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UNITED ENGINEERS,



. ■ .



LIMITED.

RILEY HARGREAVES & Go., Lt«.

HOWARTH ERSKIIME, LIMITED.



£iig!R&GP$, Shipbuilders and General Contractors.

STRAITS SETTLEMENTS and SIAM.



IMPORTERS ©JF"

■) All kinds of Provisions, Wines and

Spirits, Tobacconists' Goods, Perfumery,
Travelling Implements, Stationery, Harness and Saddlery,
Glassware and Crockery, Kitchen Utensils, &c, &c.

LARGEST STOCK IN BANGKOK. REGULAR FRESH SUPPLIES.



. ■:?-:■':.;■■■■ ft



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Government Contractors and General Impc



Proprietors of : —

THE PRATU SAMYOT STORE •■
THE BANGKOK OUTFITTING CO.

THE SIAM DISPENSARY AND DRUG STORE







(By appointment to His Majesty.)

C. Pappayanopulos.

ARfSTQCRATIC TOBACCO MANUFACTORY,

New Road.

High Grade Egyptian Cigarettes

Made by skilled workman from finest Turkish Tobacco-

Our stock is always fresh as our supplies arrive by every steamer.

Cigarettes m tde to order.

Largest cigarette machine in the East. Capacity 80,000 a day.
Purveyors to the most fastidious.

C. PAPPAYANOPULOS,

Managing Proprietor

G. Yamaeuchi & Co.

40-45 YAWARAJ ROAD, BANGKOK.

BRANCH STORE

36-39 TAN0N BURABHA NEW ROAD,
Cable address: Yamaguchi.

Direct Importers & Wholesalers of Japanese Goods.

QUFfc SPECIALITIES:-

* Photo apparatus an I Chemicals.

Photo Plates and papers
Photo Mounts and frames.
Pictorial Post cards and Stationery.
Japanese screens and Lacquer goods.
Fancy Dry goods.
Japanese Kimonos.
Perfumery, and Toilet goods.
Toys & Flower Decorations.

ETC., ETC., ETC.



COUNTY PUBLIC ■LIBRARY



**•* \ ifiiii x^ 5 ^



Gc 959.3 D62 1914
Bangkok and Siam,
directory




DIRECTORY



FOR



Bangkok and Siam.



1914.
Prick Ten Ticaxs.



Twenty- Fifth Year of Publication,



Events.

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and Keymer, Son & Co., WhiteMars St., E. C.

SINGAPORE— Kelly and Walsh, Ltd.

HONGKONG— Kelly and Walsh, Ltd.
Printed and Published at "The Bangkok Times" Office.

BY THE

Bangkok ZimcB press fctb,

[A II Rights Reserved.]



Aft



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Ft. Wayne, lActiAM



H9H6KBH6 & 8HAN(]9AUiKIl_G0RPOBATI0N,

Head Office:— HONGKONG.



Paid-dp Capital ..........4 15,000,000

Reserve Funds: —
Sterling

£1,500,000 at 2s ..#15,000,000



Silver 17,450,000



Reserve :—



-S 32,450,000



Liability of Proprietors $15,000,000

CHIEF MANAGER,

Hongkong, N J. STABB.

BRAN IHES AND AGENCIES:



1MOY
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9, GRACF.CHURCH STREKT, E. 0.



LONDON BANKERS:— LONDON COUNTY AND
WESTMINSTER BANK, LIMITED.



•]<*(



Bangkok: Interest allowed — On current accounts at the rate ><
I per cent, peranniim on the daily balances.

Fixed Deposits: — The rates of interest allowed on Fixed Deposit an
be ascertained on application.

Letters of Credit issued available in the principal cities of the woid.

Drafts granted, Bills negotiated or sent tor collection, and oven
iription of Banking and Exchange business transacted.

J. KEDDIU,

Acting Agmt, Bangkok.
Office of the Corporation at the month of the Klong-Kut-Mai Canal.

Office Hours 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Saturdays 9 a.m. „ 12 noon.

January, 1914



1st



Ooni&nU.


i


CONTENTS.




Part I.






