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II JP

CLEANER

NATIONAL AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE



- 1949 ~
25^




WUcU U 0«A "(load to. Suswiual?" - P* 9 e. 7









CLYMER'S
DEPARTMENT STORE

BUCKS COUNTY'S
LARGEST STORE

The National Agricultural
College is one of its patrons

YOUR PATRONAGE SOLICITED

Doylestown, Pa.
PHONE 211



Metro Greenhouses Are Superior!

For over 75 years Metropolitan
greenhouses have been famous for
their ruggedness, durability and
dependability.

Make Metro your standard of com-



METROPOLITAN
GREENHOUSE MFG. CORP.

1867 Flushing Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y.



ENTERPRISE
Mill Soap Works

Columbia Alkali
Products

Industrial Soaps — Chemicals
Laundry — Dry Cleaning Supplies

2229-31-33 N. Twelfth St.
PHILADELPHIA, PA.



Compliments of

WILLIAM

HOBENSACK'S

SONS

— <>—



Ivyland, Pa.



"All Work Done in Our Own Plant" £

B I TZ E R |

Dry Cleaning and v
Dye Works



Plant
Phone 4125



Store
Phone 4248



RALPH E. MYERS

Creamery and Dairy

EQUIPMENT and SUPPLIES

Doylestown, Pa.

WEISBARD'S DRUG STORE

Prescription Drug Store
Since 1874

Main and State Streets
DOYLESTOWN, PA.



I
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Corsages — Cut Flowers j

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SANDY RIDGE |

FLOWER SHOP !



TELEPHONE 4169
Doylestown, Pa.



HAMBURG
BROOM WORKS

Manufacturers of Quality

BROOMS

for Nearly a Half Century



Write us for prices on House, Mill,
Factory, Toy, and Whisk Brooms



HAMBURG, PA.



THE CAR OF THE YEAR!

The Entirely

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Your inspection of this sensational product is cordially extended to you.

J. J. CONROY

Authorized Dealer Since 1919
WEST STATE STREET DOYLESTOWN, PENNSYLVANIA

SITNEK FUEL COMPANY
Coal and Coke

SUITE 2100

Sixteen Sixteen Walnut Street

PHILADELPHIA, PA.



SURVEYS SERVICE

ANDREW J. NICHOLAS & CO.

Deep Well Pumping
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ERECTIONS



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"MEININGERS"

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34 W. State Street
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Phone: Doylestown 5624



Plumbing

Stoker Equipment

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General Electric
Oil Equipment

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Deep Freeze Refrigeration



Farm Equipment Headquarters

MeCORMICK-DEERING Farm Machines
INTERNATIONAL Motor Trucks OLDSMOBILE Cars

Earn and Dairy Equipment, Farm Freezers, Sprayers, Silos, Power Lawn Mowers

DOYLESTOWN AGRICULTURAL CO.

PHONE 231 Established 1851 DOYLESTOWN, PA.



BOOKS and STATIONERY

Greeting Cards for All Occasions
Parker and Sheaffer Fountain Pens



J. A. GARDY PRINTING CO.

28 W. State St. Doylestown, Pa.



WB&E



QUALITY

SINCE
1885



Leaders in Scientific Instruments

Photographic Materials
Engineering & Drafting Supplies

Blue Prints & Photostats
Laboratory Equipment & Supplies
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Motion Picture Cameras & Projectors



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PHILADELPHIA, PA.



Shive Hardware Co.

Paints, Glass,

House Furnishings Goods

and Seeds

Main and State Streets
Doylestown, Pa. Phone 4053



Compliments of

MONTGOMERY

WHOLESALE
DISTRIBUTORS



DRAWING
MATERIALS
PHOTOSTATS
BLUE PRINTS

Engineering Equipment
Surveying Instruments

J. H. Weil & Co.



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at PEARLMAN'S

you'll find
FAMOUS NAMES



Bendix
Kelvinator
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Kitchens



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Complete stock of records
of all makes



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Doylestown, Pa.



