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A. i



THANKSGIVING
NOVEMBER 21, 1961



Digitized by the Internet Archive

in 2010 with funding from

Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation



http://www.archive.org/details/gleaner58261stud




GteaMf

" DELAWARE VALLEY COLLEGE
of
SCIENCE & AGRICULTURE



Vol. LVIII



FALL, 1961



No. 2



Staff

EDITORS-IN-CHIEF-Martin Gilman, John Mertz

Associate Editor Carl Sachs

Typing Editor Allan Goldfarb

Business Manager Jerry Schorr

Layout Staff Richard Swackhamer, James Matro

Circulation Editor Lee Thompson

Photography Editor Jonathan Yentis

Contributing Staff: Baron Feldmar, Robert Pras.Ronald Cole, Walter Gross,
David Goldstein, John Kurtzig, Dick Wells, Richard Harlan, Bob
Somerville, Steve Klein, Robert Denlinger, Charles Meyers, Frank
Grau, Jack Williams, Dick Phillips, Matthew Polis, David Spalding,
Robert Hilsen, Harold Nightwine, John Bulette, Walter Shannon

Faculty Advisor R. D. Forbes

THE GLEANER is published four times in the school year by the students of the Delaware
Valley College of Science and Agriculture. Entered as second class matter at the Post Office
at Doylestovvn, Pennsylvania. Subscription rate — $2.00 per year.



SHORT STORY

"GUNSMIRK"

John Mertz

"Mr. Dillun. Mr. Dill-un."

"What is it, Chester?"

"Mr. Dillun, there's a "

"How many times do I have to tell
yah? Don't go hollarin' across the
street at me like that. Now, hobble
over here."

"Mr. Dillun, there's a "

"Nice day, eh, Doc? Reckon I'll take
a ride out to Jeb Parson's place."

"Ya, well Mat, now I dunno ....
course it would be a nice day fer
fishin'."

"Yeh. But I dunnon if I can get
outta this chair."

"Mr. Dillun, diere's a big "

"Chester, what's all the excitement
about? Now what's goin' on here,
huh?"

"Well gosh, Mr. Dillun, there's a
big, rough-lookin' "

"Say Doc, have you seen Kitty?"

"Why no, Matt, I was just

well, I was just thinking .... well no
Matt, I ain't seen her."

'"Well, I reckon I'll go over to the
Longbranch and see if I can bum
another beer off her."

"Mr. Dillun, will you please listen.
There's a fellar over the Longbranch
says' he's gonna have it out with you
and .... well you know I can't stand
the sight of blood."

"Chester .... well, alright now
Chester, saddle my horse and we'll
just have a look at this fellar. On sec-
ond thought, never mind the horse-
he's too danged small and embarrasses
the hell outa me . . . ."

"Well now Matt, I dunno. Maybe
you just better cool off a little cause
I ain't figgerin' to open the office just
yet."

"Doc's right, Mr. Dillun. Why
shucks, it just wouldn't look right if
you and Doc didn't sit out here in
front of the jail and add color to the
scene an' all. why shucks, Mr. Dull-
un "

"Now hold on, Chester. I reckon I
can take care of myself."

"Well now, Matt, I just don't
know "

"But Mr. Dillun "

"Now Chester, you stay here and
mind the jail. I'm going over to have
a talk with Miss Kitty."

"Hiya, Kitty."

"Hi, Matt. Come-on, we'll sit at one
of the tables and have a beer."
(Continued on page 6)



A Plan You'll Be Able
To Stand

Allan Goldfarb

Many Students on the campuses of
our colleges and universities do not
understand the correct way of study-
ing. "Is tiiere a better way to study
man tne one I have?" Many times this
nas been said to a professor by a stu-
dent who is doing poorly in a course,
lo this student and to others in his,
or her, class, I definitely feel there is
a proper way in which all will benefit.

\Vhen you read the material from
different courses, you must approach
the material of each in a different
fashion. You'll notice I said in a dif-
ferent fashion; too many students feel
that there is only one way to study
all subjects. But you'll be in for a great
surprise and higher grades, if you fol-
low the next few points of advice.

If you have courses in the field of
Biology, you must develop a definite
system ot memory. When you read
about certain areas of plants and ani-
mals; try to form in your mind a pic-
ture of what it looks like. It has been
said "a picture is worth a thousand
words." Also, make a list of all Bio-
logical terms with their meanings;
and if possible a picture to go along
with each explanation.