Page


Abolition of Slavery, New law for the


39


Addenda


380


Administration, Local


177


Aides-de-Camp of H. M. The King


258


Alphabetical List of foreign residents


349


Agriculture


94


Agriculture, Ministry of


283


Arms Act


90


Army


134


Army List


260


Art Department, Royal


248


Bangkok and its Trade


128


Bangkok, The Census of


190


Bankruptcy Act


66


Banks


313


Bank Holidays, 1914


218


Bar, The Menam ...


112


Births and Deaths, Registration of


58


Calendar for 1914


2U


Calendar, Official


98


Calendar, The People's


98


Civil Service College


298


Census. The


198


Clubs


310


Coinage


20S


Communications, Ministry of ...


287


Compass in Siamese


117


Courts of Justice, Constitution of


145


Courts of Justice, Judges


272


Customs and Excise Department


296


Diplomatic and Consular Body


302


Education Department


286


Education, State of ..


197


Fauna


part ii


Festivals. Fasts, Observances, 1914


2J7



THE



t^uuu vLuvuiuravuu ^aun ^



INCORPORATED BY ROYAL CHARTER.



Authorized and paid up Capital . . Tcs. 3,000,000.00



3Boar& of ©f rcctora.

PHRA SOPHOL PETCHARUT. 1 PHRA BORIBOON.
PHY A THEPTAWARAWADI. W. BREBMER, Esq*;

PHYA BURI NAWARASTH. E. FLGSIO Esqr.



lonfcon Bankers :

DIRECTION DER DISCONTO-GESELLSCHAFr,

Berlin Bankers:

DEUTSCH-ASIATISCHE BANK.
Branch at Sampeng.

The institution buys, sell?, and collects Bills of Exolrmcre on
Europe, India and China and transacts every description of Exchange
and Banking Business.



CURRENT ACCOUNT DEPOSITS AT \tfo ON DAILY BALANCES

Pate? of interest allowed, on fixed deposits may be ascertained
en application.

Safe-Deposit Lockers let to the Public at monthly rentals.

favin^ Department wP.li Siamese Government Stock Security.

for email investors.

OFFICE HOURS ... ^a.m. to 3 p.m.

SATURDAYS 9 a.m. to 12 noon.

A. WlLLKKE,

Aj. Manager.



Contents,



Finance,


Page
213


Finance, Ministry of


295


Flags, Law Relating to


151


Foreign Office


299


Foreign Countries, Siamese Officials in


300


Forestry in Siam ...


129


Forest Department.


281


Fuangs, etc, Demonetising of ...


56


Garden Taxes, New Assessment of,


61


General Directory ...


o05


Gendarmerie, Provincial


281


Gold Standard Law, The


48


Gulf of Siam,


107


Hackney Carriage Act

Harbour Department

History, Old Siam,

History, Recent

Holidays and Festivals, Description of

Hospitals

Interior, Ministry of


15

27«

1

9

21

309

279


Irrigation Branch of Ministry of Agriculture
Justice, Ministry of


283
271


King's College
Ladies' Directory ...


272
375


Land Records Department


283


Land Tax, Paddy ...
Law School


to

271


Legal Practitioners


310


Legations


302


Library, National ...

Light Dues ... ..,


297
117


Lights in Gulf


113


Local Government, Ministry of
Lordi Lieutenant, His Majesty's


274

282


Marine, Ministry of


267


Marriage in Siam
Medical College


37

286


Merchants, Professions


317



Aft*" €*f*

...C^ <-» patented <fe> 'Va
G>*, in all countries. i*

A wood-preserving rnd antiseptic oil t reparation
against

f ccny, br^rot fungus and woo^fcestro^ino insects.



" Avenarius " Carbolineum is an oil preparation which can he easily appVed by
air 'no.lv. For twenty years i ■■ Combining

renter efficiency ii deserves the preference over oii-eoJours and
ermaneni preservation of wood is paramount.
Thin BervaHve and antiseptic (disinfect ine) notion on wood;

not onl v • the latter from decay f.ii<i dry-rot fungus, but it keeps off the

noxious to v ■ itB and similar "insectB.

" Avenarius" f'atbolineu a ma;, likewise be usad with advantage for coating stone for
tbeprevei ' even iu t.io case of — nitioas exudation, for damp wall, for preserving

ship's tacl - Is, etc.

