Copyright
Solomon Lincoln.

History of the town of Hingham, Plymouth County, Massachusetts online

. (page 13 of 14)
Online LibrarySolomon LincolnHistory of the town of Hingham, Plymouth County, Massachusetts → online text (page 13 of 14)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


aforesayd Wompatuck called by the English Josiah sachem : and
Squmuck called by the English Daniell and Ahahdun Indians :
have hcere unto set our hands and seales the fourth day of July iu
the yeare of our Lord God one thousand six hundred sixty and five
and in the seaventeenth yearc of the raigne of our soveraigne Lord
Charles the second by the grace of God of Great Brittanie France
and Ireland King defender of the faith &c 1665 _ _ _
Signed sealled and delivered
In the the presence of us :

Job Noesliteans Indian ~| the markc JO of (l.s.) Wom-

the marke of V/ william Man- [ patuck called by the English

ananianut Indian Josiah cheif sachem

the markeof 8 Robert Mamun- '^the marke J| ofSqumuck (l.s.)

called bv the English Daniell
Sonne of Chickatabut
the marke ^^ of Ahahden
(L.s.)



1-



tahorin Indian
John Hues
Mattias Q Briggs
the marke of p Job Judkins

Josiah Wompatuck Squmuck Ahahdtn Indians apeared p'sonal-
ly the 19th of may 1668 and acknowledged this instrum't of
writing to be theyr act and deed freely and voluntary without com-
pulsion, acknowledged before JNO. LEVERETT, Ast.

<]C|=The above copy of the Indian Deed of the Township of Hing-
ham, is printed literally and verbally, from the original.



REPRESENTATIVES.

Supposing that a correct list of representatives of this town, in the
General Court, &c. from 1636 to the present time might not be un-
interesting, I have prepared the following list. James Savage, Esq,
politely furnished that portion of it which extends from May 1636
to 1666. In a few cases the delegates were not inhabitants of
Hingham, as Blackleach, in 1636, Houchin, in 1651, &c., Savage,
in 1663.



APPENDIX.



163



At the sixth Court,

25 May, 1636, Mr. Blackleach, Joseph Andrews, Nicholas Baker.
8 Sept. " Joseph Andrews.

7 Dec. " none

18 April 37, Joseph Andrews, Anthony Fames.

17 May, '= Joseph Andrews, Anthony Eames.

26 Sept. " Joseph Andrews, Anthony Eames.
2 Nov. " Samuel Warde.

12 March, " Samuel Warde, Anthony Eames.
2 May, 38, Joseph Andrews, Nicholas Baker.

6 Sept. " Mr. Joseph Hull, Anthony Eames.

13 March, " Mr. Joseph Hull, Anthony Earnes.
22 May, 39, Mr. Joseph Peck, Edmund Hobart.

4 Sept. " Mr. Joseph Peck, Edmund Hobart.

13 May, 40, Mr. Joseph Peck, Mr. James Bates.

7 Oct. " Mr. Joseph Peck, Edmund Hobart.
2 June, 41, Mr. Joseph Peck, Henry Smyth.

8 Oct. " Mr. Joseph Peck, Stephen Paine.

The deputies at the General Court from Oct. 1641 to Sept. 1642
do not appear in the Records, as there is a slight failure in the be-
ginning of Vol. n.

8 Sept. 1642, Mr. Joseph Peck, Edmund Hobart.
10 May. 43, Bozoan Allen, Joshua Hobart.

7 March, " Anthony Eames, Joshua Hobart.

29 May, 44, Bozoan Allen, John Porter.

14 " 45, Bozoan Allen, Joshua Hobart.

6 " 46, Bozoan Allen, Joshua Hobart.

26 " 47, Bozoan Allen, Joshua Hobart.

10 " 48, Nicholas Jacob, Thomas Underwood.

2 " 49, Nicholas Jacob, John Beale.

22 " 50, Bozoan Allen, Joshua Hobart.

