Sidney Hall.

A new British atlas: comprising a series of 54 maps, constructed from the ... online

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was bora at Cockermouth, and died in 1805 ; Uie Rev. W. Gilpin, author of several works on picturesque scenery,
who was bom at Scaleby Castle, and died at Boldre, in Hampshire, of which parish he was vicar, in 1804; his
brother, Sawrey Gilpin, R. A., an eminent painter, who died in 1807 ; Captain Joseph Huddart, F. R. S., di*-
tinguished as a naval engineer and hydrographer, was born in 1741, at Allonby, and died in 1816; and Wilson
Lowry, F.R.S., a celebrated engraver, was born at Whitehaven, in 1762, and died in 1824.



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DERBYSHIRE.



l4t.b«tir66a5id^.4tmm.a&d53d6ff.31m]]i.N. Loii.be-
tvramldflg.andSdflg. Sniiii. W. Oiestest length 56 m. Greats
«it breedth 33 m. Superficial extent 656,640 aoree. Bonndariea :
K. YerUhire ; E. Nettingliamaliire and Leiceatenhire ; S. Leices-
tatduie and Warwiokahire ; W^SCatfbidaliiieandCliealiire. Hvn-
dnda 6. Pasiahaa 137. Bofovgh 1. Market-towna 11 : Alfre-
ton, Aahboum, Bakewell, Belper, Buxton, Chap^-en-le Frith,
Cheaterfield, Crom&rd. Darby, TideaweD, and Wirkaworth.

Diooaee of Lichfield and Coventrj ; archdeaconry of Deiby, in-
elodi^ the deaneriea of Aahboum, Caatillar, Chaaterfield, Derby,
Hig^ Peak, and Repton. Endowed grammar-achoola, with nnirer-
flitj pririlegea, at Derby, Repton, and Cheaterfield.

Midland Circuit.—- Aaaiaea, and Epiphany, Lent and Michaelmaa
aMBonahald at Derby, where it the ooenty gaol; Hilary aaaatona



held at Cheaterfield. Acting magiitntee 54* Membera of ParU»-
ment, S fiv the noctheni diTiaion of the county, S. for the aonthem
diviaion, and S for the borough of Derby.

Polling-plaeea tar the northern diTiaion of the County — BakeweU,
Cheaterfield, Chi^pd-en-le-Frith, Alfreton, and Gloeaop ; for the
aouthem dirisioii— Deiby, Aahboum, Wiikswoith, Mdboumy and
Belper.

Population, &c. (in 18S1) inhabited houaea 40,054; familiea
42,404, oompriaing 105,873 malea, and 107,460 femalea; total
213483 : (in 1831 ) total 237,170. AMnaament far poor and county
rateB(in 1826) land 71,375i. lit.; dwelling-houaea 12,735<.6f.;
rnilla, factoriea, &c. 21281. It.; manorial profita, &c. 1454/. lit.;
total 87,693/. 9l. : (in 1830) total 108,303/.



This county is divided from north to south into two districts by the river Derwent, but it may be more correctly
distinguished as consisting of a mountainous tract on the north, and a comparatively level region on the south.
In the northern part, or district of th6 Peak, the climate is bleak and changeable, and the surface of the country
rocky and uneven. Here are found the loftiest eminences in the midland parts of England, particularly those of
Axe-edge, south-west of Buxton, 1756 feet above the sea; Kinderscout and Holme-moss, near the north-west
border, the latter 1859 feet above the level of the sea; Hathersedge, near the northern border, between Sheffield
and Tideswell ; and Lords Seat, near Castleton. Matlock, on the banks of the Derwent ; Dove Dale, three
miles north of Ashboum ; Monsal Dale, north-west of Bakewell ; Eyam, or Middleton Dale, east of Tideswell ;
Upper Dove Dale, 'five miles north of Ashboum; Donnington Cliff, on the Trent, south-east of Derby;
Chee Tor, on the Wye, near Buxton; and Windley Hill, between Derby and Wirksworth, — are places
noted for the beautiful scenery and extensive prospects they afford. Here are several remarkable caves
as Bagshaw*s Cavem> south-west of Bradwell ; Elden Hole, north of Peak Forest ; Golconda, near Hop-
ton ; Poolers Hole, south-west of Buxton ; and Peak's Hole, near Castleton. In these mountainous regions
are mines of lead, iron, copper, antimony, calamine, fluor-spar» gypsum, marble, limestone, and coai.
The southern part of the county is pleasant and healthy, the climate is temperate, and the soil rich and
fertile, producing plentiful crops of wheat and barley, as well as other kinds of grain. On the b«inks of
the Dove, towards the western border of the county, are rich dairy-farms, furnishing great quantities of cheese
for the London market. The extensive culture of camomile may be mentioned as somewhat peculiar to this
county. The chief manufectures are those of cotton stockings, silk, woollen cloth, linen, tanned leather, and
iron^ besides pottery, porcelain, and ornamental articles from the Derbyshire spar. This couray is likewise noted