Now let's travel tothe field of Lit-
erature. First of all— don't skim every
page to get an idea of what the para-
graphs on that page mean. You take
each paragraph and try to see the im-
portance of the setting, characters,
and any elements which may tend to
be of greater significance later on in
the story. Always search for a climax
which may come about in any sen-
tence.

The Social Sciences usually present
to the student his greatest reading
problems. In the Social Science cour-
ses, you must first realize the import-
ance of building up a vocabulary. As
you read and see new words— write
these words down and list their mean-
ings. Terminology was stressed to us
in our early schooling; and it still is of
vital importance to us as we increase
our academic status.

With an understanding of the vo-
cabulary of the studies, you are in a
better position to learn the material
accurately and concisely. Although
memorization is vital in order to in-
crease one's understanding of an area;
it is of greater significance when one
learns while he is storing this knowl-
edge in his memory.

(Continued on page 7)



Choosing a Roommate

Martin R. Gilman

At West Point a roommate is refer-
red to as your "wife." A joke? Per-
haps! But why not consider this quite
seriously? Your choice in a roommate
can either make you or break you in
your studies! Some men spend years
in choosing a woman who, they be-
lieve, will De qualified for the role as
their wife. They know exactly what
they are looking for and how to go
about securing the desired spouse.
Since you must spend a minimum of
one semester with your choice of a
roommate, it is beneficial to spend
some time in finding the right one.

What qualifications should you look
for in a roommate? Perhaps the most
important one is compatibility. You
must be able to get along well to-
gether. Someone who has the same,
or at least similar, outside interests
as yourseif; someone who belongs to
the same clubs or has the same habits
that you do.

Should one pick a person in one's
major? There are as many points in
iavor of this as there are against it.
The final decision is, of course, en-
tirely up to the individual. One of the
biggest factors in favor of picking a
roommate within your major is that
you will have someone with whom to
discuss academic problems without
having to leave the confines of your
room and thereby subtract from your
study time. On the other hand, with
a roommate in another major, there
would be more of a chance to broaden
your education without actually in-
creasing your study load.

Finally what kind of a student is
the prospective roommate. Does he
have good study habits? Good study
habits are contagious! It is important,
however, to remember that the con-
verse of this is also true. Avoid the
"Gipper" for a roommate unless you
would like to become one of his kind.

I have mentioned only a very few
of the reasons which should be con-
sidered. It would be impossible to
make an exact list of good and bad
points since no two people think alike,
nor do any two people demand the
same requirements in a roommate.
No matter what you look for, the main
thing is to consider objectively be-
fore choosing.



OPTIMIST

A student who takes a chemistry
test with a pen!



PAGE TWO



THE GLEANER



Education and Earning

A. David Schurr

Most animals are born with the
ability to adapt themselves to a wide
variety of changes in their envorin-
ment. These changes are usually
limited to weather and food.

The human animal has a unique
problem: Mental adjustment! The
ability of a man to adjust mentally
depends on his quantitative thinking
capacity. In other words, the greater
mental effort a man can put into his
job, the greater are his chances for
advancement.

The prime purpose of any univer-
sity or college is to produce people
who can think. The students who at-
tend these higher institutions have
natural ability for constructive and
creative thoughts. Ideally, these peo-
ple graduate with the same ability to
think as compared widi the others
in their class, but more advanced than
those who had the same original
ability but did not go to college.

The college graduate has been
trained to adapt to change and to ac-
cept new facts. Within hours he would
go from English, to Calculas, to
Chemistry during a typical school day.
This constant flexing of the mind
creates good mental tone and en-
hances his ability to accept a change
in situation.

The point can be best seen by this
illustration: Two men with equal
mental ability graduate from high
school with identical marks. One goes
into apprenticeship and becomes a
laborer, the other attends college and
becomes a technician. Ten years after
graduation from high school the lab-
orer might be making more than the
technician. If, at this time they should
both lose their jobs and turn to car-
pentry, the college trained man would
be able to pick up the trade faster
than the laborer. He would do a bet-
ter job than the laborer because of
his ability to pick up the "tricks of the
trade" faster, and hence earn more
money.

