Thomas Henry Huxley.

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compared with Franklin, 325.

Francis, Dr. William, i. 84, 124, 131.

Franco-Prussian War, i. 359, 361.

Frankland, Sir Edward, i. 151, 277.
Letters to on x Club, 1.281; Spottis-
woode's illness, ii. 54; vigour of
"old fogies": Mentone earth-
quake, 174; habits of eels, 181;
article on " Struggle for Exist-
ence," 199; on Royal Society
federation scheme, 201.

Franklin, B., influence compared with
that of Fox, ii. 325.

Free thought, ultimate success of, i.
428; tone of some publications,
ii. 342, 429.

Freemantle, Rev. W. H., account of
the Oxford British Association,
1860, i. 200; controversy with, on
Bible teaching, 368.

French, knowledge of, i. 160.

Froude, J. A., i. 354, 511, 513.

Fullerian Professorship, i. 93, 150; res-
ignation, 314.

Galbraith, leaves Natural History Re-

viciv, i. 225.

Galileo and the Pope, ii. 122.
Gallegos river, fossils at, i. 297, 335.
Gallon, Sir D., at x Club, i. 279.
Galton, F., on Committee of the

Reader, i. 227.
Geary, i. 37.

Gegenbaur, Professor, i. 176.
Geikie, Sir A., sends proofs of the

Primer to, i. 412.
Gemmation, lecture on, i. 151.
Genesis, controversy over, ii. 123; re-
newed in Times, 314 sq.
Genius, men of, a " sport," i. 259; as

an explosive power, 384.
Gentians, study of, begun, ii. 146 sq. ;

continued, 214.

" Geological Contemporaneity," i. 220.
" Geological Reform," i. 333.
Geological Society, Fellow of, i. 161;

elected Secretary, 166.



INDEX



517



Geological Survey, work on, i. 154.

George, H., Progress and Poverty, ii.
261, 264.

German, knowledge of, i. 160, ii. 444.

German speculation, research and
style, ii. 382.

Gilman, Professor D. C., i. 279.

Glacier ice, paper on, i. 155.

Gladstone, Professor J. H., account
of Huxley's work on the School
Board, i. 364 sq.

Gladstone, Right Hon. W. E., and
Metaphysical Society, i. 338; not
an expert in metaphysics, 341 ; the
greatest intellect in Europe, 379;
reaction from, 525; a graceful ac-
tion, ii. 15; function of, 286; at-
tacks Huxley in the Impregnable
Rock of Holy Scripture, 287; swine
miracle, 288; and Parnell, 291-93;
typical of the century? 396.
controversy with, on Genesis, ii. 122
sqq. ; estimate of, 130; letter on
the ordeal of public criticism,
190; revived by others, 314 sq.
second controversy with, ii. 450, 452.

Goethe, quoted, i. 163; on " thatige
Skepsis," 181; his Aphorisms
translated for the first number of
Nature, 351; scientific insight of,
ii. 431.

Golf, Huxley plays, i. 390.

Goodsir, Dr. John, as man of science,

i. IG2.

Gordon, C. G., ideas and character, ii.
101, 102, 107; why he did not have
the African fever, 103.

Gordon, G. \V., executed by Eyre, i.
300 sq.

Gore, Canon, ii. 286.

Gosse, Edmund, anonymous review-
ers, ii. 153.

Grant, Dr., introduction to, i. 27; as
man of science, 102; an early evo-
lutionist, 180.

Grant (friend of Dr. Dohrn), i. 431.

Grant Duff, Sir M., letter from pos-
sibilities of a political career for
Huxley, i. 380; Lord Rector of
Aberdeen, 420.

Granville, Lord, letter from appoints
Huxley on London University
Senate: anecdote of Clay, the



whist player, ii. 64; a master of
polished putting down, 178.

Gray, Asa, misunderstanding of Dar-
win, ii. 205; appreciation of, ib.

Gray, J. E., introduction to, i. 27, 29;
support from, 87; a zoological
whirlwind, 171.

Green, T. H., i. 195; account of Hux-
ley's speech at Oxford, 199.

Green, of Leeds, to help in Men of
Science Series, i. 535.

