T. J O'Shea.

Farming & planting in British East Africa. A description of the leading agricultural centres and an account of agricultural conditions and prospects online

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of cured tobacco leaf has been similarly disposed of
in the current year.

The varieties under trial are: — Natal Uba, West sugar cank.
Indian Sealey Seedling, West Indian B.1528, West
Indian li.3922, West Indian B.2396. Uba is
particularly serviceable in the form of chopped
green feed, mixed with mealie meal and o her
crushed igrain, for the diary cows. Of the West
Indian varieties Sealey Seedling is, so far, the most
promising. Large numbers of cuttings of the canes
have been sent out to settlers in various parts of the
Uplands.

These are highly satisfactory, especially potatoes, vegetaijles
beans, peas, brocoli, cauliflower, turnips, carrots, and salads.
cabbages, lettuce, radish and tomato. Pot herbs ir.
variety are all that can be desired.

131



GINGER. Among the newly imported economic plants

under trial at Kabete, is a plot of ginger, raised from
rhizomes received in Nov., 1916, from the Cedara
School of Agriculture, Natal. The plants have made
good growth and their general condition is en-
couraging.

ORENA The fibre from the inner bark of this shrubby

LOBATA. plant of the Malvaceae order, is being used in Brazil

for the manufacture of coffee sacks, etc. Part of a
small consignment of Urena Lobata seed obtained
from the Department of Agriculture, Ceylon, and
sown at Kabete in the middle of January, 191 7, has
germinated satisfactorily, but the seedlings are
making slow growth.

TEA. Several nursery beds were planted with Tea seed,

imported from India, at the end of March, 191 7.
50% of the seed germinated, and at the time of
writing the seedlings are healthy and thriving.
In previous reports of the Economic Plants Division
mention has been made of the Tea bushes at Came-
ville, Limuru, where growth has been excellent.
Similar results are reported in connection with the
Tea bushes established at the Government Adminis-
trative Station at Kericho.



TELFARiA This is the name of the huge cucurbitaceous

PEDATA. plants rambling over several Albizzia trees in a section

of the main nursery. It belongs to the cucumber and
melon family and is a native of the Shimba Hills and
Taveta districts, as well as other parts of the lower
tropical belt of the Protectorate. The fruit is fre-
quently 18 inches to two feet in length, and 8 to 10
inches thick, with several deep longitudinal furrows
outside. Numerous circular seeds are produced, from
an inch to an inch and a half in diameter. They yield
by pressure an excellent bland oil, and besides, are
eaten as dessert, the flavour of the nuts much re-
sembling that of the Brazil nut and the Caryocar nut.
From a spectacular point of view the clump of
Telfairias at Kabete holds premier place with visitors,
hence the following brief historical notice may be
recorded. In 1904 Kweme seeds were collected in the
Taveta district by Mr. Andrew Linton, and from
these seeds several plants were raised the same year
by the compiler of these notes, and established at the
old Experimental Farm, where they subsequently

IHii



fruited, The Kabete plants under notice were raised
and established by Mr. G. W. Evans in 1909 from
seed obtained by him at the old Experimental Farm
referred to.

The outstanding feature in connection with the milk.
farm during 1916-17 has been the supplying of milk
to sick and wounded soldiers and to the Carrier Corps
at the Military Hospitals and bases at and around
Nairobi. In all 30,985 gallons were supplied. The
Military authorities very considerably helped in the
matter by placing at the disposal of the farm suffi-
cient native cows to augment the milk from the
Department's pedigree and grade cows. Foodstuffs
and other material, and a proportion of the herd
boys, were also supplied by the Military.

The following tables dealing with the field crops cenerai.
at Kabete are taken from the Annual Report for crops.
1915-1916.



MAIZE VARIETY EXPERIMENTS.
First Season: — Area 23-02 Acres.



Variety.


Planted.


Duration


Har-
vested.


Yield,
per acre.


Hickory Horse Tooth

do.
Lady.smith White ...

do.


11)1.5.
29th— 80th Mar.

do.
27th— 29th Mar
2nd April.


About

C. mths

do.

do.

do.


191.5.
Aug, 8th

.. yth

Sep 29th
Oct. 4 th


l,39.Slb9.
2..59f. lbs.
8,439 lbs.
1,478 lbs.



An area of 8.48 acres was planted on 29th — 30th value of
March, 1915 and harvested on the 8th August, 1915. rotation
Half of this area had lain fallow during the previous of crops.
season and half had carried a crop of beans. The
yield from the portion after fallow was 1,393 lbs.
per acre, and the portion after beans gave a yield of
2,596 lbs. per acre. The whole plot received the
same treatment as regards planting, harvesting and
general cultivation. The superior growth of the
bean portion of the area was most marked almost from
germination and the result is worthy of the attention
of settlers.



133



BEANS.

BEAN VARIETY EXPERIMENT.
First Season: — Area 58 Acres.



Variety.



Rose Cocos
Canadian Wonder..
Noyau au Bhxnc ..
BrailaFlat White..



Planted.



191o.

5th May.

71 h M;.y

3('th April.

20th May.



Duration



About

4 mths

do.

do

do.



Har-
vested,



! 9 I r,
SDth Auir
()th AufT
ISth An-.'-
iOth Sep.



Yield
per acre



709 lbs.
84 2 lbs.
r.28 lbs
302 lbs.



Second Season • — 43 48 Ac


res.




Variety.


Planted.


D u rati en


Har-
vested


Yield
per acre.


Canadian Wontier ...
Noyau au Blanc ...
BrailaFlat white...


191.-).
nth Nov.
6t,h Nov.
l/th Nov.
12th Nov


About
4 mths.

do.

do.

do.


1 9 1 r..
llthFeb.
9th Feb.
4th Mar
15th Feb


874 lbs.
383 lbs.
359 lbs.
459 lbs.



During the first season we had good rains and
in the second rain only fell when the crop was
planted and none during their growth.

Beans, etc. — (Small Plots).
First Season.



Variety.


Planted


Harvested


Yield






1915


per acre.




1915




Canadian Wonder Beans.


17th April


17 th Awr


:.480 lbs


Field Peas


14th ..


28th .,


1,080 lbs


Rose Coco (Selected) ...


19th ..


17th .,


1.400 lbs


Flajrelot Beans


17th


14th ,.


1,810 lbs


Lentils (Egyptian)


17th ..


2(Uh „


1,225 lbs


Broad lieans


17th .,


28th ..


fio2 lbs


Butter Beans


1 9th „


10th „


990 lbs.


Telephone peas


17th ,.


28 th ,.


900 lbs.


Noyau au Blanc


19th


7th „


960 lbs.


Rose Coco ...


19th


17th „


1,255 lbs.


Stratag-em Peas


19th ..


28th ..


1,340 lbs.


White Coco Beans


19th .,


28th ., 1


1,230 lbs.


Schmaltzbahnen


17th ,


7th .,


940 lbs.


Horse Beans


Kith .,


3rd S.^p. 1


875 lbs.


American Wonder Peas.


Ihth ..


3rd ..


7421b8..


Indian Gram


17th .,


Failure





134



Second Season.



Varifty


Planted.


Harvested.


Yield
per acre.




1915


191b.




Broad beans


2nd Nov.


8th April.


Um ibs.


Schmaltzbahneii




1 8th Feb.


540 lbs.


Canadian Wondei-


.,


,.


450 lbs.


White Coc


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Online LibraryT. J O'SheaFarming & planting in British East Africa. A description of the leading agricultural centres and an account of agricultural conditions and prospects → online text (page 14 of 16)