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assisting us in our class and .social activities. Many of our burdens were lightened
by their aid. Our sliort stay at Farm School will long be remembered and cherished
the rest of our lives. We leave })ehi!id us a Farm School that is growing and adding
many achievements to its name. \\C. I he Class of '27, leave soon, and hope that the
success we make will be part of the a( liicNcniciil f)f l''arni School.



4 52 p-




Harey Bachman, '27



A Review of the 1926 Season

/^^^■^HIS review is written to bring back to the minds of the students the great
m year that Farm School has just passed through in athletics. The success of
most of our athletic teams is a wonderful tribute to the efforts of Mr. Samuels,
our coach.

The baseball team started the ball rolling. We engaged in ten contests, won seven
and lost three. In the win-column we added our ancient rivals, P. I. D., defeating
them 9-5 after they had won ten straight games, which more than made the season a
success. Coach Samuels will long live in our minds. He was with us heart and soul.
Those who were awarded their letters in return for their work on the diamond were:
Capt. Stonitsch, Wiseman, Bachman, Lynch, Loew, Pescken, Elliot, Brick, Weschner,
O'Rourke and Mgr. Eckstein.

In the annual Freslmian- Junior post-season classic, the Juniors were awarded the
game after a heated argument, with a score of 11-9.

After the baseball season what could be more fitting than our annual "Green and
Gold" meet, which included tennis, swimming, football and track and field events.
The Green team led by Capt. Eckstein, amassed a total of 155 points to 88 for the
Gold team by Capt. Levin. Stonitsch, of the Gold team, the high individual scorer
with 20 points, was awarded the gold medal, while Edelman, of the Green team, took
second honors with 18 points. He received a gold filled medal. Jung, of the Green,
and Loew, of the Gold, were tied with 15 points each for third place. They each
received a silver medal.

A short rest and we went headlong into what we consider the major sport of
the school.

With sixty candidates answering the call, we started the football season with that



{Continued on page 61)
•4 53 \p"



Who's Who in Farm School Athletics




Sami'el "Babe" Samuels



^J^^HAT old adage— "All good tilings

# come in small packages" seems to
have become conspicuously true in
Farm School. After having tried large,
medium, thin and stout coaches, and
after having tasted bitter dregs of defeat,
Coach Samuels, a wee bit of a personage,
was called upon to guide the atliletic
destinies of Farm School from the low
I^hine to which it had fallen, to its present
aristocratic position, as a feared and
worthy opponent of only the best prep
teams in the country.

A graduate of P'arm School, he left a
record as one of the best atliletes in its
histoPk-.

Not only did he perff)rin well on the
diamond, but was .selected in his senior
year to captain the .squad. For two
years he was quart erback, once on the
19^20 football team, one of the finest
teams to represent the .school.

I'pon graduating, Coach Samuels ma-
triculated at Mass. .Vgr. College, where he
soon made a reconl well to be f)roud of.
For three years he helj^<'d iiis Alma
Mater obtain glory in baseball and
Vjasketball, })eing captain of I lie latter



team which won the New England State
Championship, after defeating Harvard
and Dartmouth. For two years he was
selected by the leading sport critics on
the x\.ll-New England Mythical Five.

With a nucleus of only three veterans
at the start of his coaching career Mr.
Samuels produced the great 1925 football
team with only one defeat in eight games.
This year another top notch eleven was
welded together, the result being that
Farm School was the leading scorer of
Pa., 233 pts. being amassed to their
opponents' 40.

His method in training the fellows and
his system of psychology used in getting
the proper spirit and attitude of his men
on the various teams is the biggest feature
of his success. The personality posses.sed
by this important person, a builder of a
fine rej)utation for his teams and himself,
has V)een shown l)y the friendshij) linked
with the schools that, engage in athletic
conflicts with the Farm School. The future
aspect of atliletics at Farm School seems
bright under the guidance of our esteemed
and noteworthy coach, S.]J. Samuels.
Sam HojiouiTZ, '26.



-4 54 h



The GLEANER



THE PAST SEASON

Captain Joseph Lynch, '28

(3~\ /*0W that the season is over we

J %/ can look back with pride and
Vj joy and pack away the sweet
memory of another football season.

Everyone who followed us through the
season was pleased with our showing.
The one big reason for our performance
was the spirit of good fellowship which
prevailed at all times. There was not
one player on the team that did not give
his "all" at any time.

Enough cannot be said of our coach,
Mr. Samuels, who is an inspiration to
everyone who plays under him. Every-
one knows what a good coach means to a
team. Coach Samuels was all that, and
more.

