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but, since they were not in competition for
the cup, it was awarded to ATO.

The only hole in the ATO armor was swim-
ming. Phi Sig handily grabbed this trophy
by beating the nearest competitor by ten
points.

The fight for the Intramural Athletic Tro-
phy may be close if Phi Sig is able to defend
its Softball title of last year.




Dutch Schulze, Director o£ Athletics
and Supervisor of Intramural Ath-
letics, mugs up for the camera.



PHI SIGMA KAPPA INTRAMURAL SWIMMING CHAMPIONS. First Row: Charlie Peters,
Coach; Bill Hopper, Randy Gardner, Bart Jepson, Mickey Myers, Al Rappoport, Bob Fogan,
Howie Parker.




/l^.tife





THE INDEPENDENT INTRAMURAL CHAMPION SWIMMING TEAM. Left to right: Ada McLean, Ann
Patten. Gail Morton. Loiii C:hilds (rear) , Barbara Ford.



WOMEN'S INTRAMURALS




This was the real year for the
Independents, with their wins in
swimming and in basketball.

Although most of their wins
were by narrow margins, they
were able to rack up the points
when most needed.

They also possessed the keen-
est sense of competition and
put their every effort into win-
ning.



.Swimming Coach Bob Frailcy preps
tivo contenders on how to improve
their form.





INDEPENDENT INTRAMURAL BASKETBALL CHAM-
PIONS, Left to right: Lee Levy. Lallie Burba. Betsv Boos,
Jeanne Zitmore (rear). Liz Chin. Sue Robinson.



A strained moment at the Phi Mulndependent
game.



"In arrears" — the talents of Jean
Gedney and Sara \an Dvke were not
sufficient as KD lost to the Inde-
pendents.




97



if'^^i*!!!



VARSITY BASEBALL TEA\f: First Row: Ronnie McPherson. Bill Wood. Jimmy Williams, Jay Chamberlain. Lew Griffith.
Captain; Ronnie \Veber. Sonny Morris. Sonny Day, Wally Ryland. Second Rou': Mike Chasman. Trainer and Manager; Pete
Popham, Asst. Coach; Joe Pellagrino, John Schreck. Larry McCoy. Walt Eckbreth, Dick Parker, Ed Carlough, Dutch Schulze,
Coach.



BASEBALL



The Eagles showed a new look this year.

This took place mainly in the infield with
only two lettermen returning. Joining them
were newcomers Sonny Day, Jay Chamberlain,
and Wally Ryland. The pitching had life in-
jected into it with the arrival of Larry McCoy,



Ronnie McPherson, and Bill Wood. The out-
field boasted two returning lettermen in Dick
Parker and Lew Griffith.

All in all, this should be one of the best sea-
sons A.LI, has had in a long time.



McCoy comes in from the mound to make a play
at home.



'Ye'r out I" as Rvland tags Colby player at the plate.




TENNIS



AU's team is definitely one of the better con-
ference teams. Topped only by Catholic U. and
Loyola, it looks like at least a third place in
this very close race.

Danny C7reenfield, who captains the team, is
playing his fourth year and is considered one
of the top conference players.

Another strong point has been the success in
the doubles matches, where the playing has been
outstanding throughout the season.




/^




N:?^



Captain Danny Greenfield gets set to
smash one.



VARSITY TENNIS TEAM. First Row: Bob Frailey, Coach; Danny Greenfield, Captain; Bill DeLorme, Bob
Skinner, Chung, Dick Horn, Sam Albert, Carl Havener, Al Rappoport, Manager.




A Queen is crowned



THIS YEAR



FROSH MEET A.U.



"Frightened Freshmen" got their first glimpse
of "Sophisticated Sophomores" during Skit
Night. At this time they began to think that
maybe sophomores were human too.

One week later the "greenhorns" retaliated
with their own theatrical extravaganza. Fresh-
man Talent Night proved that maybe this wasn't
the worst freshman class in the history of A.U.
after all.




Marcia Eddy represents the Sophomores in a
hula.



