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With men of the calibre of these just
mentioned it is only natural to pin great
hopes on our athletes for the coming
year, and with the proper support and
cooperation it is most probable that our
ondest hopes will be ^^ndicated.



TWIST OF FATE

( Cunt tiiucd from jiriyc 10)
wolf. He riinllered something alioiil the
survival of the fittest and grimly »et
his teeth and unslung his rifle. 'I'his wa»
his game — wolf. He marched on — noting
nothing but the footj)rints. 'J'lien— he
heard a .sound, turnefl about, and fired.
He mis.sed and turned to run in his panic.
He felt the snap of the wolf's jaws at hi.s
feet. This was the end — it was the law
of life, — to live and kill. And so he had
lived, so .shall he be killed. He stumbled
and as he looked up into those glistening
eyes and felt the .sharp pang of his
throat, he gurgled one despairing, in-
articulate cry.

The next day it snowed.



Jesse — "Hirsh plays the piano by ear."
Jule — "He certainly must be a mon-
strosity!"



Mr. Schmieder — "I have large quanti-
ties of bugs."

Wattman — "You've got nothing on
me."



Steinshleif er — " Vy do de fellows call me
a Grik?"

Channin — "Becose your fadder came
ofer from Europe."

Steinshleifer — "Yell, vy don't dey call
you der same ting:'"

Channin — "Your pop came ofer from
Europe, but mine is still there yet."



Among us students there are two sides
to every question, the Dean's and ^Ir.
Goodling's.



Mr. McKown — "And all this talk
about the Turks having harems is false;
why there isn't a single man in ^lecca
who has more than one wife I''




y*[<(s



D. Dallas l^icii.



/^^^IIK studciit l)()il\- \vi>lics to thank tin- Aluimii lor their untiring work
M to\v;iril improving athk'tic ac-tivilios of tiu- schook At the recent
(lance hekl hy the Phihulelphia chai)ter, the ])rofit of .Sr2().62 was
given toward tiie new Alumni football field. Accordingly, many members
of our Alumni Association responded with money until today, that field
already made, can compete with any of its kind in the country.

Again we wish to thank these contributors who are nu'ntione<l here:



David .\ulcl)erj;. ''J'2
Harry Hacliman, ''27
William Uayer, 'A'S
Casper Bliimer, '*5
Davia Becker, i!
Nathan Bromberp. -iO
.■\rcliie Cohen, '27
Harry Corenzwitz, 'il
Clifton Doremus, '-20
Harry Einstein. '11
Harrv Eskin, ''23
S. Erde. "17
Fairstein. "i't
S. Feinherg, '00
Leopold Finciis, ''23
Hvnian Kahinowitz, 'ii
Harrv Radlcr. '17
J. Uohhins. '19
David Rothstein, '2-2
H. Ross, '1.1
Ruhinow. '10
M. Semel. 'I.i
F. Selegman, 'io
S. Sobel, '10
B. Smith. '10
B. Stern, '1.5
M. Snyder, '08
P. Trupin, '20
R. Waxnian, '21
B. Weiphtman. '13
A. Witkin. '14



H. Wolf, 'l.-)
.lames Work. '13
.F. I'Iman, '14
W. Rinnenberg, '25
M. Cireenwald. '21

Kii.t Trip Siirphi.i
.1. Hellar. '02
David I'latt. '23
^I. Selector. 'lO
E. Sclilcssinper. '13
G. Hecker, '14
I.cvintow, 'Hi
M. Mayer, '18
S. Bruiiwasser, '20
Jacob Finkel. '15
Harry Fishtein, '20
Lonis Fox, '22
Solis (ialob. '20
Leo (iinsherp. I !•
BenCioldlierp. '20
J. (;ro.ss. '21
Walter Groman, '20
S. Hauscmaw. '12
I'. Ilaiicliercuv. '10
II. B. Hirscli. '20
.1, Ipcr.'ii
Ix)nis Keislinp. '22
.Joseph Kleinfield, '20
L. Kravit, 12
il. Kraiise, '21
M. Krause, '21



Nathan Lipshntz.

M. Ma','ram. '10

.1. Malkin. ''23

Ira J. Mills. ''20

N. Nusbaum. '10

.1. Sarner, '17

C. J. Toor, '16

S. Rudley, '08

S. B. Samuels. '21

.\bc Miller. '07

.\l. Finkel, '1.5

H. Riibenstein, '11

S. Fine. '20

Ben Golilberp, '11

Slicnnan. 'IS

Beriiliard Ustrolenk. '00

.S. Kocklin. 'Il

Stoloroff, '13

Ilapden,

.1. Ratner. '06

lloscn.

