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dwelling house in Pomeroy. Mr. Ervin vacated his house in
favor of John Bailey and built another cabin at the mouth of
Kerr's run; lived there in 1815, when he sold to Nathan
Clark, who was therefore about the fifth settler of the town of
Pomeroy. Some of the above mentioned improvements were
sold to other parties. Clark sold his improvement to Robert
Bailey or Randall Stivers, who afterwards sold to Major Dill.
Nial Nye bought a lot of Dill and built the first store house,
where he kept the first post office in Pomeroy in 1827. Mr.
John Knight bought the improvement made by Mr. Ervin of
a Mr. Miles, and Samuel Grant bought the Partlow improve-
ment.

Robert »Bailey, Elihu Higley, John Bailey, David Bailey,
Hedgeman Hysell, Leonard Hysell and Elam Higley met at
the house of Samuel Ervin and from there started to Gallipolis
and volunteered under General Tupper to serve in the Wa**
of 1812.

Thomas Ervin, Robert Bailey, David Bailey and John Bai-
ley were pioneer keelboat men, who boated salt from Ka-
nawha to Pittsburg, the boat being owned by P. Green and
Jack Allen.

The first public road cut through the woods from Gallipolis
to Chester was opened by Samuel Ervin, Asahel Cooley and



96 Pioneer History of Meigs County

Hamilton Kerr. [Note. — The date of this road is not given,
but there were settlements on Leading creek and at Athens
as early as at Chester, and may have been opened as early by
way of these settlements from Gallipolis to Athens.] It should
be borne in mind that many roads were barely marked out for
horse or foot men that were never opened for teams. Mr.
Thomas Matthews settled in Chester in 1798 or 1799, and he
told me (Larkin) while we were in company passing over the
hill on the Rutland road to Middleport that there was where
he and Hamilton Kerr and some other men whose names are
forgotten located a road to Shade river, crossing Leading
creek where the K. & M. Railroad crosses that stream, run-
ning immediately up the point of that hill and following the
ridge all the way west of Middleport and Pomeroy, but that
road was never opened for teams. S. C. L.

Mr. Ervin stated that in 1814 the Ohio river was very high,
so that his father, Samuel Ervin and family, were compelled
to leave the cabin and take shelter in a cave, where they lived
seven days and nights, in much discomfort, as it was in the
month of February.

Rutland, Ohio, March 29th, 1878.
To the Teacher and Scholars of the School in Pleasant Val-
ley :
We propose to write a few items in relation to the early
history and settlement of the little spot of earth that appears
to be of so much importance and which in reality is so very
interesting to the inhabitants of what is now called Pleasant
Valley, the lawn where now stands the seat of learning and
capitol for this community, together with its surroundings up
and down the vale —

When wild turkeys and deer.

And old black bears that prowled.

Were sought by hunters here.

Though wolves as sentries howled.



Pioneer History of Meigs County 9Y

j This place in those olden days was called the White Oak
I Flats. Now it has been three score and ten years since the
I first settlement was made within its borders. I will relate a
few incidents. Soon after the Hon. Brewster Higley settled
' with his family near the mouth of the middle fork of Leading
creek in the spring of 1799, and not far from the mouth of
Great run, which drains the water of this little valley into the
j channel of that little creek, Mr. Levi Stedman had estab-
lished himself on Shade river at a point where Chester now
i stands and had built a mill for the grinding of wheat for the
settlers. It became necessary that a road should be opened
between the two places. Accordingly, it was agreed that Mr.
I Levi Stedman and a party from Shade river and a company
from Leading creek, under the direction of Mr. Brewster
, Higley, should meet near the place where little George Russell
! lived at the forks of Thomas creek. The parties having met,
, proceeded to mark out the road to their respective homes.
I The Leading creek party marked the way very near where ^.t
is now established. When they passed through a very thick
wood on what is now the Stow farm and on through the low
gap to a place by the west line of the McGuire land, it being
in June and night had overtaken them, the darkness was in-
tense, not a gleam of light to direct them, when one of their
number thought of an expedient, which was to get into the
channel of that little stream, exceedingly crooked as it was,
and to follow its" meanderings to the mouth, which was open
ground, so they all got safely home. This occurred in 1804
or 1805.

