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Sons of the Revolution. California Society.

Spirit of patriotism as evidenced by the revolutionary and ancestral records of the society, Sons of the revolution of the state of California online

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SOCIETY
SONS OF THE
REVOLUTION




UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA
AT LOS ANGELES




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SPIRIT of PATRIOTISM



As Evidenced by the
Revolutionary ana Ancestral Records

of the
Society, Sons of the Revolution

in the
State of California




ORRA EUGENE MONNETTE

Editor

LEON LE LANNE FRENCH

Assistant Editor



Los Angfeles, California

1915



PUBLICATION COMMITTEE



Orra Eugene Monnefte, Chairman

EJward Tkomas Harden

Bradner \Vells Lee

Artnur Jay >>Vaters

James Ratnwell Page, Treasurer



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(Contents



Introductory Note

Objects of the Society

Why a Revolutionary Patriotic Society should secure

recognition and support
Officers of the General Society
Historical Sketch of the General Society
Constitution of the General Society
Founders of the California Society
History of the California Society
Constitution of the California Society
By-Laws of the California Society
Articles of Incorporation of the California Society
Officers and Committees for the year 1914
Officers and Committees for the year 1915
Active Membership of the California Society
Necrological List.

How to Become a Member of the California Society
The Liberty Bell, the Society's First Journalistic Endeavor
California Chronology
The Virginia Charter and the Settlement of Jamestown,

Virginia
Revolutionary Soldiers and Lineages Represented in the

Membership of California Society
The Last Men of the Revolution
Some Maryland Revolutionary Soldiers
Revolutionary Soldiers of South Carolina
Sailors, Marines and Officers of the American Navy
during the Revolution.



27S159



Copyright 1915

SOCIETY, SONS OF THE REVOLUTION

IN THE
STATE OF CALIFORNIA

All Rights Reserved



STANDARD PRINTING CO.

PRINTERS
LOS ANGELES



Introductory Note



HISTORY of the building of any book is interesting It
is an index to the thought and purpose which have controlled
in the undertaking. The merit of the production is best reflected
in the spirit guiding its accomplishment.

It may be said, with pardonable pride and justification, that
during the last three years the Society, Sons of the Revolution, in
the State of California, has gathered unto itself greater energy and
stronger enthusiasm. These reinforcements have given it a strength
and vigor not at all reflective upon its previous distinguished course
of many years but certainly resulting in an increase of membership,
extension of activity and enlargement of support, all tending to
make it a very strong and forceful organization. During the year
1913 it was recommended by the writer to the Board of Directors
that a special campaign be inaugurated for new members as a basis
for securing the achievements in prospect. This was adopted as
the policy for that year and every energy invoked to make the
matter a success. This resulted in the influx of a large number of
new members, composed of the most representative citizens of the
City of Los Angeles. As a complement to this work, the next step
was in the direction of increasing the library facilities of the Society.
Much thought, time and money were then expended in the procuring
of additional volumes and more recently printed Revolutionary
records which were placed in the library at an expenditure of
approximately one thousand dollars. This in itself soon placed the
library upon a very complete foundation and brought about its
recognition as one of the accredited libraries of the State. Its effect
upon the work of the Society, particularly with reference to the
admission of new members, wa's vital and important. The library
has sixteen hundred volumes, including practically everything in
print relative to the Revolutionary Period, and provides within
itself all available sources of information tending to establish Revo-
lutionary service, with the sole exception of the lines of inquiry and
search which must be made at times with respect to the records of
the United States Government. Further, the Society of Colonial
Wars in the State of California maintains its offices and headquar-
ters, together with a magnificent library of five hundred volumes,
devoted to genealogical research and Colonial records, all in con-
junction with this Society and its library.

In addition, while heretofore the work of the Society had '.been
carried on in a very thorough and competent manner by previous
administrations, the increase of membership, with new blood and



10 INTRODUCTORY NOTE

new ideas, as it were, resulted in the development of a social life
and enthusiastic co-operation in the Society which had not formerly
existed. Several notable dinners and banquets have followed which
have had their direct effect in making the Society of positive value
to its membership and at the same time crystallizing both effort and
plan for a continuation of its growth and prosperity.

