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The Students of The National Farm School.

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bringing fancy prices. I

Our new building being completed, we are equiping V ^

it with up-to-date greenhouse and office appliances.



THE GLEANER 13

Potting benches and pot-containers have also been built
Easter bulbs are being started for the occasion.

A. M. '20.



ANIMAL HUSBANDRY

(With Apoligies to Plumb)

Unbroken live stock is referred to as green. This
is especially true of the Freshmen breed. The average
Farm Schooler is a lover (?) of Freshmen and ex-
presses a common inherited sentiment.

There are several uses for Freshmen, principally
that of labor. In prehistoric times they ran wild, but
vvith the cultivation of the fields, both Freshmen and
their close relatives oxen, became beasts of burden and
laborers in the field. They resemble oxen in the same
slowness of gait. However, their great endurance,
steady habits and ease to keep make them favorites as
team-mates for Dory.

Although modern methods of transportation care
for enormous amounts of freight, the fact is, the de-
mand for Freshmen does not diminish. The draft work
on our farms must be largely accomplished by these
creatures. j

The principal points of Freshmen are as follows:
The ears should be fine and not too large for the size
and not to close together. They should be carried in 1 an
alert, pleasing manner, indicating good disposition. The
nostrils should be large, showing good breathing ca-
pacity. The muzzle should be^ large, indicating good
feeding qualities. Not much criticism can be placed on
this point as the breed today shows rather an over-de-
velopment at this point.

The throat latch is that part where the head and
neck are joined on the underside. An objection is a full-
ness and heaviness of all parts above this point. Such
heaviness is called a ''block-head." The uSes of other
parts of the body are too well understood to require
explanations.

In general it can be said, Freshmen should not be
too old for their age, too heavy for their weight, too
tall for their height or to wise for the size of their hat.

The height of Freshmen is usually expressed in
ratio to Youngies' bean poles.

A few of the diseases commonly found are sleeping
isckness, snoring, yapping, dislocation of the lower jaw,
which is usually the sequel to a case Of yap. Others



t4 THE GLEANER

are Younuitis. Inertia, bookworm and a peculiar disease
manifested by pulling legs. A proposed remedy for this
is to allow them to pull the stumps in front of the
Poultry Department. The tough root wood could then
be made Into wooden legs for the unfortunate instruc-
tors who happened to trust them. Most of the Faculty,
however, have put in an order for cast-iron legs.

Environment can be considered, to weed out the
weaker individuals and leave only the best. The factors
governing this environment are haying season, manure
pile, coal pile and Young's. Unfavorable factors are
peach season, Doylestown and girls.

The pedigree plays an important part in selection.
The principal questions one should ask to ascertain
parentage are "When were you born and why?" and
others on this order.

Many judges of Freshmen are led aw r ay by fads. It
really make no difference if they are one-quarter white
and three-quarters black or vice-versa.

Because of the large number comprising the herd,
some system of tagging must be enforced. Some au-
thorities say that metal ear tags are best. Such a tag
is fastened on the ear, a hole being punched thru which
to pass a part of the tag. However, the tags may be
torn out or lost. The tatooing of number inside the
ears, by means of a special needle and an indelible fluid,
is advocated. The ears may also be notched according
to a certain code.

Space does not permit any further details about the
Freshmen, but the Freshmen will learn further about
"details." H. M. C. '21.





For Sale

Villains, Monsters and Clams. Apply to Mr. Os-
trolenk. N. F. S.



Wanted

Man capable of handling stallions on exhibition.
Our stud contains Noble Jake II., and King Dory VIII.
Apply H. Kraft, Main Barn. N .F. S.



TIIK (JLMANWii



15








H. S. SMITH. EDITOR.

ATHLETICS

We are starting the sports of the 1&19 year with a
clear slate. In order to keep this slate clear we must
have a ■ successful season and such season demands of
every one of the old "Farm School Pep." the "pep,"
not only among the players, but among their school-
mates and supporters as well. When base ball practice
is called every student must come out arid share in pro-
ducing the best team the School has ever had.

The sports that most of us are looking forward to
are track and base ball. We expect to have our first
track practice as soon as the weather permits. With
Mills, Bromberg and Buskin as the principals and others
of slightly lesser calibre, we expect a fast track team.
Manager Goldberg has been very busy looking up in-
formation concerning different meets that are to be
held this spring. So far he has succeeded in entering
the Penn Relays, to be held on April 26.