Greene, Professor R., i. 176, 225.

Gregory, Sir W. H., with, in Egypt,
i- 3975 Governor of Ceylon, 404.

Greswell, Rev. Richard, i. 196, 201.

Grey, Albert, M.P., letter to, on
Home Rule, ii. 132.

Griffiths, Mr., Secretary British Asso-
ciation, i. 441.

Grote, George, and titles, i. 386.

Grove, Sir G., a criticism, i. 324.

Gull, Sir W., and F.R.S., ii. 119.

Gunther, Dr., i. 448.

Gutzlaff, saying of, ii. 141, 151.

Haeckel, Professor Ernst, his Gas-
trsea theory, dependent on Hux-
ley's discoveries, i. 43; Darwin-
ism in Germany, 287; unable to
attend British Association, 1866,
208; and Bathybius, 317 sq.
Letters to on reading Die Radio-
Icrien, i. 255; dissuades him from
joining Arctic expedition: Dar-
winism: philological evidence in
ethnology, 287, 288; on his Mor-
phologic: controversy, 309; mar-
riage: classification of birds:
handwriting, 311; von Baer's
Copley: reptiles and birds, 325;
translation of his Morphologic: in-
fluence of children, 327, 328; no-
tice of the Anthropogenic: attack
on Darwin in the Quarterly : Amphi-
o.rns and the primitive vertebrate,
457; Rattlesnake " collection " :
his Medusae unpublished: Cray-
fish: Spirula: his children, 527.

Hahn, Father, reminiscences of Hux-
ley's impartiality in teaching, ii.
428.

Hamilton, on the unconditioned, i.
234, 262.



5 i8



LIFE OF PROFESSOR HUXLEY



Hand, lecture on, i. 525, 533.
Harcourt, Sir W., letter to, suppres-
sion of physiological experiment,

i. 467-

Hardwicke, printer, i. 223-24.
Harrison, F., in Metaphysical Society,

i- 338; attacks agnosticism, ii.

235 sq.; controversy with: the

"Apologetic Irenicon," 318 sq. ;

attack of, philosophically borne,

363-
Harrison, J., letter to science and

agriculture, ii. 300.

Hartington, Lord, science should be
aided like the army and navy, ii.
164; technical education, 165; let-
ter to Deceased Wife's Sister
Bill, 233.

Hartismere, Lord, Vivisection Bill, i.
469.

Harvey, i. 216; lecture on, 520, 523;
article on, ii. i ; tercentenary,
385 sq.

Haughton, Professor S., leaves Natu-
ral History Review, i. 225.

Hay, Sir John, visit to, at Tangier,

i- 397-

Head, Francis, " javelins," ii. 182.

Healy, T., and Parnell, ii. 292.

Heathorn, Henrietta Anne (see Mrs.
T. H. Huxley), engagement, i.
39, 40; description of, 40; remote
prospect of marriage, 48, 49; ar-
rives in England, 138.

Heathorn, Mrs., i. 242.

Helmholtz, i. 279.

Helps, Sir A., i. 279.

Henslow, Professor, i. 96, 97, 160, 195,
196, 201; death of, 243; relation
to Darwin, ii. 42.

Herring, memoir on, i. 159; experi-
ments as to the spawning of, 166;
address on, ii. 30.

Herschel, Sir John, i. 64.

Hesitation, no good ever done by, i.

432.

Hippocampus, i. 206, 215.
Hird, Dr., presents testimonial to, ii.

73-

Hirst, Thomas Archer, i. 243; and x
Club, 277, 281, 282; character of,
419; Royal Medal, ii. 66; illness
of, 209; death of, 352.



Histology, work on, i. 159.

Historical Association of Lancashire
and Cheshire, presentation to
Huxley, i. 360.

Hobhouse, Lord, Huxley secures in-
tellectual freedom, ii. 430.

Hockenhull, Swanus de, ancestor of
the family of Huxley, i. 2.

Holiday, work, i. 391, 513, 530, 531;
borne well, ii. 45; definition of,

63-

Holland, Sir Henry, on Plato, ii. 451.