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for ale, particularly the rich luftcious variety of that liquor called Burton ale. The prmcipal riven are the Trent,
the Derwenty the Doye, the Wye, the Erwash, and the Rother. There are mineral springs of a sulphureous quality
at Kedleston, Shattlewood, and Cawley, near Dronfield; chalybeate springs at Quamdon, two miles from
Derby, Westwood, near Tandersley, Buxton, and Tibshelf, four miles north-east of Alfreton ; and tepid springs
at Matlock, Buxton, and Bakewell.

Derbyshire was probably inhabited before the Roman conquest by the Cassii ; after that event it was included
in the province of Plavia Csesariensis ; and during the Saxon Heptarchy it formed a part of the kingdom of Mer-
cia. Among the existing relics of former ages, there are in this county stone circles, Logan, or rocking-stones, and
barrows, probably of British origin. The Roman road called Ryknield Street, passed through Derbyshire, and
there was, probably, a Roman station at Tapton Hill, and perhaps some others. Coins, inscribed blocks of
lead, and other Roman antiquities, have been found here. Among the baronial castles of which there are remains,
may be mentioned those of Codnor, Peak Castle, Horseley, and Melboum. Tlie principal monastic relics are
those of Dale Abbey, Beauchief Abbey, Repton Priory, and Yeveley, which was a preceptory of the Knights
Hospitallers, The parish churches of Repton and Melboum, and the desecrated church of Steetley, in the parish
of Whitwell, exhibit interesting specimens of Norman architecture.

The noblemen's and gentlemen's seats in this county chiefly deserving of notice are, Chatsworth and Hard-
wick Hall, belonging to the Duke of Devonshire ; Kedleston, to Lord Scarsdale; Haddon Hall, to the Duke of
Rutland ; Willersley Castle, to Richard Arkwright, Esq. ; Sudbury Hall, to Lord Vernon ; Bretby Park, to the
Earl of Chesterfield ; Wingerworth Hall, to Sir Henry Hunloke, Bart. ; Caulk Abbey, near Ashby-de-la-Zouch, to
Sir George Crewe, Bart. ; Drakelow, south of Burton-upon-Trent, to Sir Roger Gresley, Bart. ; and Willesley Hall,
in a detached part of the county, south-west of Ashby-de-la-Zouch, to Sir Charles Hastings, Bart. Among the
eminent natives of Derbyshire may be noticed. Sir Hugh Willoughby, bom at Risley, eastward of Derby, a famous
navigator, who, together with his crew, perished off the coast of Lapland in an attempt to discover a north-west
passage to China, in 1554 ; Sir Anthony Fitzherbert, a judge, distinguished as a writer on law and husbandry, who
was a native of Norbury, south-west of Ashboum, and died in 1538 ; Jedidiah Buxton, a peasant, born in 1705, at
Elmton, eastward of Chesterfield, noted as a self-taught arithmetician ; John Flamsteed, astronomer royal, bom
at Denby, eastward of Belper, who died in 1719; James Brindley, the celebrated engineer, who was bom at
Tunsted, and died in 1772 ; Samuel Richardson, the novelist, bom at Derby in 1689, and died in 1761 ; Joseph
Wright, an eminent painter, who died in 1797, was also bom at Derby; as likewise was William Hutton, the
author of several works relative to English history and antiquities, who died at Birmingham in 1815, aged 92;
Dr. John Woodward^ author of the *' Natural History of the Earth," bom in 1665, died in 1728 ; Anna Seward,
in ingenious poetess, who was born at Eyam, in 1747^ and died at Lichfield in 1809 ; Dr. Thomas Denman^ an
eminent physician, who was bom at Bakewell, and died in London in 1815 ; and Dr. Thomas Fanshaw Middleton,
the first Bishop of Calcutta, m the East Indies, where he died in 1822, was a native of Kedleston.



