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Solomon Clark.

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Joseph, Cornet,



122, 143
372
226
373

130, 190
189

132, 335

235

244

146

190

372

190

132, 142, 335

257

161

142

131

249

373

16

131

104

J 140, 167

( 187



Joseph, Esq. 68,122,130,187

Joseph B., Col., 137

Joseph, Rev., 47. 129. 205

Joseph C, 336

Joseph Clark, 68

Joseph, 3d, 188

Joseph, 4th, 189

Joseph, 5th, 189

John, 49

John, Jr., ia2

John R., Maj., 336

John, Lieut., 129, 159, 201

Jonathan, 132

Josiah, 140, 189

Josiah, Jr., 142



Justus, 117, 256

Levi, Rev., 335

Levi, Jr., Rev., 336

Lewis, 117

Lewis, Mrs., 2x?6

Lucy, 152, 163

Medad, 190
Moses, 1-32, 205. 249

Myra, 372

Naomi, 143
Noah, Sr., 116, 116. 168, 189

Noah. Jr., 117, 226

Oliver, 130

Phineas, 131

Rhoda, 130

Samuel, Capt., 131, 132

Samuel, 141

Samuel L., 132

Sarah, 132

Sarah Ann, 256

Sarah L., 372

Simeon, 190

Simeon, Jr., 190

Smith, 138

Spencer. Mrs., 161

Theodore, Mrs., 138

Thomas, 189

Timothy, 117

William, Maj., 129

Warham, 190

PARTRIDGE.

Betsey, 374

Colonel, 121, 170

Hannah, 71



Mrs.,



PEASE.



PECK.



138



Gustavus D., Dr., 336

PELTON.
Betsey, 197

PENNY.



Joseph, Rer.,

PHELPS.

Charles,
Ebenezer,
Ebenezer S., Dea.,
Henry L. ,
Martin. Dr.,
Moses Stuart,

Nathaniel, Dea., <

Nathaniel, Lieut.,

Rachel,

Solomon,

Sylvanus,

Timothy,

William,

PHOENIX.

Alexander, Rev., -|

Daniel Sidney,

PICKARD.
Daniel,



336



119
118

119, 270
337
337
337

117, 118

208, 265
119
149
337
136
118

117, 118



229, 231
338
232



338



XII



INDEX.



PIERCE.

Benjamin, Prof.,
Franklin,
James Mills,
John, Rev.,

PIERPONT.
John, Rev.,

PIXLEY.

Martin S.,
Stephen C, Rev.,



223. 338
338
223
227



224



338
250



PLANT.



89,



103,
215.
339,



Alfred,

POMEROY.

Asahel,
Betsey,
Daniel, Maj.,
Daniel, Lieut.,
Ebenezer, Dea., 181,
Ebenezer, Maj., 32, 99,
Gains, 102,

John, Capt.,
Jonathan Law,
Josiah, Ensign,
Lemuel,

Medad, Dea., -j ^^

Medad, Dr.,

Mehitable,

Moses,

Pliny,

Polly,

Quartus,

Samuel, Rev.,

Seth, Gen.,

Seth, Rev.,

Simeon,

Thaddeus,

Thankful,

Thomas, Col.,

Thomas M.,

William,

PORTER.

Samuel,
Samuel, Dr.

PRATT.

Grotius,
William O.

PRENTISS.
Henry C,

PRINCE.

William H.,

PRINCELY.

Phillip,

QUIRK.
Anna M.

RAYNOR.
Charlotte W.



339



102
227
162
102
266
102
229
102
101
102
101
176
264
101
120

51
101
101
223
339

54
339

50
339

69
101

52
101



141
143



197
340



REEVE.



Judge,



340
340
209
373
372
222



RICHARDS.

James, Rev. 230

William, Rev. 230

William, Jr., Rev. 230

ROBERTS.
O. 0., Dr. 340

ROGERS.
Ebenezer P., Rev. 340

ROOD.
David, Mrs. 250

ROOT.

Ebenezer, 341

Elihu, Lieut. 51

Jesse, Hon. 74, 341

Oliver, 91

RUSSELL.
Jerusha, 149

RUST.
Nathaniel, 131

SALISBURY.