Home Rule, letter to A. Grey, ii.
132; also 144, 188.

Hooker, Sir J. D., his case a prece-
dent, i. 31, 61, 64; at Ipswich, 97;
at his marriage, 140; on Snow-
don with, 155; relations with
Darwin, 178; on species, 182, 190;
at Oxford, 1860, 195, 200, 201, 202;
origin of friendship with, 232; re-
monstrates with Huxley on excur-
sions into philosophy, 247; x Club,
278, ii. 128; clubs not for the old,
i. 282: with Huxley in Brittany,
308; President British Associa-
tion, 319; with Huxley in the
Eifel, 353; presentation to, at
Liverpool, 360; on Huxley's in-
tellect, 392; trouble with official
chief, 405, 408, 412, 419; account
of trip to the Auvergne, 420 sqq.;
receives Order of the Pole Star,
427; on Belfast meeting of British
Association, 432, 445; unable to
write obituary of Darwin, ii. 41;
P.R.S., 54; vigour of, 174; his
treatment by Government, 176;
friendship with, 225; Royal So-
ciety's Medal, 431; Huxley's love
of the garden, 469-71.
Letters from on his work on micro-
organisms, i. 356; Dana's obitu-
ary of Gray, ii. 205.
Letters to his selection for the
Royal Medal, i. 119; E. Forbes,
126; his approaching marriage,
139 (two); submerged forest, 140;
British Museum Collections, 144;
science in the Saturday Review,
150; glacier paper, 155; Swiss
trip, 156; election to Imp. Acad.
Cass. : Fullerian Lectures, 161 ; on



INDEX



519



criticism, 168; approaching " Au-
gustan Age " of English science,
171; on his Flora of Tasmania,
176, 177; on naturalists' fund, 177;
on Times review of the Origin,
190; on the ape question, 205;
on Punch squib, 206; his absence:
Edinburgh lectures, 210; Hux-
ley's address at Geological So-
ciety, 220; working men's lec-
tures, 1862, 223; Natural History
Review, 225, 226; future leaders of
science, 239; christening, 240; on
Natural History Review and ma-
terialists, 241; illness and death of
Henslow, 243, 244; move to Kew:
a poor client, 250, 251; science
examinations, 256; pressure of
work, 264; Science and Art De-
partment examinations, 274; Dar-
win's Copley Medal, 275; on .r
Club, 281, 282.

Medical men and F.R.S.,ii. 119;
distribution of gentians, 151, 152;
Darwin and the Quarterly review-
ers: chance and atheism, 153;
death of Symonds: gentians, 183;
the P.R.S. and politics, 185; his
Copley Medal, 189, 191 ; technical
education address at Manchester,
193; distribution of Coniferae,
194; visit from H. Spencer, 198;
Trustee of the British Museum:
story about Lowe: difficulty of
the Origin, 204; on Dana's obitu-
ary of Asa Gray: difficulty of
the Origin: primer of Darwin-
ismus, 204, 205; x Club breaking
up, 209; affection of the heart:
Moseley's breakdown, 210; Dar-
win obituary, possible senility,
ib.\ hybridism of gentians, 220;
a nomadic life or none: deaf-
ness: botanist should study dis-
tribution in the Engadine, 221,
222; visit from, before leaving
London, 221; Copley Medal:
friendship and salt-water experi-
ences, 225; x archives: a " house-
hold animal of value," 229; De-
ceased Wife's Sister question,
231; raison d'etre of clubs, 246;
applied science and the Royal