QUAKERTOWN

WHOLESALE

CONFECTIONERY

COMPANY



1 5 South Second Street
QUAKERTOWN, PA.



l/Jouth

Everything for the
College Student

West State Street, Doylestown, Po.



DOYLESTOWN INN

Home of Quality Food



STATE NEAR MAIN STREET
Dolyestown, Pa.






rJLetters to the C^ditc



I

! Dear Mr. Rosenoff:



HELKER'S I

I

ESSO SERVICE j

and '

SNACK BAR

I
ROUTE 202 )

I

One Quarter Mile West

of College Entrance I



t Rhode s Radio Service

i

J RADIO AND TELEVISION
I Sales and Service

Registered Radio Service Engineers

No. 5 WEST OAKLAND AVE.
Phone: 5106 Doylestown, Pa.



j The Place to Go ,

I for your j

I I

! Haircuts and Shaves ,

j H. C. NELSON !

J Tonsorialist

I 1 7 S. Main St. Doylestown, Pa. |



COUNTY THEATRE

Doylestown, Pa.

Bucks County's
Most Beautiful Theatre



MATINEES

Sunday at 2: 1 5; Saturday at 1 :30



EVENINGS

Shows at 7 & 9, including Sunday



SAT. EVENING

Three Shows at 6, 8 & 10 p.m.



Joseph A. Wodock, Proprietor



I have received your complimentary
copy of the Gleaner for the month of
November. I appreciate very much your
sending me this publication, because I
do get quite a few questions from time
to time, relative to the activities of the
college, and I enjoy knowing what is
going on.

Thank you very much for including
me on your mailing list.

Wm. F. Greenawalt

County Agent
Doylestown, Pa

• • • •
A. Greenblatt and Staff:

I perused your November issue of the
Gleaner and it brought back mem-
ories. I have worked as "scribe" for the
Gleaner in 1930-31. The photo on the
cover page made me think back 20 years
when I arrived as a freshman and how
with a feeling mixed with wonder and
butterflies in the "tummy" I walked
from the R.R. station up the hill to
Lasker Hall.

Of course there was a slow period of
adjustment but before I knew it, three
years had flown. They were happy years.

Now I wish you Good Luck And
Success on a real "Live" publication.
My best wishes to you and your staff.

P.S. You already know of the fine
meeting the N. Y. Alumni held recently.
What a great turnout! It was refreshing
to see old and new faces.

Sidney Goldberg, '31
(It's good to receive letters such as
these — we welcome more. — Editors) —



r"£**S**£*'2*°£"{*'3**f'*S**f"3**3'*?**3**2**2**£**?**£'*i**$'*? , *S'*$"$'4' 4*— *n— nH — uu — «■ » u »» uu ,»,<— ua »» »» — •}■



FOOTBALL BANQUET

The Annual N.A.C. Football
Banquet will be held in Lasker
Hall on Friday, January 21st, at
7:00 P.M.

There will be a special pro-
gram of entertainment and a
number of famous football ce-
lebrities will be on hand.

President James Work will be
the Toastmaster.



The GLEANER

NATIONAL AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE

Farm School, Bucks County, Pennsylvania



Vol. LIII



JANUARY, 1949



No. 3



STAFF

Editor-in-Chief .. .Alex Greenblatt Morris Lowenthal Layout

Managing Editor . . Herbert Rosenoff Sol Resnick, Alfred Hass

Business Manager . . Irwin Friedman Associate Editors

FACULTY ADVISORS

Mr. Norman Finkler Mr. Donald Meyer

Mr. Samuel B. Samuels

DEPARTMENTAL EDITORS

Horticulture . . . .David Blumenfield Art Roald Meloney

Food Industry Jack Pernatin Photography Harold Haftel

Animal Husbandry . . .Stan Schwartz Sports Ernie Cohen

Poultry Saul Goldstein

REPORTERS

Roger Gable Donald Selak Danny Bugeslov

Morty Ballin Dave Miller Carl F. Leutner Jack Greenberg

BUSINESS BOARD
Melvin Kreisler Sheldon Koltoff Orion Freeman

CONTRIBUTORS

Don Christian Bill Gallagher Sam Silver

Melvin Silverman Bill Clancey



. . . CONTENTS . ..