This first mentioned sport gives the Freshman Class
a chance to show their ability. Everyone of them wants
to be prepared when the first practice is called. Remem-
ber that track furthers base ball and football to a large
extent.

Base ball is another sport that is looked forward to
by a number of students. We have, at present, material
that was unsurpassed in previous years. Although the
graduating class leaves before the season starts, the
Junior and Senior classes among themselves have men
enough for one team, without considering the incoming
Freshmen Class. There are five men remaining
from last year's 'Varsity, namely, (Capt.) Braunstein,
Smith, Mills, Mannes and Zinn and a number of prom-
ising substitutes, who bid to make a regular berth this
year.

It is up to the Freshman Class to uphold former



1 6 THE GLEANER

classes attendance at practice, by coming out in full

force.

Manager Rrumwasser has arranged the following
schedule of games, a large number being played ai
honn The games and their dates follow.

April 5, Trenton Art School.

April L2, Doylestown High School.

April Hi, Southern High School.

May 2, Chestnut Hill High School.

May ;;, Norrfstown High School.

May 10, onen.

May 17, open.

May 24, Catholic High SchooL

May 30, P. I. D.

PerKiomen Seminary pending.

The annual election of A. A. officers for the 1919
year was held on February 2, 1919. The following offi-
cers were elected*

rsidore Braunstein, President.

Hesse Glick, Vice President.

Win. E. Schneider, Business Manager.

Philip Trupin, Secretary-Treasurer.

Moses Daniels, Candy Manager.

Iiaac Skaist, Asisstant Candy Manager.

A. Katz, Tennis Manager.

It was also decided to| have an A. A. project garden
to bear part of the expenses. Last year the garden was
\ ■]•>• successful financially. This year a larger plot will
be plained under the supervision of Abraham Katz.
+

Professor Toor (to Smith in Poultry Class) : When
I studied this, subject, I was less interested in it than
you.

Mills: Impossible.

Professor Markowitz (at 3 p. m.): Whafl is another
name for cyst.

Stuttering students (3 p. m. to 4 p. m.) : Bl-1-la-ad-
derW -W-Wo-or-orm.

Class (at/ 4 p. in.): Its a tapeworm by this time.

Freshman to Poultry Instructors: Is it true that a
hen's egg will produce a hen and a rooster's egg a
rooster?

Dr. M. (to Freshman Class) ; Mr. Dutton, of Chal-
font, has a bull which he bought for $500 and wouldn't
sell for $5,000. It's weight is 2,000 lbs.

Voice in the rear: Some bull, ha, fellows?



1



THE GLEANER



17




J



GEORGE GOLDBERG. EDITOR.

THE ESSENCE OF FARM SCHOOL SPIRIT

Many of us have an idea of Farm School Spirit in a
vague way. We, therefore, have as many kinds of defini-
tions as students. The following outline is to the point
and shows what one of us thinks about it.

1. Remember that the school comes before the class.

2. If able, participate in all school activities.

3. Be courteous and obliging to all visitors.

4. Show respect to your Faculty.

5. Pay all your Gleaner and A. A. dues.

6. Consider others besides yourself. Animals are be-
ings and their care should be placed first.

G. F., '20.


CLASS OF 1920

We are* here at last, ready to take the helm of the
jolly old ship. "Senority." With Groman at the head,
our good ship will travel safely over the seas of leader-
ship. What a wonderful feeling!

Our class is now climbing the heights of success,
and from our pinnacle on high we shall direct the school
activities. In base ball we are trying to make the best
team in the school's history. Last year's 'Varity men,
Braunstein, Smith and Mills will form a nucleus for the
1919 team.

Our old associates who have just departed are gone
but not forgotten, and many incidents will be recalled
of the good times we had together.

But what is that we see in the, distance? How it
shines with a soft glow, like that of well-polished
emerald. It approaches nearer and nearer. It is the



18 THE GLEANER

9.20 from I'hilly, and thru its windows shine the lumi-
nous countenances of the verdant Freshmen.
Freshmen, the Class of 1920 welcomes you.