Society, ib. ; Academy dinner:
portrait of Hooker, 248; Monte
Generoso: called an old gentle-
man: anxieties about children
when grown up: x Club sub-
scription, 252; return from Ma-
loja, 256; orchids and the influ-
ence of conditions: Balfour and
R. C. University for Ireland,
2 S75 possibility of becoming a
pamphleteer, 261; proposed trip
to Canaries, 266; Linnean Medal:
trip to the Canaries, 272; quietude
of mind impossible, theologians
keep him occupied, 286; abuse
over Salvation Army affair, 291 ;
Carpenter's First Three Gospels:
varieties of pleurisy: Parnell, 291,
292; Parnell and his followers,
292; sick of controversy: Glad-
stone and his guides, 293; Mr.
Rich's legacy: seeks portrait of
John Richardson, 304, 305; visits
to Tyndall and Mrs. Darwin, 305;
French translation of essays on
Darwinism, 309; the Privy Coun-
cillorship: only remaining object
of ambition, 345; influenza and
the x, 352; funeral of Hirst, ib. ;
his sense of duty: death of Bow-
man, 353; x Club: his grandchild
on grown-up people and trouble,
354; Owen's work: Hume and
" being made a saint of," 362,
363; warning against overwork
and influenza, 385; at Maloja:
boys and their accidents: collects
essays: writes chapter in Owen's
Life: illness of friends, 386, 387
( C P- 395); Tyndall's death: remi-
niscences, 391 ; the Antarctic con-
tinent: reminiscences of Tyndall:
friendly words, 392; chapter on
Owen: a piece of antiquity, 395;
British Association at Oxford,
1894, 401 ; Darwin Medal and
Nature dinner: public speaking:
a tenth volume of essays pro-
jected: returns to philosophy:
Greek and English: cause of giv-
ing up dissecting work; charac-
ter of R. Strachey: Brian and
the brine, 414, 415; on Pithccan-



520



LIFE OF PROFESSOR HUXLEY



thropus, 417; illness and consti-
tutional toughness: Spencer and
"pour le merite," 425; reassures
him against the pessimistic re-
ports of his health, ib.

Hooker, Sir William, i. 250.

Hornby, Admiral, i. 396.

Horner, Leonard, i. 68, 220.

Horse, evolution of, i. 351; pedigree
of, 420; recent additions to our
knowledge of the pedigree of, 503.

Howard, Cardinal, ii. 97.

Howell, George, M.P., letter to" a
man who did his best to help the
people " ; technical education, i.



Howes, Professor G. B., helps in the
new science teaching, i. 407 .;
extends text-book, 409; on Hux-
ley's drawings at South Kensing-
ton, ii. 431; unpublished work,
Appendix I.; reminiscences, 435;
description of his lectures, 438.
Letter to the scientific docker, ii.
3S8.

Hubrecht, Professor A., impression of
Huxley, ii. 447.

Hull, lectures at, i. 257.

Humboldt, receives a Royal Medal,
i. 112.

Hume, book on, i. 530-34; his nearest
approach to a work of fiction,
ii. 7.

Hume, on miracles, i. 532; his philo-
sophical diamonds require set-
ting, ib.; on impossibilities, ii.
296, 297.

Humphry, Dr., Darwin's LL.D., i.
516.

Hunterian Lectures, i. 143,254,264,269;
lectures the basis of his Manual
of Comparative Anatomy, 254; re-
signs, 335.

Hutton, R. H., on Vivisection Com-
mission, i. 472; and vivisection,
ii. 256.

Huxley, Eliza. See Scott, Mrs.

Huxley, Ellen, marries Dr. Cooke,
i. 6.

Huxley, George, of Wyre Hall, i. 2.

Huxley, George, sen., at Baling, i. i;
returns to Coventry, 6.

Huxley, Mrs. George, senior (Rachel



Withers), mother of T. H. Hux-
ley, i. i; description of, 3; love
for, 4; her death, 90, 107.
Letters to accommodation at sea, i.
30; Rio, 33; Mauritius, 36; de-
scription of Miss Heathorn, 41,
42; Port Essington, 46; announc-
ing his return, 70.

Huxley, George, jun., in Pyrenees
with, i. 92; lives with, for a time,
104; death of, 268.

Huxley, Mrs. George, jun., i. 115.

Huxley, H., letter to, on his engage-
ment, ii. 268.

Huxley, James Edmund, i. 21.

Huxley, Jessie O., i. 169. See also
Waller, Mrs.

Huxley, L., letters to on winning a
scholarship, ii. 8; Fishery ap-
pointment, 24; on Mastership of
University College, Oxford, 34;
assassination of Lord F. Caven-
dish, 48; pagan and papal Rome,
98; teaching of history: Siena, 104,
105; system at Eton: Lake Dis-
trict Defence Society, 143, 144;
hon. committee of French teach-
ers, 174; will not write on politics,
184; Salvation Army: Mr. Sidg-
wick's rebuke to the Speaker, 289;
building a house, 355; on his
twenty-first birthday, 458.