B. Mallorv. '17

David Brandt. '20

Rubin. '-2.-.

Weipcl, '14

Herman Litwin. '27

De Vito. '21

Total Collected—
.■i;2.000.02.



'/'///•; (ilJlANER



21



ciiai'Ti<:r chats

PhILADEH'IIIA ("llAI'lKll:

The riiiladcphi;! oiiKil st:i>^c(l llitir
elections rcccnlly ;im(I licrc is tiie out-
come :

Prenidenl — Sam ItiuUey, '08

First Vice-Prenident — Georf^e I Icc-ker, '14

Second Vice-President — Martiiic Rosen-
thal, '20

Secretari/ and Treasurer — Edgar E.
Hecsh, '21.

An executive committee was instituted
which consists of Selector, Rosen, Rask-
ing, Rosenthal, and Hecsh. The meeting
place of the Philadelphia Chapter is at
Whitehall, 410.5 Chestnut Street, and
they get together, not only when the
sun shines but on the second Sunday of
each month without fail.

Here are the very words from ''Ed"
Hecsh's pen, "Help us make our Alma
Mater a bigger institution, join us and
see what we are doing. "

These "Philadelphians" might be in
the city of brotherly love, but be care-
ful, they are out for blood, real flesh and
blood. Why just in the last year they
scouted up one hundred and three new
members.

Rudley's efforts have been untiring and
he has certainly worked very devotedly.
He has been to the New York Chapter
meeting several times in order to keep
both organizations close together.

The annual dance was held at White-
hall on Tuesday, February 21st. Some
two hundred or more people attended
including many men of the Graduating
Class of '21 who were guests of the
chapter. The older "grads" were numer-
ous, notwithstanding how well they are
distributed over the entire country.

It was quite different from the usual
run of dances, in that some clever
juvenile talent was displayed in the
form of five snappy little dancing girls.



liefreshments were plentiful, the music

by \\\f (irccii mikI Gr.l.l r,r,-|,.-sl r;i proved
lo l.c su|)cr Im-;iIc(1, nihI ;. Ik.H' 'Io/,.ti
\cry fine jjrizes were f^iven.

And as a last thing the " J'liilad<l-
phians" are looking forward to two more
great days, June 30tli and July 1st,
when the Alumni celebrate their annual
get-together. If it is enjoyed as much

as last year — Nuff sed.

* * *

New York Cifapter:

The ever alert boys from tlic Great

White Way are still up and doing.

Appended hereon is the result of their

elections recently:

President — Dr. Henry Ro.ss, '1.5
\ ice-President — Max Semel, '1.5
Second Vice-President — Lewis A. Kravit
Financial Secretary — David Piatt, '23
Correspondinci Secretary — Samuel Haus-

man, '11



ALUMNI NOTES

Brunowaser, '20, better known as
"Bruno", has entered the political field
and is a member of the Board of Educa-
tion of Pittsburgh. It appears that
"Bruno" is the entire executive force
of the Pittsburgh Chapter. Good stuff,
"Bruno", keep it up.



"Burt" Taylor, '26, is connected with
the Jenison Dairy Feeds Co., and reports
that his address is Box 25, Jenison,
Michigan.



"Joe" Kisber, '26, has success that is
far reaching: he 's n the rubber tire
business in Memphis, Tennessee.



Denver, Colorado, can boast of one of
its residents in the form of Sam Katz,
'27, who is doing real well with the
large dairy herd of the Jewish Sana-
torium there.

{Continued nn page 26)




I'll 11,11' Weder, '"29



/T WAS sloniiy and cold— tliat
iccountcd for my presence at the fire-
side; and accompanying tliat soli-
tude of peace, came a dreamy repose,
heightened by the weather and warmth.
I fell asleep and began to dream. I was
in my yacht and was drifting. From
Hawaii with its entrancing melodies
I coursed onward to the South Seas,
where I was shipwrecked. By an odd
coincidence I found myself in Egypt,
engaged in viewing its world-famed
tombs, and imagining Rameses, with
his millions of barbarian workers con-
structing this marvel.

I started, nodded again, and this
time was transported to the Bachelors'
Club, playing a round of golf, and event-
ually establishing a new record when —

"Mr. Thought," a voice said, "I am
very sorry to interfere at this time, but
you have forgotten your Exchanges.
They are due soon."