G. G. '20.



CLASS OF 1921

With the close of February ends our Freshman
year. To celebrate such an! event in our Farm School
career, we held our first annual banquet at Hotel Kelly,
Chalfont, Pa. Mr. Allman, our worthy toastmaster, his
wife, Mr. and Mrs. Markowitz, Mr. Toor, Mrs. McDoyell,
Miss Churchman. Miss Colvin and Coach Sam. Miller,
all helped to make it a very successful affair. We regret-
ted the absence of Mr. and Mrs. Ostrolenk and Coach
Ernest Katz.

Athletics will, no doubt, have its share of the '21
class, as we have veterans of last year's teams.

Alarch will find our ship steered by its new offi-
cers: Philip Tropin, President; Abe Zinn, Vice President;
HarryKrauss, Secretary-Treasurer.

We welcome the Freshmen and try to make their
first year at Farm School a pleasant one. H. K. '21.



LITERARY SOCIETY

On February 1, the 1919 season of the Literary So-
ciety was formally opened by President Mannes, who
spoke of the benefits to be derived from such organiza-
tions. The following officers were elected for the term
and were installed on February 8. George Goldberg,
President; Gustave Taube, Vice President; Harry Cor-
enzwit, Secretary-Treasurer.

Several meetings have been held and from the
genuine interst shown, succss is guaranteed. Mucn
good literary material is expected in the "22 class.

All school organizations are but stepping stones to
a bigger, better Farm School. Let the Literary Society,
produce material for "The Gleaner," the voice of our
school. H. M. C. '21.


ZIONIST SOCIETY

The Farm School Zionist Society can be likened
unto a flower which expands until it is in full bloom.
By watching carefully the whole effect can be seen.

One year has passed and the Zionist Society stands



1



THE GLEANER 1 9

with almost undecimated ranks, after a conflict with
ignorance on the part of most of the students on the
subject. Some have dropped out because they have
found Zionism unappealing, but a number were anxious
to learn about it to a greater extent.

The beginning of the second year of the Society's
existence gives a new set of men a chance to come to
the fore. These men are already showing signs of the
part they are to play. It is to the incoming Freshmen
that the Society wishes to make itself heard. They
should lose no time to get in step with the movement.
Join the ranks and reap the harvest. G. B. '20.

, , , ♦ , ,

A SMART FRESHMAN?

There was a Freshman in Farm School

And he was wond'rous smart.
He went to meet his folks in town,

With Dory an dthe cart.

And when he got to town he saw

He left his tail-gate home.
So at the end, he piled some rocks,

And said, "I've/ got some dome."

And when his folks got in the cart
And there were ten you know,

He said "Gid-dap" to his great steed
But the darn horse wouldn't go.

So 'neath the horse he built a fire

The flame, they 1 ; started well
But the horse moved on a little bit

And burnt the cart to — Pieces!

And in the cart his folks were burnt

The ten as bad as one
To Farm School he did say, "Good-bye"

With you I guess I'm done. H. T. '21.



J



20



THE GLEANER





i




CL/\33 J>U£3 AK-E \.

Z-S-4- iNtTiATiorl Fe£ ? 1




You hAV*T<> f^H ,s ~i
fVC^ *\ONTh FcK
\ A . Puts





THE GLEANER 21

SCRUB AND RUB.

MOE PINKLESTEIN, EDITOR.

Friestat: What, have you got an original joke?

Forman: Yes.

F.: What is it?

Forman: A Freshman.

F. : Oh! that's an old one.

Fine: Muskrats are dumb animals and walk into a
trap without baiting.

Daniels: Just like a Freshman.

Intelligent questions asked by a Freshman :

By pouring hot water down a chicken's throat, can
you obtain a hard-boiled egg?

By giving cows a good supply of water, will they
ever dry up?

The squirrels are busily preparing for their annual
harvest of nuts. (Freshman.)

Uncle Harman says, "If I had anything to do with
those Freshmen I'd sell them for a yaller pup, and
shoot the pup."

KRAFTY SAYINGS.



Prof, to Freshman: What is the matter? Didn't you
spend any time on your lessons last night?
Fresh.: Yes, sir, all night.
Prof.: How is that?

Fresh: I had them under my mattress all night.
Prof. M.: Where are your brains today?
Pupil: Why today?