Thanks to the Faculty and Student
Body for their staunch backing and
wonderful support. Without these two
factors our season would not have been
half as pleasant.

I wish to thank everyone who has
helped me make the past season a success.



OUR NEW FOOTBALL CAPTAIN

Harry "Jonathan" Cowen, better known
throughout the school as "Johnny," en-
tered the National Farm School in Sep-
tember, 19!25. He is a graduate of the
Central High School of Philadelphia, and
was chosen on the All-Scholastic team
while playing football at C. H. S.

Johnny got off to a flying start in his
athletic career at Farm School by making
the Varsity football team in his Freshman
year. He also made the basketball squad
as a first year man.

Our new captain kept up the excellent
work in his Junior year by again making
the Varsity football team, although



playing a star game as fullback instead of
his former position at tackle. At present,
he is again on the basketball squad,
working hard to secure his letter in this
sport.

Our retiring leader of the football team,
Capt. Lynch, has made an enviable
record. The spirit instilled by him into
the team and his presence of mind at the
crises of many games, set a high standard
for Capt. Cowen to follow the coming
season.

The school is confident he will live up
to the standard. We are all back of you.
Captain.

OUR FOOTBALL SCRUBS
H. B. Teichon, '29

We had a fine turnout for football, but
we realized that aside from needing the
enthusiam and spirit of the school to
produce a winning team, we needed a
good "scrub team." The response given
to Coach Samuels by the scrubs, was both
gratifying to him and a sign of a very
good team to represent Farm School
next year.

When one realizes that the job of the
scrubs is to show as much opposition as
possible whUe at scrimmage with the
Varsity, and at the same time help them
in polishing the team, the job of a scrub
is peculiar. Yet we realize the only way
of climbing up the ladder to become a
varsity man, is a rung at a time.
Although due credit is never given unless
one attains the varsity berth, the scrubs
in themselves worked hard.

We have prepared for the future. It
is now in our hands to do for ourselves
that which was formerly done for the
school and the football team by others.
W^e must act of our own accord.

Let us make good next year.



■4 55 \a-




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5



The GLEANER



SPIRIT

H. B. Trichon, '29

^^OMIXG to that old worn-out topic
■ c\ again, which has been the out-
\Z^ standing point of every returning
grad's speech, and has helped many
a sport writer fill up his column, we come
to a situation where, after going through
a successful football season, we begin to
wonder whether our spirit was what it
should have been during the season which
has just closed.

It is true that many of our student
body attended our games played away
from the home grounds, it is also true
that sometimes a rally was held before
each gamie and posters were seen through-
out the campus and buUdings — but where
was all the cheering and support when
our team was on the verge of losing?

That is where the whole fault lay during
the past few seasons with the lack of true
spirit.

It is evident that spirit was displayed;
but by all ? No ! Just the same group
of individuals cheer time and time again
for their Alma Mater ; and even this group
loses heart and forgets to cheer when
our team is up against the wall.

Lacking community spirit, a group
cannot work together to develop this
lacking element; class must co-operate
with class and show a distinct and finished
mode of spirit on the atliletic field
whether in victory or defeat — "finished"
in the respect of a fighter to the finish.

All the "pep and spirit" shown by the
students in the last year or so, is by far,
better than the preceding years in which
the "Old Farm School Spirit" was com-
pletely forgotten; nevertheless, a great
deal of improvement can be shown, and
as long as we have an Alma Mater that
needs support, why not go into it with a
whole-hearted spirit?





THE "F"


MEN




Player


Position


Age


Height


Weight


Capt. Lynch


End


20


5.11


160


Elliot


End


19


5.11


165


Fidelgoltz


End


18


6.—


165


Rosen


Tackle


20


5.7


190


Levin


Tackle


20


5.11


160


Friefeld


Tackle


18


5.10


170


Bernhard


Guard


19


5.10


165


Myers


Guard


21


6.—


190


Lipman


Center


17


6.1


190


Bachman


Center


19


5.7K


150


Stonitsch


Quarterback


20


5.11


150


Horwitz


Halfback


21


5.4


150


Levine


Halfback


17


5.6


140


Hoguet


Halfback


20


5.11K


185


Cowen


Fullback


20


5.7


170



Average weight of team 166 (Backfield 160)^,
Line 170i^).
Average height 5 feet Q}^ inches.

Average age 19.