Arethusa, 253

SAMPSON.
William H. 341

SANFORD.

Addison, 229

James, Rev. 228

James, Mrs. 228

John, Rev. 228

John E., Hon. 229

SAWYER,
Eleanor F. 373

SEARLE.

John, Rev. 341

SEEGER,

Charles L. , Dr. 341

Edwin, Dr. 342

SEELYE.
L. Clark, Prest. 342

SERGEANT.
Caroline B. 373

SEWARD.
Samuel, 342

SEYMOUR.
Christopher, Dr., 342

SHAW.
Samuel, Dr. 174

SHEEHAN.
J. T., Rev. 342

SHELDON.

Benjamin, Dr. 343

Caleb. 195

Catharine, 226

David S. 343

[Concluded on page 375.]



Ebenezer, 191

Ebenezer, Mrs. 193

Ebenezer, Jr. 193

Ebenezei, Ensign, 193

Edward W. 344

Elias, 193

George, Hon. 192
George,Rev. 195,226,238,343

George W. 343

Hannah. Ill

Henry Isaac, 343
Isaac, Sr. 178, 191, 204

Isaac, Jr., 192

Isaac, 3d, 195

Jerusha, 222

John, 135

John, Ensign, 192
Marv, 114, 135

Miriam, 147

Sarah, 141

Silence, 220

Thankful. 178

Theodore, 195

Theodore, 344

Thomas, 265

SHEPHERD.



Charles,
Levi, Dr.
Levi. Mrs.
Stella,
Thomas,



193, 344

88, 193, 234

193

234

193



SILSBEE.

Joseph L. 344

William, Rev. 252, 344

SILSBY.

John, Prof. 247

SITGREAVES.
Samuel, Rev. 232

SKILTON.

Ida, 373

SLOANE.



Jonathan, Hon.


344


SMEAD.




William,


128


SMITH.




Albert, Rev.


237


Alvah,


115


Arthur H., Rev.,


237


Benjamin Eli,


242


Charles,


146


Charles P.,


345


Charles Henry,


242


Eli, Rev.


195, 226


Eli, Rev., D. D.


242


Edward R.


242


Henry B., Prof.


240


Henry G.


345


Hermon,


163


Horace,


345


James,


162


Jonathan,


257


Justin,


115


Lewis,


146


Mary,


257


Milo,


146



ANTIQUITIES AND HISTORICALS.



CHAPTER I.

EARLY TIMES IN NORTHAxMPTON.

Being the first, so-called, in the United States, a few
words in commencing as to the origin of its name. !S ap-
posed to be taken from the native town, Northampton, in
England, of one of the prominent settlers, Capt. John King,
a man of intelligence and worth, himself and family held in
high repute among the people. Master King, long a noted
school teacher, a hundred years ago, more or less, was a de-
scendant. So, also, was Experience King, wife of Ool. Tim-
othy D wight, the mother of Major Timothy, the trader, se-
lectman, town recorder, etc., six feet and four inches high.
Such was the origin of the name, Northampton. If not
given by Capt. King himself, it was done by the settlers out
of respect to him.

Pass to the topic of Northampton roads in early times.
In tills matter, ^*old things have passed away." For the
first ten years, from 165-4 till the spring of 1GG4, there
seems not to have been a road of any description. Only a
horse path from the south, entered the settlement, and a
similar one from Hadley. At length a communication with