Huxley, Noel, i. 169, 173; death of,
229, 233, 237.

Huxley, Samuel, i. 2.

Huxley, Mrs. T. H. (see also H. A.
Heathorn), his chief critic, i. 324.
Letters to draws the sword, i. 70;
his lodgings, 71; help from Bur-
nett, 77; successes, 87; an unequal
struggle, 87, 88; resolves to stay
in London, 91; British Associa-
tion at Ipswich, 95 sq. ; jealousy
of his rise, 105; Royal Medal, 109;
succeeds Forbes, 117; post at
School of Mines, ib.; Coast Sur-
vey and Edinburgh chair, 121-23;
his future career, 427; Aberdeen
address, 438; on British Associa-
tion, Belfast, 444-46; Lord Shaftes-
bury, 460-62; Edinburgh lectures,
476 sq. ; second summer in Edin-
burgh, 491; American trip, 493;



INDEX



521



Scottish University Commission,
511; spring in Edinburgh, 512;
article in the Echo, ib.; Bright's
speeches, ib. ; greatness of Reau-
mur: speech on Darwin's LL.D.,
515; Prof. Marsh's arrival, 530.

Fishery duties, ii. 29 sq., 31; In-
ternational Medical Congress, 35;
proposed resignation, 86; his stay
at Ilkley, 137 sq.; publication of
Science and Morals, 156; effect of
Ilkley, ib.; from Savernake, 175;
from the Canaries, 269 sq. ; cere-
mony of kissing hands, as P.C.,
348; good health in 1893, 385.

Huxley, Thomas, grandfather of T.
H. Huxley, i. i.

Huxley, T. H., incident at his birth,
i. 3; his mother, likeness to, ib. ;
devotion to, 4; his childhood, ib. ;
faculty for drawing, 4, 46, 397, 447;
school-days, 5 (cp. ii. 155, 280
sq.); early studies, 6-9; blood-
poisoning, 8; learns German, 9;
boyish journal, 10 sqq. ; at Rother-
hithe, ii, 16; impressed by social
problems, 16; studies botany, 18;
wins a medal, 20; at Charing
Cross Hospital, 21, 22, 23; his
first discovery, 23; interview
with Faraday, ib. ; career deter-
mined by Fayrer and Ransom,
25, 271, ii. 142; enters the Navy,
i. 25; joins the Rattlesnake, 26;
his life on the Rattlesnake, 28 sq. ;
at Madeira, 33; Rio, ib. ; cross-
ing the line, 34; the first fruits
of the voyage, 36; at the Cape,
ib.; Mauritius, 37; Sydney, 38;
engaged to be married, 40; im-
portance of his work on the Me-
dusae, 42 43; among the Aus-
tralian aborigines, 45; with Ken-
nedy, 45, 48; writes " Science at
Sea," 50; leaves Australia, 56;
impression of missionaries in
New Zealand, ib. ; at the Falk-
lands, 57; position in Navy, 59;
returns home, 60; scientific recog-
nition of, 70; early friends in
London, 71; difficulties, 72, 75,
89-92; elected F.R.S., 72-74;
misses the Royal Medal, 75; deal-



