Copyright
Stuart W. (Stuart Warren) Cramer.

Useful information for cotton manufacturers (Volume v.2) online

. (page 1 of 43)
Online LibraryStuart W. (Stuart Warren) CramerUseful information for cotton manufacturers (Volume v.2) → online text (page 1 of 43)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


LIBRARY



^NSSACHOs^^




1895



^r«minsmsM»it!iiil!ffi]iWfflifflllliflSllMilffl^




i:J!| fissbiw
}•: j |4| 1-1.1 if?: i1

5:: -ii'lrii^ hi!;:



DURFEE C»nrr



USEFUL Information

FOR

COTTON MANUFACTURERS,

Compiled and Issued
by

Stuart W- Cramer,

Mill Architect and Engineer,

Contractor for

Cotton Mill Machinery
and Equipment*



MAIN OFFICE s BRANCH OFFICE

Trust Building, Equitable Building.

Charlotte, N. C. Atlanta, Ga.



SECOND EDITION.

(Complete in Three Volumes.)

VOLUME II.
J904.

{All rights reserved )



X

rs



Copyright, 1904,

by

STUART W. CRAMER.







Limited Edition,



(Not for Sale.)



Ill



SMTI LIBRARY



Queen City Printing and Paper Co.

PRINTERS.

Charlotte, N. C.



ANNOUNCEMENT.




The above cut illustrates the Trust Building just com-
pleted at Charlotte, N. C, in which our offices are located
on the first floor.

Our new draughting rooms on the top floor of this build-
ing afford us ample room, light, and other facilities for the
proper carrying on of this department of our business, the
extent and importance of which will be realized when we
call attention to the fact that we have made plans and speci-
fications for over one hundred Southern cotton mills and
have installed in them complete outfits of machiner}- and
equipment, not to mention the additional detailed draught-
ing that has been required in connection with the machinery
and equipment that we have furnished to practically as many
more mills designed by other engineers or by the mill officers
themselves

We also call attention to our Branch Office in the Equit=
able Building, Atlanta, Georgia.

Our customers and friends are cordially tendered the use
of our offices as headquarters when in either Charlotte or
Atlanta.

vSTUART W. CRAMRR,

Agent for
The Whitin Machine Works,
WooNSOCKET Machine and Press Company,
KiTSON Machine Company,
Etc., Etc.



^SUMMARY OF CONTENTS.



Volume L

Section I.:

The Textile Machiner}' ordinarily installed in a yarn or
cloth mill on plain work.

Appendix.

Volume IL

Section IL:

Sundry and Miscellaneous Equipment and Power Plants.
Appendix.

Volume IIL

Section IIL:

Dyeing and Special Finishing Machinery.

Section IV.:

Cotton and its Manufacture, Mill Architecture and Engi-
neering, with General Technical and Miscellaneous Infor-
mation.

Index:

An Alphabetical Index for all three volumes.
* A Table of Contents will be found at the end of each volume.



VI



Atlanta, Ga,, STUART W. CRAMER, Charlotte, N, C,



SECTION IL



Sundry and Miscellaneous Equipment
and Power Plants ♦



319



Atlanta, Ga., STUART W, CRAMER, Charlotte, N. C.



JONES & LAUGHLIN
SHAFTING, PULLEYS, HANGERS, ETC.

Cold-Rolled Shafting,

From Prof. R. H. Thurston^s Report on Cold-Rolled Iron and Steel.
General Conclusions*

(i). The process of cold-rolling produces a very marked
change in the physical properties of the iron or steel thus
treated.

(a) It increases the tenacity from 25 to 40 per cent, and
the resistance to transverse stress from 50 to 80 per cent.

(d) It elevates the elastic limits under both tensile and
transverse stresses, from ho to 125 per cent.

(r) The modulus of elastic resilience is elevated from 300 to
400 per cent. The elastic resilience to transverse stress is
augmented from 150 to 425 per cent.

(2). Cold=rolling also improves the metal in other respects :

(a) It gives the iron or steel a smooth, bright surface, ab-
solutely free from the scale of black oxide unavoidably left
when hot-rolled.

{d) It is made exactly to gauge, and for many purposes
requires no further preparation.

(c) In working the metal, the wear and tear of the tools
are less than with hot-rolled iron, thus saving labor and ex-
pense in fitting.

(d) The cold=rolled iron or steel resists stresses much
more uniformly than does the untreated metal. Irregulari-
ties of resistance exhibited by the latter do not appear in the



-220



Atlanta, Ga,, STUART W. CRAMER, Charlotte, N. C.



J» & L, Shaftings Continued.

former ; this is more particularly true for transverse stress,
as is shown by the smoothness of the strain-diagrams pro-
duced by the cold-rolled bars.