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DEVONSHIRE.



Lat. between 50 deg. 15 min. and 51 deg. 15 min. N. Ixm.
between 3 deg. and 4 deg. 36 min. W. Greatest length 71 m.
Greatest breadth 64 m. Superficial extent 1,519,360 acres.
Boundaries: N. the Bristol Channel; E. Somersetshire and Dor-
setshire; S. the English Channel; W. Cornwall. Hundreds 33.
Parishes 466. City 1 : Exeter. Boroughs 9. Market-towns 34 :
Ashburtoui Axminster, Barnstaple, Bampton, Bideibrd, Brixham,
Chudleigh, Chumleigh, CoUumpton, Colyton, Crediton, Dartmouth,
Deronport, Hatherleigh, Holsworthy, Honiton, lUracombe, Kings-
bridge, Modbury, South Molton, Moreton Hempstead, Newton
Abbot, Oakhampton, Ottery St. Mary, Plymouth, Plympton, Sid-
mooth, Stonehouse, Tayistock, Teignmottth, Tirerton, Topsham,
Torrington, and Totness.

Diocese of Exeter ; archdeaconry of Barnstaple, including the
deaneries of Barnstaple, Chumleigh, Hertland, Shirwell, South
Moltoo, and Torringtnn ; archdeaconry of Exeter, including the
deaneries of Aylesbeare, Cadbury, Exeter, DunkesweU, Duns-
ford, Honiton, Kenne, Plymtree, and Tiverton; archdeaconry of
Totness, including the deaneries of Holsworthy, Ipplepen, Moreton,
Oakhampton, Plympton, Tamerton, Taristock, Totness, and



Woodleigb. Endowed grrammar-schools, with unirersity priri-
leges, at Exeter, Crediton, Kingsbridge, Otteiy St. Mary, Tarib*
tock, Tiverton, AshburUm, and Chudleigh.

' Western Circuit. — Assiaes and quarter-sessions fiyr the county
Jield at Exeter, where is the county gaol. Acting magistrates 167.
Members of Parliament, 3 for the northern dirision of the county,
2 for the southern division, t for the city of Exeter, 2 each for the
boroughs of Banistaple, Tiverton, Devonport, Honiton, Pljrmouth,
Tavistock, and Totness, and 1 each for the boroughs of Ashburton
and Dartmouth. ^

Polling-places for the northern division of the County — South
Molton, CoUumpton, Barnstaple, Torrington, Holsworthy, and
Crediton ; for the southern division — Exeter, Honiton, Newton-
Abbot, Kingsbridge, Plymouth, Tavistock, and Oakhampton.

Po))ulation, &o. (in 1821) inhabited houses 71,486; families
90,714; comprising 208,229 males, and 230,811 females; total
.439,040: (in 1831) total 494,168. Assessment for poor and
county rates (in 1826) laud 180,872/. 18s.; dwelling-houses
47,898/. 3«.; mills, factories, &c. 3925/. 5s.; mtoorial profits
3396/. 8s.; total 236,092/. 14f. : (in 1830) total 250,713/.



This county displays great variety of soil and surface, as might be expected from its vast extent : from the
eastern border where it joins Dorsetshire, and along the southern coast, the country is extremely pleasant and
fertile, and the climate is so mild, that myrtles grow and flourish in open ground. Between Exeter and the
border of Cornwall, lies the wide barren tract, called the Forest of Dartmoor, consisting of naked rushy marshes,
and bleak rocky hills, which only serve for the pasturage of sheep, but this tract has been improved by draining
and cultivation. The north-eastern part of the county, adjoining Exmoor, in Somersetshire, is in general dry
and heathy, and here are mines of copper, lead, and other minerals. Wheat, barley, beans, and peas, are the
most usual productions of the arable land ; flax is likewise cultivated, but only sparingly. Devonshire is famous
for the produce of the dairy, particularly butter, and what is called clouted, or Devonshire cream, much of wliich
is sent for sale to London. Cider must also be mentioned as a staple piquet of this county, but tlie quality is
inferior in flavour, if not in strength, to tliat of Herefordshire. Besides moorstone, or granite, the mountainous
parts of Devonshire afford the ores of lead, iron, tin, and manganese ; and silver, gold, copper, and other metals,
have been found, but in small quantities. Tin was anciently abundant, but the trade in that metal is now almost
exclusively confined to Cornwall. The woollen mianufacture was formerly carried on very extensively m the
southern parts of Devonshire, but the trade has declined, and disappeared from some places, yet coarse woollen
goods are still manufactured to a considerable extent ; and Axminster is famous for its carpet manufactory. The
most remarkable heights in Devonshire are Butterton Hill, 1203 feet above the level of the sea ; Cawsand Beacon,
1792 feet; Furland, near Dartmouth; Little Haldon, between Kenne and Exminster; and Rippin Tor, on Dart-
moor, 1549 feet above the sea.

