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The Students of The National Farm School.

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and spectators were keyed up to
the highest pitch. George replaced
Wagner. Kaufman then ^i^nalled
for George to carry the ball
through the line, but instead -^f the
Temple line facing- him lie found
that their line tightened utj and



THE GLEANER



formed a huge iron wall. Semel

and Kaufman then tried to go
through but met with the same re-
sults. ( >n the fourth attempt
George's powerful exertion pierced
the lemple line for a touchdown.
George kicked for goal but failed.
Score, 1$ to 6.

This game established the long-
sought- for reputation for Farm
School.

Doctor Obrien congratulated the
Farm School team upon their
showing, which was a great sur-
prise to him. And in fact prom*
ised to put us on Central High
School's football schedule for next
year.

Summing up, it is just to state
that it was more of a victory for
Farm School than a defeat.

Line up :
Farm School Temple Univ.

Xussbaum left end Tuttle

Harkavy left tackle Scarry

Light left guard Miller

Seligman center McDonald

Hancharow right guard Martin

Bautman right tackle Shields

(Captain)
Stamen right end Schaefer

i Wilensky)

Kauffman ....quarterback Nash

HeHand left halfback.... Johnson

(Ross)

Semel right halfback Slick

(Captain)

George fullback Eartle

i Wagner)

Umpire — McGee. Referee — Dr. O'-
Brien, Central High. Head linesman —
Prof, Xicli. Temple University. Time
of periods — \2 and 15 minutes. Touch-
downs — Eartle. 2: George. 1. Goals from
touchdown — Schaeffer.
FARM SCHOOL. ^2: SOUTH-
ERN HIGH, o

On Friday October sqth Farm
School played its fourth game of



the season, meeting Southern High
School at Southwark field, Phil-
adelphia, and scored $2 points to
Southern's o. Farm School was
confident of an overwhelming vic-
ory, judging by the showing made
by Southern against its former op-
ponents, who were admittedly be-
low our class.

More than fifty students, exclu-
clusive of the nineteen regular
players, went to Philadelphia fco
assist the team to victory by the
influence of their cheering and
moral support.

Captain Semel insisted upon fif-
teen minute quarters, but South-
ern claimed they were unaccus-
tomed to longer than ten and eight-
minute quarters. After some
wrangling a compromise was ef-
fected, arranging for fifteen and
twelve-minute periods of play.

The game began at 3 p. m. The
first half was devoid of scoring ex-
cept for one touchdown in favor
of Farm School. Score, 6 to o.

Our [boys never sHowed such
poor form as that exhibited in the
first half of this game.

They lacked that spirit anjd gin-
ger which was so prominently
displayed in the Perkiomen and
Wilmington games.

Southern's play was character-
ized by slugging. This had a bad
effect on the Farm School aggre-
gation who had never experienced
such style of play. In addition.
it gave them an excuse for not try-
in? harder and running up a big-
ger score than 6 to o.

(Continued on page 14. )



THE GLEANER







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THE GLEANER



'3




Samuel Dorfman, Editor



Class of 1915
The realization that we have on-
ly four months till graduation finds
us all using the midnight oil..

We have ordered our graduation
pins, ond are thinking seriously a
bout a class night which promises
to be the best ever.

H. S.



1916

Now that Farm School's major
sport, football, is in full swing',
we feel, breathe and dream foot-
ball. We succeeded in capturing
few places on the 'Varsity foot-
ball team.

We are anxiously looking for-
ward towards the coming Fresh-
men-Junior football game.

1917

The prevailing spirit of foot' al 1
has entered into the Fheshmen
Class. Every member of the clasr.
has familiarized himself with the
essential details of the game.

The boys are exerting them-
selves to the utmost in order to
make the clash with the Junior?
an interesting contest.

L. G.



Literary Society,

During the past month several
new members have been placed up-
on our roll, and it is to be hoped
that the society will greatly profit
by their entrance.

The interclass debates are now
in full swing. Recent election
of officers chose : Harry Schor,
president; Benj. Wade, vice- pres^
ident ; Samuel Dorfma'n, secreta-
ry-



So many poems have been re-
ceived lately that we are prompted
to say :
"All poems poorly worded

Will be thrown into the basket,
The poet ( ?) will be murdered.

And sent home in a casket."

Your poems are solicited. — Ed.

Semel wishes to announce tha 1
by his vast experience in driving
he discovered that a horse can pull
uphill much easier with a brake on



How we envy Hank an] Ellis in
Economical Entomology class.



THE GLEANER



SOME TRAVELING
Wade and Ellis were suspended,
they were desperate. (Naturally
so. Weren't they bombers?) They
threatened to leave the country for
ever. ,

Here comes the soft music—
They went to Philalelphia ! (New
^ork papers please copy.)

CLASS AND CLUB
WHAT CHEEK!
Miss B in Plant Pathology class,
speaking about fungus diseases ex^
plained : "Mildew shows a white
powdery growth on surface. Who
can give me an example?"

Magraw, with his winsome
"gold teeth" smile shouted. "Girls."