Who's Who page 6

by Alfred Hass '50
Holiday Festival Spreads Good Cheer page 6

by Roger Gable '50
Book Review — Road to Survival page 7

by Danny Bugeslov '51
Ramblings in Poultry page 8

by Saul Goldstein '50
New Type Egg Washing Machine Installed page 9

by Saul Goldstein '50
Principles of Farm Accounting page 10

by Danny Bugeslov '51
Dairy Farming page 1 1

by Herbert Rosenoff '50
Woodlands on the Farm page 1 1

by Don Selak '50
Recommendations of Fruit and Vegetable Committees page 12

by Dave Miller '50
Summary of Important Lectures at N. J. Horticulture Conven-
tion on December 6 page 13

by David Blumenfield '50
Association of American Universities Ends Its Practice of

Accrediting Colleges page 13

by Dave Miller '50
Basketball Preview page 14

by Bill Clancey '51
Pocket Size Poison page 14

by Ernie Cohen '50

Alumni News page 16

Experiments with Maple Trees page 16

by Don Christian '50
Food Chemistry "305" page 17

by Jack Pernatin '50
Apartment for Gallagher page 18

by Bill Gallagher '51



EDITORIALS

Let's Not Forget

Now that it's the beginning of a New
Year probably many of us have made
numerous resolutions that we'll soon
break. But this is one resolution that,
we should make and shouldn't break! —

The unfinished business of

helping Jimmy Peters.

We raised almost §500 to help him
financially and then we stopped. What's
to be done now? Let's not rest on the
fact that we raised all that money our-
selves.

Sure, we ran a dance and solicited
donations, but our fund raising stopped
there. Why not continue? Let's go on
helping the Peters.

Let's be the first group in the college
(the classes of '50, '51, and '52) to
start something of far reaching effect to
the students. Graduates at other schools
dedicate plaques, statues, trees, or paint-
ings, After they have left or are ready
to leave.

We propose that a JAMES PETERS
FUND be established which shall always
be present at this school to help other
students who may come upon unforeseen
difficulties. The government will not
always finance a college education. There
may come a time when a student may
have to leave college in his last year be-
cause of financial difficulties. Other con-
ditions may arise which may require a
loan for a short period of time.

Let this be a student fund through and
through, with little backing from the
administration, alumni, or outsiders.

Let's expand such a fund. What are
your ideas?

When each class leaves the college it
will present N. A. C. with a gift. Let's
give the money now. This would start
the fund with approximately §300-400.

Another aid for the fund would be
a donation by each club. Individual ideas
may also help. Let's run the dances to
earn a profit, extra money to be put into
the fund. How about an alumni-varsity
or freshman basketball game with all
proceeds to go into this fund?

We're willing to do something, are
You? Let's start that fund off today.



The Gleaner is published throughout the school year by the student body
of the National Agricultural College. Entered as second class matter at the Post
Office at Farm School, Pa. Subscription rate — $1.50 per year.



On the Cover

With finals just around the corner,
Sol Resnick '50 has begun to "hit
the books" — at that moment his
nind was elsewhere.



WHO'S WHO ON THE FACULTY

WALTER J. GROMAN, SUPERINTENDENT OF FARMS



Most likely you see him once a day,
and yet you don't know who he
is. He rides around from field
to field in a Chevrolet coupe; corn pick-
ing here, plowing there, planting wheat
some place else, work to be done every-
where. And in case you've never had
the opportunity of meeting him, he is
Mr. Walter J. Groman, class of 1920,
and at present, manager of the various
college farms.