I am sure it was Con.science, though
I looked around and failed to note any
presence. However, I set to work at
once.

I find the Archive, Northeast High,
Philadelphia, Pa., to be an excellent
magazine. It is admirably balanced, its



literary dcpartniciit is above par and
all of the other de|)artnients are well
re])resentcd. Unfortunately, you have
failed to include an exchange deparlment.

In viewing tlie Soulhroii, South Phila-
delphia High, Philadelphia, Pa., mj-
time was enjoyably spent. The cover
is clever and the cuts are well arranged.
Max Sonder's "En Xocte" is well
written and as a whole we class the
Soiithruii as an original publication.

The Hem, Dorchester High, Dorchester,
Mass., is a compliment to the feminine
sex. Try not to display such a large
amount of tragic stories. There must
l)e a few giggles in your school. Your
issue is neatly blended; but a few cuts
will somewhat relieve the mind of
straight reading. And then, too, you
might i)ul in a few campus notes.

The Oriole, Baltimore City College,
Baltimore, Md., is to be praised for its
fine reading matter. Your literary and
poetry departments are unusually fine.

l"pon reading the Student, Horns High
Sc-hool, Covington, Ky., I find a few
good departments. However, there are
too many ads for such a small issue.

What claimed my immediate interest

(Continual on page 20)



THE GLEANER 23



Qcimpus Qhatter

According to our latest expectations the Student Body rnigfit \h'. per-
mitted to smoke in the cluh room. We hope the Senate- \voui(] do their
utmost to secure this slight i)rivilege.

The inactivity of the Senate last year was due principally In I he iiincliv-
ity of the Senators. With the new members of the "once mo.st ];<n\<rl'ul
organization" in school pulling together and with vigor, a big year slioiiM
be in store for us.



It seems rather encouraging that several students not on the G moaner
Staff are beginning to contribute towards our publications. M. ^liller, '29,
and L. H. Rickert, '29, have offered material for this issue and we hope it is
merely a "warming up".



Now that we are all back frbm our "Easter" vacation, we wonder whether
the faculty and "Board" could not draw up a definite calendar for the year
so as to do away with the confusion and doubt preceding each vacation
period.



The inseparables of the Second Floor Club Room, Inc., have disbanded
physically, but the Glk.\ner has inside dope on the matter and knows they're
all together in spirit. Incidentally, the entire "clique" is connected with
the Gleaner and are regular contributors.

*****
The Gle.\ner is very pleased to announce that the prize offered by
Carl P. Green, '28, for the most useful contributor outside staff members,
has been awarded to William Goodstein, '29.

*****

In the fistic encounter between Monkey-wrench Tolaud and Louisiana
Jake, contenders for the detail skipper's title, both emerged. — It is said,
however, that Jake won by a drawl.

This space is devoted to those at OlTl annex at the Jewish Hospital.
There is no one there, so we leave this blank.

*****

One of our alumni, formerly of the '29 Class, Sid Jungman. has visited
us and reports that he is engaged in raising geraniums — on the fire escape of
his home in New York City.



«4



THE GLEASER



ADVENTURE

(Colli i mud from ptige S)

ing down loose particli-s of stone as lie
went.

When lie reached thr towir room \u-
threw open the door and walked in.
All was hlack and still. lie tried to
convince liim.self that the (ghostly tradi-
tion was a myth, hnt the a.ssum])tioii
of this idea was only to hide from liim-
self the fear arising in his mind. .V
clock in the distance tolled three. He
wanted to leave, hut courage reproached
liini. He was unea.sy and nervous, but
stood firm, waiting in alarmed expectancy
for something to happen. His eyes
were drawn as hy a magnet to the old
chest which seemed illumined by a
strange light. \'ainly he tried to shift
his gaze, but it was riveted uncontrollably
on the box of cedar. Suddenly with a
sharp click the lid sjjrang back. An icy
chill crept up his spine. Slowly two
tiny balls of glowing red fire rose from
the chest. They dance<l devilishly before
his eyes like crimson sunspots, revolving
rapidly and growing larger and larger
with a low rumbling sound which was
becoming more intense every moment.
Soon the two huge, flaming balls merged
in the air. The room was filled with the
hca\-y crimson glow and the mighty
rumbling pained his ears. A volume
of black smoke shot up before the now-
terrified youth and seemed, to his des-
paired gaze, to whirl into the shape of
an old man with streaming white hair
and horrible mien. The boy fixed his
eyes upon those staring glassy eyes and
the pinched bony face of deadly pallor
which gleamed with hatred. The spectre's
clawlike hand held the gleaming dagger
which dripped with thick, red blood.
From a hideous gash in his breast the
blood trickled and as each drop reached
the floor a wild piercing scream rent
the air. Under the influence of this