14 AN^TIQUITIES AND HISTORICALS.

the outside world, and especially with the metropolis, at
Boston, seemed necessary, the first road was laid to Windsor,
Ct., in 1664. Over this track, wheat was conveyed in carts
and rudely constructed wagons, to Hartford, and there ship-
ped for Boston for the payment of taxes. A road to Had-
ley about the same time, connected that place with North-
ampton, Springfield, Hartford and Boston. What we call
streets, such as King, Pleasant, Market, Hawley, nothing of
the kind, strictly speaking, existed for many years. Only
foot paths led from house to house. The foregoing prepares
the way for what may be said respecting the mode of travel-
ing and of riding, then in practice. Without roads, for the
most part there was little occasion for pleasure carriages,
wagons, sleighs, and the like. Not till the first hundred
years closed was there seen a i:)leasure vehicle in the town.
Mr. Nathaniel D wight, a trader and farmer, who originated
in Dedham and settled in this town in 1695, was the first
owner of what was called a sleigh, having plank runners.
The common mode of riding and journeying, was on horse-
back. Thus people rode to church, husbands and wives on
the same horse. Easthampton people, for a long period,
previous to 1785, came to church at Northampton on horse-
back. The young people walked to meeting. Southampton
people did the same, previous to 1737. Mr. Edwards, the
minister, performed all his journeys to New Haven, Boston,
and once in 1747 to Portsmouth, N. H., on horseback.
Frequently some member of the family accompanied him on
the same horse. There is a tradition in the family of some
of the Strongs, that when their ancestor, Eev. John Hooker,
fourth minister of Northampton, was married, viz.: at
Springfield, 1755, at Ool. Worthington's house, the bride,
Sarah Wortliington, a sister of the Colonel, rode from S])ring-



EARLY TIMES IN NORTHAMPTON. 15

field to her new home at Northampton, on horseback, ac-
cording to the etiquette of that period, on a pillion behind
one of Mr. Hooker's deacons. What another has said will
give us some idea of the slow progress of this mode of
traveling in those times. "It was a week's journey for a
man and a horse to go to Boston; the path was distinguish-
able by marks cut upon the trees through the long stretch
of forest between the two places." How changed since then!
Now, in the early part of the month of July, the journey
down and back can be performed on the same day between
the rising and setting of the sun.

Instead of a few lines, an extended chapter might be given
respecting the Indians in the vicinity of Northampton at the
time under consideration. In Windsor, Ct., in 1670, thirty-
five years after its first settlement, there were nineteen In-
dians to one white person. The long continued precautions
in Northampton for nearly ninety years, show the danger ap-
2n*ehended from this quarter. Agriculture was confined to
the soil not far from home. No field could be cleared, no
labor done with safety, even in the nearest forested grounds.
"The unfortunate laborer Avas sometimes shot where he sup-
2:)0sed an Indian enemy would never venture." The Hon.
John Stoddard, sometimes called Col. Stoddard, once came
near being killed by an ambush of savages who lay in wait
for him at a farm, Avhich he had, only one mile west of the
center. One of his laborers was killed, but he with the rest
escaped.

Omitting other points, that of the fashions for instance,
a few words about the wearing apparel of the people. The
few traders in the community dealt very sparingly, if at all,
in what may be called dress goods. Cloths for the men and
women were of home manufacture. Somewhat coarse, but



16 ANTIQUITIES AND HISTORICALS.

substantial, often lasting a numljcr of years. Quite a cnri-
osity, a few years since, was an old Northampton account
book of one of the leading store-keepers, previous to 1760,
and afterward, showing among other things that the most
common business of the establishment consisted in selling-
nails and the like for building purposes; buttons, lining,
twist, silk for garments. The gowns of females of home
manufacture seemed not so important as other things they
wore. Bonnets not being used, nothing was sold belonging
to the head, and very little for the feet. The ladies did
their own knitting, thoroughly, of course. Trimmings for
garments met with an extensive sale. Felt hats w^ere com-
mon with the men.

Not out of place, an item or two respecting an article now
so often seen, viz: Tobacco. Its use commenced compara-
tively early in the history of the community. Probably not
kept and sold at first by traders. Farmers raised it in lim-
ited quantities, not for the market, but for individual or
home use. Very strict rules, however, held the people as to
the use of the article publicly. Take the following, at
Springfield, June 29th, 1649: Hugh Parsons was fined ten
shillings for taking tobacco in the open street. Probably
the ladies would hold up both hands in favor of such a law
and its enforcement at the present day. At another date of
the same year, James Bridgman of Springfield, was fined for
taking tobacco in his own yard.