ings of the Government with,
about his Rattlesnake work, 77 sq.,
108, 127; list of early papers, 81,
82; stands for various professor-
ships, 83-87, 108; leaves the Navy,
81 ; writes for the Westminster Re-
view, 92; delivers the Fullerian
Lectures, 93, 314; succeeds Forbes,
93; describes the scientific world
of 1851,99; jealousy of, 104, 105; his
first lecture, 106-108; receives the
Royal Society's Medal, 109, in,
114 (see also 268); morning inca-
pacity, 113; people he can deal
with, 115; lives by his pen, 116,
129; obtains a post in the School
of Mines, 117; and on the Geo-
logical Survey, 118; openness of
dealing with his friends, Hooker
and Forbes, 119; Carpenter, 121;
about a rejected memoir, 121 (see
also ii. 187, 195, 200) ; refuses un-
certain position at Edinburgh,
123; prefers a scientific career in
London, 123, 125, 126, 129, 130,
!33> I 35'y his principle of "hav-
ing a row at starting," 130; mar-
riage, 139 sq. ; early work on the
Invertebrata interrupted, 143;
paleontological work, 143; Brit-
ish Museum Collections, 144; on
the value of a hundred a year,
150; tries to organise a scientific
review, 150, 225 sq. (see Natural
History Review) ; his wish to be-
come a physiologist, 151; writes
on the Cell Theory and the Skull,
152; ill-health during the fifties,
154; tour in Switzerland, 155 sq. ;
ascends Mont Blanc, 157, 170;
work on glaciers, 155, 158; bal-
ance-sheet of work in 1857, 159;
apparent desultoriness of his ear-
lier work, 160; begins the sys-
tematic consultation of foreign
writers, 160; recognition abroad,
ib.; birth of his son Noel, 162;
his aim in life, 162; death of his
son, 163; position in 1858, 169;
ambition, 170; translation and lec-
turing, 171; money and marriage,
174; paleontology and anatomy,
175; loss of priority through delay



522



LIFE OF PROFESSOR HUXLEY



of " Oceanic Hydrozoa," 175, 176;
his personal contributions to sci-
ence, 177; effect on him of the
Origin, 178 sqq. ; " anti-progressive
confession of faith," 178; one of
the decisive critics of the Origin,
ib. ; " general agent " to Darwin,
183, 297; nature of his support of
Darwin, 183; as Darwin's bull-
dog, 391; descent of man, 184, 191;
takes up ethnology, 213; his phi-
losophy of life, 236, 443; love of
philosophy, 247; early life, 237;
moves to Abbey Place, 242; his
handwriting, 248, 311, 484, 485; on
matrimony, 249, 311, 313; children,
328, ii. 224, 253; " Happy Family,"
i. 313; fondness for music, 250;
health, 252; expedition to Switzer-
land, ib.; Hunterian Lectures,
254, 335; the British Museum,
267 (cp. ii. 204) ; controversy, i.
271, 516, 523, ii. 290; exhilarating
effect of controversy, ii. 123-25,
130, 154; not inconsistent with
friendship, 414, ii. 187 (cp. ii. 18) ;
reputation, i. 270, 271 (cp. 427) ;
ethnological work, 283; vein of
laziness, 290; appealed to on point
of honour, 290; science course for
International College, 290 sq. ; on
Indian anthropological scheme,
294 sq. ; Edinburgh degree, 296;
the writing of elementary books,
305; Elementary Physiology, ib.; in-
cident at a working-men's lecture,
308; trip to Brittany, ib.; anec-
dote of the cerebellum, 315; on
" eating the leek," 318; rapidity
of thought, 319; influence of his
style, 320; the moralities of criti-
cism, 322, 328; a good book and
fools, 323; turning-point in his
career, 1870, 346; popular view of,
about 1870, 347; effect of Lay Ser-
mons, ib. ; growing pressure of
official work, 347 sq, (cp. 428, ii.
21); dubbed "Pope" by the Spec-
tator, 350; on evolution of the
horse, 351; influence of Descartes,
and scientific Calvinism, 352 (cp.
122); visits the Eifel, 354; his de-
gree of D.C.L. opposed, ib. ;