THE GREEN AND GOLD
FOOTBALL RECORD



N. F. S.


16


Bordentown Military Institute





N. F. S.


60


Bangor High School





N. F. S.


38


Williamson Trade School





N. F. S.


7


Wenonah Military Academy


7


N. F. S.


58


New Jersey Institute for Deaf





N. F. S.


14


Salesianum High School


19


N. F. S.


34


Brown Preparatory School





N. F. S.


6


Penna. Institute for Deaf


14


N. F. S.


233


Opponents


40


^\


on 5


Tied 1 Lost 2





HIGHEST SCHOLASTIC SCORER IN PENKSTLVANIA



••=!l 57 >■



The GLEANER



A HE.\RT BREAKER




(^y±



■"TER giving Brown
I'rep its worst defeat
of the year, our
Cireen and Gold warriors had
one thought uppermost in
mind, namely, to beat P. I.
D., our ancient rivals.

Much zeal and spirit among the
students, faculty, and grads preceded
the game, but it was not Farm School's
year yet.

Coming upon the gridiron at ^It. Airs'
with the knowledge of four defeats, in as
many years, at the hands of the mutes,
we were all the more determined to add
P. T. D.'s scalp to our list of victories.
.\1 though the game was lost because of a
fumble by one of our backs, our boys
had the edge on the dummies and were
leading 6-0 until the fatal last quarter,
when the victors scored all their points.

I'nable to play in the last four tilts of
the season on account of a bad knee
injury-, our Capt., Joe Lynch, played part
of the P. I. D. game, and with Joe in the
line-up the team seemed to show a new
brand of fight.

Our lone touchdown was due to a pass
from Iloguet to Fidelgoltz, after Lynch
drew the P. I. D. team to his side of the
field leaving Fidelgoltz free. He caught
the ball unmolested.

The entire team showed up remarkably
well. Johnny Co wen's defensive work was
outstanding.

Too much cannot be said of the game,
but the loss means more than ever that
we have to beat our rivals in next year's
clash.

The game started with Farm School
kicking off, P. I. D. surprising all Farm
School followers by returning the ball to
Farm School's 40-yard line. Within a
few minutes they had brought the ball
to the five-vard line. P. L D. could not



gain an inch at this point, and Farm
School punted out of danger. P. I. D.
could not gain through the line and
attempted a placement kick, which went
wide.

F.vRM School Gets Started

Farm School took the ball on their own
twenty-yard line, and with slashing off-
tackle plays, coupled with end runs,
made a steady march of eighty yards
and a touchdowai. The try for extra
point failed.

From this stage of the game P. I. D.
was crumbling slowly but surely. Farm
School was heading for another touch-
down and had already made a march of
thirty yards when the unfortunate fumble
occurred. It was picked up by Urofsky
of P. I. D., who ran for a touchdown.
They also kicked the goal for the extra
point.

After this touchdown P. I. D. was
clearly the master for the rest of the game.
A few minutes later P. I. D. scored
another touchdown on an intercepted
forward pass. The game ended shortly
after with a score of 14-6.

Urofsky and Yeingst were the out-
.standing performers for P. I. D.

THE line up:

P. I. D. N. F. S.

I rofsky left end Fidelgoltz

Grinnel left tackle Freifeld

Schrovsky left guard Myers

Gerhard center Lipraan

Hovanac right guard Bernhard

Morrow right tackle Rosen-Levin

Seward riglit end . Elliot t-Glazer- Lynch

Cohen-Seward quarterback Stonitsch

Potter left halfhack Horowitz

Mesiczenick right halfhack Iloguet

^'cingst fullback Cowen

Touchflowns: — Fidelgoltz, I 'rofsky, Seward.

PoinLs after touchdowns: — Yiengst 2

Rr-fcree — Gideon

[ mpire — Coleman

Head Linesman — Hopkins



-diss}"



The GLEANER



Green and Gold Cyclone

Coach Samuels



/^ W BEGINNING the preliminary prac-
#~m tice with only six letter men of
the previous season's record-
breaking team, the outlook did not seem
very bright, considering that three back-
field posts were left depleted by gradua-
tion. However, by hard work, and
splendid co-operation by the candidates,
and other personnel, interested in the
welfare of the team, a well balanced and
trained squad was gradually developed,
and gave a good account of itself by
gaining a decisive victory over the
Bordentown Military Institute, in the
opening game of the season. The cul-
mination of the season showed the team
to have only two defeats on the record.
Both of these games were lost in the last
few minutes by very close scores, coupled
with the fact that the main cogs in the
football machine were out of the game
with injuries. The team had great
offensive power, scoring a total of two
hundred thirty-three points, and being
credited as the highest scoring scholastic
team in Pennsylvania. Defensively, only
thirty points were scored against the
Green and Gold eleven in eight games.
On two occasions against their strongest
opponents on the schedule, the Farm
School eleven held the invaders for four
downs, the ball being only two yards from
the goal line.

