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you meant,
I don't see how you could miss it.
For a mate he is shy — we'll

yield to the consumers

cry.
To the butcher's block we'll lead

him.
The pier has four hams from

birth
And they think it's true.
But at your death, two will de-
part from you.



I'll



to



grind all these animals
tankage
And sow it on the field for ad-
vantage,
For I doubt very much, if hecks

as such,
Will help solve the food sit-
uation.

Respectfully.

S. S. A.
Per B. Jaffe, Fertilizer Trust.



Freshie, getting first glimpse
of Mrs. A. — to Junior — "Did you
see her, she smiled to me."

Junior — "Well, that's nothing,
the first time I saw you I laugh-
ed my head off."



We Freshmen
We Freshmen came — on
crutches.

We Freshmen saw — stars.
We Freshmen concuered —
the wilds of Doylestown.
"I never believed," said Katz to

me,
"That Wolff could lauqrh, he haw

he."
We are not a bunch of cranks,
We can stand your Freshman

pranks,
We will treat you rather p-entlv
So lonfr as vou are not too

friendly,
So helo us, Fre«hmen: T^p 1C ^0.

B. '20.

Seniors w^re made to lead the

way.
Juniors are .srlad when they have

their say,
But Freshmen, I'm sure,
Are so young and pure,
For one year they must decay.



THE GLEANER




Samuel Miller, 19



A clear slate faces the sport
issue of the N. F. S. stars. Is
it to be marred? Or is it to be
chalked full of victories? The
former must be false, as false
2lZ a glass egg under the folds of
a setting hen. Victories mark
the zenith of the athletic career
of 1918 as surely as stars plus
good raw material equals a
Farm School baseball season,
and dark horses and veteran
footballists makes a Farm
School career possible.

Second to good material
comes spirit. Spirit can't be
talked into you. Accomplish-
ment acquires a true spirit back-
ing. Do not think I mean you
should become discouraged, dis-
heartened, and foolish enough to
lay down altogether after a de-
feat or some condition that does
not favorably comply to the
welfare of the sport. By no
means is this my advice. Ac-
complishment based on past
achievements, and future bright
prospects, ought to be the guides
of good spirit. The momentary
downfall yields nothing to the
past victorious record if one
hears the true sportsmanlike
spirit. Mistakes and failures
pre companions of success and
fame. A team cannot be suc-
cessful all the time. Else why
have competition? Let us then
be up and doing with a spirit
for any fate, with pep and vim



behind it to make it a feat of
modern date.
Freshmen !

To you verdant men goes the
responsibility of upholding
Farm School's good reputation.
You will find that athletics (es-
pecially baseball and football) is
a part of our life here. The
teams we turn out depend equal-
ly on the co-operation of every
student.

The previous freshmen class-
es have, in the main, lived up to
expectations. New wonders are
discovered, developed, and in
their latter years they take the
reins and lead on. But we want
more than the average number
and quality of participants as
the accustomed entrance that
new classes creates. We want
more active, vigorous, heartfelt,
enthusiastic fellows to step in
and make good. The majority
of you are in some capacity or
other able to help, therefore put
your full energy into the ring
and with us you can create an
indominitable spirit and victor-
ious teams.

Of last year's team four vet-
erans remain. Many more stu-
dents of good calibre are listed
for dark horses. So, freshmen,
with baseball prospects high and
a collection of good material at
band you need strain all your
energies to make a berth for
vourself.



14



THE GLEANER



GENTLE HINTS TO THE
FRESHMEN

1. A good start is a good fin-
ish. If an upper classman or-
ders you to do anything, do not
do it.

No 2. Do not become a member of
the literary society, .nor contnlb-

ute to the Gleaner; but when
you see two upper classmen con-
versing, butt in.

3. Do not use the study pe-
riods for studying. Throw your
pillows at one another. Make
all the unnecessary noises you
can, and in this way you will be
recommended by Mr. Ostrolenk
to the faculty as a merit stu-
dent.

4. Never observe order in the
dining room. The knives anu
forks are there to raise a rack-
et. Hold your class meetings
during meals. Practice your
class yells. Call off your foot-
ball signals, and write youi
algebra examples on the table-
cloth. In this way you will
make a hit with the matron.

5. Do not become a member
of the Athletic Association
subscribe to the Gleaner, be-
cause our treasuries are over-
flowing. Also, do not partici-
pate in athletics as we have too
many candidates reporting
practices.

6. A freshmen cap is a thing
of the past. Do not wear it.
This will insure you a free ;
port to x ? ! ! !x heaven.

7. Do not use the athletic
field for practices, but practice
upon the lawns. Our lawns



seem to thrive best when tramp-
led on. Put as many bails
through the window as possible.