THE GLEANER

GRADUATION EXERCISES

On February 22 the class of L919 held their gradua-
tion exercises in Segal Hall. The hall was tastefully
decorated with streamers of pine' and bunting hung
across the room.

The exercises were opened with the invocation by
Rev. Mr. Steckel, of Doylestown.

The principle speaker of the day was Mr. L. M.
Hodges, the "Optimist" of the Philadelphia North Amer-
ican. In a well delivered speech he touched upon the
great possibilities of the present day farmer, especially
those trained along agricultural lines. The fact that
George Washington and other celebrated men were ex-
cellent farmers was also touched upon. Twenty-one
men were made extremely happy when their diplomas
were given them. This was their passport to the out-
side world and their new school of learning — Experience.

On the following day the Class Day exercises were
held The program was as follows:

Salutatory — Mordecai Rosenberg.

Class History — Jacob I. Mannes.

Prophecv — Joseph Goldstein.

Class Will— George Wolf.

Presentation of the Hoe — M. Morris Schlosberg.

Knocks and Boosts — Irwin Marcus.

The Class Prophecy and Knocks and Boosts were
extremely humoruos and delivered in an excellent man-
ner.

In the evening a play entitled, "The Board Was
Bored," was presented. The manner in which this
comedy was enacted is a credit to the class and the
playwright, Mr. Drue Allman.

One would think that the entire class were profes-
sionals, hired for the occasion.

Roar upon roar of laughter was heard as Professor
Pinknoodle (I. Marcus) quizzed the class to make a
good showing before the board. After the play the
floor was cleared and dancing was enjoyed until a late
hour. Many visitors from Philadelphia and other
places were present and they all asserted that February
23 was a most enjoyable day. G. G. '20.



)



J



THE GLEANER 23

ALUMNI NOTES.

HARRY CORENZWIT, EDITOR.

GRADUATING CLASS OF 1919

The followers of the "Maroon and Gray" held their
farewell banquet at the Monument House, February 17,
1919. The occasion was opened with a prayer for the
completion of a three years' course in Scientific Agri-
culture.

Toasts of good-will were offered and responded to
by all present. Special mention was made, and com-
mented upon, of those members not able to be present,
owing to the necessity of an immediate departure to
their positions. After the regular procedure of such an
occasion, the last regular meeting of the Class of '19
was called to order by Chairman M. M. Schlosberg. A
motion was made and passed that a corresponding sec-
retary be elected. J. I. Mannes was elected. A vow of
friendship for each other and for the love of our Alma
Mater, was) made. A second vow was made that all the
members, if possible, should meet at N. P. S. on Janu-
ary 1, 1938. This year was unanimously voted upon as
it doubles nineteen, and because of the significance at-
tached to nineteen. There are nineteen members in the
graduating class, the nineteenth graduating class of the
school, and the year of graduation is double nineteen —
1919.

After the banquet the members paraded about Doy-
lestown, cheering the inhabitants, the police force (one
bluecoat), and themselves, until their hoarse neighing
died away into the night.

Brown, David, Crop Manager, Mt. Carroll, Illinois.

Goldstein, Joseph, Stock Breeder, Morristown, N. J.

Goldsmith. Bernard, pending.

Greenburg, Samuel, Poultryman, Mohegan Lake,

N. Y,

Greenburg, William, pending.

Hahne, John, Supt. of Barns, Annapolis, Md.

Harwitz, Philip, General Farm Work, Mohegan
Lake, N. Y.

Joffe, Benjamin, Assistant Manager, Brattleboro. Vt.

Katz, Ernest, Working Foreman, Pawhuska, Okla-
homa.

Mannes, Jacob I., Post-Graduate, National Farm

School, Pa.

Marcus, Irving, Herdsman, Buzzard Bay, Mass.



L'-l THE GLEANER

Miller, Jacob L., Herdsman, Hanover, Pa.
.Miller. Samuel, Official Milk Tester, Delaware State
Del.

RabinowitZ, Jacob pending.

Rosenberg. Mordccai. Herdsman. Morrison, Va.
Schlosberg, Morris M., Post-Graduate, National
Kami School. Pa.

Segal. Max, Farm Crop Manager, Annapolis. Md.
Viener Emmanuel, Herdsman, Monticello. Wis-
consin.

Wolf. George, Herdsman, Crownsville, Md.