(e) This treatment of iron or steel produces a very im-
portant improvement in uniformity of structure, the cold°
rolled iron or steel excelling common iron or steel in its
uniformity of density from surface to center, as well as in its
uniformity of strength from outside to the middle of the bar.

(3). This great increase of strength, stiffness, elasticity,
and resilience is obtained at the expense of some ductility,
which diminishes as the tenacity increases. The modulus of
ultimate resilience of the cold-rolled metal is, however, above
50 per cent, of that of the untreated metal.

Cold=rolled iron or steel thus greatly excels common iron
or steel in all cases where the metal is to sustain maximum
loads without permanent set or distortion.

(4). We conclude, that as a material of construction, cold-
rolled iron or steel has many peculiar advantages ; that it is
suitable for all constructions not exposed to high tempera-
tures ; that it is especially suitable for all purposes demanding
a high elastic limit and great shock-resisting power without
permanent distortion ; that the process improves the metal
throughout — its benefits, as has been seen, reaching the cen-
ter of the bar, and rendering the whole much more homo-
geneous and uniform than common iron or steel.

The tables of summaries will be found particularly conven-
ient, as exhibiting most concisely all data obtained. The
table of working and breaking loads [see Report on page 322]
will be of especial value for many cases of practical appli-
cation.

Very respectfully,

R. H. THURSTON.



321



Atlanta, Ga., STUART W. CRAMER, Charlotte, N, C.



J, & L. Shafting, Continued*



Determination of the Effect of CoId-RoIIing upon the

Inner Portion of the Bar

Tests made b}' Prof. Thurston at the Mechanical Labora-
tory, Department of Engineering, Stevens Institute of Tech-
nology. Specimens were turned to their respective diameters
from bars 2 inches in diameter.



COLD-ROLLED IRON.









Modulus of Rupture




Percent-




c




per sq.


inch of


Percent-


age of


Lab.


i


Elastic
Limit.






age of
Exten-


Reduc-


No.






tion of








Orig'l


Fract'd


sion.


area at




5




Sect'n.


feect'n.




fracture.


1 168*


.K


63,900


66,900


94,800


6.00


29.44


1169





56,600


68,500


95.500


7-65


28.30


1170


I


56,700


60,600


86,200


6.55


31. '2


1105B


}4


56,600


65,640


93,000


9.00


29.66


1105c


rs


55.4C0


66,650


90,600


9.22


26.47


1105D




56,000


66,200


91,600


8.14


27.76


1105E


Yi


54,300


63,400


99,000


729


28.89


1105F


X


50,900


64,660


91,800


3-43


29.60



HOT-ROLLED IRON.



II7I


1%


30,900


48,700


83,100


30.00


41.38


II72


Ij4


23,500


49,500


82 700


25.70


40.18


1 173*


I


26,000


47,900


78,700


21.30


39 14


II04B


Yi


23,800


49,330


79,400


21.57


37.85


1104c




24,100


50,520


9u,ioo


24-57


43 94


1I04D


Yi


23,900


50,980


93,600


1857


4042


II0411:


%


20,800


52.540


97,700


2057


46.24


II04F


%


22,400


42,980


78,400


16.93


47.28



i=Broke outside of the initial marks.



322



Atlanta, Ga., STUART W. CRAMER, Charlotte, N. C,



]. & L» Shafting, Continued*
Lar §fe For §fed Shafts.

Large shafts forged at short notice from Open Hearth
Steel of any diameter up to 20 inches.

Head Shafts, Crank Shafts, Etc.

The following cuts illustrate the terms used to designate
special work on heavy shafts :



-



Plain Shaft.




Shaft Collared and Key=Seated for Pulley.



-^r^fr:



U



Shaft Bossed, Collared and Key=Seated
for Pulley and Coupling.

Key-Seating.

For many purposes long Key-Seats in Shafts are required.
Many thousand Cold-Rolled Shafts have been key-seated
their entire length, and in ;/o instance have they failed to
show their superiority over Turned Shafts key-seated.



323



Atlanta, Ga., STUART W. CRAMER, Charlotte, N, C.



J» & L. Shafting, Continued^

Fig.l



'^




o

CO :^



H-1 S






E



Fig.2



I^L



^


o


IN
l-l


CO m^


i










" 1 s




c.


o




^


o






vo O ro


^


00




^




in ON CM


^






^






^




COVO 1-1


M






1 ^^


Q


5

in


o be
S o


L'gl
Bear


hof
ngs.



A-



r>|^;^



-I'i^



o in



a II






S1«iid-c









I?

aJaa .

a II M

1-T3 11
iU C jL

1^ -.^ ^

VM ="

IJI

=" g

a; + )=■

O ■" IK

-a "So
o li ^"

^ s£



e 3s S



03 nj 2



2ii




which is from centre to centre of bearings.