7 " 51, Bozoan Allen, Jeremiah Houchin.*

27 " 52, Bozoan Allen, Jeremiah Houchin.
18 " 53, Joshua Hobart, Jeremiah Houchin.

* Jeremiah Houchin, was a citizen of Boston, and sometimes a
selectman of the town: — " Jeremy Houchin, who was a tanner by
trade, was located at the corner of Hanover and Court streets
(Concert Hall) and had his tan-pits and tan-yards there." — Sno^r's
History of Boston.



t64 APPENDIX,

3 May, 1G54, Joshua Hobart, Jeremiah Houchin.
23 " 55, Jeremiah Houchin, alone.

1-1 " 56, Joshua Hobart, John Leavitt.

6 " 57, Jeremiah Houchin, alone.

19 " 58, Joshua Hobarf, Jeremiah Houchin.

11 " 59, 1st Session, Hobart & Houchin, 2d do. Hobart,

John Beale.
30 " 60, Joshua Hobart, alone.

At the important court called Dec. 19, 1660, Hingham was not
represented, nor 22 May, 1661.

7 May, 1662, Joshua Hobart.

27 " 63, Thomas Savage, Joshua Hobart

18 " 64, John Leavitt, alone.

3 " 65, Joshua Hobart, alone.

23 " 66, John Thaxter, alone.

The remainder of this list is from the Town Records, with the
dates of the election of the members. By those records Joshua
Hobart and John Thaxter appear to have been deputies in Sep-
tember 1666.
3 May, 1.669, Joshua Hobart,
10 March, 69-70, Joshua Hobart.

Joshua Hobart.

Joshua Hobart.

Joshua Hobart.

Joshua Hobart.

Nathaniel Beale,

Thomas Andrews.

Joshua Hobart.

Daniel Gushing, Sen.

Joshua Hobart,

Daniel Gushing, Sen.

Nathaniel Beal.

John Smith.*

John Smith.

John Smith.

John Smith.

* Jolm Smith Avas an Assistant in 1686, He died Mav 169=%



10 "


70-1,


11 «'


72-3,


6 May,


74,


12 March,


74-5,


2 April,


77,


1


78,


5 May,


79,


22 March,


79-80


23 April,


8J,


1 May,


82,


9 ''


83,


Nov.


83,


11 March,


S3-4,


10 '•


84-5,


9 '•'


85-6,



APPENDIX. i6'5

17 May, 1689, Thomas Andrews and Daniel Cusliing, Sen. were
chosen to represent the town in the Council of Safety. Mr. Gush-
ing did not accept the appointment.

4 June, 1689, Thomas Andrews was elected to represent the
town in the Council of Safety.

14 March, 1690-1, Nathaniel Beal.

I June, 92, Jeremiah Beal, David Hobarf.

18 Sept. 93, Nathaniel Beal.
13 Oct. 93, Nathaniel Beal.
11 April, 94, John Smith.

6 May, 95, Daniel Cushing, Sen.

7 <« 96, David Hobart.

5 " 97, Samuel Thaxter, Jr.
9 " 98, Wilham Hersey.

5 " 99, William Hersey. ^

7 " 1700, Joshua Beal.

13 " 01, Jeremiah Beal.

22 '•' 02, Theophilus Cushing.

3 March, 02-3, Theophilus Cushing.

28 April, 03, Theophilus Cushing.

8 May, 04, Theophilus Cushing.

28 April, 05, Josiah Leavitt.

6 June, " Samuel Eelles.
1 May, 06, Samuel Eelles.

1 •' 07, Theophilus Cushing.
6 " 08, Samuel Thaxter.

27 April, 09, Samuel Thaxter.
10 May, 10, Samuel Thaxter.

II " 11, Samuel Thaxter.

12 " 12, Samuel Thaxter.

14 " 13, Theophilus Cushing.
3 " 14, Samuel Thaxter.

After the accession of George I., Gov. Dudley dissolved the
Court, and issued precepts for new elections.