The principal rivers are the Torridge, the Oke, and the Taw, which fall into the Bristol Channel, and the £xe,
the Teign, the Dart, and the Tamar, which enter the English Channel. Besides these may be mentioned the
Axe, the Otter, the Avon, the Erme, the Yealme, the Plym, and the Tavy. Before the Roman conquest, this
part of the island was inhabited by the Damnonii, a powerful tribe of Britons, who carried on commercial inter-



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course with the Phoenicians, the Carthaginians, and the Gauls ; and under the Romans it was included in the
province called Britannia Prima. Among the British antiquities in Devonshire are, a circular enclosure of stone,
called Grimspound, in the parish of Manaton, and there are others in various parts of Dartmoor and elsewhere.
At Drewsteignton is a large cromlech, and there are in many places barrows and intrenchments, probably of
British origin. Through this county passed the Roman Iknield Street, on which were the stations of Isca
Damnoniorum, and probably some others. This district was added to the kingdom of Wessex, by conquest, after
614 ; in the ninth and tenth centuries, it was invaded by the Danes ; after the Norman conquest, William I. besieged
and took Exeter, which was again the scene of hostilities in the following reign. During the civil war under
Charles I., several military transactions occurred in Devonshire, the inhabitants of which were in general devoted
to the royal cause. The latest event of national importance connected with this county was the landing of the
Prince of Orange, at Torbay, November 4, 1688, previously to the revolution, which placed him on the throne of
Great Britain. There were anciently castles at Exeter, Oakhampton, Berry Pomeroy, Torrington, and Dart-
mouth, and there are still some remains of those fortresses. Previously to the Reformation, there were about thirty
monastic establishments, and a preceptory of the Knights Templars, among which the ruins of Tavistock Abbey are
the most considerable; there are also some remains of Buckfastleigh Abbey, and others.

The noblemen *s and gentlemen's seats in this county deserving of notice are, Haldon House, belonging to Sir
Lawrence Palk, Bart. ; Ugbrook Park, to Lord Clifford ; Holne Park and Tawstock Court, to Sir Bouchier Wrey,
Bart. ; Dartington House, to Mr. Champemoune; Bickham, to Sir William Elford, Bart. ; Powderham Castle,
to Lord Courtenay; Tor Abbey, to George Cary, Esq.; Sharpham, to J. B. Bastard, Esq.; Castle Hill, near
South Molton, to Earl Fortescu ; and Creedy House, Crediton, to the late Sir Humphry Davy.

