Sidney Hall.

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those of Bungay, Clare, Framlingham, Haughleigh, Lidgate, Mettingham, Orford, and Wingfield. Hengrave
Hall is the most remarkable ancient mansion. Here are the remains of the Abbeys of Bury St. Edmund's and
Leiston ; of the priories of Blythburgh» Butley, Clare, Herringfleet, Ipswich, Mendham, and Sudbury ; and of
the nunneries of Bungay and Redlingfield.

Noblemen's and gentlemen's seats: Ampton Hall, the seat of Lord Calthorpe ; Barton Hall, of Sir H. Bun-
bury, Bart. ; Easton White House, of the Earl of Rochford ; Euston Hall, of the Duke of Grafton ; Helmingham
Hall, of the Countess of Dysart ; Heveningham Hall, of Lord Huntingfield ; Ickworth Park, of the Earl of
Bristol ; Fomham St. Genoveve, of the Duke of Norfolk; Kentwell Hall, of Hart Logan, Esq. ; Redgrave Hall,
of Admiral Wilson ; Finborough Hall, of Roger Pettiward, Esq. ; Rendlesham House, of Lord Rendlesham ;
livermere Hall, of Nathaniel Lee Acton, Esq. ; and Troston Hall, of Robert Lofit, Esq.

Among the eminent natives may be specified, Roger Grosseteste, Bishop of Lincoln, who was bom at Strad-
brooke, and died in 1253 ; John Bale, Bishop of Ossory, bom at Cove, and died November, 1563 ; the cele-
brated Cardinal Wolsey, the son of a butcher at Ipswich, who died in 1530; John Lydgate, a monk of the
Abbey of Bury St. Edmund's, distinguished as a poetical writer in the 15th century; Dr. William Sancroft,
Archbishop of Canterbury , was bom at Fresingfield, and died in 1693 ; William Wotton, an eminent philological
and critical writer, who was bom at Wrentham, and died in 1726 ; Thomas Gainsborough, a celebrated land-
scape painter, bom at Sudbury, and died in 1788; Mrs. Sarah Trimmer, distinguished for her useful writings
on education, who was bom at Ipswich in 1741, and died in 1810 ; Humphrey Repton, distinguished as a land-
scape gardener, bom at Bury St. Edmund's, and died in 1818 ; Clara Reeve, an ingenious novel-writer, born
at Ipswich, and died in 1808; Mrs. Inchbald, an eminent dramatist and novel-writer, born at Stanningfield,
and*died in 1821 ; Bloomfield, the poet, was bom at Honington, near Bury St. Edmund's, and died in 1823 ;
and George Crabbe, author of " The Borough," '* Tales in Verse," and various other poems, was a native of
Aldeburgh, and died in 1832, at Trowbridge in Wiltshire, of which place he was rector.



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SURREY.



Lit between 51 deg. 5 min. and 51 deg. 31 min. N. Lon. be-
tween 3 min. £• and 51 min. W. Greatestlength 37 m. Greatest
breadth S7 m. Superficial extent 485,120 acres. Bonndaries:
N. Middlesex ; E. Kent ; S. Soiaex ; W. Hampshire and Berkshire.
Hundreds 14. Parishes 141. Boroughs 4. Market-towns 12:
Blechingley, Chertsey, Croydon, Dorking, Famham, Gatton, Go-
dalming, Guildford, Haslemere, Kingston, Reigate, and Southwark.

Diocese of Winchester ; archdeaconry of Surrey, containing the
deaneries of Ewell, Southwark, and Stoke ; and the deaneiy of
CroydcQ, in the peculiar jurisdiction of the Archbishop of Canter-
bnxy. Endowed grammar-schools, with university privileges, at
Guildford, and St. Olave's and St. Saviour's, in Southwark.

Home Circuit — Lent and winter assizes are held .at Kingston,
«nd the summer assises at Guildford and Croydon, alternately.
Quarter-sessions held at Newington Butts, January 12 ; at Reigate,



April 20; at Guildford, July 13; and at Kingston, October 19.
i The gaol is in Horsemonger Lane. Acting magistrates 165. Mem-
bers of Parliament, 2 for the eastern division of the county, 2 ibr
the western division, 2 each for the boroughs of Lambeth, South-
wark, and Guildford, and 1 for the borou^ of Reigate.