"Avenarins" f'arbolineum penetrates into the wood, this property being a great
advantag-i over all other kinds of pain hitherto in use, which ice of th :

wood, stop up the pores and thus even accelerate ■'
not thoroughly seasoned. "Avenarius" Carbolineum is neither .orrosive nor

ib'le. It may be applied to dry wood as well as to green wood. New wood.
i,".nar<d with " ivenaritw" Carbolineum, presents ;. pretty nut-brown appearance,
the gt£in showing through.

• ■ ■,,.,., is" Ci keeps for an indefinite period without undergoing any

change.

Its application is mple and may be performed by rsons, either

by laying ties— bound pr. b iron rings or wii

liqai.j. A deeper penetration into the pores of the wooJ an
tig "Avenarius" Carbolineum warm.

(ne lb. of " Avenarius " Carbolineum will cover a surface of about ;j s i.are Yards at
less cosr than anv oilier material.

Hence it 'follows that . 4i Avenarius '' Carbolineum vfTcn important advantages Over
Other sorts of paint, for instance that, while being more du.vibh . it is se
than oil-paints covering the same ar.-.i Owing to being ..ion.- li pud it even surpasses tar
as rega I efficiency.

Wh.-revei' it has been introduced hitherto. "Avenarius'' Carbolineum has soon met
with get eiaiion and its efficiency has been proved by its universal application,

f i. on RAILWAYS: io railway carriages, sk . es, sheds, fences and other

r F8HiP«a.wij-C-<rtG, H ftRfeO'^R Vib hkg, ETC.; to ships, boats, ships
tackle a ""■ eii bridges arid -jU sorts of j in BUILPIKC

TRADE. ivSANUFACTCriLo and MtNIWG PUANT t \q all i art - i bove and

be low : u AC R :.«-•■ •' I'ts such as waggons,

carts, ploughs, ' '-'•'-'■

Larjc siock oa hanJ for immediate delivery.

FALCK & BEIDEK,

Sole Agents.



Contents.



Page.

Mining Regulations, New ... ... ... 46

Mining in Siam ... ... ... 202

Mines, Department of ... ... ... 284

Ministry, The ... ... ... ... 254

Mint, The Royal ... ... ... ... 296

Missions in Siam, Foreign ... ..;. ... 305

Monthons, List of ..'. ... ... 180

Morphine and Cocaine Act. B. E. 2456 (1913) ... 172

Naturalisation Law ... ... ... 61

Navigation in Siamese Waters, Law on ... ... 43

Navy ... ... .... 137

Navy List ... ... ... 268

Official Directory ... ... ... 245

Opium, Administration Department ... ... 297

Pension Act, Siam ... ... ... 32

Physicians and Surgeons ... ... ... 309

Pikat Rates, Standard ... ... ... 120

Pitkat Pasi ( Customs Tariff for teak ) ... ... 120

Pilotage, Tariff of ... ... ... 115

Police Department ... ... ... 274

Population ... ... ... 187

Post Offices • ... , ... ... ... 291

Postal and Telegraph Department ... ... 290

Postal Regulations ... ... ... 139

Princes of the Royal House ... ... ... 245

Private Secretary's Department ... ... 25 i

Privy Purse Department ... ... ... 253

Privy Seal, Ministry of ... ... ... 254

Public Instruction ... ... ... 209

Public Instruction, Ministry of ... ... 285

Queen Mother, Household of ... ... ... 253

Railways in Siam ... ... ... 184

Railway Department, Royal ... ... ... 292

Railway, Southern ... ... ... 993

Registration on Removal ( Province of Bangkok ) ... 60

Revenue Department ( Bangkok ) ... ... 275

Revenue Department (Provincial ) ... ... 280

Rice and Sawmills ' ... ... ... 315




KAWASAKI DOCKYARD Co., Ltd.

Telephones : Cable Address •

|: «C KOBE, JAPAN ... ;i£S&V«55 *«~

737, Store Dept. Engineering Codes Ubed.

