scscjui-Centennial Com-
mittee decided to appoint a subcommittee to take
charge of the Fourth of July exercises, the head
of which subcommittee being the Director of
Public Works, who has in past years had the
supervision of the day's program.

"On November 25th, the city's birthday will
be appropriately obser^вАҐed, an efficient subcom-
mittee havmg been appointed to have special
charge of the program for the day.

" In order to make the whole celebration a fitting
one, it will be necessary for citizens generally to
contribute financial aid. It may be remarked
that it is the idea of the committee, in view of the
existing financial stringency, to indulge in no un-
necessary or trivial extravagances, but at the
same time to endeavor to make the celebration
such as will redound to the credit of the city, and
one that will be not only beneficial to our people
generally, but also interesting and instructive.
Knowing this, I have no hesitation, as Mayor and
Chairman of the (General Sesqui-Centennial Com-
mittee, in now appealing to all good citizens of
Pittsburgh to contribute according to their means
to the fund required for the celebration and also
to lend their personal aid to the work of the com-
mittee generally.

" Contributions may be sent to John B. Jackson,
Treasurer of the Scscjui-Centennial Committee,
No. 343 Fourth Avenue.

"I earnestly trust that the response to this
appeal will be such as to insure a celebration



commensurate with the dignity, greatness and
history of the city and one which e\-ery true and
loyal Pittsburgher may hereafter ever recall with
proper pride. George W. Guthrie."

HISTORY OF THE CELEBRATION

The above proclamation not only verv clearly
set forth the reasons for having the Sesqui-Cen-
tennial celebration of Pittsburgh, but it also quite
accurately outlined the form which it eventually
took. Before it was issued, considerable pre-
liminary work had been done.

The idea of holding the Sesqui-Centennial cele-
bration was first publicly advocated in an editorial
written by Burd S. Patterson on November 25,
iqoO, and printed in the "Pittsburgh Post" of the
next morning. The article was during the next
thirteen months followed by about fifty others by
the same author in the same paper, all urging the
holding of the celebration. During the summer
and fall of 1907 Mr. Patterson, in personal inter-
views and in writing, submitted to the officers and
directors of the Chamber of Commerce detailed
plans for the celebration. In March, 1908, he sub-
mitted these plans to Mayor George W. Guthrie,
who approved them, and a few days later had the
matter brought to the attention of City Councils.

In December, igo(), the Pittsburgh Chapter
of the Daughters of the American Revolution, at
the instance of the Regent, Mrs. Samuel A. Am-
nion, and Miss Julia ^Morgan Harding, passed
resolutions approving of the proposed celebration.
Early in January, 190S, the Chapter requested
Mavor Guthrie to take an interest in the cele-
bration and a few days later he replied, asking for
some suggestions, which were furnished to him
about the first of April.

On ^londay evening, March 30th, at the in-
stance of Mayor Guthrie, Joseph C. Wasson'
introduced in Common Council a resolution,
which was unanimously passed, providing for
the appointment of a committee of councils to
act with a committee of citizens to arrange for
the celebration.




O J3




it



(14)



PITTSBURGH'S SESQUI-CENTENNIAL



The same evening, on the motion of William
H. Stevenson, the resolution was approved by
Select Council.

About three weeks later President William
Brand of Common Council appointed the follow-
ing members of that body to represent it on the
committee: Joseph C. Wasson, Hugh Ferguson,
Samuel McElroy, Charles GuUand, R. K. Coch-
rane, George J. Kambach, Jacob Soffel, Jr.

During the next week, Dr. E. R. Walters, Presi-
dent of Select Council, appointed the following
members of that body on the committee : William
H. Stevenson, T. J. Hawkins, Richard Armstrong,
P. A. Manion, Charles C. Kohnc.

On April 29th the committee of Councils met
and organized by electing William H. Stevenson,
Chairman, and Edward J. Martin, Secretary.

On April 30th Mayor Guthrie, after consulta-
tion with Mr. Stevenson and Mr. Patterson, named
a General Committee of Citizens to co-operate
with the Committee of Councils. Suljsccjuently,
an agreement was reached by which Ijoth com-
mittees were consolidated into one General Com-
mittee with the understanding that the Chairman
of the Councils Committee should be the Chair-
man of the Executive Committee of the General
Committee, and that the Councils Committee
should be a sul)C()mmittee of the General Com-
mittee and, in concert witli the Mayor, should
have full jurisdiction over all matters requiring
the action of the city's lawmakers.