102




Pat Van der Hyden, representing the Sopho-
mores, caps Ronnie McPherson, a new Frosh.



The Freshman with the most demerits takes his
punishment from Lee Levy.



The rosy dreams of the Frosh crum-
bled as they went through the rigors
of Freshmen week, which was con-
cluded with Kangaroo Court.

Were the Sophs really out to see that
the Freshmen race became extinct? The
only consolation of these glorified high
school seniors was that it would be their
turn next year!



Frosh Mike Chasman and Harry Fairbairn work
off their demerits by measuring the front of
Mary Graydon Hall in fish lengths.




103




DCs serve coffee and cake at their party.



"Indian Signs," the trade mark of an ATO rush
party.



RUSHING



Phi Mil's Hght the nishees' way by candlelight.



■ 04





Two lushees pledge "A Tramps'
Organization" during OM s winning
skit.



ATO's winning
presentation of Fishnet



AUCOLA SKIT NIGHT



With their own versions of Dragnet and fra-
ternity rushing, ATO and OM took the honors
in the first annual Aucola Skit Night. Through
the efforts of Lee Levy, this proved to be one
of the high spots of the year and served to stim-
ulate student interest in the yearbook.



CANDIDATES FOR THE AUCOl.A QUEEN.
First Roic: Midge Eisenlolir, Nancy Chick. Lou-
ise Ralph, Lorri Childs, Carolyn .Siple. Second
Row. I'at Cole. Pat Van der Hyden, Janet Ogg,
Jean Sherwood, Marlene Williams.





Miss Nancy Chick, 1954 Aucola Queen



107




Lee Levy patuoniimes to a record at
the Coffee Shop Opening.



MC \1 Rappoport assists Dr. .•Anderson in
crowning the Oucen.




Dr. and Mrs. .\nderson cut the ribbon, of-
ficially opening the new "Eagle's Nest."



THE EAGLES

NOW HAVE A NEST!



108




Want a cup of coffee? Want eggs
for breakfast (with or without . . .
shells) ?

The new Eagle's Nest is the
place for you. At the grand open-
ing of this spot where "the elite
meet to eat" President and Mrs.
Anderson officially cut the ribbon.

The climax of the evening came
when Phyllis Holm was crowned
with a coffee pot as Coffee Shop
Queen of 1953.




Coffee Shop Queen Phyllis Holm poms llic first cup of
coffee in the new Eagle's Nest.




The Queen and her court — Anne Bainard
and Sue Olson.



109



A.U. fi.fi. IN N.Y.




Oop:




The Hofstra game as seen on televi



in Washington.



New Yoik basketball fans surveyed the Eagles on two occasions dur-
ing the 53-54 season, and were left with a favorable impression. The
A.U. quintet gave both Manhattan and NYU a taste of "big time" ball
in the early part of the campaign, until finally succumbing 75-52, and
83-69, to superior height and depth in its first sweep through the New
York area.

On its second visit to the Empire State the basketball squad was
televised nationally during the Hofstra Invitational Christmas Tourna-
ment. This time the A.U. men, rising to the occasion, defeated the
Flying Dutchmen in a thrilling 74-73 contest.

These are the bovs who started for A.V. in the New York
games: Charlie Baer. Dan Greenfield, Bud Dalv, Carl Havener,
John Selby.





Delta Gamma won the float competition

with this?



Phi Sigma Kappa's winning poster.



HOMECOMING



Amid posters, floats, and winning baskets, the
alums were welcomed back to their Alma Mater
at the annual homecoming celebration.

At half time, Miriam Thompson followed in
the footsteps of her two older sisters to become
the Homecoming Queen of 1953.

Cannibals and Square dancers proved to be
the winning themes of the float and poster, and
74 to 68 was A.U.'s winning score.

A dance ended the "Hot Time In the Old
Home Town" that night.



Larry McCoy takes a rebound from the Loyola
basket.






Dean Shaw, seen from the rear, as
she and Don Osten take a break from
the game.