From the spectator's standpoint the
success of the team may be due to various
sundry reasons. As a team it had no
stars standing head and shoulders above
the other individuals. From the team's
standpoint the successful season in a
great measure was due to the splendid
spirit and co-operation amongst the
members on the squad, which resulted in



the forming of many new friendships
plus the unflinching desire for any neces-
sary hard work in order to achieve
results. Another predominating factor
was the interest and spirit which the
entire . student body. Faculty, and Board
Members showed towards the interest of
members on the squad.

Three valuable men will be lost by
graduation. Sam Hurowitz, a veteran
backfield man for three years, was one
of the most valuable members on the
eleven. A hard worker, and fighting
every minute of the game, he was one of
the most consistent ground gainers, being
versatile on end runs and off tackle plays.
Defensively he was equally valuable in
backing the line, and also when needed
as a safety man.

At tackle, Frefeld was a valuable man
in line play. Always aggressive, with
ability to take plenty of punishment, his
side of the line was not weakened. He
also was capable of getting down the
field quickly under punted balls.

The other tackle on the line to be lost
by graduating is I. Levin. Playing his
first year of varsity football, he showed
enough ability to earn him the position.
While not as valuable as other members
on the line, he had the knack of adapting
himself to the game very quickly.

With such men as Lynch, Cowen,
Stonitsch,Hoguet, Bernard, Elliott, Fidel-
goltz, Meyers, Lipman, Levine, Rosen,
and other capable substitutes remaining,
the outlook for another successful year
seems bright. However, the greatest
asset for another good year is the
unlimited supply of the Farm School
traditional spirit coupled with hard work.



••^I 59 l!=-



The GLEANER




FRESTOrAX-.R'NIOR (,a:ME
ENDS IN TIE, ()-()

N S E V E R A L

inches of snow, and
more falling, aided
l)y a whistling, biting
wind, the traditional
battle l)etween the
Freshman and Jnnior classes was staged.
Hands numb and faces frozen, twenty-two
figures stmnbled, slipped and fought to a
scoreless tie.

The Juniors received the ball on the
kickofi", and after failing to gain, punted
to the Freslunan's forty-yard line. The
Freshmen then carried the ball into the
Juniors' territory by line plunges and end
runs, and held it there for the better part
of the first half. But every time a
score looked possible the Juniors fought
like tigers.

Tlie second half found the ball in the
Freshies' territory' for the most part, due
to the comeback of the Juniors, combined
with the wonderful punting of Brick.

The swirling snow hid the goal posts
and unchecked wind chilled the players
until they were fighting on pure grit
alone. Fumbles were common and passes
rare because the players were numb \\\\\\
cold and pain.

Friedland, of the Junior team, was the
outstanding offensive player for his class.
He was the only one who could gain
ground through the Freshman line and
was responsible for the two first downs.
\ ankowitz was a bear on the defense.
Xo one could gain any ground through
him. Captain Tunick figured in breaking
up most of the Freshman end runs,
while for fight and grit Herzberg and
Abrams shone.

For the Freshmen, 'I'uransky at tackle
made practically three-fourths of tlie
tackles. Time after time he would break



through the Junior line to make sen-
sational tackles. Soskin opened up holes
man>- a time for a Fresliman to slip
through for a substantial gain, (\iptain
Jung and Stulilman guarding the wings,
performed very well.

Like trained teams of colleges, the two
teams shifted and cracked the line with
precision.

The Juniors had a slight edge in weight,
but, due to the sterling line of the Fresh-
men, not much ground was gained. The
Freslunen advanced by line plunges and
end runs. They made eight first downs
to the Juniors' two, but the Juniors
recovered most of this lost ground in
punting, having an average of forty
yards to the Freshies' thirty-yard punts.

At no time in the annals of Freshman-
Junior games was there ever one staged as
on Dec. 5, 1926.

Joe Lynch, who coached the Juniors
and Harry Baclm^ian, coach of the
yearlings, deserve great credit for the
gentlemanlike and spirited game put up
by the two classes.