Miss B was lecturing about tht
disease called apple blotch. "The
following varieties are susceptible
to this disease : Ben Davis, Smith
Cider and Maiden Blush apples;
Has any one in the class seen a
Maiden Blush?"

The Juniors were too bashful to
answer.



HIGHER EDUCATION
To test the boiling point of a
thermometer, Klevansky wo u Id
test it in snow. Correct, take c
zero.



In reading war despatches in the*
papers you will find many names
unpronounceable. But don't b<?
discouraged. We find Economical
Entomology names jaw-breaking.

(Continued from Page u)
However James Work, our
worthy roach, did not take this
view. Between the halves he as-



sembled the squad and gave them
the warmest raking imaginable.
The team seemed to realize ■ that
they were not doing their level best
when they heard the coach's re-
marks concerning their loose play-
ing; and when he suggested that
Southern had a good chance for
victory if Farm School did not
brace up our boys got together and
faithfully promised to improve in
the following half.

They surely made good their
promise. The team came back so
strong that twenty-six points were
added to their side of the score
during the last two quarters.

Left-end Nussbaum, in particu-
lar, was the star of the game ; he
scored three touchdowns, one on
a forward pass, and two on South-
ern's fumbles. He made runs of
30 and 70 yards to accomplish
these. Captain Semel, Kaufman
and George featured in this game.

Line up :
Farm School S. H. S.

Nussbaum left end Black

(Bunnin)

Half and left tackle Rosetsky

Lig'ht left guard Zirpole

(Lubin)

Seligman center

Hancharow . . . .right guard. . . . Hudson

Staemen right tackle . . Goldenberg

(Sacks)

Kauffman right end Meloy

Ross quarterback Gottlieb

Semel left halfback Kins

(Weinstein)
George . . right halfback . . McPhillmee

Referee — Schristna. U m p i r e — Mc-
Cann. Touhdowns — S'emel, George,
Nussbaum, 3. Goals from touhdowns — .
George, 2. Substitutes — Harkavy for #
Helfand ; Helf and for Ro c s : Forems \
for Bauiman : Citron for Hautcharan :
Wagner for George.



THE GLE NER



IS




Benjamin Wade, Editor



Some of the issues of our con-
temporaries for the month of Oc-
tober have made their appearance
on our exchange table. We note
that our contemporaries, save for
a limited few, were not imbuec)
with the havoc in Europe and did
not deviate from the regular rou-
tine of "class and school spirit"'
editorials to extend commentary
expression on the European calam-
ity. We think and maintain that
the school paper ought to comment
on world-current topics.

With thanks we beg to acknowl-
edge receipt of the following ex-
changes .

The Ides (George School) Sha-
mokin High School Review, The
Archive, The Blue and Gray
Southern, The Recorl ( Sioux
City) The Mirror (Bethlehem,
Pa.)', The Mt. Airy World, The
High School Recorder ( Brooklyn.



Ky.) Hilltop, The School Review,
N. Y.), The Student (Covington,
The Academy Scholium, Delaware
College Review, Newark, Del.),
The Irwinian, The Old Gold air^
Blue, Garnet anl White, The But
letin (Montclair, N. J.), The H*
A. S. Record, The Jeffersonian,
The Commercial Caravel ( New
(York), The Advocate, Vail-Deaue
Budget, The Oracle (Cincinnati.
Ohio), The Spectator, Red and
Black (Tampa, Fla.), The Norma'
Review, The Orient, The Courier.
W r e would like to hear from
more of our exchange friends who
have been rather slow in coming.



Graduate visiting the school saw
Burtin hurrying towarls the sta-
tion. He stopped him and jex,-
claimed, "Where you going?" How
are ye (Hawaii") !

Burton, who is a little absent-
minded, replied, "No. Honolulu."



i6



THE GLEANER



AGRICULTURE ( Conti n u e d

from page 7).

The corn at the Main Barn de
partment has been husked and
some of the fodder taken in to be
shredded. A carload of mangels
has been shipped to Xarvon, Pa.,
and more is being sold daily by the
ton.

AT FARM NO. 3

All the winter plowing is done.
We planted about 5 acres of rye
and 3 acres of wheat. We received
about 55 bushels of corn to the
acre. We harvested and stored
away for the winter 200 bushels
of apples ; 100 bushels have beer
sold during the summer and about
100 bushels have been made into
cider, which is selling very profit-
ably. We have succeeded in re
claiming the 17-acre meadow. .It
is all plowed up and ready for a
crop to be planted next spring.

Several hundred bushels of ap-
ples and pears have been harvest-
ed. Some were sold and the rest
were stored away for the use of
the Domestic department during
the winter months.

A considerable amount of man-
gles have been sold from Farm No-
t. and the rest have been stored
away for the use of the stock. The
corn has been husked and a large
yield was realized. We are get-
ting some of our hens and pullets
ready for market.



WITH OUR GRADUATES

L. Kaskin, ex-' 15, has charge of
a herd of Guernsey cattle at Del-
aware Gap, Pa.

Morris Druckman, ex '16, is en-
gaged in diversified farming at
Liberty, N. Y.