The first settler in this valley was Abel Larkin, who moved
into his cabin April 1st, 1808, on the northeast corner of
Section No. 7, in Rutland township. The second settler was
Joseph Richardson, a little west, in 1809, who sold to Samuel
Danforth in 1811. Mr. Danforth resided there until his death
in 1845. The place had been occupied by dififerent families
until now, 1878, it is owned by John F. Stevens. Richard



98 Pioneer History of Meigs County

Cook and James McGuire came with their families from Mari-
etta in 1813 and settled on Section No. 1. Earl P. Archer
came about that time and bought land in 1814, and Elihu
Higley married Nancy Cook and settled on Section No. 2 in
1816. Bereman Bailey located a farm a little north in 1827.
Hazael Lathrop, who framed more buildings in this neigh-
borhood than any other man in his time, came from New
York in 1817. He married Catharine, a daughter of Billy
Wright, and lived in a cabin on the eastern border of Section
No. 8. He moved farther west in 1825, but after seventy
years that strip of land is known as the "Lathrop Place."

Mr. Richard Cook died July 17th, 1840, aged seventy-three
years. His wife, Irene Cook, nee Hodge, died October 7th,
1839, aged seventy- three years.

About 1812 James McGuire bought a farm in Pleasant Val-
ley. He was born in Ireland August 14th, 1777. He emigrated
to Marietta and there married the Widow Murray, who had
four children — William, John, Eliza and Matilda. Mrs. Mc-
Guire's maiden name was Mary Garnet. She was a sister of
the mother of John Brougli, the famous war Governor of Ohio.
A little story was current about Esquire Brough, father of the
Governor, of his queer decisions when an acting magistrate.
He made the witness pay the cost of prosecution in a case of
larceny. A mechanic living in Plarmar and working in Marietta
had a canoe to go over to his work and back for his meals.
Persons troubled him by taking away his canoe when he
wanted it. He therefore gave notice that he would prosecute
the first one that did it. So the next day a man came along
and asked where such a man had gone. He saw him take the
canoe and go out of the mouth of the Muskingum. "Did you
see him do that?" "Yes." Dropping his tools, he went to
Esquire Brough for a warrant, and the man and the witness
were soon before the court. There the witness said he did
not see the man take the canoe, that he said so "for a joke."
The judge figured a little and said, "I find the prisoner not



Pioneer History of Meigs County



99



guilty. So much cost for the witness to pay." Then, address-
ing the witness, ordered him to pay it over quick or he would
send him to jail for contempt of court, so the witness forked
it over.

The Original Forest of Rutland.

S. C. Larkin. Dr. Frank Parker.



Common name.
White Oak.
Black, or Yellow Oak.
Red Oak.
Chestnut Oak.
Swamp Oak.
Pin Oak.
Laurel-leaf Oak.
Shell-bark Hickory — Small

Nut.
Shell-bark Hickory — Large

Nut.
Bitter Pignut— Soft Shell.
Black Walnut.
Butternut.
Chestnut.
White Elm.
Red, or Slippery Elm.
Sycamore.
Beach.
Birch.

Bass-wood, or Linn.
Cherry.
Buckeye.
Box Elder.
Cotton Wood.
Yellow Pine.
Red Cedar.
Cucumber.
Hemlock.

Peppuridge, or Gum.
Persimmon.
Aspen.



Quercus
Quercus
Quercus
Quercus
Quercus
Quercus
Quercus



Botanical.
Alba.
Touelona.
Rubra.
Castaneo.
Discolor,
Polastris.
Imbricano.



Caya Micro-a.