Mr. Groman was born near Allen-
town, Pennsylvania, and entered the
National Farm School in 1917. When
Mr. Groman enrolled, students could not
major in the fields they were interested
in, because, at that time, everyone was
required to take identical subjects, and
it was only in 1930 that the different
educational departments were estab-
lished: dairy, poultry, horticulture, etc.

At that time, and up to 1927, it was
a policy of the school to pick two boys
from each graduating class for a post
graduate course. This course constituted
a managerial position and consisted of
supervising one of the school farms.
Mr. Groman was given farm #4. He
remained here and became farm fore-
man and herdsman. In 1924, when the
school instituted a course "Farm Equip-
ment and Gas Engines," Mr. Groman
became the instructor. He continued in
this capacity as well as supervisor until
1938, when he left and assumed a posi-
tion with the Doylestown Agricultural
Company as parts and service manager.
Here he had the opportunity to become
acquainted with farmers in the neigh-
borhood.

In 1943, Mr. Groman was reemployed
by National Farm School as manager of
all school farms and this is his position
at present.

He resides near the campus, in a house
that was built over 200 years ago.

The different farms under Mr. Gro-
man's supervision include units # 1 and
#2 near the campus and railroad; #3
near Mr. Feisser's house which is being
worked on the contour at present; units
#4 and #5 on the other side of lower
state road; unit #6 near the dairy; and
unit #1, last summer's poultry range.
Last season 526 acres were cropped by
the General Agricultural Department
under Mr. Groman. They included 140




Mr. Groman in a leisure moment at home.

acres of corn, 140 acres of wheat, 7 acres
of potatoes for college kitchen use, 12
acres of soybeans for seed, 22 acres of
oats, and 205 acres of hay. (Including
35 acres of alfalfa which were cut three
times during the season.)

There are 65 acres of pasture near



the dairy, and most of this was top
dressed heavily with manure last year.
Mr. Groman estimates his average yield
of corn at 75 bushels per acre, but on
the De Kalb test for a single acre, the
yield was 106.26 bushels. For the past
four years, however, the farm has aver-
aged up to 116 bushels on the De Kalb
test.

In the past, Mr. Groman has con-
ducted various experiments here in con-
junction with the Pennsylvania State
College of Agriculture and the United
States Department of Agriculture. Two
of these were with fertilizer practice
and time of seeding wheat in relation to
infestation of Hessian fly (done with
the state college and government respec-
tively). Due to these experiments of
wheat, arbitrary dates were recom-
mended for wheat planting in this area.

Mr. Groman's plans for the college
farm include installation of tile drains
in certain wet spots to facilitate culti-
vation, and the laying out of contours
on farm #7 as a soil conservation prac-
tice. His general policy wherever pos-
sible, will be to follow a three year ro-
tation of corn, wheat, and hay.



Holiday Festival Spreads Qood Cheer

BY Roger Gable '50



On the night of December 16th, the
true Christmas spirit of good cheer burst
forth into reality when the second "Holi-
day Festival" was presented in Lasker
Hall. The festivities were sponsored by
the National Agricultural College Glee
Club, now under the able leadership of
Mrs. Richman and Mrs. Shelly, both of
Doylestown.

The gala evening appropriately began
with a Christmas dinner, following the
maxim that the true basis of total satis-
faction is a full stomach. The program,
slightly longer and much more varied
than it had been the previous year, was
highly praised by the entire student
body. The Glee Club sang five selections,
and the audience joined in on "Jingle
Bells," "Come all Ye Faithful," "Silent
Night," "Joy to the World," "The First
Noel," and "Little Town of Bethlehem."

The Glee Club, breaking away from
the traditional Christmas carols, sang
selections of enduring popularity. These
6



included "Sing Me a Chanty," "Jesu,
Joy of Man's Desiring," a Fred Waring
arrangement of "Coming Thru the Rye,"
"Dry Bones," and their theme song,
"Ladies Day." The band played "Mr.
Joe" and "Indian Boy."