It is an easy transition from tobacco to tea. The first
ever seen in Northampton, was sent to Col. Dwight by a
friend in Boston, and was not called tea, but '^bohea." It
was previous to 1746. In their ignorance of the article, the
family steeped it — a quarter of a pound — all up at once, as
they would make an herb drink. It was so bitter they
could not drink it, and threw it away in disgust.



EARLY TIMES IN NORTHAMPTOl^. 17

The following may interest some: The only painted houses
in Northampton, as late as 1781, were the Dwight House,
John Hunt's, Caleb Strong's, Timothy Mather's, and Dea.
Ebenezer Hunt's, all gambrel roofs. It may seem a small
matter to insert the next item, but it will be new to many.
It was at one time a disputed point among some of the
Northampton circles, whether the first Dr. Hunt's wife or
Mrs. Benjamin Tappan was the first one in town that had a
carpet on her floor. But passing matters of this kind.

Before closing, three particulars will be added, specially
commendatory of those early times, or rather of the people
who then lived. The first respects the subject of litigation.
The town was remarkably free from this j^ractice. Col. Tim-
othy Dwight used to boast that in eighteen years of his life,
in which he was in full practice as a lawyer, not a single
suit was commenced against any one of the inliabitants. It
has also been said, though it may not be true, that before
the revolutionary war no inhabitant of the town sued another
for debt. The second relates to the early action of the first
settlers in the matter of a public school. A deeply interest-
ing chapter. It shows the value they attached to learning;
their sacrifices to promote it. Notice the following dates,
bearing in mind how few and in what straightened circum-
stances the people were. Had a different policy prevailed,
never would the history of the town have been what it has.
In 1663 they employed a school-master at six pounds and the
benefit of the scholars. That is, he received the whole
price of the tuition and six pounds sterling as an additional
sum paid by the town. In 1670, when incurring extra ex-
penses for various purposes, they appropriated 100 acres of
land for the use of the school, also thirty pounds per annum
to a schoolmaster, able and fit to teach children to read and



18 ANTIQUITIES AND HISTOEICALS.

write English, to keep and cast accounts. Increased appro-
priations followed from time to time, in 1G87, 1703, 1712,
1725. Showing the same enlightened views from one genera-
tion to another. Thus from the earliest times, whatever
the burdens, incident to their situation, pressing upon the
people, the grammar school, so-called, with scarce any inter-
mission, was a cherished institution.

The third respects the maintenance of, and punctual at-
tendance of the people on the public institutions of religion.
Dating from the first settlement, for one hundred and thirty
years, no place in New England exhibited a greater regard
for the sanctuary. Fourteen hundred and sixty ])ersons were
once counted in the church on a Sabbath afternoon, amount-
ing to five-sixths of the inhabitants. The usual proportion
from 1654 to 1784. Five out of six, eighty out of ninety-
six, of the people attended church regularly. Only little
children, the sick, the extremely aged, and those in atten-
dance on the sick were absent from the house of God on the
Sabbath. Please notice and think of this remarkable fact.
So it was less than one hundred years ago. So it had been
in the town from the beginning. No wonder intelligence,
good order, respect for the laws, harmony and good neigh-
borhood prevailed. No wonder the place never suffered very
severely from the Indians, though it suffered some. Again
and again the savages prowled around it, but it was never
destroyed. Why? "Them that honor me I will honor."



CHAPTER 11.

ESTHER WARHAM MATHER — NORTHAMPTON^'S FIRST MIKISTER'S
WIFE— A RESIDEIfT SEVEKTY-SEVEN" YEARS. — HER REMARK-
ABLE LETTER.

Historically and providentially a remarkable woman. Next
to Elder John Strong, the ancestor of the Strong family of
the United States, may be placed the above; her name on
the town records of Windsor, Ct., being written Hester
Warham. Notice a few particulars. The first respects the
date of her birth, ten years before any settlement existed in
the valley of the Connecticut, north of Springfield, and only
a short period after the first colony from Dorchester reached
the inviting soil, skirting the Connecticut at Windsor. Early
on the list of births stands her name, in that infant province
of which Wethersfield, Hartford, and Windsor were the chief
localities. Including that at New Haven, just coming into
being, but a few hundred people then comprised the white
population of her native state. The second relates to her
marriage and settlement in Northampton, ever after, for al-
most eighty years, her home. A copy of the record at
Windsor, made by Matthew Grant, a long time ago, and
found among his joapers, x3arefully ^ireserved, says: Eleazar
Mather and Hester Warham were married Sept. 29, 1G59.
Near the same time another, already named, left Windsor
with his family for Northampton, viz., Elder John Strong.