supernatural pnwcr the ycnilli cuuM l)ut
helplessly watch liie .siiiie \sitli smart-
ing eyes. The rumbling Ix^came a
deafening roar which dazed him as it
pounded in his ears. The fullness of the
flaming glow filled him like a grate and
dulled his brain, a mist came before
his eyes. He battled against the over-
|)owering lethargy, but the black monster
bore down upon him and he lap.sed into
unconsciousness with the glittering dead
eyes of the spectre upon liim.

The cold gray mist of (hiwii was creep-
ing into the room when next lie woke.
He was weak and dazed. With faltering
stejjs he left the empty room. -Vs he
climbed laboriously down the steps a
phantom passed him. She was beautiful
and seemed young though her hair was
like snow. .As she g'idcd past him her
floating veil brushed against the side
of his hea<l. It .scorched him as though
a burning fire were running through his
hair. He turned and saw her enter the
roiitii 111- liad just (piitted, but he did
not follow her. He blinked once or
twice and wondered whether it was
really a phantom or a figment of his
imagination, an hallucination. His
thoughts were confirmed when he looked
at his feet and saw — blood.

The refreshing rain and cold morning
air soon revived his strength as he made
his way to town. The night's horror
was still upon him and so claimed his
mind that he was in the streets of the
village before he was aware of il. .V
shop window with a display of flaming
red attracted his attention, perhaps
because of the ghastly recollection, still
fresh in his mind. The shop window
reflected a man difTerent from the
former youth. Yesterday he had been
a handsome youth, but this was a
haggard man with a streak of white
through the chestnut hair where, he
claims, the phantom touched him. This



THE GLEANER



25



could not be the same man! Aye, it was
an old man in ai)pearanc;e if not years.
You may say that the terrific storm,
a bolt of lightning, and the terror caused
by his solitary visit to the grim fortress
had produced a strange hallucination,
and that but the mad daughter of the



murflered lor<l harl j)assed him on the
stairs, but he believes differently. He
would have told you that there arc
some things in life that man or impetuous
youth cannot play with and remain
unscorchcd, least of all uilli I hi- mystery
of the unknown.



/ I\new Him When

Victor, '29

Your light may dazzle other men

But never those that knew vou when — ■



The soaring eagle seems a wren

To all the birds that knew him when —

Your old home town and native glen
Are full of those who knew you when —

To build the bridge or drain the fen

Counts naught to those who knew you when-

Tho' Daniel dared the lion's den,

"A fake," cried those who knew him when —



Of all cold words of tongue or pen

The worst are these: "I knew him when — "




iG



THE GLEAXER



ALUMNI NOTES EXCHANGE

(Conliiiiifil from page 31) {('onliniicd from page 2i)

Tlie KIO IJiislicl Clul) of Bucks County, in the I'crkiomeiiite, Pcrkionicn Prep,

Pa., welconieii "Archie" Cohen, "'^7, who Peunshurjj, Pa., wa-; "Victory Preferred",
just ci>n)])lele(l a very successful season



at spuii culture.

Mr. Smmuh'Is will no ddiiKt sucrct'i! in
liis usual ca[)al)le niauuer, and the .Vluiiuii
A.ssociation are as one in wishing him the
best of luck.



S. Krotoshonsky, ''2'2, the hero of the
"Lost ]}atlali()n" recently arrived from
Palestine, where he had hcen doing
pioneer work since his graduation. L'pon
his arrival here Krotoshonsky was offered
a prominent part in the making of the
war film "Tlic Lust liattaliou".

The magnificent Green and Gold
banner seen flying in the breeze was a
gift of the Phila. Chapter of the Asso-
ciated Alumni.



Samuel S. Rudley, '13, aided by his
wife, recently entertained the Class of
IQiS. Mrs. Rudley is showing as great an
interest in Alumni and school affairs as
her husliand, which is quite generous.



IsR.VEL Abr.vmowitz, 391 .lo.sepli Ave.,
Rochester, N. Y.



l>y IJernhanl (iarl)er. The .Vtliletic
department is a complimeu to Alfred
Ileizer.

The CaJrl. St. John's Military .Vcad-
emy, Delatield, Wis., is appealiii;,' liiri)Uf,'h
its cover, cuts and jokes.