8. Frequently visit the dwell-
ing place of the noble seniors,
which is Segal Hall. Treat all
upper classmen with candy
when the candy box is open.

9. Whenever you are tired
and wish a vacation, do not fill
out a vacation card. This is ab-
surd. Stand behind my friend,
Al Jeane and gently caress her
hind legs. You will then have
your meals served in bed.

10. Do not play with Mr.
Bishop's pups nor flirt with Mr.
Toor's chickens.

11. The only way to get along
right is to pull legs. Pat Mr.
Bishop on the back and say,
"Why Pop, I'll do anything for
you."

Follow any of the above and
you will graduate in less than
two weeks.

With fatherly love,

GEORGE WOLF, '19.



War do"s r ed (Vvn active

service with <.■•;-■. wounds tire be-
ing cared for I y Countess Yoiirkevich
in charming surroundings in. tbe Rue
Chauveau, Neully-sur-Seiue, reports a
Paris ;li:">-t-i\

The Old Briga.de includes Pax, who
four times saved bis master's life;
Dick of the Somine, who bad a leg am-
putated after a heroic exploit; Dick
of the Yser, whose regimental officers
decorated him with the Croix de
Guerre.

Altogether the countess is caring for
nearly six hundred dogs who have been
the devoted companions of stretcher
bearers and the friends of the poilus.

Already these faithful heroes are
fasting as a result of food restrictions
and with the more severe regime of
bread cards there are fresh clouds
ratherin" on tin Lr horizon.



C



THE GLEANER



15




Arthur Neubauer, Editor



J



CLASS OF '19

Hello ! We're coming ! We're
here ! Seniors ! On our last lap
a clear track with Mannes at the
helm- What more can mortal
desire.

The departure of the gradu-
ating class of '18 leaves a gap
we are more than able to fill.
On the foundation laid in our
freshman year and improved
during our junior year, we are
now striving to attain our goal
— a goal which is ideal and im-
pregnant with success.

Our class has generously and
substantially contributed to-
ward every school activity. With
such commendable baseball vet-
erans as Segal, Lieb, Jaffee and
Katz, the school will boast of a
team this summer unprecedent-
ed in the annals of Farm School.
Nuff said.

Coming events cast their
shadows before. So do fresh-
men, else why does everything
seem to be bathed in a pale
luminous green tint? At any
rate several members of our
class are clucking in a motherly
fashion and are quite broody; a
sure sign of spring and fresh-
men ; bless their helpless hearts.

The Senior Class of '19 greets
you freshmen. M. S., '19.



CLASS OF '20

The pleasant and profitable
occurrences of the past year are
reminiscences that seem to be
all magic and charm.

Our class was well represent-
ed in all the sports, but this did
not prevent us from relieving
Hoover from some of his wor-
ries by aiding materially in
raising bumper crops.

In all probability we will ac-
tively participate in the athlet-
ics. We have men who are im-
bibed with genuine Farm School
spirit — excel in everything un-
dertaken.

With the recollection fresh in
our minds of the banquet held
at Hotel Kelly, Chalfont, Pa..,
we are determined to keep the
year bright and cheerful.

Freshies, our greetings to
you are heartfelt. We cherish
the sacred memory of your city
life, revere the vocation you
have chosen, and foster your in-
fant lives in the bosom of un-
selfishness. Our lesson to you
— cherish, honor and obey our
superiority. A. N., '20.



16



THE GLEANER



ZIONIST SOCIETY



Th;



Prc-f. S. Marcc-vitz, President.
National Farm Schoc and by our own presence here



has reason to congratulate itgeii at the National Farm School.

upon the successful organiza- We- chose agriculture for our

tion of a Zionist Society. A calling, not for its material

meeting was held January 8th, gains, for few farmers get rich,



at which time Mr. Cowen very
ably addressed the members oi
the school and organized the so-
ciety which has already taken
steps to become affiliated with
the Intercollegiate Zionist Asso-
ciation..

I believe we as members o2
this society are particularly for-
tunate, for not only has the
spirit awakened withm us to our
national consciousness, but be-



but to live close to nature, which
close association makes for mor-
ality.