Polling-places for the eastern division — Croydon, Reigate, Cam-
berwell, and Kingston ; for the western division— Guxldford,'Dork-
ing, and Chertsey.

Population, &c. (in 1821) inhabited houses 64,790; families
88,806, comprising 189,871 males, and 208,787 females ; total
398,658 : (in 1831) total 486,326. Estimated increase of inhabit-
ants from 1700 to 1821, 251,800. Assessment for poor and county
rates (in 1826) land 80^7/. 2(.; dwelling-houses 144,064/.;
mills, factories, &c. 22,983/. 5«. ; manorial profits, &c. 2645/. 8f. ;
total 250,049/. 15f. : (in 1830) total 321,304/.



The scenery of this county is distinguished for beauty and variety, exhibiting in some places wild and naked
heaths, which form a striking contrast with the adjoining highly-cultivated and ornamented districts. On the
border of the Thames are beautiful meadows and garden-grounds, interspersed with villas and plantations, the
soil of which is a rich loam, combined with sand. A dark blue ferruginous clay is found to the south, the native
soil of the oak, extending south-west from the Norwood Hills ; between Carshalton and Clandon, occurs a
strong clay, which decreases towards the west. Across the county, from east to west, stretches a line of open
downs, composed of chalk-hills, having a gradual declivity to the north, and lofty precipitous cli£ls on the south.
The soil of the more southern line of hills is a sandy loam, varying in colour and fertility, but of great depth, and
richest in the vicinity of Godalming. The wealds of Surrey, which lie to the south of these, join those of
Kent and Sussex ; and the southern border is well watered, and displays a rich variety of wood, arable, and
pasture land. Banstead Downs, noted for fine sheep-pasture, are within the chalk district ; and Epsom Warren,
noted for its race-ground. The forest of Holmsdale, in the south-east, was once the haunt of the red deer.
The quantity of land under tillage is very considerable. Wheat, fine barley for malting, and peas and beans, are
generally grown ; carrots and parsnips are raised in abundance for the London markets. Farnham is famous for
its hops ; and woad is produced for dyeing on the hills about Banstead. Asparagus is cultivated at Mortlake and
Battersea ; and at Mitcham and Tooting are raised peppermint, lavender, camomile, poppies, and other medi-
cinal plants. The timber growing in the Wealds consists principally of oak, birch, ash, chestnut, sallow, hazel,
and alder ; besides which, beech, walnut, elm, box, yew, larch, and maple, are grown in difierent parts of the
county. Dorking is famous for a peculiar breed of fowls ; and the rivers and streams are well stored with fish.
The manufactures are principally executed by mills, worked by the streams ; among which are those for making
fiour, paper, snufi*, and oil, besides those for preparing leather and parchment, and grinding logwood ; at Croy-
don and Mitcham are calico bleaching and printing works ; at Maldon are powder-mills ; at Godalming are
factories for weaving stockings and making patent fleecy hosiery ; and the manufactures of worsteds, blankets,
tilts, and collar-cloths, are also found at the same place ; at Mortlake is a manufactory of delft and stone ware ;
and at Guildford is a sawing-mill. Surrey presents a greater number of fine views from hills and mountain
heights than most other counties of equal extent in South Britain. The most remarkable are those of Norwood,
in the parish of Croydon ; Richmond Hill ; St. Ann's Hill, and Botley Hill, near Chertsey ; Box Hill, near
Dorking ; Leith Hill, near Wotton ; Hind Head ; and Gnbcewood Hill, n^ar Godalming. The principal rivers,
exclusive of the Thames, are the Wey and the Mole. The former rises in Hampshire, and passing northward, falls
into the Thames at Ham Haw ; the Mole, formed by several streams from the south, flows through the county to
join the Thames at Moulsey, opposite Hampton Court ; and numerous rivulets enter the Thames, among which u



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the Wandle, noted for the purity of its water, which terminates near Wandsworth ; and the little nrer Loddon
forming part of the western border. The mineral springs of this county are numerous, among which may be
mentioned the saline purgative spas at Norwood (recently discovered, and now much frequented) ; Dulwich ;
Streatham ; Oodstone ; Epsom (formerly in high repute) ; and Jessop's Well, Stoke Common, three miles south
of Claremont ; and at Cobham is a chalybeate spring, resemblmg that of Tunbridge. In the chalk-hill, upon
which Guildford Castle stands, are several remarkable excavations.