FACULTY
SHOWS TALENT



The skirted faculty hockey team.



Where else in the world but A.U. could one
see the faculty, dressed in skirts and wigs, play
the girls' varsity in field hockey? And where else
could one dance in the dreamy atmosphere of
the annual Freshman Sno Ball? Obviously A.U.
has a monopoly on these wonderful moments.



FRESHMAN
SNO BALL



.Students agreed that the decorations were the
best ever at this dance.





115



SEASONS GREETINGS



Nothing gave A.U. the Christmas spirit quite
as much as "Season Greetings," the annual
Christmas show presented by the music and
dramatic organizations, and directed by Don
Osten. With "Santa Claus" giving the talent as
gifts, something was present to suit everyone's
tastes.



The performers posed as dolls to answer let-
ters written to Santa. And what a variety of
dolls there were? One coiUd find a clown doll
capering, a pair of romantic dolls, a dancing
doll, a nightclub doll, and many others.

Then came the singing of "Ave Maria," and
the stirring Nativity Scene, which was presented
in pantomime.




Don Oslen, in an old and familial-
pose, introduces the show.



116



Pat Shelhamcr sings the lovely and inspiring
"Ave Maria. "




Dancing-doll Sara Van Dyke
performs a ballet number.



Rudy "Santa" Garcia jokes with
his helpers Loretta Kricgsman
and Carol Wilson.



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MGH GOES COED!



Never thought we'd see the day that MEN
roamed the upper floors of Mary Graydon Hall
— but it happened during Open House! When
one of the fellows answered the third floor
phone, the man on the other end was slightly
startled.



Sam Albert and Barbara Balas decide that this
Mary Graydon life might have it's good points,
after all.




MOONLIGHT
GIRL DANCE



Phi Sigma Kappa held it's annual "Moon-
light Girl Dance" and picked Louise Ralph as
its Beauty Queen from three finalists, which in-
cluded Pat Shelhamer and Anne Bell.

The drowsy revelers then took off for home
through a never-to-be-forgotten dense fog.



Louise seems delighted as Ed Carlough places
her Moonlight pin.




Miss Louise Ralph
Moonlight Girl of Phi Sigma Kappa




HIGHLIGHTS OF OUR CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION



What would Christmas be without a tra-
ditional Christmas dinner? With turkey and
all the trimmings, it was a tremendous success.

The candlelight service for the girls, that
followed the dinner festivities, brought a
warm Christmas feeling to the dorm. Sue Ol-
son was chosen best-loved girl by the other
Mary Graydon residents.



THE MOST REPRESENTATIVES GIRLS:

Fieshinan Nancy Sumler, Sophomore Jane
Fuller. Junior Doris Lee Sampson, Senior
Ethel McEvoy, Washington Semester Anne
Bell.




The German C:liib, with its winning table decoration.



A scene from the ilorm mid-
night candlelight service.



The cafeteria gals give their annual Christ-
mas COIUCII.





From 2:00 to 4:00 A.M., wc all went out caroling to the President's house, dormitories, and
fraternity houses.

This picture carries a lot of weight — Dean Shaw proper-
ly scolds Lee Lew




Pat Shelhamer toasts a marshmallow at
the Independent's party.




Carol Wilson hands a gift to "Apostoclaus" as
he hands thcni out to the oqihans.



This year the fraternity pledges, under the
guidance of Al Stallone, gave a Christmas
party for a group of orphans. John Apos-
tolakos, as Santa, distributed gifts, and each
child got a free dinner.

Each sorority, and the independent group,
sponsored a Christmas party for their mem-
bers after the midnight service.



PARTIES FOR

GIRLS AND ORPHANS




A highlight of the dorm parties was the capture of a stray male who got too near the front dooi
of Mary Graydon.




A.U. GOES ITALIAN




To prove that our Social Board was really
on the ball (meatball, that is) , we held a
bis^ spaghetti dinner to satisfy the heartiest
of appetites. As the old Chinese proverb
says, "He who walked away hungry, just
didn't grai) fast enough."