CONTRACTOES TO THE IMPERIAL JAPANESE ARMY, NAVY,
AND FOREIGN GOVERNMENTS.
SHIPBUILDERS, ENGINEERS, BOILERMAKERS,
Manufacturer! of
. o . Cast Steel Rudders, Stern Frames, Propeller Blades,
. - . Braekets and Stems, Steel Gearing Pistons.
• • • Cylinders and Engine Castings.

All work guaranteed to he of highest order and to contain all the most up to
date improvements.



PARTICULARS OF DCCK AND SLIPS






No. 1. Graving Dock— Length ... ... ... ...


425'


6"


Width of entranca en top


63'


6"


Do. bottom ...


51'


7"


Depth over sill ... ... ...


23'


9"


No. 2. Patent Slip— Length „ eo ... ... ,.. ...


280'


6"


No. 3. Do. Do. ... ... ... .. ...


180'


0"



The Dockyard extends along almost the whole length of the shore of the

Western Harbour, and is in close proximity to the Shipping Berths.

Powerful Salvage and Towing Boats available at shortest Notice.



Contents



Page.

Royal Chamberlain's Dept. ... ... ... 248

Royal Household, Ministry of ... ... 247

Sanitary Department ... ... ... 278

Sanitary Department Regulations ... ... Ig3

Sanitary Decree, Local ... ... I .",7

Siamese Orders ... •>;,•?



Part 11.
TREATIES.



Britain and Siam (1855)



(1868



Survey Department ... ... 298

Teak Trade in Siam ... ... ._ 118

Telegrams, Tariff" of ... ... 143

Telegraph Offices ... ... .. 291

Tides ■•• ••• ... ... ... 110

To vva ge Rates ... ... ... j [ $

Treasury Savings Bank Law. B. E. 2456 (1913) ... 215

War, Ministry of ... ... ... 255

Ways of Communication, Department of ... ... 287

Weights and Measures ... ... ... \Q\

Wind and Weather in Gulf ... ... ... 107



Page.
10



(supplementary) ... ... 17



27



„ (1883) ... ... ... 29

(1883) g iquor traffic) ... ... 34

(1899) (registration) ... ... 37

„ (1899) (land tax) ... 39

„ (1909) ... ... ... 40

British Order in Council (1909) ... 49

Siamese and English Law (1909) ... 52

Anglo-Siamese Loan Agreement (1909) o-i

Britain and Siam Extradition (1911) ... f,t;

France and Siam (1856) ... 63

;> (1867) ... :;; ::; 7 ~

» (1893) ... ... ... 8]

.» (1904) ... ... ... 86

» (1907) ... ... ... 91

Anglo-French Convention (1896) ... . <^7

0904, ... '.'.'. 102

Germany and Siam (1862) ... . 104

(1884) ... ... U5

121
129



dated States and Siam (1856)

The Netherlands and Siam (1860)

Japan and Siam (1898) ... . . ... 139

Russia and Siam (1899) ... " m [ 14(5

Denmark and Siam (1905) ... ... ... 147

Paly and Siam '1905) ... ... 150

Denmark and Siam (1913) ... ... ... 151



MM. A. Rostand
E Roumk
Edgard -tern
R i>h Tregomain



SOOIETE 4NONYME AU CAPITA!, DE 48,000,000.— de Francs.

RESERVE 4>b,')0o,O0X - „

COURT OF DIRECTORS.

M. HELY d' 1 ISSELS (Baron).. Chairman.

M. A. de MONTPLANET Zkyjuty '." rirmah.

MM. Ch. Demachy
E. Bethenod

HUBEKT HeNROTTK

L. Masson

Sta.sisl.as Simon E Ullmann

M. Stanislas Simon, — Administrateur-Dii ecteur.
M. Thfon de la Chaume — Directeur Adjoint.
MM. Fsnaro ari'l Lmcaze -Soui-Directeura
Heuu Oiice : 15Wis Rum L^ffitte, Paius
LONDON BANKERS:
The Union of London & Smiths Bank, L-d. Comptoir National d'Escompte de Paris,

Drafts issued on all principal ci'ies in the world. Bills taken on collection or
negotiated. Letters of Credi I arantel

Every description of Ranking an > exchange business trxnsacted.
Interest allowed on Currei.t-Accounts at the rate of 1 per cent p->r annum on
the daiiy balances.