The ancient inhabitants of this county were the Regni, or Rhemi ; under the Romans it belonged to the pro-
vince of Britannia Prima ; and under the Saxons to the kingdoms of Wessez and Kent. In- 893 this county was
ravaged by the Danes, under Hastings, but they were repelled by Alfred. Runnymede, near Staines, is famous
as the spot where the barons in 1215 obtained from King John the great charter of liberties, the breach of which
obliged the opponents of that tyrant to offer the crown to Prince Louis of France, who brought over an army>
and captured several towns and castles ; and among the latter those of Guildford and Famham, but on John's
death they were retaken by Henry III., and the French prince was obliged to quit the kingdom. Surrey was
again the seat of warfare, during the commotions excited by Montfort, Earl of Leicester^ in 1264; and also in
the contests between the houses of York and Lancaster ; and in 1554, in the rebellion of Sir Thomas Wyat
against Queen Mary. In the civil war, under Charles I., some contests took place here, the most important of
which was the defeat of the Royalists, near Kingston, in 1647. Among the more recent events were the riots in
St. George's Fields, in 1768, when Wilkes was confined in the King's Bench ; and in 1780 the riots in the same
place commenced, in consequence of the procession of the Protestant Association, headed by Lord George
Gordon. The Roman road, called Ermyn Street, crossed this county, and on it was situated the station of
Noviomagus, supposed by some antiquaries to have been at Woodcote, near Croydon, but it is more probable
that its site was Holwood Hill, on the Kentish frontier. There are also traces of a Roman camp and settlement
at Walton-upon-Thames ; and at Kingston, where have been found sepulchral urns, coins, and other Roman
antiquities. Remains of ancient encampments, supposed to be Roman, may be traced at Bottle Hill, in the
parish of Warlingham ; on Castle Hill, in that of Hascomb ; on Holmbury Hill, in the parish of Ockley ; at
Oatlands, and elsewhere. The camps of Hanstie Bury, on Leith Hill, and that of War Coppice Hill, in the
parish of Catterham, are supposed to be of Danish origin. There are considerable remains of the ancient castles
of Famham, and Guildford, and there are some traces of that of Bletchingley, but of Reigate Castle there are no
remains. The monastic establishments in this county, before the Reformation, were numerous, but the principal
existing relics are those of the abbeys of Chertsey and Waverley, and of the priories of Merton and Newark, or
Newstead, in the parish of Send.

Noblemen's and gentlemen's seato : Ashtead Park, belonging to the Hon. Colonel Howard ; Bagshoc Park,
to H. R. H. the Duke of Gloucester ; Ewell House, to the Earl of Onslow ; Claremont, to the King of Belgium ;
Oatlands, to Edward Hughes Ball Hughes, Esq. ; Norbury Park, near Leatherhead, to Henry Piper Sperlmg,
Esq. ; Lambeth Palace, to the Archbishop of Canterbury ; and Pamshill, to the Countess of Carhampton.

Among the more distinguished natives of this county may be mentioned William Occam, a learned scholastic
divine, of the order of Cordeliers, who was bom at Ockham, and flourished in the fourteenth century; Walter
de Merton, founder of Merton College, Oxford, who was bora at Merton, and after having been Bishop of
Rochester, and Lord Chancellor, died in 1277; Dr. Richard Corbet, Bishop of Norwich, an ingenious poet, in
the reign of Charles I., who was a native of Ewell ; Dr. Henry Hammond, a learned divine and scripture com-
mentator, who was bom at Chertsey, and died in 1660 ; Lord Peterborough, distinguished as a statesman and
military officer, in the reign of Queen Anne, who was a native of Reigate ; Benjamin Martin, a mathematical
instmment-maker and ingenious writer on natural philosophy, who was bora at Worplesdon, and died in 1782; '

Edward Gibbon, a celebrated historian, who was a native of Putney ; Henry St. John, Lord Bolingbroke, bora '

at Battersea, in 1672, and died in 1751 ; Captain Francis Grose, author of the *' Antiquities of England and I

Wales," bom at Richmond in 1731, and died at Dublin in 1791. Thomas Hope, the author of Anastasius," i

a Greek romance, and other works, had a seat at Deepdene, where he died in 1831. I



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SUSSEX.