M. I'Ik isi.ii adds the sauce to Carol

s|-.lgllClll.



Howie and Ethel partake in the widely-accepted
Italian style.



Alpha Sigma Phi held their annual Christ-
mas dance at the home of the Broyhills. High-
light of the evening was the choosing of their
Dream Girl, Sue Olson.




The newly-crowned Queen and her es
cort, Ernie Dibble.



124



Sally entertains the ATO's during intermission before
the crowning of the Queen.




ATO PICKS
SWEETHEART



The ATO Christmas Dance was held
this year in the ATO House on Campus.
Miss Sally Shanklin was elected Sweet-
heart of ATO by vote of the chapter.
Another highlight of the evening was
the exchanging of comic presents among
the members.



ATO SWEETHEARTS FOR THE LAST FOUR YEARS: Mrs. Florence
Sanders. 1951; Miss Sally Shankin, 1954; Miss Betty Elliott, 1952; Miss
Jackie Hoffecker, 1953.




126



Miss Sally Shanklin, Sweetheart of ATO




.127



CAMPUS SPROUTS
NEW ARCHITECTURE




■Wpjirwrir"



■w » ft «. i-i itr mmr. ■■■ •»'



Mr. Kaufman, President of the
Evening Star, breaks ground for
the new Radio and Television
Building. Looking on are Presi-
dent of the Board of Trustees,
Fletcher, and President Anderson.



Architect's drawing of the Radio-TV
Center.



Work on the new Center is progress-
ing rapidly.




128



Ground has been broken and construction
started on the quarter million dollar TV-Radio
production Workshop being built for the Uni-
versity by the Evening Star Broadcasting Com-
pany (WMAL) . This building is the first of
its type in the Washington area and will con-
tain radio and television studios as well as class-
rooms and research space.



Two new dormitories are now being con-
structed, and are scheduled to be completed
about January. These dorms are the begin-
ning of a new quadrangle, to consist of seven
similar units, located on the Nebraska avenue
end of the campus. The temporary veterans
apartments are being torn down to make room
for the new construction.




• nflllTOIIICt roil THt.oA4f*




»TENIf»U»C— AMOHITtCT



Architects drawing of the
two new dormitories,
each to house 110 stu-
dents.



Those temporary apart-
ments are now being torn
down, to be replaced by



new structures.



129



MASON-DIXON CONFERENCE




This is the first year in Conference history
that A.U. has been eliminated in the first round
of the tournament. The Eagles, nevertheless,
made one of their finest showings of the sea-
son.

The bucketboys were 10 points down at half-
time and managed to gain a 4 point lead over a
slow-moving Roanoke Club. At one point in
the rally, every fan stood up and cheered a
fast-break play completed by the sharp-passing
A.U. aggregation. At that point the Eagles ran
oiu of steam and finally were defeated in the
last minutes of the contest.



John .Sclby out jumps the Roanoke boys for a rebound.




Miss Betty Elliott, Apple Blossom Princess




The girls line up for the impressive opener _ "Granada.'



AQUIANA FIESTA



"South America - Ole!!" The water show
paid tribute to a land of color and romance.
With graceful dives and smooth strokes they
presented percision designs, romance stories,
comedy and solo numbers. Who could forget
the Donkey Serenade, with the youngest mem-



ber of the group as the waltzing burro?

Of course. Bob Frailey was traditionally
thrown into the pool right after the final per-
formance. An added surprise was a birthday
party for "the little donkey" after the Saturday
night show.



132




Technician takes a light reading for the television film cameras.



Performers form a pattern for the finale of "Fiesta De La Aqua.'




FRATS PRANCE




Everyone dances as the orchestra plays a waltz at
the Interfraternity Prom at the Hamilton Hotel.



Guests do the Bunny Hop at the Bunny Hop.




EASTER FROLIC



What is a college without the traditional
"dreamy dances?" A.U. had its share of these.

The Interfraternity Prom was one of the
big formals of the year. The Bunny Hop
was the traditional Sophomore-sponsored
shindig. Both proved that we would have
very pleasant memories of A.U.'s social life.