On the other hand, if they kept their
jobs until they were both fifty years
of age, a physical factor must be con-
sidered. The laborer, now past middle
age, is finding it difficult to produce
as well as he did in his youth. He is
decreasing in value to his employer
and thus his earning power is radi-



cally cut. The technician after all
these years has developed through
training and association, a deep in-
sight into his work and has become
quite valuable to his employer. With
earning power increasing, he can en-
joy the rest of his production life with
a far greater margin of security than
can his laborer friend.



The Virtues of Advertising

A. D. Shun

The complex civilization that exists
in America today consists of a highly
organized pattern of individual ef-
forts. One of the byproducts of this
culture is specialization. Where only
a handful of men were once involved
in the manufacture of complete pro-
ducts, there are now hundreds taking
part in just one step of the process.
A prime example is the product of
fruit. The farmer is the director of his
farm. He hires men that know how to
plant, men that know how to prune,
(Continued on page 6)



"The Best
at
Its Best"

ED'S
DINER

Franklin and State Streets
DOYLESTOWN, PA.



POETRY

The Soul of Man
l)i/ Phytophil

Man looms through life as if in a daze,

And to bis question it does amaze,

The divine philosopher of the trinity,

Of his origin and his destiny;

How immortal is a man?

And on what eternity does he stand?

Why shrinks his soul that seeks im-
mortality,

But while on earth curses his divinity,

There are no pearly gates and streets
of gold;

Or elderly gentleman as it is told;

How entertaining it may be,

But not for those who think theisti-
cally:

But as a question of philosophy,

I'll take the quest of immortality;

Those of math are answered mathe-
matically,

Those of physics by physical inge-
nuity.

While those of God, the freedom of
the will,

The immortality of the soul are of a
philosophic character;

With God as its universal author and
guarantor,

The immaterial cannot disintegrate,

As flesh and blood, I do debate,

Where worms come in and steal thy

meat,

And to them, imperial man. let them
eat,

"Death replaces substance to its natu-
ral state,

Terrestrial and aqueous to its original
fate,

Aerial fluid ascends to heaven from
whence it came,"

A philosophy the Chinese noble pro-
claims,

But of my faith I must explain.

The mind is as distinct from the brain.

As the sculptor is from hammer and
chisel.

And though it seems stark catacly-
smal.

That the body disintegrate to naught.

The souls immunity it is taught.

Lives on to taste eternity.

And thus fulfill its destiny,

Would God destroy the work of His
hands,

Or sustain that image of Himself, the
soul of man.



PLEASE PATRONIZE
OUR ADVERTISERS



PAGE THREE



EDITORIAL

Male-Help Wanted

Intelligent, conscientuous college
student for staff work. No experience
necessary-will train. Yes, we're still
looking for students who like to write.
We are looking for original work in
the line of short stories, long stories,
feature articles, cartoons, jokes, cross-
word puzzles, poems and any other
literary work which would be of in-
terest to the Student Body.



The aim of this magazine is to print
the type of material which you, the
students, want to read. In order to at-
tain these goals we will need your
help. Therefore, any suggestions and/
or contributions will be greatly ap-
preciated. Any contributions or cor-
rective criticisms can be made to my-
self or to any of the magazine spe-
cialty editors.

On behalf o fthe entire Gleaner
staff, I would like to take this oppor-
tunity to wish you all a HAPPY
THANKSGIVING VACATION!

M.R.G.



BOOK REPORT

The Lincoln Lords

Cameron Hawley

This book illustrates the trials and
tribulatinos of the modern day com-
pany presidents, and the faith that is
placed in them by their families.

Lincoln Lord is a president for hire.
He has held the position of president
in various companies, but has never
been able to continue in any one of
these positions for any length of time.
The main reason for that fact is that
he never had complete control of any
company. His wife, Maggie, and his
son Kip, who is attending a prep
school, have lost all confidence in him.
Any good he does manage to achieve
is written off by his family as just fol-
lowing someone elses ideas.

The book centers around Mr. Lord's
ability, or inability, to properly run a
company. Mr. Lord is given a chance
to prove himself by taking the Presi-
dency of The Costal Foods Canning
Company, the company having been
on a steady decline since the death of
its owner.

Soon after Mr. Lord's emergence as
president of Costol Foods, the com-
pany begins to gain back its losses. A



new product is marketed and the com-
pany is back in full scale production.
At this point the author of the book
writes in detail about the troubles
facing the new president, including
management, production and family
interference.

The climax of the story is centered
around whether Mr. Lord will hold on
to the presidency of the company or
merely resign when the going gets too
rough.