LaL between 50 deg. 44 min. and 51 deg. 9 min. N. Lcn. between
50 min. £ . and 57 min. W . G reatest length 76 m. Greatest breadth
tOm. Superficial extent 936,320 acres. Boundaries: N. Surrey
ndKent; £. Kent ; S. English Chaimel; W.Hampshire. Rapes
6. Hundreds, liberties, &c. ?i. Parishes 300. City 1 : Chi-
chester. Boroughs 7. Market-towns 18: Arundel, Bramber,
Brighton, Cuckfield, East Grinstead, Hailsham, Hastings, Horsham,
Lewes, Little Hampton, Midhurst, Petworth, Rye, Seaford, Shore-
ham, Steyning, Winchelsea, and Worthing.

Diocese of Chichester ; archdeaconry of Chichester, containing
the deaneries of Arundel, Boxgrove, Chichester, Midhilrst, and
Storrington ; and, locallj, that of Paghsm ; and that of Lewes,
containing the deaneries of DaUington, Hastings, Ltwes, and
Perensey ; and, locally, that of South Mailing. Endowed gram-
mar-school, with uniTersity prinleges, at Lewes.

Home Circuit. — Assizes held in summer and winter at Lewes,
and in Lent at Horaham ; at which towns are the county prisons.



Quarter-sessions held at Petworth, Horsham, Lewes, and Chiches-
ter. Acting magistrates 134. Members of Parliament, 2 for the
eastern division of the county, 2 for the western division, 2 for the
city of Chichester, 2 each for the boroughs of Brigbthetanstona,
Hastings, and Lewes, and 1 each for the boroughs of Bye, Arundel»
Horsham, ami Midhurst.

Polling-places for the eastern division — Lewes, East Grinstead,
Battle, and Mayfield; for the western division — Chichester, Steyn«
ing, Petworth, Honham, and Arundel.

Population, &c. (in 1821) inhabited houses 36,283 ; fomiliea
43,565, comprising 116,705 males, and 116,314 females ; total
233,019: (in 1831) total 272,328. Estimated increase of inhabit-
anta from 1700 to 1821, 146«300. Assessment for poor and county
rates (in 1826) land 214,304(. li.; dwelling-houses 42,752/. 2#.;
mills, factories, &c. 4609/. t2«. ; manorial profits 465/. 12i. ; total
262,lSl/.7<. : (in 1830) total 289,051/.



The surface of this county in the north corresponds wifli the adjoining districts of Suitey and Kent, forming a
port of the woodland tract called the Weald, which is separated from the remainder by a range of barren hills;
the lowland is fruitful and well ciiltirated, but the whole slfll resembles a great forest, broad belte of timber-trees
having been left around the enclosures when the woods were in general destroyed. Southward of this district
are the South Downs, part of a range of chalk-hills extending through the south-eastern part of the county, and
terminating on the shore near Eastbourne. Among the chief agricultural products are wheat, barley, oats, and
peas. Turnips are extensively cultivated for sheep ; and potatoes in the vicinity of Battle, Eastbourne, and Chi-
chester. Hops are grown in the north-eastern part of the county, and to the south-west are a number of orchards,
from the produce of which cider is made, the best in the neighbourhood of Petworth. Sussex has always been
famed for timber, especially oak. The chief mineral product of this county is limestone, some kinds of which are
polished as marble, particularly that about Petworth. The cattle are a native breed of a large size and red colour.
The sheep called South Downs are a peculiar black-faced variety, esteemed for the fineness of the fleece, and the
excellence of the mutton. The principal heighU are Beachy Head, Bow Hill, Brightling Down, Chanctonbury
Hill, Crowborough Beacon, Ditchling Beacon, Fairlight Down, Firle Beacon, and Rook's Hill. The most important
rivers in this county are the Arun, which rises in St Leonard's Forest, and falls into the English Channel at Arundel
port ; the Adur, which has its source in the Weald, and enters the sea near Brighton ; the Ouse, the Rother, and the
Cockmere. The ancient inhabitants of Sussex were the Regni, or Rhemi, a tribe of Britons, who were reduced
to subjection by Vespasian. Under the Roman government it belonged to the province called Britannia Prima,
and contained the stations of Regnum, or Regentium, Chichester; Portus Anderida, Pevensey; Ad Decimum,