"%*,<-. ,|^r




•\



i »



«»»




X .



Miss Carol Wilson, Bunny Hop Queen




RECIPIENTS OF OUTSTANDING SENIOR AWARDS:
Sue Olson, Sorority; Sam Albeit, Independent.



Gail Morton, Independent; Ed Walker, Fraternity;



". . . AND GOOD CLOSE HARMONY"



Kappa Delta and Alpha Sigma Phi placed
first in the annual All-Greek Song Fest, spon-
sored by the Interfraternity and Panhellenic
Councils.

The KD's, led by Sara Van Dyke, sang
"Here's to Old Kappa Delta" and "Kiss Me
Again." Alpha Sig, last year's winners, sang
"Within the Mystic Circle" and "I Believe,"
led by Jay Guy.

Phi Mu and Alpha Sigma Phi won the
scholarship awards for the third year, retir-
ing the cup in each case. The Panhellenic
pledge scholarship award went to Betty Port-



er, of Phi Mu, with a 3.0 average. Dean
Shaw presented the Women's Outstanding
Senior awards to Independent Gail Morton
and Greek Sue Olson. Dean Bentley pre-
sented the Men's awards to Sam Albert, In-
dependent, and Edward Walker, fraternity
man.

The Special Interfraternity - Panhellenic
Award was presented to Dr. Dorothy D. Gon-
dos, as the faculty member who has done an
outstanding job in the promotion of student
life. This award is not presented annually,
only when the Councils feel it is particularly
merited.



136




Kappa Delta Sorority, winners of the Sorority competition.



Alpha Sigma Phi, winners of the men's competition.




137



A.U. SAYS FAREWELL
TO SENIORS




Seniors enjoy the biggest dance of the year — the Jiniior-Senior Prom.



Senior week was crammed full of events to
offer a final tribute to graduating AUites.

It began with Campus Day at which time
students, covered with green paint, cleaned
up, painted, and repaired the campus.

Songfest gave the sororities and fraternities



a chance to sound their "A's".

Other events of the week included an all
day picnic, a talk by Bobby Feller, Senior
Class Day, the Honors Convocation, and the
grand finale of the week — the Junior-Senior
Prom.



138




The Baccalaureate Service as framed by a window in Battelle Library.



Dr. Shenton. University Marshal, leads the graduation procession across the quadrangle.





Batlelle Memorial Library




DIRECTORY



141



UNDERGRADUATES

AIRMAN, BONSIE _ 3636 16th Street, N.W. Washine-

ton 10, D, C. - Apt. B310
ADDIS, BARNETT - 1630 In-ing N.W., Washineton

D. C. - Apt. 4 *

ALBERT SAMUEL - 830 Crittenden Street, N.W., Wash-
ington D. C.
ALEXANDER, SHIRLEY - 4600 29th Street, Mt. Rainier,

Maryland
ALLERTON, JOHN - 4600 32nd Road North, Arlington,

Virginia
ALLEN, JAMES - 119 35th Street, S.E., Washington

D. C. ^

AL-SUHAIL, COMMANDER M. - 4796 Western .■\venue

N.W., Washington, D. C.
AL-YAWER, MOHAMMED - 2121 H Street, NW

Washington, D. C.
APOSTOLAKOS, JOHN - 1511 Allison Street, N.W

Washington, D. C.
AQUILINO, LYLE - 6020 20th Street North, Arling-

ton, Virginia
AILCIA, AROSCURENA - Peunome, Cicle, Rep. de

Pausura
ARRAND, FRANCES - 993 Bradley Street, Flint, Michi-
gan
AMUNDSON, CLARENCE - 1834 A Street, S.E., Wash-
ington. D. C.
ANDERSON, WALTER - 4913 Jay Street, N.E., Wash-
ington, D. C.
ANDRUS. EDWARD - Route 2, Box 467, Alexandria,

Virginia
ANSARY, CYRUS - 3409D New Mexico Avenue, N W

Washington 16, D. C.
ANTUNES, JORGE - 1426 N Street, N.W., Washington
D. C. ^ '



ASARE-LARTEY, LEWIS - P.O. Box 12 Aburi, Gold
Coast, British West Africa.