The General Committee met in the Common
Council Chamber on May 7, 1908. ]\Iayor
Guthrie called the meeting to order and stated the
object of the committee to be to secure a suitable
celebration of the city's one hundred and fiftieth
birthday anniversary. The Mayor was elected
chairman of the meeting and suggested that Burd
S. Patterson act as temporary secretary.

THE COMMITTEE ORGANIZED

The Mayor, being called away by pressure of
official business, relinquished the chair to W. K.
Shiras. A permanent organization was effected





by the election of the following officers: Chair-
man, H. D. W. English; First Vice-Chairman,
Hon. James W. Brown; Second Vice-Chairman,
H. J. Heinz; Third \'ice-Chairman, Mrs. Samuel
A. Ammon; Treasurer, John B. Jackson; Chair-
man of the Executive Committee, W. H. Steven-
son; Secretary, Burd S. Patterson.

The officers, Chairman of the Executive
Committee and ^layor were authorized to decide
upon the plan and scope of celebration and to
select necessary subcommittees. Meetings of
the officers were held on May 7th and May nth
in the Mayor's office. Mr. English having found
it necessary to decline the chairmanship of the
General Committee, ^Nlayor Guthrie was elected
to the position with the understanding that William
H. Stevenson, Chairman of the Executive Com-
mittee, should be the active executive officer and
that the Mayor's duties as General Chairman
should be chiefly of an advisory character. This
understanding was carried into elTect and the
result was highly satisfactory. ^Nlr. Stevenson
pro\'ed to be a most capable executive officer of
the committee. He worked untiringly and effi-
ciently. He was full of helpful suggestions and
ever ready to listen to such from others. He
was careful in appro^'ing expenditures and in-
sisted upon the pro\'ision of the necessary means
in ad\-ance of any appropriation being made.
Mavor Guthrie was also \'ery helpful not only
as an adviser but in securing the co-operation of
the Citv Councils and other officials and in per-
forming the many duties and functions which
developed upon him as the Chief Executive of
the city and Chairman of the General Committee.

On ^lay 19th a meeting of the officers and
chairman of the subcommittees was held in
Select Council Chamber for the purpose of
organizing the Executive Committee. W. H.
Stevenson was made Chairman of the Executive
Committee and Burd S. Patterson, Secretary.
Subsequently, A. J. Kelly, Jr., was chosen Vice-
Chairman. In this capacity, and also as Chair-
man of the Anniversary Day Committee, Mr.

5)




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(i6)



PITTSBURGH'S SESQUI-CENTENNIAL



Kelly did notable work. Mr. H. D. W. English
accepted the chairmanship of the Subcommittee
on Greater Pittsburgh Day with the understanding
that one day of the Sesqui-Centennial Celebration
should be so denominated. He stated that a
fund of between $6,000 and $7,000, which had
been raised for the celebration of the creation of
a Greater Pittsburgh by the "Pittsburgh
Dispatch" and the Chamber of Com-
merce, would be used for the expenses of the
Sesqui-Centcnnial Greater Pittsburgh Day
Celebration. Thereafter the Executive Com-
mittee met frequently.

PLAN OF CELEBRATION

It was decided that the celel^ration should be
in three parts. The first celebration was to be
on Independence Day and Director of Public
Works Alexander B. Shepherd was made Chair-
man of the subcommittee having the celebra-
tion in charge. The Sesqui-Centennial Committee
agreed to undertake this particular celebration,
as it was not deemed advisable to have the
Mayor issue two different appeals for funds
at a time when business conditions were so
unfavorable.

The second part of the celebration, it was
decided, should be held during the week Septem-
ber 2 7th-October 3d when, it was believed, the
weather would be favorable for outdoor demon-
strations. I'he third part of the celebration was
to be held on November 25th, the 150th anniver-
sary of the taking of Fort I)u(|uesne and the
naming of the site Fort Pitt or Pittslnirgh by
General John Forbes.