Honorary Members
Boyes, Richard. "Going West."
Maver, Morris, pending.

J. I. M. '19.


HINTS TO FRESHMEN!

1. Don't take the advice of upper classmen.

2. Introduce yourselves to Mr. M. His specialty is
specimen*.

3. The way to win the affection of Mr. Young is
to be an L. P. (meaning,) Professor of Leverage.

4. When in need of musilage use 0. R., a large
suppH r is on hand.

r ). Throw bricks at the greenhouse. This conditions
you for base ball.

8, To prevent homesickness flirt with the kitchen
help.

7. When the "call boy" makes his rounds, order
your breakfast to prevent mistakes.

8 Always start eating before "Last Call." Well
begin is iislf done.

:>. Persuade the upper-classmen to become Bol-
Bhevists. i' ditics among them are greatly demoralized.

10. To increase your strength ask Miss C for chon
cyanide. 100 pills to the box.

If all these hints are adhered to, graduation will be
assured within 10 days.

ANNE NONYMOUS.



k



Wm. P. Ely & Son

Ready-to-Wear Clothing for Men, Boy*
and Children. Boots and Shoes. Hats
and Cap*. Furnishing Goods, Bicycles


( i A T( J II E r u & MA X N [NG

PHOTO-ENaRAVBfW

IN ONE OR MORE COLORS

t.hanii Chestnut Bt« Phlla., Pa.


Opposite R. R. Depot
Bell Phone Doylestown, Pa.




CLYMER'S DEPARTMENT STORE

BUCKS COUNTY'S LAROE8T STORK.

The National Farm School is one of ita

Patrons.

Your Patronage Solicited.

R, t*. CLYMER

30-40 W. STATE ST. DOYLE8TOWN, PA.


EMIL PEITER

Pure Ice Cream
Baker and Confectioner






Bell Phone, 184 A 42 E. State St.
DOYLESTOWN, PA.


...DRUGS...

GET IT AT PEARCE'S


What People Say


and it will be right
S. R. Pearce, Pharmacist, Doylestown, Pa.


^PITZ
WELLS
|/_JLICK
"^TUFF

Choice Meats, Provisions & Poultry

Cor 8th & Jefferson Sts., Philadelphia


Keystone Phone, Main 2180

B. ALPERDT

Wholesale Jobber and Dealer In

...Confectionery...

510 S. Second St., Philadelphia


Shaving Massaging
Razors Honed

WENDTES TONSORIAL PARLOR

16 North Main Street
F. H. Wendte Doylestomn, Pa


JAMES BARRETT

Dealer In

Hardware, Paints, Glass, Etc.

Corner Main and Ashland Sts*.

Doylestown, Pa.



Harry D. Richards

The College Photographer

Expert in Panorama Photography, Large Groups,
Estates, Manufacturing Plants, etc. Photographed
on one negative up to ten feet long.

4371 Cresson St., Manayunk, Pa.



IN DEALING WITH ADVERTISERS PLEASE MENTION THE " GLEANER.'



International Kerosene Tractors
International Motor Trucks
Binders Mowers Reape

Tillage

Hay Machines

Engines Wagons

International Harvester Company

OF AMERICA.

216 - 220North 23rd Street
Philadelphia, Pa.




sO DISTANCE PHONE8

Monument
House

Banquets and Suppers

J.G.MITCHELL, Prop.,
Main Street, Doylestown, Pa.

Noah K. Fisher

8anltary and Antiseptic

8HAVING PARLOR

Razors Ground and Honed

Lenape Bldg., State St, Front

DOYLE8TOWN, PA.

Clark & Stultz

PLUMBING AND HEATING
ENGINEERS

19 South Pine Street
DOYLESTOWN, PA.



Men's Furnishings
Athletic Goods

Marshall E. Smith
and Brother



25 6 27 8. Eighth St.,



Phlla,, Pa-



Fine Shoes for Man and Boy

Edward G. Case

TOGGERY SHOP

Lenape Bldg., Main Street Front

If you want your
SHOES : MENDED : RIGHT



bring them to

Joe Berkowitz

2B 8. MAIN ST., DOYLE8TO .



!<





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Online LibraryThe Students of The National Farm SchoolThe Gleaner (Volume v.10 no. 1) → online text (page 2 of 2)