20 ANTIQUITIES AKD HISTORICALS.

A valuable accession to the forty or more settlers here, these
two families proved, whose wonderful career had then just
C(?mmenced. It was truly a time of small things. No
church organization existed; a plain structure, twenty-six
feet long, eighteen wide with one door and two windows, hav-
ing a thatched roof, received the people on the Sabbath for
religious worship. Only at and near the center did the set-
tlers live, viz., on Pleasant, King, Hawley, and Market
streets. Tradition says that Mr. Mather's home lot bordered
on Main street, now occupied by Shop Eow. All told, the
population did not much exceed, perhaps it fell below, two
hundred. Across the river at Hadley, then called Newtown,
the first steps were being taken preparatory to settlement.
North as far as Canada, and West nearly to Albany, lay a
vast, unbroken wilderness. The third, respects the long pe-
riod of her connection with the Northampton church through
her two husbands, Mr. Mather and Mr. Stoddard, and her
grandson, and two other pastors in the direct line of her de-
scendants, extending, as the figures will show, over a space
of more than one hundred and fifty years. With her first
husband she lived about ten years until July 24, 1669. Five
years afterward she married his successor. Rev. Mr. Stoddard,
with whom she lived till his death, February, 1729, fifty-five
years. Jonathan Edwards, her grandson, followed Mr. Stod-
dard, his pastorate covering an interval of twenty-three
years. The fifth pastor. Rev. Solomon Williams, her great-
great-grandson, was settled fifty-six years. Taking no note
of another descendant, colleague for two years of the pre-
ceding, viz.. Rev. Samuel P. Williams, afterwards at New-
buryport, one more remains. Rev. William S. Leavitt, grand-
son of Rev. Solomon Williams, and therefore in the seventh
generation from Mrs. Mather, afterward Mrs. Stoddard. Add



ESTHER WARHAM MATHER. 21

to the above ten, fifty-five, twenty-tliree, fifty-six, fourteen for
Mr. Leavitt, Ave have one hundred and fifty-eight years, the
period, so to speak, of her connection, through these differ-
ent pastors, husbands and descendants, with the First church.
In the foregoing, nothing has been said of the twelve years
of widowhood, five after Mr. Mather's decease and seven af-
ter Mr. Stoddard's. Surely, it may be said, ^' Being dead
she yet sj^eaketh." The fourth, respects the number of in-
fluential families in the ever increasing, widening circle of
her posterity. She was the honored mother of thirteen chil-
dren who grew uj) to manhood and womanhood, three by
Mr. Mather and ten by Mr. Stoddard. What seems remark-
able, these thirteen were respectably settled in life,* having
families of their own, making the number of her children,
sons and daughters-in-law, twenty-six. These thirteen fami-
lies, walking in the steps of their godly parents, reared,
nearly all of them, sons and daughters, often a large house-
hold. There will not be time to particularize on this point.
They lived, one in Deerfield, nine children; one at East
Windsor, Ct., eleven children; one at Woodbury, Ct., eleven
children; one at Wethersfield, Ct., one at Hatfield, one at
Farmington, Ct., each having several children, two or three
in ISTorthampton, others elsewhere. One of the Northampton
families, the distinguished Col. John Stoddard, the civilian,
numbered six or more children. Such were the thirteen
families. How many times thirteen have been formed by
the third, the fourth, and succeeding generations down to the
present, who can tell? They reside in ^N'ew England, in the
Middle States, at the West, and South, in the Old World,
in the far distant East. If asked for the names of the fam-
ilies, with the writer's limited means, it would be impossible