The rates of interest allowed on f'.xeJ deposit Accounts can be ascertained on
application io the Directeur.

OtficJ Hours 9 a. m. to 3 p. m. Satnr lays 9 a. m. to 12 noon.
BnancHt-s and .".g?»«».;cs.
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Historical.



Historical



OLD SIAM.

Early records are exceedingly scarce on the history of the national
growth of the peoples of Indo-China, and such chronicles as do exist con-
sist for the most part of legend and fable, with but a thin substratum of
truth. It is only by the patient collection, examination, and sifting of the
historical material that lies scattered in epigraphic and multifarious other
historical sources, both native and foreign, as yet not laid under contri-
bution and by no means easily accessible, and by the comparison of these
with the extant chronicles, that truth can be arrived at, and the early
history of the country pieced together. This task has been painstakingly
undertaken and carried on for many years by Colonel Gerini from whose
recent publications the following summary of events from the remotest
time to the period of the advent of Europeans in the country has been
compiled. It is the first synopsis of connected and authentic early history
of the country ever yet placed before the public. Hitherto the published
accounts have never been pushed further back than A.D. 1350, the well-
known, date of the foundation of Ayuthia : and when they ventured into
remoter epochs , it was only by plunging into the mists and mazes of myth ,
and by giving uncritical repetitions of the legends current in the popular
chronicles before that period.

I. — Early History and Eacial Struggles.

(B.C. 800 to A.D. 1257.)

According, then, to the researches above referred to and the results
of recent ethnographical inquiry , this country of Siam was , in prehistorical
times, inhabited by an aboriginal, dusky-complexioned population con-
sisting, presumably, of two prevailing elements, probably widely
separated at first, but w T hich to a considerable extent blended and fused
with one another and with subsequent comers as time went on. One was
the Melanesian or Negrito element, at one time undoubtedly diffused
along the coast, but now surviving only in the wilder tracts of the Malay
Peninsula. The other belonged to the racial stock vaguely called Indo-
nesian, which left unmistakeable traces of itself in neolithic implements in
many parts of Indo-China, and is to this day represented by scattered
tribes on the Me-nam-Salwin and Me-Khong-Annamese watersheds.
Then from the eighth or tenth century B.C., if not earlier, began that
exodus of tribes from Southern China, which has continued in unbroken
sequence to this very day, when it is still, though to a smaller extent,
going on.

The first of these tribes to flow into Indo-China were those belong-
ing to the Mon-Annam, or, rather more correctly, Mon -Khmer stock,
which were very probably in origin closely related to the Indonesians, if



Historical.



not absolutely identical with them. They reached Indo-China between
the tenth and the eighth century B.C., and occupied it almost undis-
turbed for several centuries, pushing down to the extreme southern limit
of the Malay Peninsula, and driving the aboriginals before them and
away from the coast towards the hill tracts, but also partly absorbing
them into their mass.

Shortly after this, navigators and traders from Southern India took
to frequenting the coasts of Indo-China, establishing there trading
stations ; while similar parties reached the northern parts of the peninsula
by land from Northern India. Brahmanism and, later on, Buddhism,
with most other achievements of Indian culture, followed in the wake of
these pioneers, and thus it is to ancient India that Indo-China owes her
early civilization.

By the first century of the Christian era we find not only places on
the coast but also in the interior of the country designated in many an
instance by Pali or Sanskrit names, and among these appears that of
Cy&ma or Cyama-rattha for the lower portion of the Me-nam valley.
The term has been handed down in the forms Siem or Syam to this day,
out of which we have made Siam. Of these, the hybrid term Shan is but
the modern Burmese corruption. The Siamese of that time, however,
were, as may be easily inferred from the above, mainly Mon-Khmer by
stock, with a considerable admixture of the aboriginal Negrito and
Indonesian bloods. The country was split into a number of principalities
almost constantly at war with each other and with the still powerful
remnants of the aboriginal tribes, which, however, they nearly always
managed to keep under subjection. From the sixth century A.D.,
however, -the vigorous growth, under Hindu influence, of a compact
empire in Cambodia deeply affected the status of most of these diminu-
tive States, and vassalage was imposed upon them, which continued w T ith
rare intervals for some seven centuries.