LINE-UP

Juniors '28 Freshmen '29

Tunick (Capt.) right end (Capt.) Jung

Herzberg right tackle Glazer

IJerick right guard Catherwood

Blunier center Rand

Ilosenman left guard Soskin

Maltz left tackle Turansky

Abrams left cn<l Stulilman

Harris cinniliibiuk Lazarowitz

Ovsanikow right liaifljack Rosenak

Brick left halfback Chait

Krci.llan.i fullback O'llourke

Siil)stitntc.s: Juniors — IJIooiri, Yankowitz, Brown,
Cohen, Hosennian. Frcsiiinaii— Snyder, Toland,
A|»plebauni, Koltnow, Strang, Strang, Meltzer.

'lime of periods — 10 minutes.

Ik'fercc — Slangle. Umpire — Groman. Head-
Linesman — Aukberg, Wing. Timer — Samuels.



-4 60 J -



The GLEANER



"Stud'' Elliot Elected Captain of Diamond

Artists




"STUD" ELLIOT ELECTED
CAPTAIN OE DIAMOND ARTISTS

Philip "Stud" Elliot, '28,
V was elected Captain to lead
■^ the 1927 baseball team.
"^ Coming to Earm School
with intentions of further-
,,//-/ ^S'sszv ing the reputation his
brother "Dick" had made here, our
baseball captain for the coming year
started his career by earning the first
base position on the nine, in his Freshman
year.

After playing a brilliant brand of ball,
''Stud", for he was so named by his fellow
students, turned his attention to foot-
ball, and although it was a new game
to him he succeeded in making the
varsity squad.

Playing his second year of varsity



baseball for Farm School "Stud" exhibited
plenty of fight and spirit and his good
playing soon won a popularity, which he
well deserves.

Football season found Elliot on the
first eleven, holding down one of the
wing positions.

Although only two of last year's letter
men will be lost, Bachman and Wiseman,
both of whom were valuable assets last
season, prospects for a good team are
very bright. Not knowing what material
the coming Freshman class will bring in,
the following "F" men will form a nucleus
for the '27 team: Captain Elliot, Lynch,
Stonitsch, Brick, Weschner and O'Rourke.

Elliot is a born ball player and if the
team backs him and shows the same spirit
that "Stud" shows on the diamond we
can't help but come through with a
successful season.



A Review of the 1926 Season

{Continued from page 53)

real "up and at 'em spirit." The team's record of five games won, one tied and two
losses, speaks for itself. We were the highest scholastic point scorers of Penna. with a
total of 233 points. This record is all the more remarkable when you consider that
Capt. Lynch was out of half of the games with a knee injury. In the reverses we
suffered, we were uever disgraced; our opponents were of the classy variety. The
following men were awarded the coveted "F" for giving their all on the gridiron:
Capt. Lynch, Freifeld, Levin, Bachman, Horowitz, Elliot, Bernhard, Cowan, Levine,
Fidelgoltz, Houget, Myers, Lipman, Rosen and Mgr. Abelson. Honorary "F"
Rosenthal, Tuchman and Semel.

In the traditional inter-class football feud, the game ended in a scoreless tie, after
one of the best exhibitions of sportsmanship and hard fought football games to be
played between two classes. They played in three inches of snow, and all during the
conflict the snow was coming down in heavy flakes. Coach Samuels, who was time-
keeper, had a good opportunity to look over his future football material.



-=!l 61 }a-



The GLEANER



BASKETBALL

At present, the basketball team is in
full swing, and we expect to keep up our
good record with a successful season.
Although only two veterans are back
with the team, Lynch and Stonitsch,
Coach Samuels has Semel, Bachman and
Cowan of last year's second team,
besides the following new men, Elliot,
Freidland, Hoguet, Wescliner, PoUachek,
Brooks and Lazarowitz. The following
games have been arranged to date :



Our snappy forward, Bachman, was the
bright light for the Aggies, and was the
leading scorer of the team, with eight
points to his credit. Hoguet came next
with six points, besides playing a great
defensive game. Glockner and Vezard
scored most of the visitors' points, while
J. Elgart, also of the Prep team, was their
mainstay, playing a fine game at forward.

With a little more experience and with
plenty of backing on the part of the
student body, Coach Samuels can be sure
of a successful season.



Sat.


Jan.


8


Brown Prep


Home


Sat.


Jan.


15


Williamson Trade School


Home


Wed


. Jan.


19


N. J. State Deaf School


Away


Sat.


Jan.


22


N. J. State Deaf School


Home


Sat.


Jan.


29


P. I. D.


Home


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