Agriculture today is no long-
er handed down from father to
son, but is full of complex prob-
lems which are continually on
the increase as time goes on and
the balance in nature is destroy-
ed. That there will be many
such problems in Palestine goes
rithout saying. From our ex-



cause of our calling. Among the perience in this country, we

division of labor, ours is the know that insects and diseases

part to create. From many arc always on the increase as

past and bitter experiences, it cultivation becomes more inten-

is admitted by ail who have give. With the importation of

given the question thought, that nursery clock and seed, we may

our homeland can only be s< look for new pssts. Outbreaks

tied permanently and solidly, f locusts, mice and diseases due

when its basic industry is agri to mosquitoes, such as malaria,

culture, upon which all ti have already occurred. In the

United States we have no par-



rests.

"The first farmer was the
first man, and all historic
ity rests on possession and i
of land. And the profession



tlculcr fear of these problems,

"i have learned how to cope

with them and we are learning

.lints here at ths



in all eyes its ancient charm, ?r farm school. A National Farm



standing nearest to God,
first cause." True and no!:
men are reared in the coun
Many of our ancient prop
h as Amos and Lincoln



.1 colony in Palestine would

■ i rnrne:i3e value in getting

the country started. We now

; ~°"" mcc to get in on the

•round floor and help build up



modern times came from the the land, if only we are alive to

rural districts. the opportunity.

That the Jew has still a loi ~h the basic knowledge
for the soil, even though ] with which we are equipping
been denied it for so rr ourselves, we will be preparer!
is evidenced by the i to ir prove the health in th-
ai colonies of Jewisl communities, increase cron pro
in Palestine before the war, duction by Jectures and demon



L



THE GLEANER



17



strations on agricultural sub-
jects, and to bring about the in-
troduction of natural sciences in
the curriculum and the improve-
ment of agricultural methods.

The problems, no doubt, wil'
be far different in Palestine
from anything we have here in
this country. But with our
knowledge of the fundamental:;
of agriculture, we can master
them, if we but possess the will
to do so. Let us remember that
knowledge is only a means to an
end and not the end in it
The successful occupation of
Palestine by us will be deter-
mined by our worthiness and
cur morality. It is our will to
lead an uncontaminated Jewish
life in a Jewish land according
to the ideals of liberty, justice
and peace, the ideals of our
prophets.

"Not by strength and not by
might, but by my spirit."



J



S. S. A.

Much to the satisfaction of
the Seniors the newly enrolled
scientific agriculturalists awoke
to heavenly aspirations and
earthly meditations on their
Farm School career. They,
speaking of the more intelligent
but none the less ignorant
Freshies, learn't the first prin-
ciples of freshmenology.

The affair, a social gathering
of Seniors and Juniors, attended
by Freshmen, was of modern
procedure. The Freshies did
in a diplomatic style what ordi-
narily was expected of them.
From all angles it was an educa-
tional and social success ; an en-
joyable affair for the upper
lassmen and a spice of worldly
knowledge to the lowly prospec-
tive Green and Gold followers,
J. I. M., Chairman.



LITERARY SOCIETY

The meetings of this society
has met with new and energetic
impetuosity. Probably due to
the forcibleness of such work
as this society offers to those
who may desire its benefits, a
new conception has been ad-
vanced by the more intelligent
students. Their active partici-
pation is at such high tension
*hat in the near future a double
program may constitute the
larger time devoted to its meet-
ings.

A topic of interest at present
is the coming debate between
two well versed combatants.

Resolved, That a knowledge
of chemistry is more important
to the farmer than a knowledge
of physics.

ITegative — Samuel Miller.

Affirmative — George Wolff.

The officers are doing their
utmost to make the present
standard permanent.

I. MARCUS, '19,

Sec.-Treas.



Ques. — What is the difference

between Palestine alfalfa and

hr. en?

Ans. — When Palestine alfalfa

dies it is no longer green, but

when freshmen die they still re-

;: green.



Solved !

Let X=the freshman class.
Y=the teacher.
Then X+Y=order.

X — Y=a rough house.



Freshmen colors — Black and
blue.

Freshmen emblem — Skull and
bones.

Freshmen countersign — Stars,



18



THE GLEANER



FRESHMEN STANDARD
Realizing the need of some
standard whereby freshmen can
be judged in relation to the
amount of green matter in their
heads and gray matter in their
feet, the following was com-
posed.