A new racial element had meanwhile appeared on the field, which
from the centre of China, or the region about the present province of
Hunan, had, from similar impellent causes, followed in the footsteps of
the Mon-Khmers into Yunnan, which country it reached some three or
four centuries before the Christian Era. Displacing thence the Mon-
Khmer settlers further south, it continued its movement forward, pene-
trating into the northern parts of both Burma and Siam, where it started
in its turn to found principalities and centres of further expanding influ-
ence. These invaders were parts of the people denominated Lao, or
Ai-Lao, and it was only after their successful career of conquest in the
northern parts of Siam and Burma that they adopted the title of Tai or
Thai in order to distinguish and exalt themselves. When, in due course,
they made themselves masters of the whole of Siam, and had founded
there an empire which gradually extended far into Pegu and Upper
Burma, they became known to the neighbouring nations as the Siamese,
but they still continue to speak of themselves as the Thai race. Colonel
Gerini has also made an elaborate comparison of the languages and
dialects spoken by the several branches of the Thai race — Siamese, Lao,
Shan, etc. — with the languages and dialects spoken in the provinces of



Historical



China lying to the south of the Yangtse river, and he found that nearly
the whole body of the Thai language proper can be retraced thither.
And, indeed, large numbers of the same racial stock speaking Thai dialects
are yet to be found to this very day in Kwei-chou, Kwang-si and Yunnan.
The theory, hitherto upheld by most, writers, that the forebears of this
people came from Thibet or Western China is, of course, absurd, and
can no longer be maintained , in the face of the above evidence.

The racial name of this people was Lao, and Thai was simply a
title that they substituted for that name. In the seventh, eighth and
ninth centuries they formed a powerful and militant kingdom, or rather
federation of principalities, fighting now with and now against the
Emperor of China, and subjugating Upper Burma and Northern Siam,
where they soon came into collision with the Mon-Khmer States of the
Me-nam basin on the one side, and with the powerful Cambodian para-
mount authority itself on the other.

By the middle of the sixth century A.D. the western branch of
the Thai invaders of Siam had its advance-posts at the head waters of
the Me-nam, where it had founded the realm of LamphCin, thus becom-
ing a neighbour of the Swankhalok-Sukhothai kingdom that had been,
for many centuries past, the chief power in Northern Siam. This
naturally led to almost continued hostilities not only with this old king-
dom, but also with their western neighbour Pegu, and with the remnants
of the aboriginal tribes on the Salwin frontier.

Meanwhile the eastern branch had firmly established itself on the
Middle Me-Khong about Luang Phra-bang, whence it extended its sway
even towards the Annamese coast. Here it held for some time the
Song-Ka valley, co-operating at various periods with its collateral kinsmen
who had remained in Yunnan, where they now ruled supreme, in
threatening Chinese authority in Tonkin. By the middle of the four-
teenth century this branch, taking advantage of the fast decline of
Cambodian power, had extended its possessions well down the Me-Khong
within close proximity to the Khong rapids, as well as into the territory
adjoining that river to the west, which it has uninterruptedly held
to this day.

On the other hand, the progress of the western branch proceeded
somewhat slower. All it had done by the end of the eleventh century
was the establishment of autonomous settlements on the western arm of
the Me-nam only as far down as Khampheng'phet , a feudal dependency
of Sukhothai. But a far more remarkable achievement was its slow but
steady infiltration into the Cambodian vassal states of Sukhothai and
Lavo (the present Lophburi), where the Thai element gradually increased
in numbers, and in influence by blending itself with the native population
and soon threatened to become preponderant.

In the first quarter of the twelfth century a fresh infusion of
vigorous blood from the parent stock in the north- took place, when a
wave of Thai people from their old fastnesses on the Upper Me-Khong
swept down upon the now effete realms of Sukhothai and Lavo, and
bade fair to obtain permanent possession of them. The crumbling and



Historical.



agonizing Cambodian Colossus had a short sparkling of vitality, and in
a despairing effort yet succeeded in bringing back under its sway most



Online LibraryTherese Albertine Louise von Jacob RobinsonBangkok and Siam, directory (Volume yr.1914) → online text (page 1 of 51)