Caya Alba.
Caya Amara.
Fuglans Nigra.
Fuglans Cinerao.
Castaned Visca.
Ulmas Americana.
Ulma Fulva.
Platuus Occidentalis.
Fagus Peptugintalis.
Betula Nigra.
Filia Americana.
Prunus Serotiva.
Aesculas Flava.
Negando Acervides.
Populus Monilifera.
Pinus Milus.
Juniperus Virginicana.
Magnolia Acuminata.
Albies Canadensis.
Agarsa Multiflora.
Dios Virginiana.
Populus Premuloides.



100



Pioneer History of Meigs County



Sassafras.

Honey Locust.

Yellow, or Black Locust.

Mulberry,

Sour Wood.

Horn Bean, or Iron Wood.

Servis Berry.

Sweet Pignut.

Poplar, or Tulip.

White Ash.

Blue Ash.

Crab Apple.

Black Haw.

Plum.

Papaw.

Red Bud.

Waakoo.

Blue Beach.

Dog Wood.

Willow.

Witch Hazel.

Spice Bush.

Prickly Ash.

Laurel.

Sumach.

Elder.

Leatherwood.

Hazlenut.

Bladdernut.

Hackberry.

Sugar Tree.

Soft Maple.

Blackberry.

Raspberry.

Green Briar.

Eglantine Rose.

White Hydrange.

Arrow Root.

Buckberry.

Huckleberry.

Blueberry.



Sassafra Officinalis.
Gleditschia Triacanthes.
Robinia Pendracanthus.
Morus Rubra.
Oxigdendrum Arboreum.
Ostrya Virginica.
Amelanckier Canadaensis.
Caya Glabadendroir.
Lilliodendron Tulipifera.
Fraxicanus Americanus.
Fraxicanus Quadrangulata.
Pyrnes Coronarid.
Vesburnem Prunifolium.
Prunus Americana.
Asimena Triloba.
Cercis Canadensis.
Enonymas Stropurpurens.
Caspunnus Americana.
Cornus Florida.
Salix Alba.

Hamamillis Virginica.
Benjoin Oderiferen.
Lanthorylum Americana.
Kalmia Augustifolia.

Glabra.
Rhus Canadiensis.
Sambucus Canadaensis.
Dioca Palustris.
Corylus Occidentalis.
Staphylia Trifolia.
Celtis Occidentalis.
Acer Saccharinum.
Acer Rubrum.
Rubus Wilborns.
Rubus Occidentalis.
Amilox Rotundafolia.
Rosa Rubignosa.
Hydrangea Arboresceus.
Viburuma Acerifolime.
Rhaninies.

Gayhissaceid Resinosa.
Vaccinium Pennsylvanicum.



Pioneer History of Meigs County 101

Wild Tea. Ceanothis Americanus.

Frost Grape. Vitis Cordifolia.

Hill Grape. Vitis Aestivalis.

Bitter Sweet. Celastrus Celastricus.

Poison Ivy. Rhus Toxicodendron.

Virginia Creeper. Ampelopsis Lugnesolia.

Trumpet Flower. Tecoma Rudicaus.

Yellow Perila. Lanthrhoriza Aperfolia.

Pea Vine. Ipomea Prisforea.

REMARKS.

The pea vine, though small, is said to have been excellent
food for buffalo and deer, and was freely devoured by the
horses, cattle and sheep of the early settlers. It grew plenti-
fully in the Rutland woods, and was much depended on as
food for stock in warm weather. The wild tea is a small bush
that grows on the hills. The first settlers gathered it when in
bloom in June, dried it, and used it instead of tea from China,
and considered it a good substitute. The wild cherry was a
noble specimen of the forest trees, while it did not grow as
large as some others, the poplar or oak, yet it has always
been highly prized for the fine texture of its grain and bright
color of its wood. It was much sought after by cabinet mak-
ers.

A few cucumber trees grew on Section 28, but have disap-
peared. S. C. L.