•^^^^
























. " 3
















s 5 = -


2X2


3


33^


4


5 6


8


10


.2 - o ^


tt.


ft.


ft.


ft.


ft. ft.


ft.


ft.


Q«°-=
















Inches.


In.


In.


In.


In.


In.


In.


In.


In.


2


2/8


2)i


2%


2^


2^8


2%


2%


3


2)4


2)4


2^8


2M


2^8


3


3/8


3%


3^8


3


3


3H


sv*


3%


s'A


3%


4


4>4


3)4




3^


3H


3^


4


4'4


4)4


4K


4




4


aVs


4^


4X2


4%


5^


5^


45^






4X2


4^


4%


5/8


b)4


5%


5






5


5/8


5^8


5^8


6


b)4


sV^








5^


5%


6


e%


6%


6








6


6%


6^8


7/4


7X



The shaft in a line which carries the receiving pulley, or
which carries a transmitting pulley to drive another line,
should always be considered a " head shaft," and should be
of the size given by the rules for shafts carrying main pul-
leys or gears.



328



Atlanta, Ga., STUART W. CRAMER, Charlotte, N. C.



J. & L. Shafting, Continued.







Horse Power of Turned Iron Shafting








As Prime


Mover or


Head Shaft carrying Main Driving Pulley or Gear, well








supported by Bearings.






Diam.






Number of Revolutions per Minute.






of Shaft












i








100


125


150


175 200


225


250 275 300


325


1 350


Inches,


H. P.jH. P.


H. P.


H P.|H. P.


[H. P. H. PH. P. H. P


H. P.


H. P.


2


6.4


«


9.6


II. 2 12.8


14.4 16 1 17.6 19.2


21


22


2^


8.1


10


12


14 16


18 ; 20 ! 22 24


26


28


2/^


12.5


15


18


22 25


28 31 34 , 37


40


43


2K


16


20


24


28 32


36 1 40 i 44 48


52


56


3


20


25


30


35 40


45 50 1 55 60


65


70


3'4


27


34


40


47 ' 54


61 67


74 , 81


88


95


3'A


34


42


51


59 68


76 85


93 102


no


118


3?4


42


.S2


63


73 84


94 105


115 126


1.36


146


4


51


64


76


89 102


115 127


140 153


165


177


4^


72


90


J 08


126 144


162 180


198 216


234


250


5,,


100


125


150


175 200


225 250 1 275 300


325


3,S0


5V2


133


166


199


233 : 266


299 1 333 1 360 400


433


466


6


173


216


259


302 345


388 ! 431 1 474 517


560


603


A


s Second Movers or Line Shafting, Bearings 8 Feet Apart.




Diam.






Number of Revolutions per Minute.






of Shaft.














1








100


12.5


150


175


200


225 j 250


275 1 300


325


350


Inches.


H. P.


H. P.


H. P.


H. P.|H. P.


H. P.'H. P.


H. P.IH. P. H. P.


H. P-


1?4


6


7-4


89


10.4 11.9


13.4 ' 14 9


16.4 17.9


19.4


20.9


1%


7-3


91


10 9


32.7 14.5


16 3 18.2


20 21.8


23.6


254


2


«g


II. I


133


15 5 177


20 22,2


24.4 26.6


28.8


31


2>^


10.6


132


15-9


185 21 2


23 8 26.5 29 I 31.8


34.4


37


?H


12.6


i.s.s


19


22 25


28 1 31 i 35 38


41


44


2%


15


18


22


26 29


2,Z 37 ! 41 44


48


52


2. '4




21


26


30 34


39 43 47 52


56


60


2^4


23


29


34


40 1 46


52 i 58 : 64 69


75


81


3


30


37


45


52 ' 60


67 ! 75 i 82 90


97


105


3K


38


47


57


66 76


85


95 1 104 114


123


K-,3


3^


47


59


71


83 1 95


107


119


131 143


155


167


3%


58


73


88


102 117


132


146


162 176


190


205


4


71


89


107


125 ! 142


160


178


196 213


231


249




For


Simpl


y Trai


ismitting Pc


)wer and Short Counters






Diam.






Nu


mber of Rev


solutions per Minute.






of Shaft.
























100


125


150


175


200


233


267


300 333


367


400


Inches.