As a result of the campaign for new members which had there-
tofore been inaugurated, in the short space of eighteen months, the
membership in the Society was doubled, which of itself placed it
upon an assured foundation of financial support and made possible
the greater library and other resources for future achievement. In
this connection it is quite, proper to record that this newer activity
in the Society was started under the leadership of Mr. Bradner
Wells Lee, the capable and enthusiastic President of the Society
for a period of two years. It was quite natural that he should have
in mind, and also that the need should become immediately appar-
ent, the publication of a Year Book or Register of the Society which
should exhibit this new order and progress of affairs in a positive
way. Almost coincident in point of time and without previous
conference with each other, the same thought took form in the minds
of Mr. Edward Thomas Harden and the editor. Each then took it
upon himself to place the motion in concrete form as a recommen-
dation to the Board of Directors, with the result that it was received
with enthusiastic approval.

At a meeting of the Board of Directors held Tuesday, August
19, 1913, a motion was regularly made, duly seconded and carried,
that a committee be appointed by the President for the purpose of
taking into consideration, preparing and procuring the publication
of an annual Register of the Society, Sons of the Revolution, in the
State of California, for the year 1913. The President appointed on
the above committee Mr. Orra Eugene Monnette and Mr. Edward
Thomas Harden ; and this was the inception of the undertaking.

Without giving the chronological order or, in detail, the suc-
ceeding steps taken in this matter and the several enactments of
the Board of Directors, suffice it to say that the committee entered
upon its work with much enthusiasm which has continued through-
out and has at all points received the earnest and enthusiastic co-
operation of the members of the Board of Directors, to which regular
reports of progress of the work have been made and received full
approval.

The greatest problem, of course, has been the financing of the
publication. The membership has responded to several calls for
advanced subscriptions to the book, the Board of Directors has
pledged funds to the extent of at least one hundred copies of the
edition and certain members of the Society have generously agreed
to finance the undertaking as individuals.



INTRODUCTORY NOTE 11

At a meeting of the Board of Directors on January 14, 1914,
Mr. Bradner Wells Lee was formally added to the membership of
the committee on publication. At the annual election of officers in
January, 1915, Mr. Arthur Jay Waters, having been elected to the
Presidency of the Society, by virtue of his office likewise became a
member of the committee. At a meeting of the Board of Directors
held on February 10, 1915, for the purpose of assisting in matters
involved in the financial support and distribution of the publication,
Mr. James Rathwell Page. Treasurer of the Society, was duly made
a member of the Publication Committee.

The proposed publication was originally designed to become a
Year Book or Register, first for the year 1913, then for the year
1914, but necessary delays and time occupied in securing funds for
the publication have changed each of these conceptions in turn. In
the fall of 1914, when it became apparent that the book would cer-
tainly be published, the Publication Committee adopted an entirely
new plan and decided to depart from the previous idea of making
the same a Year Book or Register in the sense of attempting to
issue it as the Register of any particular year date. At this time
it was determined to place Mr. Orra Eugene Monnette in charge
of the publication as its editor, and with the approval of the com-
mittee, Mr. Leon Le Lanne French was selected as assistant editor,
and to them were committed the duty and labor of preparing the
actual manuscript and defining the limits and contents of the pub-
lication, subject to the final approval of said committee.

In the announcement made in January, 1914, to the member-
ship, the following was stated in a circular letter as being the
standard of purpose to be followed in the publication :

"1st. THE SCOPE AND VALUE OF THE PROPOSED
REGISTER.

It is intended to make this Register the most complete and
attractive piece of work ever issued by this Society. It will
contain a complete list of the membership of the Society,
together with the Revolutionary services of the ancestors, from
whom eligibility is derived, and a complete table of lineal
descent from such ancestors, who will be thus honored, those
noble men and women, through whom you descend and whom
it should be your pride and pleasure to see recorded in history;
for this is history.

2nd. DISTRIBUTION OF THE REGISTERS.

It is intended that every member of the Society shall have
a copy of this book, in addition to which a copy will be placed
in each of the important libraries of the United States and in
some of the foreign countries. The number of copies which
will be required for distribution to the General and State So-
cieties and libraries will be large.