24 Nov. 1714, Samuel Thaxter, re-elected for the five follow-
ing years.

2 June, 19, I^azarus Beal.

29 April, 20, Lazarus Beal.

13 June. " Lazarus Beal.

15*



166 APPENDIX,

Nathaniel Hobart.

Thomas Loring.

Thomas Loiino-.

Tiiomas Loring.

Thomas Loring.

Thomas Loring.

John Jacob, re-elected for the seven years
following.

James Hearsey.

James Hearsey.

James Hearsey.

Jacob Gushing.*

Jacob Gushing.

Jacob Gushing.

Jacob Gushing.

John Jacob.

Thomas Gill.

Thomas Gill.

Thomas Gill.

Jacob Gushing, " in room of Thomas Gill, Esq-.
who is gone into his Majesty's service." — Town Records.
13 May, 1745, Jacob Gushing.
12 " 46, Benjamin Lincoln.

18 " 47, Benjamin Lincoln.

12 " 48, Benjamin Lincoln.

50 " 49, Jacob Gushing, re-elected for the eight follow-

ing years.
25 *' 58, Joshua Hearsey, re-elected for the thirteen

following years.

18 " 72, John Thaxter.

19 " 73, Benjamin Lincoln.
18 " 74, Benjamin Lincoln.

21 Sept. " Benjamin Lincoln, to the Gourt to be held at

Salem.
21 Sept. 74,. Benjamin Lincoln, chosen to represent the

town in the Provincial Gongress to be held at Goncord.

* Jacob Gushiag, Esq. a respectable magistrate of this towK-.
died in 1777, aged 82.





1721,


3 Aug.


li


11 May,


22,


26 April,


23,


1 May,


24,


3 "


25,


9 "


26,


13 "


34,


19 "


35,


17 «'


36,


9 «


37,


17 '■'


38,


14 "


39,


14 "


40,


13 "


41,


17 "


42,


9 "


43,


14 "


44,


20 Aug.


<e



APPENDIX. 167

26 Dec. 1774, Benjamin Lincoln, chosen to represent the town

in the Provincial Congress to be held at Cambridge.
24 May, 75, Benjamin Lincoln., chosen to represent the town

in the Congress at Watertown.
10 July, 75, Benjamin Lincoln, chosen to represent the town

in the General Ccurt to be held at Watertown asreeablv to a

resolve of the Provincial Congress.

16 Aug. 75, Enoch Lincoln, chosen to represent the town in

the General Court then sittinor at Watertown.

23 May, 76, Enoch Lincoln, Theophilus Cushing, and John
Fearing, chosen representatives to the next General Court.

20 May, 77, Enoch Lincoln, chosen representative to the Gen-
eral Court.

18 May, 78, Enoch Lincoln, Joseph Thaxter.

17 " 79, Joseph Tha.xter, Jr. Mr. Thaxter, resigned his
seat, and the vacancy was not filled.

22 May, SO, Charles Cushing.*

UNDER THE CONSTITUTIOX*

9 Oct. 1780, Charles Cushing.

14 May, 81, Charles Cushing.

13 " 82, Theophilus Cushing.f
12 '•' 83, Theophilus Cushing.
10 " 84, Charles Cushing.

9 " 85, Theophilus Cushing.

8 " 86, Theophilus Cushing.

14 " 87, Theophilus Cushing.

5 " 88, Benjamin Lincoln, Theophilus Cushing.

4 " 89, Benjamin Lincoln.

3 " 90, Charles Cushing.

2 " 91, Charles Cushing.

* Col. Charles Cushing was one of the most influential and respect-
able of the wiiigs of tlie Revolution, in this town. He was a gentle-
man of excellent natural abilities, zealous and persevering in v\liat-
ever enjruiied. Ho removed from this town to Lunenburir, in Wor-
cester County, in 1797, where he died, November 25, 1809, aged 65.

t Gen. Theophilus Cushing, died March 11, 1820.



163



APPEXDIX.