Mr. Herman Feisser surprised and
delighted us all by doing a fine job on
a vocal. Dr. and Mrs. Reinthaler played
a string duet thoroughly enjoyed by
everyone. Ben Sykes added the western
touch by playing a guitar and singing a
few songs. Stan Schneider gave an able
performance on the marimba.

Chuck Newman played a few piano
selections which certainly added much to
the program. Then everyone in the audi-
ence caught the Christmas spirit of good
cheer and heartily joined in the singing
of carols as they went off to the gym to
see the Aggies open their 1948-49 bas-
ketball season against the Eastern Bap-
tist Theological Seminary.



Booh /?.



ROAD TO SURVIVAL — William Vogt



Road to Survival deals with a
topic that is of utmost importance
to humanity: it is an attempt to
reveal the relationship of man and his
environment. On a world-wide scale, it
is an analysis of how human beings, in
multiplying numbers, extract from a
small planet their basic needs of food,
shelter and clothing.

But despite the gravity of its subject,
the book is far from a cut and dried
scientific volume. It possesses the quali-
ties of clarity and force. It is interesting
and fascinating, easy to read and hard to
lay down. Anyone who reads it can
easily understand why it became a Book-
of-the-Month-Club selection.

The author, William Vogt, is a recog-
nized authority on conservation and
land usage. A prominent scientist, he is
Chief of the Conservation Section of
the Pan-American Union. Many of the
examples presented in the book are
based on first hand experience.

The Disappearing Land

Road to Survival presents basic
realities, the underlying forces that shape
our lives. The author shows how farm-
ers in six continents, rape their soil and
mine it. Slopes of hills are cultivated
and thus exposed to surface erosion.
The fine top soils of vast areas are loos-
ened, to be carried away as dust in the
wind. Natural vegetation that once
covered much of the earth's continental
surface is being destroyed, and the
precious, irreplaceable soil is leached of
its mineral salts — the essential plant
nutrients. Millions of acres of forests
are cut down and exploited for timber.
As a result, wild life, including beneficial
species are displaced and annihilated
<>nd the depth of the all-important water
table is altered. Everywhere man inter-
rupts and disturbs the environment, in-
stead of conforming to its laws. The
outcome is disastrous.

Industrialization and the development
of machines, the most important factors
in our modern era, are called illusions.
The prosperity and increased standard
of living that followed are temporary.
Industrialization is possible only at the
expense of recklessly exploited natural
resources and the purchasing power of



BY Danny Bugeslov '51

a weakening rural population. It is
shown that the highest living standard
is enjoyed by countries like Canada,
New Zealand, Australia and Argentina,
in which industrialization has made but
little progress. On the other hand, such
industrialized and over populated coun-
tries as Sweden, Germany, Japan, Italy
and England are having great economic
difficulties. The source of real wealth
is the soil suited for agricultural culti-
vation, and it is limited.

Social Developments

Hand in hand with the industrial
revolution came the sanitary revolution.
Simple techniques of sanitation, such as
the boiling of water became widespread.
Diseases that plagued humans for cen-
turies were being overcome by medical
devices.

Population increased even more rap-
idly; the death rate and infant mortality
fell; life expectancy rose considerably.
It all meant more hungry mouths.

But the amount of land remained
constant. Its productive capacity, (or
"biotic potential," as the author terms
it) remained, at best, the same. In most
cases, as a matter of fact, it was lowered.

In the hundred years prior to 1940,
the world population more than doubled
—from 1,000,000,000 to 2,200,000,000.
Vogt estimates the minimum amount of
arable land necessary to promote a de-
cent living is 2Vi acres per person. But
the earth has only 2,600,000,000 arable
acres, a little over one acre per person.
There are almost no virgin soils, and
the old ones are losing fertility as their
irreplaceable topsoil is washed down the
rivers.

The author offers no clear answer to
the problems he presents. The reader
will find no blueprint or complete pro-
gram. But the book does suggest some
practicable steps toward the solution of
our human dilemma.

Survival Through Education

It calls for a reorganization of think-
ing. Men must learn to know, to feel,
their dependence upon the earth. They
must stop blaming economic systems for
their failure to adjust themselves to the
world in which they live.