Times of the Dogwood being in full bloom as record of
early or late seasons:

Years. Months. Days. Years. Months. Days,



1840


April


14th


1870


May


3rd


1841


May


• 2nd


1871


April


13th


1842


April


6th


1872


May


' 1st


1843


May


10th


1873


May


7th


1844


April


15th


1874


May


13th


1845


April


24th


1875


May


18th


1846


April


25th


1876


May


6th


1847


May


2nd


1877


May


4th



102 Pioneer History of Meigs County



1848


April


23rd


1878


April


18th


1849


Missed record.


1879


May


6th


1850


May


10th


1880


April


25th


1851


April


23rd


1881


May


10th


1852


May


10th


1882


May


11th


1853


April


30th


1883


May


1st


1854


May


2nd


1884


May


12th


1855


May


7th


1885


May


13th


1856


May


7th


1886


April


27th


1857


May ,


24th


1887


May


5th


1858


April


30th


1888


May


5th


1859


May


6th


1889


April


23rd


1860


April


23rd


1890


April


29th


1861


April


30th


1891


April


24th


1862


May


4th


1892


May


4th


1863


May


10th


1893


May


8th


1864


May


11th


1894


April


28th


1865


April


22nd


1895


May


1st


1866


April


27th


1896


April


25th


1867


May


3rd


1897


May


5th


1868


May


3rd


1898


May


2nd


1869


May


3rd









This record of the Dogwood blossoming is because it
blooms with more uniformity than any other tree, showing
late or early spring, and the foregoing table has been care-
fully kept, year by year. S. C. L.

The name Rutland was given to the township through the
influence of five of its citizens who came from Rutland, Ver-
mont, and Rutland, Massachusetts. Their names were, viz. :
John Miles, Luke Brine, Abel Larkin, Brewster Higley and
Shubael Nobles. The village of Rutland was laid out in 1828,
by Barzillai H. Miles and Abijah Hubbell, Jr., and the survey
was made by Samuel Halliday, and the acknowledgment of
the deeds for the streets before Abel Larkin, Associate Judge,
August 20th, 1828. The original lots consisted of one-fourth
of an acre in Section No. 14, and fractions of Nos. 1 and 7.
Other lots have been added from Section No. 8 and No. 7.




MR. SAMUEL HALLIDAY,

Auditor of Meigs County Twenty-four Years.




AARON STIVERS.

Auditor of Meigs County in I860.



Pioneer History of Meigs County 103

SAMUEL HALLIDAY.

Mr. Samuel Halliday came from Scotland, fresh with educa-
tional honors from the University of Edinburgh, and en route
to a professorship in the Ohio University at Athens, had by
the difficulties of travel in a new country been impeded in
his progress, and by one of those strange events in life was
stranded in the little country place of Rutland, where he found
his life work. He was soon engaged in teaching, and estab-
lished a reputation for success in giving instruction to his
pupils. Judge Ephraim Cutler sent his two sons, Manasseh
and William P., to attend the "Halliday School," boarding
them with the Larkins. Gen. Holcomb sent his son Anselm
to be taught in the Scotchman's College at Rutland. Mr.
Halliday married Miss Eliza Parker, a daughter of William
Parker, an intelligent pioneer, thus locating himself as a citi-
zen, he entered into the plans for increasing the public utili-
ties. He surveyed and laid out the village of Rutland, and
surveyed and laid out the lots in the Miles graveyard. He
was influential in the erection of the two-story brick school-
house. When the county seat of Meigs county was located
in Chester, William Weldon was the first Auditor, and after
one year Mr. Samuel Halliday was elected Auditor, and served
the county in that office for twenty-four successive years. He
moved to Pomeroy when it was made the seat of justice, but
afterwards Mr. Halliday moved to Southern Illinois, where
Mrs. Eliza Halliday died. His sons were engaged in business
in Cairo, having accumulated considerable wealth, and Mr.
Halliday spent a few years with them.

He returned to Ohio, bought a farm in Gallia county, mar-
ried a widow lady, Mrs. Braley, and passed his last days in
comfortable, honorable retirement. "The memory of the just
is blessed."