12 INTRODUCTORY NOTE

3rd. FINANCING OF THIS PUBLICATION.

The scope and contemplated new features (for this Com-
mittee has new and very interestingly new features in con-
templation) place the financing of this work upon the generosity
of our individual membership which has never yet failed the
Society. The Committee' appeals not only to your sense of
generosity and good will, but as well to your patriotism, which
will be exhibited by your doing your part in the enrollment on
the pages of history, of the names of your patriotic progenitors,
as well as your own record and lineage."

As a result of this scheme of publication and this scope of the
work which was so early outlined to the membership and which has
been conscientiously adhered to, the completed work is herewith
presented to the membership of the Society, Sons of the Revolution,
in the State of California, with an earnest hope for its sincere appro-
bation in every quarter and a generous reception at every hand. It
is committed to your care and thought with a reasonable pride in
accomplishment and with the hope that its demerits may be gener-
ously overlooked.

With reference to the matter included in the book, which is not
wholly indicated in the general prospectus as originally outlined in
the above, it should be stated that the special features of this book
are the lists of Revolutionary Soldiers and Sailors which are placed
in the closing pages of the volume. Animated by the thought and
desire to make the book of permanent and extended value as a
reference book and to preserve it as a standard of usefulness in
patriotic research there have been included a list of Revolutionary
Soldiers, appearing only in scattered sources, of the State of Mary-
land ; the same of South Carolina ; and, special lists of Sailors of the
Revolutionary War, some of which have only been given to the
public in the last few years through the meritorius publication of
the Naval History Society, with headquarters at 247 Fifth Avenue,
New York City. The limited issue of its books prevents their
availability to members of all patriotic societies and, on that account
and by the courtesy of that Society, one list of Sailors is herewith
presented. The other lists were compiled from other sources.

The title of the book has been chosen with the idea that the
active life of the book would be the longer sustained if it were not
coupled with a year date which would be rapidly relegated to the
past. In addition to this the contents of the book have been guided,
both in the matter contained and in the order of presentation,
together with the valuable and exhaustive index, so that, as a refer-
ence book, its life might be the further prolonged.

The absence of illustrations is explained by the fact that the ex-
tensive matter included made it necessary to keep the cost of publi-
cation at a minimum, and while manv attractive and illustrative



INTRODUCTORY NOTE 13

features might have been added, yet it is believed that the judgment
of the committee in this connection will be fully approved.

As appears, only two illustrations have been included in the
book, viz : The frontispiece, entitled "Three Real Sons of the Revo-
lution," and that of the Monterey Mission.

The former has been inserted because of the fact that this
Society has a special distinction in having had as members three
whose fathers served in the Revolutionary War, and two of these
members are living at the time of this publication. This is unique
in itself and, for that reason, a cut of each of these "Honorable Sons"
appears in illustration in the frontispiece.

Further prompted by the desire to make this book as distinctly
Californian in character as might be possible, and having in mind
that many of the sister Societies of the Sons of the Revolution are
located in the States comprising the original thirteen Colonies and,
on that account, possess locations and history immediately con-
nected with the events of the War of the Revolution, the Publica-
tion Committee has deemed it to be both proper and significant to
include in the book a "Chronology of California," which has been
carefully compiled by the editor. This will bring to the reader and
student positive knowledge and information concerning the splendid
history belonging to the Western Coast of the United States, on the
points of early discovery, exploration, and romantic adventure, which
do not so frequently receive prominent notation as with the early
history of the Atlantic seaboard; and while high tribute must be
paid to the adventurer and colonist who made the settlement of the
Eastern Coast of the American Continent both possible and per-
manent; likewise to the intrepid and courageous Spanish romancer
and to the patient and zealous Franciscan Friar must be given simi-
lar honor and credit for the like development of the Pacific Coast.

The discovery and history of California are almost contem-
poraneous in chronicle and event with the exploration and coloniza-
tion upon the shores of the Atlantic. Christopher Columbus ante-
dated Vasco Nunez de Balboa, in his discovery of America as com-
pared with the discovery of the Pacific Ocean, by approximately
twenty-one years. Hernando Cortes was on the Pacific Coast six
years later, and California properly dates her history from the
notable voyage and discovery of Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo in 1542.