All protests in regard to mis-
judging may be brought to the
Seniors and rest assured they
will be looked into.
Head — Small but swelled, must

fit size twelve hat 5

Chest — Wide and extended, so
that Algeues first attempt

shall not be in vain 5

Arms and Feet — Extra long, so
that Young's bean poles can

be stripped clean 5

Appetite — Small, especially dur-
ing peach season 10

Disposition — Patient, loving and
obedient, This is very neces-
sary in order to learn the art
of taking care of Dory .... 5
Character — Such that it should
never be necessary to be call-
ed more than four times for



OF PERFECTION

morning details 10

Speech — Ability to speak one

language 1

Hot air and bull 1

Power to win an argument

from Pop 28

Dress— Anything not loud

enough to be heard 5

One point discounted if in-
flicted with any of the fol-
lowing: Pink shirts, green
socks or purple ties.
Inquisitiveness — Habit of ask-
ing questions that mean twice

nothing 5

Ambition — If any at all .... 15
Miscellaneous —

Any knowledge of beverage 3
Animal trainer, especially

mules 3

Expert in emptying gar-
bage and ash cans, such

as Mrs. Bishop uses 2

Some knowledge of chick-
ens — No, I don't mean

what you mean 2

JOSEPH GOLDSTEIN, '19.



You



you



probably

Freshie,
When at Farm School

would arrive,
Six men would jump up to meet

you
And to carry your grip all

strive.



A FRESHMAN'S ASPIRATIONS
thought, dear The Literary Society would bow

to you,
The Science Club do the same.
The Zion Circle would send you
to Palestine
For them to bring back fame.



To Se^ral Hall they'd escort you.

And there plead with you to
sign
Your name on a Roll of Honor,

Then with the Facultv dine.



In athletics they'd give you a
numeral
Before the season even began.
For the prowess of a freshie, 'tis
certain,
Anyone t' would quite under-
stand.



When you had finished your re- In two years you'd finish your

past career: ,

A bellboy and butler would A scientific farmer you'd be.

You to rm modern apartments, Thousands of people would seek

where you >

Tetrazzini you to sleep would For the marvel of the age

""'ng* ' they must see.



C



THE GLEANER



19



Three hundred per month you
might consider.
Of course, this was without
board.
Then you'd marry a pretty milk-
maid
And she'd give you a million
or more.



But, Oh, wasn't it heartbreaking,
Freshie,
When on this shore you did
land,
The greeting that was extended
to you
Made all of your bubbles ex-
pand.
JOS. GOLDSTEIN, '19.



X%m>TLl



'&£©§



Juluis Brodie Editor

GREEN AND GOLD FOLLOWERS UNDER
RED, WHITE AND BLUE

(As there are many grad-
uates enrolled who have not as
yet notified this department,
this is but a partial list. We
would greatly appreciate the
kindness of anyone sending his
name, or the name of those
whom he knows to be "with the
Colors" and whose name does
not appear here. This would
also aid us in keeping an accu-
rate "Service Flag.")



THE



J



'05 Max Morris, 1st Lieut.

'08 Max Fleisher, 1st Lieut.,

Camp Meade.
'13 Morris M. Moscovitz, Q. C,

Front Royal, Va.
'13 B. Harrison, Q. C.
'13 Chas. Dorfman, Q. C, Camp

Johnson.
'15 Julius Ullman, Sergeant,

Camp Johnson.
'15 L. Rosenthal, Q. C, Camp

Johnson.
'16 Bill Morieinis, "Over There"
'16 Ben Kasselman, Aviation

Corps.
'17 A. Lieberman, Q. C, Serg-
eant, Camp Johnson.



'17 Chas. Wagner, Coast Artil-
lery.

'17 J. L. Campbell, Sergeant,
Camp Meade.

'16 Jack Goldman, Light Field
Artillery.

Ex-'17 Matty Kaufman, "Over

There."
Ex-' 17 Wilansky, Ambulance

Corps.
Ex-'18 Szold, Aviation Corps.
'19 Max Schloss, Vet. Corps,

Camp Lee, Va.
Ex-'19 Otto Goldstein, National

Army.. Camp Upton.
Ex-'19 Laurhoph, Marines.



20



THE GLEANER




Once more the reins of edi-
tcrialship are grasped by new
hands. Having ranked in com-
petition with other departments
of this magazine during the
past year, this department once
more attempts strides of pro-
gressiveness.

Thanks to the psrseverance
of former Exchange Editors of
the Gleaner, the columns of this
section have yearly grown bet-
ter, stronger and more deter-
mined in its work. Its zeal to
learn and to withstand cor-
rection are of merit considera-
tion.

Aspired anew with duties of
scholar-like ability we gallop on,
and in our flight we drop ac-
knowledgements of the follow-
ing friendly communications:

Blue and Gray, Friends' Cen-
tral School, Phila., Pa.

H. A. S. Record, Woodbine, N.

Mt. Airy World, Phila., Pa.

Brown and White, Brown Col-
lege Preparatory School, Phila.,
Pa.

The Review, Phila. Trades
School. Phila., Pa.