With newly established faith from
his family, and a new found quality
of endurance, Mr. Lord holds onto his
new job. This leaves the reader with
the thought that faith and true family
love are paramount assets for a man to
possess.

This book lets the reader in on a
struggle for survival at the very tops
of the high voltage, supersonic world
of giant corporations. It will also give
the reader an excellent working
knowledge of today's modern corpor-
ations.

Walter R. Shannon



Movie Review

Two Women; La Dolche Vita

These are two Italian films, not so
recently released, but ones that seem
to be forerunners of the most recent
wave of film imports to reach the U. S.
First Sweden's Ingemar Bergman and
then the French, and finally the Italian
have come into strong contention.
Two Women and LaDolclic Vita pro-
ceeded Rocco and His Brothers, L'
Avenntura, Girl With a Suitcase, and
others; all received almost unanimous
accolades and loud huzzahs both
critically and at the box office.

Technically, in terms of lighting,
photography, quality of camera ang-
les, color (black & white) and sound,
both films are good by Hollywood
standards. The camera and editing
were clone with much sensitivity, dis-
cipline, and taste.

"La Dolche Vita" means "the sweet
life" which is an intriguingly ironic
title. La Dolche Vita is a long movie,
running over three hours. It had to be
a long movie because it is an un-
hurried and thorough dissection in
what is often excrutiating detail.
There is no doubt about director Fred-
erico Fellini's sentiment, but it does
not presume to use his innate elo-



quence on film to judge. The film is
rather like a mirror image of a par-
ticular culture; not a pretty image but
an honest one. Having illustrated
weaknesses and shortcomings of the
people one has the feeling that Mr.
Fellini has some hope that mankind
can improve. The effectiveness is a
fine tribute to Fellini's directing skill
and artistry as well as to his dedica-
tion to, and profound understanding
of his theme. The cast is a large one
composed of Italians, except for Anita
Eckberg. Miss Eckberg, who has star
billing, has a suprisingly small role,
however, she plays the part with skill
and insight.

In "Two Women," Sophia Loren,
under Victorio De Sica's direction, has
matured a truly significant dramatic
talent. Her role in this film, a dis-
traught refugee widow and mother
of a blossoming young daughter, is a
demanding one and she has met the
challenge beautifully, displaying un-
suspected flexibility. The mother-
daughter relationship is interwoven
into an absorbing story that has its
setting in Rome. The story is a poig-
nant and eloquent plea for ending
war accomplished by depicting its
ravages. The most graphic device is
an agonizing rape scene in which
mother and daughter are attacked in
a bombed out church by a band of
allied mercenaries after the war had
ended.

The solemn overtones of "Two
Women" are broken up by comedy
and romance, making for a high level
of interest throughout the film. Miss
Lorer.'a stature on the screen is im-
mense and electric; she seems to sym-
bolize the grace, feminine strength,
and innate beauty of Italian women.
John Bulette



ELY'S
CLOTHIERS

DOYLESTOWN, PA.

Outfitters for the
College Man



THE GLEANER



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CROSSWORD PUZZLE

ACROSS

1. la femme

7. Final

11. Guns do this

12. Poker stake

13. French article

15. Thick sweet liquid

17. Measurements of heat (Abb.)

18. Plural of 13 across
20. Feminine name

22. Plants of the heater, azalea, and
rhododendron family.

25. According to the rule, they follow
c

26. Hasten

27. Southern state ( Abb. )
30. Province in India

32. Cutting instrument
35. Symbol for Ionium

37. United Institute of Newscasters
(Abb.)

38. Logarithm to the base e ( Abb. )
40. Without sense

43. Parasites (slang)
45. By (German)



46. Sicknesses

47. A square meter

50. Trademark (Abb.)

51. Right (Scotch)

52. Swiss girl of storybook fame

54. Heavenly body

55. Commands or orders

DOWN

1. Irish girls

2. It, in German

3. Blood factors (Abb.)

4. To play shy

5. Man's name

6. Study, in music

7. Over there (French)

8. Against (prefix)

9. Observe intently
10. African tribe

14. A lofty nest

15. Spanish laborer

19. They say this in Spain

21. a lady (two words)

23. Chinese tea

24. Being sick
28. 3.14^



29. One dollar (two words)
31. Greek letter

33. National Nurserymen's Assn.
( Abb. )

34. The Atlantic -

36. Suffix indicating sugars, carbohy-
drates, etc.

37. Not noticed

39. Cut into sections

40. Instrument (Abb.)

41. Miss Kitt

42. Lung disease (Abb.)

43. Madame's counterparts

44. Feminine name

45. To free of
49. See 44 down
53. Pronoun



KERSHNER'S
PHARMACY

Joseph H. Kershner, Ph.G.