BALAS, BARBARA - 10208 Bieber Place, Silver Spring
Maryland *^ ^

BACHELOR, LILLYAN - 4301 Massachusetts Avenue,
N.W., Washington, D.C. _ Apt. A301

BAER, CHARLES - 257 High Street, Tamaqua, Penn-
sylvania

BAKER, LAWRENCE - 4401 South 6th Street. Arling-
ton, Virginia

BALAMUT, ISAAC - 85-21 152 Street, Jamaica 32, New
York

BARBER, THEODORE - 2004 Eye Street, N.W., Wash-
ington. D. C.

BARLOW, THOMAS - 1424 Fairview Terrace, Alexan-
dria, Virginia

BARNARD, ANNE - 617 West 168th Street. Washington
D. C.

BARRETT, MARILYN - 2627 North Roosevelt, Arling-
ton, Virginia

BARNES, ROBERT - 429 North Park Drive, Arlington,
Virginia — ,\pt. 2

BARTLETT, RICHARD - 2102 Dayton Street, Silver
Spring, Maryland

BATCHELOR, NANCY - 10 Waugh Avenue, Glyndon,
Maryland

BAUSE, DAVID - 42 East Philadelphia Avenue, Boyer-
town, Pennsylvania

BELL, ROBERT - 5512 2nd Street, N.W., Washington 11
D. C. 6 .

BELLE, SHEILA - 2900 Alden Road, Baltimore 14,
Maryland

BENNETT, GEORGIA - 517 Brunswick Street, Bruns-
wick, Maryland

BENNER, RALPH - 4616 Verplanck Place, N.W., Wash-
ington 16, D. C.



Compliments
of the

WOMAN'S GUILD

OF THE

AMERICAN UNIVERSITY



THE GANG ALWAYS

MEETS M THE
\




SHOPPES



FAMOUS DRIVE- IN HESTAURKNTS



142




8:30 arreddy?



TURNER STUDIO

Aucola Portrait Pliotographer

108 North Washington Street
Alexandria, Virginia



KI ng 9-3059



BENSON. JOHN — 3605 VanNess Street, N.W., Wash-
ington 8, D. C.
BERLIN, STEVE - 1636 Fort Dupont Street, S.E., Wash-
ington 20. D. C.

BETTER, NORMAN - 202 Bunker Hill Road, N.E.,
Washington 18, D. C.

BETSCHLER, MARY - 366 Arlington Village, Arlington,
4, Virginia

BETZLER, LAWRENCE - 2408 Arlington Blvd., Arling-
ton 4, Virginia

BLACKBURN, WILLIAM - 5028 Allan Road. Washing-
ton 16, D. C.

BLAKE. PATRICIA - 57 West 8th Street, New Vork IL
New York

BLAYCOCK. MARVIN - 4252 St. Barnabas Road, Wash-
ington 23. D. C.

BLUME. WAITER - 115-43 227 Street. Cambria Heights
11 lainaica. New York

BOGLIA, JOAN — 6420 99th Street, Forest Hills. New
York

BOICE, ROBERT - 31 15 G Street, S.E., Washington 19,
D. C.

BOLE, ELIZABETH - 303 SE Baublits Drive, Warring-
ton, Florida

BOLE, MARGARET — 303 SE Baublits Drive, Warring-
ton, Florida

BOLSTER, RICHARD - 113 Croydon Street, Silver
Spring. Maryland

BONIGER. WILLIAM - 303 Forest Drive. Erie, Penn-
sylvania

BONO. PETER — 113 2nd Avenue, Frankfort, New York

BOOKER, GEORGE - 201 16th Street, N.E., Washington,
D. C. - Apt. 2

BOOS, ELIZABETH - 1901 Otis Street, N.E., Washing-
ton 18, D. C.