The first settlement on the Atlantic Coast was Saint Augustine,
now in Florida, in 1565, but which was not continuous. The James-
town settlement of 1607 and the landing of the Mayflower in 1620
are the early dates of American history ; but the founding of the
town of San Gabriel in later New Mexico in 1598, though not per-
manent, antedates the former by nine and the latter by twenty-two
years. And, Santa Fe, New Mexico, is the second oldest and per-
manent city in the United States. Therefore, California history
and that of the Great West are just as ancient as that of Virginia



14 INTRODUCTORY NOTE

and the New England States. Further, there was a romance,
founded in the spirit of adventure, eager conquest and search for
treasure, which commenced as the inspiration of early Spanish voy-
agers and continued even until the gold excitement of 1849, which
is unequaled in comparison with the more commonplace trials and
adventures of the early colonists in eastern Xorth America.

While the American Revolution was in progress in the original
thirteen colonies, the foundations of California were being laid in
most positive and permanent form. The boasted achievements of
the Pilgrim and Puritan, and of the Huguenot are merited, but the
Californians will ever have a treasured memory of the Spanish
Cavalier and of the Franciscan Friar. Their priceless heritage was
the gift of Cabrillo and Father Junipero Serra, together with a
faithful and zealous train of romantic adventures and pious neo-
phytes. Therefore, truthfully measuring Californian history, this
is distinctively a California book.

Considering further the preparation of the material appearing
in the book, the compilation of the matter, including the corre-
spondence, and the time and labor expended, have been prodigious.
A large part of this has been contributed by Mr. Leon Le Lanne
French, to whom the credit should be given. Further, the members
of the Publication Committee and the officers of the Society have
each and all given their splendid co-operation and support in the
publication work.

In the knowledge that the work has been conscientiously per-
formed and in the hope that it shall serve its high purpose, the
publication labors are now drawn to a close. May this expression
of the activity, the earnest life of the Society, find a larger fruition
in the stimulation of a newer and stronger patriotism in the hearts
of its members and in the hearts of those who may hereafter seek
the benefit of a relationship with the Society.

ORRA EUGEXE MONNETTE,

Editor.
Los Angeles, California,

March 1, 1915.



f



Objects of the Society



THE SOCIETY OF THE SONS OF THE REVOLUTION

has been instituted

TO PERPETUATE

the memory of the men who, in the military, naval and civil
service of the Colonies and of the Continental Congress by
their acts or counsel, achieved the independence of the Coun-
try, AND

TO FURTHER THE PROPER CELEBRATION

of the anniversaries of the birthday of Washington, and of
prominent events connected with the War of the Revolution;

TO COLLECT AND SECURE

for preservation the rolls, records, and other documents
relating to that period ;

TO INSPIRE THE MEMBERS

of the Society with the patriotic spirit of their forefathers;

AND

TO PROMOTE THE FEELING

of friendship among them.

THE SOCIETY OF THE SONS OF THE REVOLUTION IN
THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA HAS BEEN INCOR-
PORATED FOR THE PURPOSES

of perpetuating among their descendants the memory of
those brave men who perilled their lives and fortunes in the
War of the Revolution to wrest the American Colonies from
British Dominion ;



and preservation of manuscripts, records and documents
relating to that contest for independence;



18 SOCIETY, SONS OF THE REVOLUTION

FOR THE INSPIRATION

among its members and their children of the patriotic spirit
of their forefathers;

FOR THE INCULCATION

of a love of country and veneration for the principles which
are the foundation of our National Unity, AND

FOR THE PROMOTION

of social intercourse and cordial fellowship among its mem-
bers.



Revolutionary Qatriotic
@lociety @(lioulcl @ecure
Recognition and @upport



Why a Revolutionary Patriotic Society

Should Secure Recognition

and Support



TRADITIONS of a people are more impressive than
historic fact itself. In the Revolution the most cherished
traditions of Liberty became incarnated in the birth of the Ameri-
can Republic.

The spiritual life of a nation is essentially founded in its ele-
mental expression of the love of law, and with this naturally follows
the loftiest ideals of liberty and truth.