These plans were successfully carried out.
They involved the raising of 850,000 by the
Executive Committee. Councils also appro-
priated Sio,ooo for decorating the city's
main thoroughfares and public buildings,
and $3,500 for the city departments' floats
in the Greater Pittsburgh Day parade. The
Greater Pittsburgh Day special fund of $6,704.90
was also expended.

(i



FINANCE COMMITTEE ORGANIZED

On May 30th, James I. Buchanan, as Chair-
man of the Subcommittee on Finance, selected
about seventy members of this subcommittee,
the selections being confirmed by Mayor Guthrie
as Chairman of the General Committee. Sub-
sequently the membership of the Finance Com-
mittee was increased to one hundred. On June
1 6th Mr. Buchanan having resigned as Chair-
man of the Finance Committee, Colonel James
]M. Guffey, who had been appointed Chairman
of the committee, accepted the position and
named Edward M. Bigelow as Vicc-Chairman.
It is but just to say that to Messrs. Guffey and
Bigelow is due the credit for raising most of the
money needed for the celebration.

The Independence Day Committee having asked
for an appropriation of $10,000, and there being
as yet no money collected by the Finance Com-
mittee, and Chairman Guft'ey and Vice-Chairman
Bigelow having agreed to guarantee that the
amount asked for would be forthcoming when
needed, even if they had to personaUy supply it,
the Finance Committee thereupon voted the ap-
propriation as asked. Subsequently at the meet-
ing of the Finance Committee, held July 3d, Mr.
Bigelow, as Chairman of the Subcommittee on
Corporations, reported that himself. Col. Guffey,
and Mr. Buchanan had called upon Mr. A. C.
Dinkev of the United States Steel Corporation and
secured a promise of a subscription of $10,000
from that organization, and also that the Pennsyl-
vania Railroad Company had subscribed $4,000,
and the Pittsburgh Railways Company $1,000.
Mr. Bigelow also reported having seen the Jones &
Laughlin Steel Company, which later contributed
82,500; tlie Pittsburgh & Lake Erie Railroad
Company, which later contributed $1,000; and
the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company, which
later gave $1,000. H. C. Frick also contributed
$1,000.

During the months of Alay and June the various
subcommittees of the Executive Committee were
appointed and effected an organization.







(i8)



PITTSBURGH'S SESQUI-CENTENNIAL



The chairmen of these subcommittees were
appointed by Mayor Guthrie as Chairman of the
General Committee. These subcommittee chair-
men then proposed the names of the members of
their respective subcommittees and they were
approved by General Chairman Guthrie. The
names of the various chairmen and other members
of the subcommittees are given elsewhere. That
the selections were wise is proven by the fact that
every one of the subcommittees accomplished the
work assigned in a most satisfactory manner.

Headquarters for the committee were opened
during the last week in June in the old rooms of
the Chamber of Commerce, third floor of the
Oliver Building, corner of Wood Street and Oliver
Avenue. The use of the rooms was given rent free
by the Chamber of Commerce which, although
removed to other quarters in the Keenan Building,
still held the unexpired lease on its former one.
On August 1 3th, the headquarters of the committee
were removed to the) magnificent new Keenan
Building, corner of Liberty Avenue and Seventh
Street. Here the committee was domiciled in the
great new room which occupies the whole fourth
floor.

The use of this room for over five months was
generously given to the committee without cost
by the proprietor of the building, Col. T. J. Keenan,
who thus in fact became one of the largest in-
dividual contributors to the committee. Col.
Keenan also, as Chairman of the Subcommittee on
Labor Interests on the Greater Pittsburgh Day
Committee, rendered valuable services, in the per-
formance of which he was greatly assisted by the
Vice-Chairman of the Committee, John E. Haines.
The Chamber of Commerce also generously per-
mitted the use of its rooms, free of charge, for
the meetings of the executive and subcommittees.

INDEPENDENCE DAY CELE-
BRATION

The Independence Day subcommittee, although
it had but a brief period for preparation, did its
work so well that the people of Pittsburgh were



given a most notable celebration of the Nation's
birthday on July 4, 1908.

The general'program was as follows:

MORNING
ScHENLEY Park :
Band concerts.
Music Pavilion, Second Brigade Band, 10 a. m. to 12

A. M.

Panther Hollow, Boys' Brigade Band, 10 A. 11. to 12 A. M.
Snyder's Grove, Pittsburgh Military Band 10 A. m. to

12 A. M.

Washington Park :

Rocereto's Band, 10 a. m. to 12 m. Patriotic Exercises,
sports and games, 10 A. m.