'Fellow of the American College
of Apothecaries"

DOYLESTOWN, PA.
Phone: Fi 8-4666



Say it with

Orchids

Queen of The Exotics

Special $3.00 -$4.00

ROSES $3.00 -$4.00

CARNATIONS $2.50 -$3.50

Free Delivery to Campus

FRANK GRAU

2354 Turk Road, Doylestown
FI 8-9680

Our Scents Make Sense, Save Cents



GUNSMIRK (continued)

"Well I dunno, Kitty. Yeh, I reckon
I could use a beer."

"Two beers, Jake."

"Ya know, Matt, Chester was in
here a while back. Said there was a
stranger in town lookin' for ya."

"Well I reckon I can take care of
myself. If he wants to see me, I reckon
I'll have to see him before too long."

"Well for goodness sake, be careful
Matt."

"Why shure, Kitty "

"I wouldn't want to see you get
hurt or nothin'."

"Kitty, there's been somethin' I been
meaning to ask ya."

"Sure, Matt. What is it?"

"Well, Kitty, I — "

"Don't be shy, Matt. After all, we've
known each other quite a while now."

"Yea, Kitty. Thats why I wanted to
ask ya — "

"Matt, that's him, comin' through
the door."

"The fellar with the black outfit?"

"Yeh. He's comin this way. Now
Matt, be careful."

"Yeh, sure, Kitty "

"Marshal Dillun?"

"Yea, that's me. What can I do for
ya?"

"Ah. And you, madam, must be the
renowned Miss Kitty."

"Yeh. That's me. who're you?"

"My card."

"P-A-L-A-D-I-N"

"At your service."

"Well what can we do for yuh, Mr.
Paladin?"

"Marshal— I've been hired to come
to Dodge to ask you to resign. And,
if you won't do so peacebly, to escort
you out of the city— by force if neces-
sary."

"Gun-fighter, eh?"

"My card."

"We did that bit already. Mind if I
ask ya who hired ya?"

"I'm sorry, but I can't disclose my
client's name."

"I see. Well, I reckon you've come
a long way for nothin'."

"In that case, shall we adjourne to
the main thoroughfare?"

"Now look here, you "

"Marshall— I'm waiting."

"Okay, Mr. Paladeen. Let's see how
good ya are with that slick-lookin',
handcrafted gun of yours."

"Yeh, Mr. Paladin."

"If you would be so kind as to com-
plete your end of the bargain."

"Oh, yeah. Well, yah see, Doc,
Chester and me, we, uh "

"I understand "



"Well he wasn't a bad guy, but he
was always keepin' Doc busy and
makin' Chester run around and drink-
in' my beer. Besides, we can't stand
those L&M's."

"In that case, Miss Kitty, if you'll

permit me to quote from "

end

ADVERTISING (continued)
men that know how to pick, and men
that know how to ship. The farmer no
longer buys hard wood to make a
handle for the piece of metal he
shaped into a plow. He now buys a
tractor and plow, infinitly better than
the one he used before; that is the sum
effort of at least ten thousand men.

The farmer had to be told that such
a device existed before he could buy.
The manufacturer knew that he must
not only inform the farmer of the
machinery but inform him in such a
way that was more appealing than his
competitors.

At one time advertising was accom-
plished by putting a sign on your
factory and a label on your product.
Since shipping was so expensive, the
manufacturer had to depend on local
trade. As time passed, business grew,
and shipping was developed into an
inexpensive and reliable service. Far
flung markets were now opened to the
local producer. In order to exploit
these markets, the people had to be
notified that his product was avail-
able to them. Agencies were formed
by enterprising people who offered to
inform the people of his product.
These agencies have grown and mul-
tiplied and are now considered as a
major factor in the American econ-
omy.

As these agencies grew, so did
America. It has been stated, by many
prominent people, that the science of
advertising has made America what
it is today.



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If I Had But Three Remaining
Days of Sight

Steve Klein

If I had but three days in which to


1

Online LibraryThe Students of Delaware Valley College of ScienceThe Gleaner (Volume v.58 no.2) → online text (page 1 of 2)