The brick school-house, referred to above, was used for
all kinds of public assemblies, religious or political, as well as
lectures on temperance or abolition. There was not a meeting



104 Pioneer History of Meigs County

house in the township, so this house was a preaching place
for all denominations, when the services would not interfere
with the school.

A payment of five dollars was made by the township trus-
tees for the privilege of holding elections in this school build-
ing.

Spelling schools and singing schools met in this "town hall"
and young people enjoyed the social opportunity.

There was a debating club, of considerable importance in
helping young men to try their skill in oratory, or sharpen
their wits by controversy. They had rules that secured to
them an exclusive selection of membership.

Many intellectual contests were held there by the young
men engaged in debating. The growth of minds, and the
friendship of hearts, nursed in that building, will continue
while life shall last with those thus associated.

THE WIND-STORM OF 1826.

The severest wind-storm ever known in Rutland from its
first settlement, came on Sunday afternoon, October 29th,
1826. The school-house just mentioned suffered greatly. The
upper story was swept off entirely, and the roof only was ever
replaced. The strong current of this wind was not more than
a quarter mile in width, showing greater strength in some
places than in others in its course, which was a little south of
east. It came from Salem township, but did little damage
until reaching the brick house of Felix Benedict, the upper
part of which was blown down. In the village of Rutland, a
frame house, the residence of Mr. Beebe, was blown all to
pieces, but fortunately the family had gone out of the house,
and so escaped with their lives. Passing over a hill a half
mile east, which was covered with heavy timber, it completely
felled the standing trees. Then pitching over another hill
into the valley of Hysell run, it removed all the timber except



Pioneer History of Meigs County 105

a few saplings that were not twisted off. At the base of the
hill stood a log cabin, the home of Royal Hysell. There were
nine persons inside when the storm began, Mr. Royal Hysell
and family, and Mr. James McGuire, Sr. The house was
leveled to a log or two at the bottom, but no one was hurt.
Passing over Thomas Fork, near the residence of Charles
Russell, the wind felled all the heavy timber on the hillside,
land then passed on to the Ohio river, where the Whitlock's
lived, and across the river into Virginia, and report came of
jits destructive path many miles into the country.

The first school in the first school-house in Salisbury town-
jship was taught by Samuel Denny, from Massachusetts, who
also helped build the school-house. The school cosisted of
nine scholars, viz. : James Smith, John Smith, Sarah Kerr
[and Christena Niswonger, these four from near the mouth of
Leading creek, and five children from Judge Higley's family.
iThis term of school was in the winter of 1801-1802. Miss
Electa Higley, afterwards Mrs. Benjamin Williams, was the
woman to teach in that school-house. Mr. Denny taught one
year in a house that belonged to Widow Case.

Mr. Denny delivered the first oration at a celebration of
the 4th of July, in 1806. He stood on a mound not far from
the Case house.

Mr. Denny left Ohio in 1810, and returned to Massachusetts,
where he married and died there.

Miss Fanny Smith taught school there, in 1811. She was
married afterwards to Mr. Asa Maples. Probably the next
school in the order of time was taught by James G. Green, a
preacher, from Kentucky in 1809.

Miss Uretta Benedict had a school in a blacksmith's shop,

built by Mr. Rufus Wells, but who had moved to Wilkesville.

This was in 1811. The teacher was afterwards the wife of

Cornelius Merrill. In 1812, Elisha Rathburn taught a school

I in a house belonging to Samuel Danforth that stood near the

I



106 Pioneer History of Meigs County

present dwelling of John F. Stevens. In 1812, a school-house
was built on land now owned by Mr. George V. Lasher, and
stood a few rods west of the old blacksmith shop. Miss Polly
Wyatt, a lady from Athens, taught school in this neighbor-
hood in 1812.

In 1816, a school-house was erected on land one hundred
feet north of the southeast corner of Section No. 8, now owned
by S. C. Larkin.