McKiNLEY Park :

38th Ward, Hill Top, Patriotic exercises, 10 A. m.

Arsenal Park:

Orthite's Military Band, 10 a. m. to 12 m.

Patriotic exercises 10 A. m., including the reading of the
Declaration of Independence ; addresses by Mayor George
W. Guthrie and others; raising of flag donated by The
Lawrenceville Board of Trade, and presentation of cannon.

HoLLiDAY Park :

Duquesne Heights. Patriotic Exercises, 9 to 12 m..
Band concert, Nirella's Band, 9 to 12 a. m.

AFTERNOON

SCHEXLEV Park:

Band concerts.

Music Pavilion, Second Brigade Band, 2 to 5 p. m.
Schenley Oval, Boys' Brigade Band, 2 to 5 p. m. Snyder's
Grove, Pittsburgh Military Band 2 to 5 p. m. Spectacular
Slide for Life, Panther Hollow Bridge. Balloon Ascension,
Parachute Jump, Vaudeville. Race Track : 2 p. ii.. Horse
races under the auspices of the Schenley Matinee Club,
George W. Baum, president.

Snyder's Grove.

2 p. M. Fancy Drill by thirty-four girls from]^the Sixth
Ward Public School (North Side) under the direction of
Prof. W. W. Shocks.

2:30 p. M. Flag Drill; Barn Dance; E.xhibition by
Kindergarten Children of Soldier Boy and Circle game;
Baby Polka; Wand Drill and March ; Gypsy Dance; Sing-
ing Game (Little Playmates) ; Virginia Reel ; Boys' Kite
Flying Contest, by Children from Lawrence Park Play-
ground and Gymnasium.

Program arranged by the Pittsburgh Playground Associa-
tion in conjunction with the General Committee.

East Park (North Side, Elk's Fountain) :



(19)





BURD S. PATTERSON

Secretary of the General and Executive Sesqui-Centennial

Committee



S. C. LONG
Chairman of Railroad and Transponation Sesqui-Centennial
Committee





MAJOR VV. H. DAVIS T. J. HAWKINS

Chairman of Military and Parade Sesqui-Centennial Committee Chairman of Decoration Sesqui-Centennial Committee

(20)



PITTSBURGH'S SESQUI-CENTENNIAL



American Military Band, 2 to 5 p. m. Daylight fire-
works and vaudeville, 2 p. m.

West Park (North Side, Band Stand) :

Grand Army Band, 2 to 5 p. m. Vaudeville, Punch and
Judy, balloon ascensions, 2 p. m.

Bigham's Field (Duquesne Heights) :

Nirella's Band, i to 5 p. m. Sjiorts and games, i to 5 p. m.

(Drmsby Park (South Side) :

Rocereto's Band, 2 to 5 p. m. Exercises and games.

Arsenal Park :

Orthite's Military Band, 2 to 5 p. m.

McKiNLEY Park :

Pennsylvania State ^^lilitary Band, 2 to 5 p. u.

EVENING

ScHENLEY Park:

Band Concert, Bunker Hill, Second Brigade Band, 7 to
10 p. M. Grand display of fireworks. Bunker Hill. Among
the many devices was one representing Greater Pittsburgh
and another representing the review of our battleship fleet
in the Pacific.

West Park (North Side) :

Band Concert, Band Stand, American Military Band,
7 to 10 p. M.

The Mound, Grand Army Band, 7 to 10 p. m.

Grand display of fireworks. Seminary Hill.

McKiNLEY Park:

Band Concert, Penn.sylvania State Military Band, 7 to
10 p. M. Grand display of fireworks.

.\rsexal Park:

Band Concert, Orthite"^ Military Band, 7 to 10 p. m.
Grand display of fireworks.

The above prot^ram was most successfully


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Online LibrarySidney A KingThe Story of the sesqui-centennial celebration of Pittsburgh, July 4, September 27 to October 3, and November 25, 1908 : illustrated with portraits of prominent men and women and views taken during the sesqui- centennial, of marine parade, Greater Pittsburgh day, University of Pittsburgh and Memoria → online text (page 1 of 23)