3
2
1

6

**
o

4

3

1

7

6



Charles Gushing.
Charles dishing.
Theophilus dishing.
Samuel Norton.
Samuel Norton.
Samuel Norton.
Jacob Leavitt.
Jothani Gay.*
Jotham Gav.

Nathan Rice,! re-elected for the three follow-
ing years.
Nathan Rice, Levi Lincoln.
Hawkes Fearing.
Hawkes Fearing.

Hawkes Fearing, Jonathan Cashing.
Hawkes Fearing, Jonathan Cushing,and Thomas
Fearing. t The same gentlemen were re-elected in 1810 and 11.



7 May,


1792


6 "


93


5 "


94


6 "


9.5


2 "


96


1 "


97


7 "


98


6 "


99


5 "


1800


4 "


01


6 "


05


5 "


06


4 "


07


2 "


OS


1 "


09



'« 12

Lincoln, Jr.
13
14
" 15

" 16

Cushing.



Thomas Fearing, Jonathan Cushing, Jotham

The same as last year.

Thomas Fearing.

Thomas Fearing.

Thomas Fearing, Jedidiah Lincoln, Charles W.



" 17, Thomas Fearing.

" " 18, Jedidiah Lincoln.

'< 19, Jedidiah Lincoln.

" 20, James Stephenson, Solomon Jones.

" 21, James Stephenson, Solomon Jones, Joseph

Richardson. §

" 22 Joseph Richardson.



* Col. Jotham Gay, son of Ebenezer Gay, D. D. He died Octo-
ber 16, 1802.

t Col. Nathan Rice, of the Armvof the Revolution. H. U. 1773.

t Dea. Thomas Fearing died March 16, 1820, aged 70.

§ Mr. Richardson was elected a member of the Senate of this
Commonwealth in 1823, and re-elected in 1824. He was again
elected in 1826 ; and he now represents Plymouth District in the
twentieth Congress.



APPENDIX. 169

3 '« 23, Jedidiah Lincoln, John Leavitt, Isaiah Wilder.

3 , " 24, Isaiah Wilder, Benjamin Thomas.

2 " 25, Benjamin Thomas. Mr. Thomas was re-elected

in 1826 and 1827.
Delegates to the Convention, for revising the Constitution in
1820-1, Joseph Richardson, Jotham Lincoln, Thomas Fearing.*

* Thomas Fearing, Esq. a magistrate, and a very estimable citi-
zen, died March 29, 1827, aged 48.



-***9®%***'



TOVrN CLERKS



For the subjoined list of Town Clerks of Hingham, I ani indebt-
ed to Jotham Lincoln, Esq.

Joseph Andrews, elected in 1637.

Matthew Hawke, died December 11, 1684.

Daniel Cushing, elected Dec. 21, 1669, died Dec. 3, 170O.

James Hawke, elected Dec. 26, 1700, died Nov. 27, 1715.

Stephen Lincoln, elected July 27, 1716, died Dec. 27, 1717.

John Norton, elected Dec. 31,1717, died August 5, 172L

Benjamin Lincoln, elected Aug. 24, 1721, died July 10, 1727.

Benjamin Lincoln, elected July 24, 1727.

Benjamin Lincoln, Jr. elected March 7, 1757.

Benjamin Cushing, elected March 3, 1778, died Aug. 8, 1812.

vSolomon Jones, elected March 10, 1806.

Jotham Lincoln, elected March 10, 1823.

{JCf= Samuel Norton officiated as Clerk jftro tempore, from July
1776, to March, 1778.



no



APPENDIX.



VOTES FOR GOVERSJOUR



Given in Hingham, since the adopt


ion of the Constitution.