The preservation of these ideals should be the dominating note
in American life, in American government, in American diplomacy.

The decimating influences of a material age, an ever increasing
alien element in our society, born and bred abroad in an atmosphere
of sedition and anarchy, make it a vital obligation of every Ameri-
can with a background of lineage, to formally ally himself with
those stable and enduring influences which were fundamental in
the beginning of this government.

In an epoch when history is making in such tragic and gigantic
form ; when the bonds of international treaty and agreement are
held so lightly; when the sophistry and the specious demand of
material growth and power are made the impelling and domineering
philosophy of imperial expansion ; when international differences, in
the very presence of the most enlightened, refined and Christian
civilization of history, can find a basis of settlement only in an
archaic and barbarous resort to human slaughter and the annihila-
tion of all that is beautiful in life and art : we may well ask our-
. selves in America whether the throes by which this Republic came
into life were not hallowed by a more just and righteous cause.

Since, in all history, Liberty never was so sweetly and tenderly
cradled as on the shores of this western world, America has cher-
ished the hope that her love of country was the type of the purest
and most vital patriotism. In the asylum she has consistently
offered to all who truly suffered oppression and who, by self-efface-
ment and merging into the spirit of our national life, loyally became
a part of the fibre of our civilization in these great offices of broth-



22 SOCIETY, SONS OF THE REVOLUTION

erhocd and helpfulness we have believed this nation has earned the
right to endure.

If in the evolution of our national life there has developed an
aristocracy of lineage, we may know that it had its beginning in
the character and genus of those ancestors whose great minds con-
ceived and strong hearts defended, the principles of liberty and law
that have made and kept this nation great. Because they lived and
died that we and all who may come after us may be free, the
patriotic societies which keep our minds reverent of the matchless
achievements of those noble men should receive the cordial support
of every American of family.

ANDREW STEWART LOBINGIER.



general @ociety



OFFICERS



OFFICERS

of the
GENERAL SOCIETY



GENERAL PRESIDENT
JAMES MORTIMER MONTGOMERY

102 Front St., New York City

GENERAL VICE-PRESIDENT
RICHARD McCALL CADWALADER

133 South 12th St., Philadelphia, Pa.

SECOND GENERAL VICE-PRESIDENT
WALTER OILMAN PAGE

Fenway Studios, Boston, Mass.

GENERAL SECRETARY
PROF. WILLIAM LIBBEY

Princeton, N. J.

ASSISTANT GENERAL SECRETARY

W. HALL HARRIS, Jr.
216 St. Paul St.. Baltimore. Md.

GENERAL TREASURER

JAMES A. SAMPLE
Cashier, Treasury Dept., Washington, D. C.

ASSISTANT GENERAL TREASURER
RALPH ISHAM

141 1 Ritchie Place, Chicago, III.

GENERAL CHAPLAIN

RT. REV. DANIEL S. TUTTLE

St. Louis, Mo.



26 SOCIETY. SONS OF THE REVOLUTION



GENERAL REGISTRAR
HON. GEORGE ELTWEED POMEROY

510 Madison Ave., Toledo, O.

GENERAL HISTORIAN
HOLDRIDGE OZRO COLLINS

814 San Fernando Building, Los Angeles, Cal.



Historical Sketch of the General Society



The first patriotic society in the United States to base its membership
upon hereditary succession was the Society of the Cincinnati, which was
formed on the banks of the Hudson River May 12, 1783, by some of the
officers of the American Army during the period of the Revolution. Mem-
bership is based upon an official service only and is established on the law
of primo-geniture. As a result of this policy that Society has remained
very small and will of necessity decrease in its membership. This re-
mained as the only patriotic Society of that character based upon Revo-
lutionary service for very nearly a century of time.

However, in December of 1873, several efforts were made by Mr.
John Austin Stevens of New York to induce the Society of the Cincinnati,
through its President-General, Honorable Hamilton Fish, to change the
policy of that organization so as to provide for admission to membership
upon more extended lines so that the doors of the organization should be



Online LibrarySons of the Revolution. California SocietySpirit of patriotism as evidenced by the revolutionary and ancestral records of the society, Sons of the revolution of the state of California → online text (page 1 of 51)