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OB the river Arun; Ad Lemanam, on the Rother; and Portus Adumi, probably Aldrington, near the
mouth of the Adur. Northward from the coast proceeded the ancient road called Ermyn Street, and there have at
different times and places been discovered tesselated pavements, pottery, coins, and other Roman antiquities*
After the departure of the Romans in the fifth century this part of the island was subdued by the Saxons in 477,
under Ella, who formed a settlement here in spite of the resistance of the inhabitants. He obtained a victory
over them near Pevensey in 485, and in 490 took Anderida, a district in the northern part of the county. In 893
the Danes, in great numbers, sailed up the river Rother, and took Appledore, in Kent, and this county was ra«
vaged and laid waste by them in the years 904, 1009, and 1013. Near Hastings William, Duke of Normandy,
landed his army, September 29, 1066, and gained his decisive victory over Harold II. on the 14th of October en-
suing. Near Lewes a victory was gained by the Earl of Leicester, in 1264, over Ring Henry III. Hostile descents
were made on this coast by the French in 1340; in 1380 they burnt Winchelsea; in 1447 Rye was likewise de-
stroyed by those invaders ; in 1 5 1 3 they plundered and set Brighton on fire ; and in 1 545 they again landed, but were
defeated and many killed. Durmg the civil war under Charles I. Chichester, a royal garrison, was besieged and
taken by Sir William Waller, in December, 1643 ; about a year after Arundel Castle was captured for the king,
but was soon retaken by Waller. An engagement took place off'Beachy Head, on June 30, 1690, between the
fleets of the French, and of the English and Dutch. At Bodiam, Bramber, Hastmgs, Lewes, Pevensey, Winchelsea,
and other places, are the ruins of ancient castles, and along the coast from Eastbourne to Bexhill, Hastings, and
Winchelsea, are many martello towers.

Noblemen's and gentlemen's seats : Arundel Castle, belonging to the Duke of Norfolk ; Ashbumham House,
near Battle, to the Earl of Ashbumham; Burton Park, near Petworth, to D. Blake, Esq. ; Cowdry Park, near
Midhurst, to W. S. Poyntz, Esq. ; Eridge Castle, to the Earl of Abergavenny ; Crowhurst Place, near Hastings,
to J. C. Pelham, Esq. ; Firle Place, near Lewes, to Lord Gage ; Goodwood, near Lavant, and Halnaker Park, near
Eartham, to the Duke of Richmond ; Eartham, between Midhurst and Chichester, to the late Right Hon. William
Huskisson ; Hurstmonceux Park, near Battle ; Petworth Park, to the Earl of Egremont ; Penshurst, once the
seat of the Sidneys; Parham Park, to Lord De la Zouche; Sheffield Park, to the Earl of Sheffield; Pavilion^
at Brighton ; Slindon House, near Arundel, to the Countess of Newburgh ; Stanmer Park, near Lewes, to the
Earl of Chichester ; Stanstead House, near East Bourne^ to the Rev. Lewis Way ; and Up Park, near Midhurst,
to Sir Harry Featherstonehaugh, Bart.

Among the eminent natives of this county may be mentioned. Archbishop Peckham, the learned author of a
** Treatise on Perspective," and various theological works, who died at Mortlake, in Surrey, in 1292 ; the learned
Selden, born at Salvington, in the parish of Terring, in 1584, and died in 1654; Thomas May, author of the
" History of the Long Parliament," who died in 1650 ; Thomas Otway, distinguished as a tragic writer, bom at
Tritton in 1651, and died in 1685 ; William Collins, the celebrated lyric poet, bom at Chichester, where he died
in 1759 ; John Hamilton Mortimer, an eminent painter, who was a native of East Boume, and' died in 1779 f
and William Hayley, author of the " Triumphs of Temper," and other poems, who died at Felpham in 1820*



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WARWICKSHIRE.