Among the eminent natives of this county may be mentioned Henry de Bracton, a celebrated lawyer of the
thirteenth century, supposed to have been born at Bracton, or Bratton Clovelly, westward of Oakhampton ; Sir
Thomas Bodley, founder of the Bodleian Library ; Sir Peter (afterwards Lord) King, who was lord chancellor,
and died in 1734; Dr. James Foster, a learned dissenting divine, who died in 1753; Simon Ockley, a skilful
orientalist, who died in 1720; Eustace Budgell, one of the writers in the ** Spectator," who died in 1737;
Thomas Yalden, a poet of some note, who died in 1736; William Jackson, an ingenious writer and musical
composer, who was bom in 1730, and died in 1803; and the celebrated painter, Sir Joshua Reynolds, all natives
of Exeter; John Jewel, Bishop of Salisbury in the sixteenth century ; Richard Hooker, author of the "Eccle-
siastical Polity,'" who was born at Heavitree, near Exeter, in 1553, and died in 1600; the famous Sir Francis
Drake, who was bom near Tavistock ; Monk, Duke of Albemarle, the restorer of Charles H., who was born at
Potheridge, near Torrington ; John Churchill, Duke of Marlborough, who was born at Ashe, eastward of Oak-
hampton; Sir Thomas Lyttleton^judge of the Common Pleas in the reign of Edward IV.; Sir John Fortescu,
chief justice of the King's Bench under the reign of Henry VL ; Sir Walter Raleigh, who was bom at Budleigh,
and was executed for alleged treason, October 29, 1618; Dr. Benjamin Kennicott, the learned editor of the
" Hebrew Bible," who was born at Totness in 1718, and died in 1783; Edward Lye, a distinguished Saxon
scholar, also bom at Totness, who died in 1767 ; John Gay, the poet, who was bom near Barnstaple, and died
in 1732 ; Newcommen, the inventor of the steam-engine about the end of the seventeenth century, was a lock-
smith at Dartmouth, and probably a native of that place ; Dr. Matthew Tindal, a noted sceptical writer, who
was born at Beer Ferris, and died in 1733; the learned antiquary, Jacob Bryant, who was born at Plymouth,
and died in 1804; Mrs. Hannah Cowley, an ingenious dramatist, who was born at Tiverton, where she died in
1S09 ; Sir George Baker, an eminent physician, born at Modbury, who died in 1809; Dr. Wolcot» celebrated
as a burlesque poet, under the name of Peter Pindar, who died in 1819; William Gifford, distinguished as a
critic and satirist, who was born at Ashburton, and died December 31, 1826 ; Sir John Carr, Knight, author of
" The Stranger in France," and other popular books of Travels ; and Major Rennell, distinguished for his eluci-
dations of Ancient Geography, who was bom at Chudleigh in 1742, and died in 1830.



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DORSETSHIRE.



IM. between 50 deg. 31 min. and 51 deg. 5 min. N. Lon.
between 1 deg. 47 min. and 3 deg. 8 min. W. Greatest length
56 m. Greatest breadth 35 m. Superficial extent 775,000 acres.
Boundaries : N. Somersetahiie and Wiltshire ; £. Hampshire ; S.
English Channel ; W. Devonshire. Hundreds 34, besides ^2 li>
berties. Parishes 258. Boroughs 8. Market-towns 15 : Bea-
minster, Blandford, Bridport, Ceme Abbas, Dorchester, Lyme
Regis, Melcombe Regis, Poole, Shaftesbury, Sherborne, Stalbridge^
Sturminster Newton, Wareham* Weymouth, and Wimbome.

Archdeaconry of Dorset and diocese of Bristol. Endowed
grammar-schools, with university privileges, at Dorchester, Sher-
borne, and Wimbome Minster.

Western Circuit, — Assizer held at Dorohester, where is the
eounty gaol ; quarter-sessions held at Blandford, Epiphany ; at
Sherborne, Lent; at Shaftesbury, Hilary; and at Bridport, Mi-



chaelmas. Acting magistrates 65. Members of Parliament, 3 fyt
the county, S each for the boroughs of Bridport, Dorchester, Poole,
and the oonjoint borough of Weymouth and Mdoombe Regis,
and 1 each for the boroughs of Lyme Regis, Shaftesbury* and
Warehum.

Polling-places for the County — Dorchester, Wimbonie, Ware-
ham, Beaminster, Sharbonie, Shaftesbury, Blandford, and Che^
silton.

Population, kc, (in 1821) inhabited houses 35,926 ; famiUes
30,312; comprising 68,954 males, and 75,565 females; total
144,499: (in 1831) total 159,252. Estimated increase of inha-
bitanto, from 1700 to 1821, 57.400. Assessment for poor
and county rates (in 1826) Isnd 74,811/. 8s.; dwelling-houses
17,169/. I2s. ; miUs, factories &c. 750/. 2». ; manorial profits, &c
914/. 6s,', total 93,645/. 8i. : (in 1830) total 104,822/.