The


votes for the two leading candidates


only are given :




17S0


, John Hancock


44,


James Bowdoin


12


81


, John Hancock


36,






82


, John Hancock


41,


James Bowdoin


9


83


, Benjamin Lincoln


31,


John Hancock


7


84


, James Bowdoin


26,


John Hancock


23


85


, Benjamin Lincoln


29,


James Bowdoin


27


86


, James Bowdoia


51,






87


, James Bowdoin


56,


John Hancock


26


88


, John Hancock


72,


James Bowdoin


1


89


, James Bowdoin


60,


Benjamin Lincoln 22


90


, James Bowdoin


39,


John Hancock


7


91


, John Hancock


21,


Thomas Russell


13


92


, Francis Dana


31,


John Hancock


13


93


Elbridge Geny


31,


John Hancock


10


94


William Gushing


95,


Samuel Adams


4


95


, Samuel Adams


36,


William Gushing


35


96


, Increase Sumner


71,


Samuel Adams


16


97


, Increase Sumner


72,


James Sullivan


3


98


, Increase Sumner


95,


James Sullivan


2


99,


Increase Sumner


113,


William Heath


31


1800,


Caleb Strong


76,


Elbridge Gerry


60


01,


Eldridge Gerry


89,


Caleb Strong


74


02.


Elbridge Gerry


97,


Caleb Strong


86


03,


Caleb Strong


102,


Elbridge Gerry


32


04,


Caleb Strong


99,


James Sullivan


60


05,


Caleb Strong


141,


James Sullivan


76


06,


James Sullivan


139,


Caleb Strong


129


07,


James Sullivan


199,


Caleb Strong


135


OS,


James Sullivan


232,


Christopher Gore 140


09,


Levi Lincoln


253,


Christopher Gore


140


10,


Elbridge Gerry


249,


Ckrist04)her Gore


138


11


, Elbridge Gerry


245,


Christopher Gore 138


12


, Elbridge Gerry


245,


Caleb Strong


171







APPENDIX.


13,


Joseph B. Varnum 255,


11,


Samuel Dexter


237,


15,


Samuel Dexter


204,


16,


Samuel Dexter


237,


17,


Henry Dearborn


221,


IS,


B.W. Crowninshie


!ld 193,


19,


B.W, Crowninshie


!ld 223,


20,


William Eustis


208,


21,


William Eustis


292,


22,


William Eustis


^14,


23,


William Eustis


251,


24,


William Eustis


•:90,


25,


Levi Lincoln


245,


26,


Levi Lincoln


245,


27,


Levi Lincoln


212,



171



Caleb Strong 195
Caleb Strong 191
Caleb Strong 171
John Brooks 163
John Brooks 153
John Brooks 144
John Brooks 158
John Brooks 141
John Brooks 146

John Brooks 135
Harrison G. Otis 153
Samuel Lathrop 164
Marcus Morton 16
Samuel Hubbard 39
Harrison G. Otis 19



"^^►^^j|Sy^*<**



FHSDERICK HENH? IBBEKIST.



The subjoined copy of a letter from Dr. Waterhouse to the late
Dr. Barker, of this town, relates to Frederick Henry Ibbekin,
•who resided several years since in this town, and who amused him-
self in constructing machines to enable hirpi to fly. Not succeeding
in his experiments, and his funds being exhausted, he shot himself
February 13, 1796. The letter may afford some interest to those
who knew this unfortunate gentleman :

" Cambridge, Mass. Feb. 23, 1796.

'* Dear Sir — Day before yesterday I received your letter. J
v/aited for more information respecting the unfortunate stranger,
who is the subject of it, or you would have had an answer by the
person who brought it.

" I knew not the name of the gentleman you enquire after, until
I heard he had shot himself at Hingham, and that he had left a let-
ter and some papers directed to rae. All that I know of him I
shall relate.