Lit. between 51 deg. 57 mia. aid 5S deg. 41 mip. N. Lon. be-
tween 1 deg. 7 min. and 1 deg. 56 min. W. Grefttest length 50 m.
Graetest bretdtb S5 m. Snperficiel extent 977.280 acres. Bound-
airiee : N. Stafibrdahire ; £. Leioeater, Northampton, and Oxford ;
S. Gloaoeaterahiraj W. Woroeatershiie and Staffocdahire. Hun-
dreds 4. Libertj 1. Pariahea SOI. City 1: Coventry. Bo-
roughs 8. Market-towns 15 : Aloester, Atbeiatone, Birmingham,
Cdeabill, Henlej-in-Arden, Kenilworth, Kineton, Leamington,
Vuneatan, Rngl^, Solihull, Southern, Stratford-on-ATon, Suttoo
Coldfield, and Warwiok.

Partly in the diooeae of Lichfield and Corentry, and partly in
that of Worcester. Archdeaconry of Corentry, containing the
deanerieaof Arden, Coventiy, Martcm, and Stoneleigh ; and that of
Worcester, containing the deaneriea of Kington and Warwick.
Endowed grammar-aohools, with uniTendty privileges, at Birming-
ham, Conbrook, Corentry, Haaptm Lney, Rugby, and Warwick.



Midland Circuit. — ^Assises and quarter ■eisions held at War-
wick, where is the county gaol. Acting magistrates 6i. Mem-
bers of Paxliament, 9 for ihs northern diviaion of the county, 2 for
the aouthem divisian, 2 for the city of Coventry, and 2 each for the
boroughs of Warwick and Birmingham.

Polling-places for the northern diviaion — Coleahill, Nuneaton,
Coventry, Birmixigham, and Dunchurch ; for the aouthem divi-
sion — Warwick, Kineton, Stratford, Henley, and Southam.

PopulatLon, &c. (in 1821) inhabited houses 55,062; fomiJUes
60,123; comprising 133,827 males, and 140,565 femalea; total
274,392: (in 1831) tdtal 336,988. Estimated increase of inha-
bitants, from 1700 to 1821, 183,400. Asaeaament for poor
and county ratea (in 1826) land 94,8422. 6«.; dweIling-4iouses
49,392/. 14f.; miUs, factories, &c. 10,6741. 5i.; manorial proiita,
&c. 3082/. 9f.; total 157,991/. 14i. : (in 1830) total 192,303/.



The surface of this county ia general consists of gentle eminences and ralleys, having a rich and pleasing
appearance ; and the scenery, though not striking, is in many places extremely agreeable, from the number and
Tariety of the small tracts of woodland scattered over it. A narrow portion of this county, on the south-west, is
divided from the other parts of it by a detached tract belonging to Worcestershire ; and near the western border
there is a smaller insulated district, enclosed by Worcestershire. The county is divided into two unequal por<
tions by the river Avon. The southern, or smaller portion^ which is called Feldon, is a champaign country of
great fertility, bordered by an elevated range of limestone hills on the south-east. The northern portion, called
the Woodland, is chiefly in a high state of cultivation, but it includes tracts of wild heath and moorland, and a
part still bears the appellation of the Forest of Arden ; here also was situated the royal forest of Killingwoith, or
Kenilworth. The soil is gravelly in the north ; clay predominates in the centre, with a substratum of limestone ;
and sandy and clayey loam in other parts, resting sometimes on freestone or limestone, and sometimes on gravel.
The climate is reckoned mild and salubrious, and the prevailing winds are from the south-west, attended often
with rain ; from the continuance of the winds from the east, in spring, vegetation sometimes suffers. Oak and
elm are the most common among the various kinds of timber. Wheat, barley, oats, beans, peas, potatoes, and
tares, are raised in considerable quantities; besides which are grown turnips in the Vale of Avon, and flax in
various places. To the north are numerous meadows and pastures, in which the long-homed Lancashire breed
of kine are principally fed for the dairy ; and abundance of cheese is made here. Sheep are kept here, which
produce wool of a fine quality. Dunsmore Heath, between the Avon and the Leam, is noted as the reputed



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Bcene ot the romantic adventoTes of Guy, Earl of Warwick. The principal heights in this county are Corley


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Online LibrarySidney HallA new British atlas: comprising a series of 54 maps, constructed from the ... → online text (page 13 of 20)