H. P.


H. P.


H. P.


H. P. H. P.


H. P.|H P.'H. P.jH. P.


H. P.


H. P.


i}4


6.7


84


ID I


II.8 1 13 5


15.7 1 17.9


20.3


22.5


24.8


27


m


8.6


107


12.8


15 17 I


20 22.8


25.8


28.6


31.5


34.3


iH


10.7


13-4


16


18.7 21.5


25 28


32


36


39


43


I 'A


13.2


16.5


19.7


23 26.4


31 1 35


39


44


48


52


2,^


16


20


24


28 32


37 ' 42 48


53


58


64


2/8


19


24


29


Zi 1 38


44 51 57


63


70


76


2 '4


22


28


34


39 45


52 60 68


75


83


90


2%


27


33


40


47 1 53


62 70 79


88


96


105


2^


31


39


47


54


62


72, 83 1 93


104


114


325


2K


41


52


62


73


83


97


III 125


139


153


167


3




67


81


94


108


126


144


162


]8o


iq8


216


3i^


68


86


103


120


137


160


182


205


228


250


273


3>^


»5


107


128


150 171


200


228


257


285


313


342



329



Atlanta, Ga., STUART W, CRAMER, Charlotte, N. C*



J. & L. Shafting, Concluded,



Horse Power of Cold Rolled Iron Shafting.



As Prime Mover or Head Shaft carrying Main Driving Pulley or Gear, well
supported by Bearings.









Number of Revolutions per


Minute.






Diam.






















of Shaft.


























100


125


150


175


200


22b


250


275


3C0


325


350


Inches.


H. P.


H. P.


H. P.


H. P.


H. P.


H. P.


H. P.


H. P.


H. P.


H. P.


H P.


i^


34


42


5-


5.9


6.7


7.6


8.4


9.3


lO.I


10.9


1 1.8


1%


5-4


6.7


8.


9.4


10.7


12. 1


13.4


14-7


16. 1


17.4


18.7


2


8.


10.


12


14


16


18


20


22


24


26


28


2V


II.4


14.2


17


20


27


25


28


31


34


37


39


2>^


1=^.6


iq


23


27


31


35


39


43


47


51


55


2h


21


26


31


36


41


47


52


57


62


67


73


3


27


34


40


47


54


61


67


74


81


88


94


S'-t


34


43


51


60


69


77


86


94


103


112


120


Z'A


43


53


64


75


85


96


107


118


128


139


150


3?4


53


66


79


92


105


119


132


145


158


171


185


4


64


80


q6


112


128


144


160


176


192


208


224


A'A


91


114


136


159


182


205


228


250


273


296


319



As Second Movers or Line Shafting, Bearings 8 Feet Apart.









Number of Revolutions per Minute.






Diam,
























of Shaft.


100


125


150


175


200


225


250


375


300


325


350


Inches.


H. P.


H. P.


H, P


H. P.


H. P.


H. P.


H. P.


H. P.


H. P.


H. P.


H. P.


lA


67


8.4


10. 1


11.8


13.5


152


16.8


18.5


20,2


21.9


23.6


1^8


8.6


10.7


12.8


'5


17.1


19.3


21.5


23.6


25.7


28.9


31


1%


107


13-4


16


187


21.5


24.2


26.8


295


32.1


348


39


1%


13.2


16 S


19.7




26.4


29.6


32.9


36.2


39.5


428


4b


2


16


20


24


28


32


36


40


44


48


52


S6


254


19


24


29


2,Z


38


43


48


52


57


62


b7


2X


22


28


34


39


45


50


56


61


68


74


80


2%


27


33


40


47


53


60


67


73


70


86


94


2^


31


39


47


54


62


69


78


86


93


lOI


109


2K


41


52


62


73


83


93


104


114


125


135


145


3


54


67


81


94


108


121


134


148


162


175


189


zV,


68


86


103


I2j


137


154


172


188


205


222


240


z%


«5


107


128


150


171


192


214


235


257


278


300



For simply Transmitting Power and Short Counters.



Diam.






Number of Revolutions per


Minute.






of Shaft.














1










100


125


150


175


2C0


233


267 1 300


333


367


400


Inches.


H. P.


H. P.


H. P.iH.P.


H. P.


H. P.


H. P.|H. P.


H. P


H. P.


H. P


I '4


6.S


8.1


9 7 if-3


13


15.2


17.4 ! 19.5


21.7


239


26


1^8


85


10.7


12.8


15


17


19.8


227 1 255


28.4


31


34


I^


II. 2


14


16.8


19 6


225


26


30 33


37


41


45


iVz


142


17-7


21.2


248


28.4


33


38 I 42


47


52


57




18


22


27


31


35


41


47 53


59


65


71


1%


22


27


33


38


44


51


58 65


72


79


87


2


26


33


40


46


53


62


71 80


88


97


106


2/8


32


40


47 55


63


73


84 95


105


116



Online LibraryStuart W. (Stuart Warren) CramerUseful information for cotton manufacturers (Volume v.2) → online text (page 1 of 43)