President British Association,
355; work on micro-organisms
and spontaneous generation, ib.
sq. ; continued work on micro-
organisms, 482; on savagery, 359;
visits the slums, ib. ; presentation
to, 360; commerce the civiliser,
ib. ; attacks on his address, 360,
361 ; stands for the School Board,
362 sq. ; his programme, 363 sq. ;
opposes proposal to open meet-
ings with prayer, 365; on Educa-
tion Committee, ib. sq.; religious
and secular teaching, 367 sq. ;
letters on the compromise and
an " incriminated lesson," 369
sqq. ; report of Education Com-
mittee, 372 sq. ; speech on Ultra-
montanism, 374 sq. ; his lasting in-
fluence, 375; impression on fel-
low-workers, 376 sq. ; examina-
tions, 374; extra subjects, ib.;
monetary assistance offered, to
remain on School Board, 379;
sacrifices involved in, 380; urged
to stand for Parliament, ib. sq. ;
Secretary of the Royal Society,
383, ii. 120, and Appendix II.; on
Challenger Committee, i. 383; sci-
ence teaching for teachers, 384,
388, 405 sq. ; continues his edu-
cational campaign, 384 sq. ; ideal
of a State Church, 386; titles for
men of science, ib. (cp. ii. 175);
edits Science Primers, 387; micro-
scopes, 388, 389; at St. Andrews,
390 sq. ; holiday work, ib. ; plays
golf, ib. ; on strong language, ib. ;
breakdown of 1871, 393 sq. ; help
of friends, 394; examines stores
at Gibraltar, 395; at Tangier, 396;
in Egypt, 397 sq. ; further treat-
ment, 402; new teaching in bi-
ology, 405; view of, 408, 410;
changes the course, 409; writes
Elementary Instruction in Biology,
ib. ; new house in Maryborough
Place, 412 sq. ; lawsuit, 413; loan
from Tyndall, 415; mixed classes
in Anatomy, 416; Lord Rector of
Aberdeen, 417; trip to the Au-
vergne, 420 sqq. ; as travelling
companion, 421 (cp. ii. 26) ; geo-



INDEX



523



logical work, 423; letters on, 423-
426; Order of the Pole Star, 427;
a paternal gander, ib. ; his repu-
tation and the part he has to play
in the world, 427 (cp. 493, 510);
scientific work after 1870, 428,
429; precious half-hours, 428, ii.
21 ; duty of fulfilling a promise,
i. 430, ii. 70; learns to smoke, i.
423 n.; attends Presbyterian serv-
ice, 439; at Belfast British Asso-
ciation, 442 sqq.; on "grasping
the nettle," 444; feeling about
vivisection, 466-68 sq., 472, 473;
grouse-murder, 485; Natural His-
tory courses at Edinburgh, 475
sq. ; suspects himself of coward-
ice, 491 ; expectation of his visit
in America, 493; a second honey-
moon, ib. ; position in the world
of thought, ib. ; tugs in New
York harbour, 494; prefers the
contents of a university to the
buildings, 495; old opinions and
new truth, ib. ; at Niagara, 498;
meets his sister again, ib. ; an ad-
dress under difficulties, 500; lec-
tures on Evolution, 501 sq. ;
prophecies fulfilled, 502; the two
things he really cares about, 510;
posthumous fame, ib. (cp. ii. 295,
299) ; ingrained laziness the bane
of his existence, 513 (cp. 290);
speech on Darwin's LL D. at
Cambridge, 514 sq., 518; help to
a distressed man of science, 516;
" bottled life," 519; politics in
1878, 523 sq. ; projected Introduc-
tions to Zoology, Mammalia, An-
thropology, and Psychology. 525;
engrossed in the Invertebrates,
526 sq. ; affected by his daugh-
ter's illness, 528, ii. 88, 94, 95, 102;
rationality and the parental ca-
pacity, 192; traces diphtheria, i.
528.

Learns Greek, ii. i; Governor
of Eton College, 3; makes draw-
ing part of the curriculum, ib. ;
attends no society except the
Royal and Zoological, ib. ; fifty-
three a youthful age, ib. ; resigns
presidency of Association of



Liberal Thinkers, 4; LL.D. at
Cambridge, ib. ; becomes a "per-
son of respectability," ib. ; "eats
the leek" over Bathybius, 5;
advantages of breaking a leg, 10;
faith in Natural Selection, 13;
"pretty Fanny's way," 15; op-
timism and pessimism, 16; friend-
ship and criticism, 18; further
involved in official duties, 21; In-
spector of Fisheries, ib. ; salary,
ib. ; duties of inspectorship de-
scribed, 23-32; conduct of meet-
ings, 28; as a companion, 26 (cp.
i. 421); as a writer, 27; as a
speaker, ib. ; life uninfluenced by
idea of future recompense, 29; a



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