Garnet and White, West
nii psfpr High School, West



The Oriole: Your popularity
is everlasting. Judging from
those on the editorial staff
yours should be a period full of
success.
Chester, Pa.

The Torch, Doylestown High
School, Doylestown, Pa.

The Oriole, City College, Bal-
timore, Md.

Blue and Gray: Your paper
never grows old. Your literary
department is worthy of its
name.

Brown and White: Why so
late in sending out your Decem-
ber number? Why not devote
a little more space to your liter-
ary department?

Review: You must be proud
of your exceedingly large honor
roll. Your jokes and personals
are very clever.

Garnet and White: The
cover of your pages is very
plain, but attractive. The mys-
terious "Ted" is a very for-
tunate young chap. Is there
any more such chances open in
Uncle Sam's service?

H. A. S. Record: You are
welcome to publish our jokes,
but kindly state that they have,
been borrowed*



Wm. P. Ely & Son

Ready-to-Wear Clothing for Men, Boys
and Children. Boots and Shoes. Hats
and Caps. Furnishing Goods, Bicycles



Opposite R. R. Depot
Bell Phone Doylestown, Pa.



EMIL EITER

Pure Ice Cream
Baker and Confectioner



Bell Phone, 184 A 42 E. State St.

DOYLESTOWN, PA.

What People Say

SPITZ
ELLS
LICK
TUFF

Choice Meats, Provisions & Poultry

Cor 8th & Jefferson Sts., Philadelphia



Shaving Massaging

Razors Honed >

WENDTES TONSORIAL PARLOR



15 North Main Street
F. II. WendUo Doylestomn, Pa



ISIDOR J. FRIEDMAN
PRINTING OF QUALITY

419 Locust St., Phlla., Pa.
Bell, Lombard 304 Key., Main 2189

R. L. CLYMER
DEPARTMENT STORE

Nos. 36, 33 and 40 West State Street
Doylestown, Pa.

...DRUGS... J

GET IT AT PEARCE'S

and it will be right

S. R. Pearce, Pharmacist, Doylestown, Pa.

Keystone Phone, Main 2180

B. ALPERDT

Wholesale Jobber and Dealer in

...Confectionery...
510 S. Second St., Philadelphia

JAMES BARRETT
Dealer in

Hardware, Paints, Glass, Etc.

Corner Main and Ashland Sts r

Doylestown, Pa.



)



Crane's Ice Cream and Baking Possess

a rich natural flavor, for every ingredient is of

high quality. It is made in a careful manner in

a sanitary plant, under the most rigid Pure Food

Restrictions.

Main Office Store and Tea Room

23rd St., below Locust 1310 Chestnut St.

PHILADELPHIA, PA.

Ill DEALING WITH ADVERTISERS, PLKASK MENTION THE "OLEAN*R ;



Burpee's Seeds Grow



and are known the world over as

the "Best Seeds that Grow."

The name Burpee on your seed

packet is an assurance of "Seeds of Quality." The Fortieth Anniversary

Edition of Burpee's Annual is brighter and better than ever. It is mailed

free. Write today, — "Ltst you forget.".,, A postcard will bring it

W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO., Burpee Buildings, Philadelphia.



JACOBY BROS.

General Department Store

STRICTLY ONE PRICE

NINTH AND SOUTH STREETS, PHILADELPHIA



M. Pearlman

Tailor and Furrier

Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and
Dyeing



Bell Phone



Doylestown, Pa.



Dr. Byron M. Fell
....DENTIST....

1328 Chestnut St, Phila.
Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday

Doylestown, Pa.
Monday, Wednesday, Friday

Noah K. Fisher

Sanitary and Antiseptic

SHAVING PARLOR

Razors Ground and Honed

Lenape Bldg., State St., Front

DOYLE8TOWN, PA.

Clark & Stultz

PLUMBING AND HEATING
ENGINEERS

19 South Pine Street
DOYLESTOWN, PA.



Bernard McGinty

Commercial and Business

...PRINTI NG...

CALENDARS

DOYLESTOWN, PA.

Men's Furnishings
Athletic Goods

Marshall E. Smith
and Brother



25 & 27 S. Eighth St.,



Phila., Pa.



Fine Shoes for Man and Boy

Edward G. Case

TOGGERY SHOP

Lenape Bldg., Main Street Front

If you want your

SHOES : MENDED : RIGHT

bring them to

Joe Berkowitz

28 8. MAIN ST., DOYLESTOWN



DKMOCHiT JOB DICPT., PKIWTKU8, UOYLKHTOWS, PA.





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