ARD R, GROFF



GROFF & CARWITHEN

Feed, Coal, Lumber, BuildliiK Materials
Mill Wurk and KooanK

Bell 420 Kevstunk 42 M Duylestown. I



Doylestown Steam Laundry

DOVLESTOWN. Pa.

Call 245 J and Let Us Relieve You of
Your Wash Day Worries



Fine Shoes for Man and Boy

Edward G. Case

TOGGEKY SHOP

Lenape Building Main Street Front



Nelson's Barber Shop

SH.WING AND II.VIB CUTTING

Farm School Trade Solicited

17 South Main Street, Doylestown, Pa.

Next to Henry Ely's Grocery Store



SHORE'S FRUIT MARKET

WILLOW GROVE



OUAKERTOWN
Wholesale Confections



CHILDREN



W. J. NYCE'S SHOE STORE

"The Home of Nice Footwear"

DovLESTOWs*. Pa.



Compliments
of

JOHNNY HOCK

F.\RM School's .Student Tonsorial Artist



THE GLEANER



27



A PASSING TIIOriGIIT

{doiiliiiiicdfroiii pmic I'})

Nature teiiclies us tlie grciitest lesson
of all. In studying the life of [)]ants
one learns the great fundamental lesson.
When life seems dull and we do not seem
to play any very important part in the
world, if we could have the grace to
wait, and the patience to store up knowl-
edge while we wait, we, too, might some
day be able to lift up our heads above
the clouds and bring a happy message
of courage to the rest of the world.

Editor's Note : Articles of this nature
are welcomed by the Gleaner and we
hope that more students will endeavor
to contribute in the near future.



CONTROVERSY OVER TUBERCU-
LIN TESTING

[Conlimicd from page 11)

appropriated was used, with sufficient
evidence to warrant the exhaustion of
the sum before the year was up. With
continued tuberculin testing it will take
a good many years and a goodly sum of
money to produce tuberculin-free herds.
The reward will be a premium for the
milk produced from such herds. Will
such a premium offset the loss incurred
in building up such herds? At the rate
cows are reacting to the test it will take
a good many years to replace them. It



is logical to as.sumc that high producerH
being under a great strain have low i)f)fiy
vitality and are quite easily su.seeptil)le to
the mici.sma of tuberculosis germs. 'I'liis
might involve a milk shortage, and
perhaps higher prices for milk.

In the ultimate analysis the entire
situation is a matter of individual
opinion influencing the individual accord-
ing to his prejudices. As long as there
remains any danger of contamination to
the public there .should not be any
hesitancy in testing. A little more con-
sideration in reasonable indemnity would
help immensely to relieve the issue.



Mr. Groman (after explaining the
carburetor for a full period) — "Now, is
this clear?"

John — ^" There's one thing I don't
understand."

Mr. Groman — "What is it?"

John — "What is a carburetor?"



Mr. Wing — "I've had enough from
you, Lehrer, get out and stay out."

Lehrer (15 minutes later) — "Mr.
Wing—"

Mr. Wing — "I thought I told you to
get out?"

Lehrer — "But I can't hear so well
outside."



GUSTAVE SANDERS

Home Portrait Photographer

W. STATE AND COURT STREETS
DOYLESTO\\T<, PA.

Sittingj- by Appointment Special Rates tn Schools



28



THE GLEASER



GEORGE SOMMER
Dairy Products

DOYLESTOWN, Pa.



B. H. MOORE

AGENT KOR

UNITED CIGABS

DOYLESTOWN. Pa.
' Happiness " Candy a Specialty



MAX PEARLMAN

Tftllor and Furrier fur Men and Women

DycinR. Cleaning, and Rep;iirinR

Suits Pressed and Steamed

34 S, Main St.. Dovlestown, Pa.



A. SPRINTZ

First Class Shoe Repairing and Shoe
ShIniiiK Parlor

24 East State Street

Dovlestown. Pa.



WILLIAM NEIS & SON

MAKERS OF

Superfine Soft Drinks



MARKOVITZ BROTHERS

Importers of
HOSIERY UNDEBWEAB NOTIONS

321-323 Market Street Philadelphia. Pa.



ATHLETIC OUTFITTERS



1210 Chestnut St.



Phila., Pa.



THOMAS LYONS

Watches, Clock.«, Jewelry and Slirerware

Repairing a Specialty DOYLESTOWN. PA.



Dear Mr. Ree,

Can you tell me \\ liy I Imveii't ^'ot red
hair.^

TkKK.SA CiUEEN.