On October 18th the Alumni As-
sociation held the regular annual
meeting at the Farm School,
Chas. Horn reported his work
as Secretary for the past year.
There were quite a number of
graduates present and fond memo-
ries were exchanged. Officers fo<e-
the coming year were elected as
follows: James, Work, '12, pres-
ident; Ed. Schlesinger, '13, vice-
president ; Chas. Horn, '06, secre-
tary. Mr. Horn would like to hear-
from all the grads.

If you want your

SHOES MENDED RIGHT

bring them to

Joe Berkowitz



28 S. MAIN ST.



DOYLESTOWN, PA.



Bell Phone 245 x



Terms C. O. D.



Dofbtowo Ha sl a m nd Laundfy



Steam

WILLIAM H. FULLER, Prop.

201-205 N. Broad St. Doyle9town, Pa.

HENRY S. BEIDLER

DEALER IN

Coal, Flour, Grain, Feed, Timothy and

Clover Seed, Lime, Fertilizers, &c
South Main St., Opposite the Gas W
DOYLESTOWN, PA



c (

orks %



Win. P. Ely & Son

Raady-to-wear Clothing (or Men, Boys and
Children. Boot* and shoes. Hats and Caps
Furnishing Goods. Bicycles

Opposite R. R. Depot
Bell Ph«n« Doylestown, Pa.



EMIL PEITER

Pure Ice Crean
Baker and Confectioner

Bell Phone, 184 A. 42 E. STATE ST.

DOYLESTOWN, PA.

R. L. CLYMER
Mentfmt

STATE STREET DOYLESTOWN, PA.

What People Say

SPITZ
ELLS
LICK
TUFF

Choice Meats, Provision* & Poultry
Cor. 8th & Jefferson Sts. - Philadelphia

A. R. LEAR

Confectionery and Ice Cream Parlors

Opposite Post Office
DOYLESTOWN, PA.



Isidor J. Friedman
PRINTING of QUALITY



419 Locust St.

Bell, Lombard 2994



Philm., Pa.

Key., Main 218



DIEGES & CLUST

" IF WE MADE IT— IT'S RIGHT "
Official Jewelers of the Leading Colleges

Schools and Associations
Class Pins, Fraternity Pins, Medals, Cups,

Etc. Watches, Diamonds, Jewelry
1011 Chesnut St. Philadelphia

DRUGS

GET IT AT PEARCE'S
and it will be light

S. R. Pearce, Pharmacist, Doylestown, Pa.
Keystone Phone, Main 2180

J3. ALPERDT

. Wholesale Jobber and Dealer in

Confectionery

5 1 S. Second St. Philadelphia

JAMES BARRET

Dealer in
Hardware, Paints, Glass etc.

Comer Main and Ashland Sts.
Doylestown, Pa.



Crane's Ice Cream & Baking Possess

a rich natural flavor, for every ingredient is
of high quality. It is made in a careful man-
ner in a sanitary plant, under the most rigid
Pure Food Restrictions.



Main office



Store and Tea Room



23rd St. below Locust 1310 Chestnut St.

PHILADELPHIA, PA.



IN DEALING "WITH ADVERTISERS, PLEASE MENTION THE GLEANER



T"% T^l *1 1 * is sufficient for the front

Burpee, rhiladelphia, SMS-satsa

* * * * dress plainly on the other

side we shall be pleased to send THE LEADING AMERICAN SEED CATALOG,— a bright new
book of 182 pages, which should be read by . — _ _

all who would have the best garden possible II «■ ■

ss^sass seeds of the 15iirpee-V£iiaiity



Reliable Sporting Goods

or Every Description Complete Catalogue mailed on request

Howard George

4539 Frankford Avenue - -W Philadelphia, Pa.



BEAUTIFUL FLOWERS



OR

VEGETABLES

ALWAYS GROW
WHEN YOU SOW

fci. MICHELL'S

^ "Distinctive"




^RANDALL'S

Har<Jware Department Store

Main St. £? Oakland Ave.

Doylestown, Pa.

Builders' Hardware, Mechanics' Tools and
Supplies, House Furnishing Goods, Cut-
lery, Stationery, Sporting Goods, Wall
Paper, Paints and Varnishes
Farm equipment and Garden Supplies

BELL PHONE 169 A

Men's Furnishings
Athletic Goods

MARSHALL E. SMITH
& BROTHER

25 a 27 S. Might St. Phila.



NOAMppFISHER

SanitJ^f ~Et Antiseptic
SHAVING PARLOR

Razors Ground and Honed

Lenape Bldg., State St. Front
DOYLESIOWN, *>A.



Fine Shoes for Man and Boy

EDWARD G. CASE

TOQQERY SHOP

Lenape Building, Main Stieet Front



CRAVEN'S STUDIO

Pictures, Picture Frames and Mats, Postal Cards,
Buildings, Etc. Family Groups.

DOYLESTOWN, PA.



o



CORNER COURT and STATE STPEETS



J. S. STRAFFORD PRINTING CO., 1025-27 RIDGE AVE., PHIL.A.





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Online LibraryThe Students of The National Farm SchoolThe Gleaner (Volume v.3 no.13) → online text (page 2 of 2)