172 APPENDIX.

'*" About two months since he came to my house alone, and intro-
duced himself with saying that he was a foreigner, and wished an
acquaintance with some scientific man : that he understood I had
travelled much in foreign countries, and for such and such reasons,
which he mentioned, he chose to introduce himself to me in order
to converse on a subject which had long been the object of his con-
templation. The subject was pneumatics and mechanics. On these
branches of science he talked sensibly and learnedly. Sometimes
he spoke in French, sometimes Dutch, and frequently expressed
himself in Latin. But what gave the whole a light and whimsical
air, was its ultimate application ; which was neither more nor less
than FLYING like a bird! i endeavoured to convince him, that
the structure or anatomy of a bird was very different, even in their
bones, from man, and from all animals that do not fly ; and that
amongst other peculiarities, 1 would remind him that there was no
instance in the vast tribe of animated nature, where there was such
an extent of surface, and such strength, united Avith such levity,
as are found in the body of a bird ; and I expatiated on the anato-
my of a quill and of a feather, and of their faculty of filling each
tube with air ; and that I could not believe that any wings could
be contrived, whether like that of a bird's, or like a bat^s, (which
was his favourite notion,) that could raise the human body from
the ground, by merely taking hold of the air. He then said he
would remove my doubts by actual experiment, and took his leave,
with a promise of calling again in three dajs. He came accor-
dingly, and explained himself farther on his favorite scheme. I
listened to him with attention because he seemed to think, in gen-
eral, like a man of sense, and speak like a gentleman. I could
however discern that his Cartesian philosoph}' had not been suffi-
ciently con*ected by later demonstrations.

From his good figure, dress, and address, polite and easy man-
ners, I concluded that he was some unfortunate emigrant from the
Continent of Europe, probably an officer in the service of the mon-
archy, who, destitute of money and friends, chose to apply some
of the principles he had learnt at college, to the purpose of pro-
curing subsistence by a novel exhibition. On this account I never
asked his name or nation.

You ask me, if I suppose he was insane anytime before he com-
mitted that shocking deed ? The writings and drawings which he



APPENDIX. 173

left directed to me, are so far from evincing a deranged mind, that
they indicate a cool and vigorous intellect, being executed not
merely with taste, but mathematical exactness. Nevertheless had
I been on the Jury, I should have given my verdict " insanity ;"
for he shot himself in a pai-oxysm of despair ^ which implies a sus-
pension of reason.

" I have been told that this unfortunate man quitted his home
{Germany,) in consequence of his father insisting that he should
pursue the profession of divinity. I have never heard any thing
against his character ; but have seen some evidences of his human-
ity in giving freedom to his slave, after binding him to a trade by
which he could get his living. On the whole I take him to have
been one of those unfortunate young men, who having seen but
the superficies of life, believed every thing to be what it appears ;
and whose rapid imagination conceived certain e7ids, without pos-
sessing fortune, or patience to pursue the means.

" He expresses himself to the following effect in the melancholy
letter which he left to me : ' All my plans having failed, my
money gone, I resolved to put an end to my life ; hut thought it
my duty to leave to you the description of my machines. My
death ivill make no one U7ihappy, therefore I go with satisfaction
out of this world. Good sir ! live well and contented; — when
you receive this, I shall be in another world, where I expect to
enjoy more happiness than I have experienced in this /'

" With the horror such a deed naturally inspires, we cannot but
mix a portion of commiseration ; especially when we recollect that
the gifts of a vivid imagination bring the heaviest task on the vig-
ilance of reason ; and that such endowments require a degree of
discipline, which seldom attends the higher gifts of the mind ; clearly
proving to us, that nature, without the commanding voice of reli-
gion, has left the noblest of her works imperfect.
" With esteem, &c.

BENJAMIN WATERHOUSE."

To Br. Barker, Hingham.
16



J""4 APPExN'DIX.



SOME ACCOUNT OF THE GTL3IANS, LEAVITTS,

OTISES, &C. &C.

The following is an extract of a letter which I have recently re-
ceived from JoHX Farmer, Esq. of Concord, New-Hampshire.
The information which it contains respecting some of the descend-
ants of the first settlers of Hingham, is too interesting to be with-
held from publication,

" Concord, JV. H. 15 Dec. 1827.