to give but a few, such as the following: The W^illiams
2



22 ANTIQUITIES AND HISTORICALS.

stock, two distinct races, very numerous. A part of the Ed-
wards race, quite large. So of the Stoddard, the Hooker,
the Dwight, the Strong, Porter, Parsons, Backus, Hopkins,
Woodbridge, Park, Hawley, Sheldon families. But not to
dwell. Passing from families, the fifth particular respects
educated individuals, lawyers, judges, statesmen, ministers,
missionaries, physicians, editors, scholars, professors, authors,
poets and the like, able to trace their ancestry and origin
back to this eminent woman. Their voices are heard in the
pulpit, at the bar, on the bench, in various seats of learning,
in professional institutions, in legislative bodies, in the halls
of Congress, in the chair of state, and, it may be, in the
ca])inet of the nation. Their acquisitions enrich the secular
and religious press. The long list of the educated furnished
by the Williams and the other races enumerated, if accurate-
ly and fully prepared, would comprise but a part of the
whole. The writer recalls seven Mathers of Northampton,
mostly of the last century, professional men, one excepted,
who died soon after leaving college, descendants of Esther
Mather Stoddard. These five particulars, therefore, sustain
the statement at the commencement, viz: Historically and
providentially a remarkable Avoman. But these are not all.
Fully explained, that fearful chapter of harrowing details,
occurring only a few miles above Northampton, at Deerfield,
in the winter of 1704, would show her intimate relation to
some of the principal sufferers in that tragedy. But not to
recall and recount the painful story. A fitting close, not
only of the foregoing particulars, but of her earthly history,
is found in the next illustration. She was remarkable in re-
spect to what immediately preceded her departure. Had it
been put to her option, she could have desired nothing bet-
ter. The year 1735, that part included in the spring and



ESTHER WARHAM MATHER. 23

summer months, was a favored one to that community, prob-
ably beyond any previous or subsequent one. The popuhition
numbered eleven hundred. Three hundred of the above were
brought, scripturally speaking, ^^out of darkness into marvel-
lous light." It was emphatically a year of Jubilee to the
entire people. The joyful news went over the water to Eng-
land, Scotland, and elsewhere. A spectator of these memor-
able scenes, imagine the feelings of this venerable woman in
her ninety-second or third year. The call comes from the
Master to go up higher. Reviewing the past seventy-seven
years, contrasting Northampton as she first saw it in 1659,
with its condition in 1736; the church numbering over six
hundred members, perhaps the largest in New England,
would it be strange if the language of aged Simeon fell from
her lips, " Lord, now lettest thou thy servant dej^art in
peace, for mine eyes have seen thy salvation!"

Very valuable the following letter, written by this eminent
woman 178 years ago, to her daughter, Mrs. Esther Edwards
at East Windsor, Ot., after the birth of her son, the re-
nowned Jonathan. For it the public are indebted to Rev.
H. 0. Hovey, formerly of Florence, Mass., now of New
Haven:

Northampton, Dec. 7th, 1703.

Dear Daughter : — God be thanked for your safe delivery and
raising you up to health again. We are under mixt dispen-
sations. We have a great deal of mercy, and we have smart
afflictions. Eliakim is not and Eunice is not, and it hath
pleased God to take away your dear brother Israel also, who
was taken by ye enemy and carried to a place called Brest,
in France, and being ready to be transported into England
was taken sick of a fever and died there, as we understand



24 ANTIQUITIES AND HISTOEICALS.

by a letter from the crew's master of the ship now in Lon-
don. It is a heavy stroak to us added to ye former, and Ave,
David-like, mourn every day. I had not done mourning for
ye former, but God hath added grief to my sorrow. What
shall I say! It l^ecomes me, Aaron-like, to hold my peace.
God grant that I may, with Job, come as gold out of the
fire, when I have been tried. I hoj^e you and ye rest of my
children will learn by these awful stroaks so to number your
days as to apply your hearts to wisdom. We see by these
instances that our days may be very few here, and when and
how we shall be taken out of this world, God only knows.
Therefore we had need to be ready, seeing we know not what
hour our Lord will come. Ye time is short, and it may be
very short to us that remains as was to your sister and
brother. One day made a great change in my dear daugh-



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