Dear Teresa,
Ivorv doesn't rust.



De.^k Mr. Ree,

\Vliy do hulls have rings in their nose?
LoTTA Chlst.
Dear Mi.ss Crist,

Foolish child, why that's his wedding
Ting.



Dear Mr. Ree,

Do catfish have kittens?

Lester Rene.
De.\r Lester,

Search me; do dogfish have puppies?

Mr. Schmieder — "What is the rota-
tion of crops?'"

Blunier — "Puttinj,' them in a hox, and
shaking 'em around."

Mr. Sfhmiedcr — "I said crops not
craps."

Bloom — "What do you mean Ijy tell up
Helen that I'm a fool?"

Zaroe — "I'm sorry I didn't know it
was a secret."



Bullet — "Hey, Morphy, hear aljout
the race?"

Weshner — " What race? "

Bullet — "The human race, l)ut you're
not in it. Oooh."



!Mayer — "So that's final?"

Sarah — "Yes, shall I return your
letters?"

!Mayer — "Yes, there's some good
material in them that I can use on some
other girl. "



THE GLEANER



20



Qompliments of the

'President



DINNER PARTIES CATERING BANQUETS

BRUNNER'S

Restaurant and Catering Service

29 South Main Street, Doylestown, Pa.
Norman S. Brunner, Prop. Phone 66-J



DRUGS

Tlic Store of Service and Quality
SAMUEL R. PEABCE

Doylestown Penna.



BAKERY AND CONFECTIONERY

Hnme-Made Ice Cream

WHfJLESALE AND RETAIL

SCHABINGER & SONS



DOYLESTOWN INN

Home Cooking Our Specialty
LUNCH BOOM RESTAURANT

Phone 37 18 West State Street



JENKINTOWN DOYLESTOWN

GOLDBERG'S

Carrying a Complete Line of

Men's Clothing, Furnishings
and Shoes

to properly introduce the Doylestown Store
to the National Farm School

make a standing invitation to all Farm School Boys

to deal here

With Special Privilege of a 10% Discount



30



THE GLEANER



NEW STRAND THEATRE

DoV1.L;SK)\\.N, I'liNNA.

"THE HOME OF THE BEST PHOTOPLAYS"
Performances every evening at 7 and 8 :45
Matinee on Mondays, 4 P. M. and Saturdays, 2:15 P. M.
Nicholas F. Power, Manager



SClirVl.KR & BOWERS

Uu(IIIU>r> III .>I('ii'> A: Buys' iiulliliiK &
ilaberd&sliory

"Custom TailorinK. Clt-aning & PrcssinK
Is Part of Our Service"

PlIOSE 27" J DOYLfSIOWN. V\.



TARTAN BRAND
Alfred Lowry & Bro.



Philadelphia



Penna.



Hell 182 Keystone 19-D

CHAS. B. MOVER

30 East State Street
DOYLESTOWN. PA.

•ii

KELMNATOR

Electrical Contracting

Radio Equipment

Automotive Electrical Equipment



DIETRICH'S

Monument Square Barber Stiop

DOYLESTOWN'. PA.



Narih Loads the World In Motor Value

SALE.S jNAiSri. SKKVKE

DliVLKSTuU.N NASH
State Street West of Clinton



HOFFMAN, CROWN MFG. CO.

Conlraclor lo the Government
312 Markkt Street PHILADELPHIA



Bell Pho.ne


DOYLESTOWN 85 -J '




DOYLESTOWN TAILORING CO.




CUSTOM TAILORING




FOR LADIES AND GENTLEMEN




Ties Pressed and Cleaned


S. E. POLOXSKY


Prop. DOYLESTOWN, Pa.



THE GLEANER 31





CompUmenls






of






MR.


and MRS.


B.


RIVKIN




BRIGHTON BEACH,


N. Y.

i



PHONE, SHEEPSHEAD 0355

Water Front Property a Specialty



BR



IVKIN

REALTOR



207 BRIGHTON BEACH AVENUE
BROOKLYN, N. Y.



Insurance, Mortgage Loans



3^



THK GLEASER




WEWBROiiK II liII'MISG COMPANY

5800 N. Mcrvine St. (Terminus Broad Street Subway)



^he Gleaner



IS ANOTHER SCHOOL
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in a plant built and equipped
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the quality of paper, mono-


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Online LibraryThe Students of The National Farm SchoolThe Gleaner (Volume v.28 no.1) → online text (page 3 of 4)