" Our state is nnder considerable obligations for the accession we
received from the early settlers of Hingham. You are probably
aware that the Folsoms, Gilmans and Leavitts, so extensively scat-
tered over New Hampshire, are descended from those of the same
name among the first inhabitants of Hingham. Of the first name,
there were John, Peter, Ephraim and Samuel in Exeter in 1683,
and from these, it is probable. General Nathaniel Folsom, a
meritorious officer in our revolutionary war, a state counsellor in
1776, and a delegate to the old Congress, the late Hon. Simeon
FoLsoM, a senator in our legislature for the second district, and
Hon. John Folsom, late a judge of the court of sessions, are de-
scendants.

" Edward Oilman's descendants are figuratively as numerous as
the sands on the sea shore. There is hardly a state in the union in
"which they may not be found. In 1683, I find there were three
families of the name at Exeter, Edward Oilman, John, sen. and
John, jr., and these in 1739, had multiplied to more than thirty
families of the patronymick name, living in Exeter, besides those
who had emigrated to other towns.

" Twenty-four of the grantees of Gilmanton in this state, a town
granted in 1727, were of the name of Oilman. The faniily have
been in civil office from the time our colony became a royal prov-
ince, in 1680, to the present time. John Oilman was one of the
first counsellors named in President Cutts's commission, and died in
1708. Col. Peter Oilman was one of the royal counsellors in
1772 ; Hon. Nicholas Oilman, a counsellor in 1777 and 1778,
Hon. Joseph Oilman, in 1787 ; while the present venerable John
Taylor Oilman was fourteen years, eleven in succession, our
highly respected Chief Magistrate, his brother Nicholas Oilman,



APPENDIX. 175

a member of the House of Representatives in Congress eight years,
and in the national Senate nine years, and anotlier brother the pres-
ent Nathaniel. Gilman a state senator and state treasurer many
years. Our ecclesiastical annals have also the Rev. Nathaniel.
Oilman, H. C. 1724, and Rev. Tristram Oilman, H. C. 1757,
both respected clergymen and useful men.

" Samuel and Moses Leavitt, sons of your ancient Dea. John Lea-
vitt, settled in Exeter, and were living there in 16S3, and their de-
scendants are numerous, and have enjoyed civil and military office.
The late Gen. Moses Leavitt, for seven years a senator in the
General Court, the present Thomas Leavitt, one of the Justices
of the Peace throughout the state, and Dudley Leavitt, the
astronomer and mathematician of our region, are among their de-
scendants.

" To your list of Graduates, which will form an interesting part of
your History, I cannot add, excepting that Rev. Jeremiah Hobart
was settled in Hempstead, according to Mr. Wood, in 1682, and
removed to Haddam about 1696 ; and Rev. Jeremiah Cushing, of
Scituate, died 22 March, 1706.

" Among the settlers of Hingham under 1635, 1 notice the name of
"William Walton. Was not this the Rev. William Walton, mentioned
by Johnson, and erroneously called William JValtham, by Mather,
who was for about twenty years the minister of Marblehead, al-
though not inducted into the pastoral office in that place ? I believe
.some of his descendants are in this state.

" The Otises were here as early as 1663, and the name is common
in the county of Strafford. Richard Otis is, I suppose, the common
ancestor of all of the name in New Hampshire ; and he might have
been the son of your John Otis. The name was written on our
early records Oates. The names of Hilliard and Hull were here
about the same time with that of Otis, and the late Rev. Timothy
Hilliard, of Cambridge, was a native of your state, and perhaps a
descendant of Emanuel (or Anthony) Hilliard, who was lost, with
seven otiier persons, in a boat going out of Hampton, 20th October,
1657. Ben or Reuben Hull (written both ways) was the ancestor
of the Hulls, a name not now conmiou in this region."



ERRATA.

Page 14, line 15, for 1780 read 1788.
" 16, *' 14, for June 19, read June IT.



1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 13

Online LibrarySolomon LincolnHistory of the town of Hingham, Plymouth County, Massachusetts → online text (page 13 of 14)