This house was built of logs, hewed or dressed on the inside
as far up as the joists, with a stone chimney built on the out-
side, while the cracks between the logs were chinked with
small pieces of wood or stone and daubed on the outside with
mud. The windows for light were made by cutting out one-
half of the upper side of the log at the proper height, and one-
half of the log next above, on the under side, so as to match.
Instead of glass, paper was fastened on, and then greased so
as to admit the light. This was done on two sides of the
house, and benches were made for the children to sit on, and
boards laid on pins driven into the logs below the windows
were for writing tables. The floor was made of boards, and
loose boards were laid on joists overhead. The roof was made
according to the common log-cabin style, by having eave-
bearers and buttling poles to hold the long shingles in proper
place. Nails were scarce and few were used in building.

The first teacher in this house was David Lindsey, who
taught in the winter of 1816 and 1817. He then settled on the
east branch of Thomas Fork, near the Rutland and Chester
road. His successor as a teacher was Selah Barrett, who
came from Vermont, bringing a yotmg wife with him. They
moved into the school-house and taught the winter school.
His habit was to rise early, cut wood, make a fire, eat breakfast,
and then move the household goods into the loft each morning
before school hours. This was in November, 1817, and the
winter 1818.



Pioneer History of Meigs County 107

Brewster Higley, Jr., and his sister, Susan Higley, were
teachers at some time in this log school-house. Mr. Samuel
Halliday taught many terms in a house on the school lot, and
continued to teach in different neighborhoods until the brick
school house was built, where he taught until his election as
Auditor of Meigs county, which office he held for twenty-four
years, having been elected in 1825.

"First school-house was a small log cabin, built about 1809
on the ground now occupied by the lower graveyard in Mid-
dleport. The first teacher in that house was Jared Gaston, in
1810. The second teacher was Sally Higley, afterwards the
wife of Daniel C. McNaughton, and the next term of school
was taught by John Gilliland, who continued to teach about
one year. The second school-house was built of hewed logs
'a short distance above Leading creek, on the Ministerial Sec-
tion, and was designed for a meeting house, as well as a
school-house. It was in this house that the first Courts of
Common Pleas were held for the county of Meigs in the year
1819." Recollections, John C. Hysell, Esq., who lived with
his father where the Rutland road came out to the river at
the mouth of Bone Hollow, their home for eight or nine years,
while he was a boy of sixteen years,

Joel Lowther was born in Loudon county, Virginia, August
4th, 1741. He was a Revolutionary soldier and drew a pen-
sion. He made his home at the house of John Stevens in
Rutland, and died there November 7th, 1853. After his death,
the Military Record was examined by Jesse Hubbell, then
acting Justice of the Peace, who found that record made him
one year older than his own account, which made him 112
years, 3 months and 3 days old, at the time of his death.



108 Pioneer History of Meigs County

GRANT AND KNIGHT FAMILIES.

December 1st, 1817, the families of John Grant, St., and
wife, Sarah Boltwood Grant ; their sons, Samuel Grant, wife
and children ; John Knight and wife, nee Agnes Grant, landed
at Silver run, Salisbury township, having had a long and
tedious journey from Maine, which was made, first in wagons
as far as Wellsburg on the upper Ohio, where a flatboat was
constructed in which they floated down the river to Silver run,
their destination. With them came a lad, John Pierce, whose
home had been with the senior Grant for several years.
Landress Grant, a bachelor brother, came also.

John Grant, Sr., died in June, 1820, and Mrs. Sarah Grant
died in March, 1824. They are buried in the "Miles Ceme-
tery," side by side.

Samuel Grant married in Maine, Hannah Davis, and they
landed with a family of eight children, viz. :

Oliver Grant, married Mary Jones, daughter of Philip Jones,
of Middleport, and moved to Iowa.

There was an invalid son of Samuel Grant, who lived to
mature years, but died many years ago.

Royal C. Grant, the inventor and machinist of Middleport,
O., married Lovina Fuller, who died many years ago.

William Grant married Esther Hobart and settled in Middle-
port, O. He was associated with his brothers, John and Sam-
uel Grant, Jr., in the steam flouring mill, one of the finest mills


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