From the mild temperature of its atmosphere and fertility of its soil, this county has been called the garden
of England. Its general appearance is uneven, and in some parts very hilly ; but its most striking features are
the wide open downs, on which are fed numerous flocks of sheep. These downs form the western extremity of
the great range of chalk-hills, which stretches across the island. The chief products of Dorset are corn, espe-
cially barley, flax, hemp, timber, cattle, sheep, and wool. The district called the Isle of Purbeck contains
numerous quarries of excellent building stone, and the Isle of Portland is noted for the abundance which it
furnishes of a similar material. The principal manufactures of this county are those of flax and hemp, chiefly in
the neighbourhood of Bridport ; and silk-spinning, weaving coarse woollen cloths, making sail-cloth, ropes, and
other articles for the fisheries, are among the branches of industry here prosecuted. Dorsetshire has long been
noted for its ale. The most remarkable hills are those of Pilsdon and Lewesdon, in the westerU part of the
county ; Eggerdon, near W in terbome Abbas ; and St. Alban*s, or St. Aldelm's Head, on the coast south of Ck)rfe
Castle ; Bull Barrow Beacon, Dumpdon Hill, Nine Barrow Down, and Wingreen Hill. Chideock Hill, near
Charmouth ; Corfe Castle ; Mambury, near Dorchester ; Lullworth, and Shaftesbury, are places aflPording varied
and extensive prospects. The principal rivers are the Frome, the Stour, the Piddle, the Ivel, and the Hooke or
Owke At Nottington, near Weymouth, is a sulphureous mineral spring, the waters of which contain a con-
siderable proportion of alkaline salt ; and there are others of a similar nature at Sherford, Morden, and Sher-
borne, a saline spring at Chilcombe ; and petrifying springs at Sherborne, and at Bothenwood, near Wimborne.

Among the natural curiosities of this county may be mentioned the Chesil Bank, or isthmus, which joins the
Isle of Portland to the other part of the county, and which consists of a ridge of sand and gravel, seventeen miles



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in length, said to be the longest in Europe, except that of Memel in Polish Prassia ; and on the sea-side, near
Lyme Regis, were discovered a few years ago carious fossil bones of extinct species of animals, supposed to
have been gigantic creatures of the lizard kind, and to which geologists have given the names of Icthyosaurus*
and Plesiosaurus. Specimens of these antediluvian relics are preserved in the British Museum.

The earliest known inhabitants of this county were called by the Romans, Durotriges, which probably signifies
dwellers by the water, or inhabitants of the sea-coast. Under the Roman government, Dorsetshire was included
in the province called Britannia Prima ; it was intersected by the Iknield Street, and contained the stations of
Vindogladia, supposed by some to have been at Gussage St. Michael, and by others at Wimbome Minster ;
Dumovaria, Dorchester, and perhaps some others. There are in different parts of the county barrows, stone
pillars, and other antique remains, supposed to have been of British origin. Near Dorchester are the interesting
vestiges of a Roman amphitheatre ; and in a valley, between Maiden Newton and Frampton, near the river
Frome, a fine tesselated pavement was discovered, in April, 1794. During the Heptarchy this county belonged
to the kingdom of Wessex ; and in the beginning of the eleventh century it was devastated by the Danes, under
their king Sweyn, who destroyed the towns of Dorchester, Sherborne, and Shaftesbury. Throughout the civil
war, under Charles I., Lyme and Poole were garrisoned for the parliament, and Corfe Castle, and other for-
tresses for the king ; and the siege of Corfe, with its defence by Lady Bankes, the wife of Sir John Bankes, chief
justice of the Common Pleas, was one of the most memorable events in the history of that period. In 1685
the Duke of Monmouth landed at Lyme, on his ill-concerted expedition for the invasion of the kingdom ; and
which terminated in his capture in the parish of Horton in this county, after his defeat at Sedgemoor. Within
this county were several baronial castles, of which there are still some remains, as those of Corfe, Brownsea,
Portland, and Sherborne. Among the conventual establishments in Dorsetshire may be mentioned the nunnery
of Shaftesbury, founded in the eighth century ; that of Wimbome, which was destroyed by the Danes in the
tenth century, and refounded as a convent of slecular canons ; the Benedictine abbey of Sherborne ; Ceme
Abbey, Milton Abbey, Cranbome Benedictine abbey, and those of Abbotsbury and Bindon, which were the
most important ; and of most of them there are some remains.

The principal noblemen's and gentlemen's seats in this county are Milton Abbey, belonging to Lady Caroline
Damer ; Brianston House, to £. Berkeley Portman, Esq. ; Wimbome St. Giles, to the Earl of Shaftesbury ;
Eastbury Park, to the Duke of Buckingham ; LuUworth Castle, to Cardinal Weld ; Kingston House, to W.


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Online LibrarySidney HallA new British atlas: comprising a series of 54 maps, constructed from the ... → online text (page 4 of 20)