BOSVVELL. JUDITH - 7 Cedar Street, Alexandria, Vir-
ginia

BOWIE, JANET — 4801 Connecticut Avenue, Wash-
ington, D. C.

BRADFORD, ROSALYN - 4604 South 4th Street, Arling-
ton, Virginia

BRAR. HAZOORA - 2700 Macomb Street, Washington,
D. C.

BRIGGS, ROBERT - 5503 28th Avenue, S.E., Washing-
ton 21, D. C.

BROOKS, K.\THERINE - 630 Webster Street, N.W.,
Washington. D. C.

BROWN. DAVID — 1731 First Street, N.W., Washington,

D. C.
BROWN. JOSEPH - 1731 D Street. N.W.. Washington,

D. C.
BROWN. PHYLLIS — 117 Winchester Way. Falls Church.

X'irginia
BUDENSTEIN, NANETTE - 2515 13th Street, N.W.,

Washington. D. C.
BUITRAGO. LUIS - 817 Webster Street. N.W., Wash-
ington, D. C.



The Place To Go For

CUT FLOWERS - CORSAGES - ARRANGEMENTS

4200 Wisconsin Avenue, N.W.

Telephone: WO odiey 6-9650



143



.BURBA, LALLIE — Army War College, Carlile Barracks,

Pennsylvania
BUTLER, ANNE - 6202 Welbom Road, Washington 16,

D. C.
BUSH, FLORA - 6600 Luzon Avenue, N.W., Washington,

D. C.

CANNON, JOSEPH - 2122 36th Place, S.E., Washing-
ton 20, D. C.

CARLOUGH. EDWARD - 3215 Gunston Road, Alex-
andria, Virginia

CARVER, HARRY - 1031 20th Street, South, Arlington,
Virginia

CAUDLE, JAMES - 3460-4 New Mexico Avenue, Wash-
ington 16. D. C.

CERNY, MILTON - 2830 South Maple Avenue, Berwyn,
Illinois

CHAMBLIN, HOWARD - 4429 20th Road North, Ar-
lington 7, Virginia

CHASMAN, MICHAEL - 341 Sanford Avenue, Hillside,
New Jersey

CHICK. NANCY - 804 South Harrison Street, Arlington,
Virginia

CHILDS, LORRI - 3736 15th Avenue, New York 34,
New York

CHIN, ELIZABETH — 1412 Montague Street, N.W.,
Washington 11, D. C.

CHUNG, JOHN - 54 Avenue Republica, Macan, S. China

CLAGGETT, PAUL - 4523 Iowa Avenue. N.W., Wash-
ington, D. C.

CLARKE, CAROLINE - South Howell Avenue, Center-
beach, Long Island. New York

COBB. GLADYS - 5827 Potomac Avenue, N.W.. Wash-
ington 16, D. C.

COBLENTZ, MARY ELLEN - Route 1 Atwood Road,
Silver Spring, Maryland

COLEMAN, EDYTH - 1024 Maplewood Drive, Falls
Church, Virginia



COLLINS, OSCAR - 6921 Blair Road, N.W., Wash-
ington, D. C.

COOKE, WALTER - 3204 Park Place, N.W., Wash-
ington, D. C.

COONES, PEGGY - 110-07 73 Road, Forest Hills, New
York

COOPER, CAROL — St. Margarets, RD 2, Annapolis,
Maryland

COOPER, MARY - 851 21 Street, N.E., Washington,
D. C.

GOTTEN, BENJAMIN - 412 4th Street, N.E., Wash-
ington, D. C.

COOPER, VIRGINIA - 1411 South Thomas, .\rlington,
Virginia

COUSIN. W1LLI.\M - 1708 North Fulton Avenue, Bal-
timore, Maryland

CROSBY, GEORGE - 4604 29th Street, Mt. Rainier,
Maryland

CROSIER, ELEANOR - 6422 Broad Street, Brookmond,


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Online LibraryT. De Witt (Thomas De Witt) TalmageAucola (Volume 1954) → online text (page 3 of 5)