A world wide educational program



must be launched, to make every man,
woman, and child realize what is at
stake. More and better scientific experts
are urgently needed to carry on an
adequate conservation program.

In order to promote ecological health,
the book suggests:

( 1 ) That renewable resources, such
as forests, be used on a sustained yield
basis, and

(2) That nations adjust their demand
for food to the necessarily limited
supply.

This can be done by lowering the
standard of living, or by maintaining
less people.

The Malthusian Theory

Checking the rise in population by
means of birth control may seem, to
some groups, objectionable, but in the
opinion of Vogt it is far better than
letting millions live in poverty and
despair, and die of starvation as they do
in India and China today.

These ideas are not original with
William Vogt. Together with another
book, Our Plundered Planet by
Fairfield Osborne, Road TO Survival
is typical of a school of thought known
as the Malthusian theory or Malthusian-
ism. A British clergyman named Thomas
Robert Malthus was the founder and the
original exponent of this theory.
Malthus, who died in 1834, predicted
that the world's population would soon
outgrow its food supply. Then, war
and famine, caused by overpopulation
would result.

It is erroneous to believe however,
that the Malthusian theory is accepted
by all scientists. It is a subject of much
debate and controversy.

Opponents of the theory maintain
that within the last century, humanity
made real progress toward better living,
and that the world never ran out of food.
True, there are local famines, as there
always had been, but they result from
faulty distribution and waste, not from
lack of food. They claim that Malthusi-
anism grossly exaggerates the problem
and underestimates both nature's re-
sources and man's resourcefulness. Some
scientists consider the entire concept of
(Continued on page 18)



RAMBLINQS IN POULTRY



By Saul Goldstein '50



NATIONAL AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE POULTRY TEAM
PLACES SIXTH AT RUTGERS UNIVERSITY



THE National Agricultural College
invaded Rutgers University, New
Brunswick, New Jersey, during
Thanksgiving, and its three-man poul-
try 7 judging team placed sixth in N.A.C.'s
first participation in inter-collegiate
poultry judging competition.

Professor Raino Lanson, of the col-
lege poultry department coached Joe
Fulcoly, Saul Goldstein, John Reed, and
alternate Erwin Goldstein to take part
in this event. It was the first time in the
history of the college that we had sent
a team to participate in inter-collegiate
activities pertaining to agriculture.

For this 24th Eastern Inter-Collegiate
Poultry Judging Contest, the first held
since the war, ten agricultural colleges
entered from the northeast section of the
country.

The program began on Friday, No-
vember 26, with the registration of the
teams, a meeting of coaches, and a talk
on New Castle Disease by Professor F.
R. Beaudette, of Rutgers University. On
the following day, Saturday, each team
competed in a written examination and



the remainder of the day was spent in
judging ten classes of birds. That same
night the final results were made known
and the awards were presented at a
banquet held at Howard Johnson's Res-
taurant by John A. Pino, General Con-
test Committee Chairman of Rutgers
University.

The awards of Gold cups were then
presented to Cornell, New Hampshire,
and Connecticut, who placed first, sec-
end, and third in that order. The plac-
ing of the remainder of the teams was
as follows: fourth, Massachusetts; fifth,
Maryland; sixth, NATIONAL AGRICUL-
TURAL College; seventh, West Vir-
ginia; eighth, Rutgers; ninth, Delaware;
tenth, Rhode Island.

In individual honors, the Aggie's top
man, John Reed, placed eleventh out of
the thirty men who had participated.

The cordial hospitality extended by
Rutgers University concluded on Sunday
afternoon with a tour of the Rutgers
Agricultural Campus.

The National Agricultural College
poultry team gained a great deal of ex-



f * * i ■ •♦

# ft. . •>













...!







N.A.C. Poultry Judging Team (left to right) — John Reed, Alternate Erwin Goldstein,
Saul Goldstein, Professor Raino Lanson, and Joe Fulcoly.



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