Thomas F. Byrnes.

Guide through Mount Auburn. A hand-book for passengers over the Cambridge Railroad. Illustrated with engravings and a plan of the cemetery online

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with this touching inscription : —

My Wife. Mrs. S. P. W. Crocker, died May 18, 1856, aged 47 years
and 10 months. She was always so pleasant.

We next pass the Harrington, Rice, Greene, Gates, and
Labree lots, on all of which there are appropriate memorials.

Turn to the right into Beech Avenue, and pass through
Beech Avenue toward Central Square.

Centkal Square.

On the left will be seen a memorial to Martha Whiting, —

In memory of our Teacher, who died Aug. 22, 1853, aged 58 years.
She hath done what she could. Erected by the pupils of the Charles-
town Female Seminary.

On the right, between Beech and Central Avenues, may
be seen the monument, probably the first erected ivithin the

grounds, to the memory of Hannah Adams, and inscribed,

To Hannah Adams, Historian of the Jews and Reviewer of the Cbri«-
tian Sects, this monument is erected by her female friends First Tl-h-
ant of Mount Auburn. She died Bee. 15, 1831, aged 76.




WHITLNG MEMORIAL.

Sec pnge G2.



64 HANDBOOK.

The lot on wliich this monument stands is a very small
one, and the monument itself is simple and unpretending.
It "will be noticed that the inscription declares that Miss
Adams was the " first tenant of Mount Auburn." This is
not the exact truth. The records of the Corporation show
that the Ji7-si burial in Mount Auburn was of a cMld of
James Boyd, July 6, 1832, in lot No. 182, on Mountain
Avenue. The second burial was of Mrs. Hastings, wife of
Thomas Hastings, of East Cambridge, July 12, 1832, in lot
301, on the same avenue. Mrs. Hastings was therefore,
although she died many years previously, the first adult
buried in Moxmt Auburn, as the monument on the Has-
tings lot declai-es. There was doubtless no misstatement
intended, in relation to Miss Adams, bj- the writer of the
inscription. She died in December, 1831, only about three
months after the Cemetery was consecrated. It was im-
possible to place her body in Mount Auburn at that sea-
son of the year; and it was in all probability placed in
some temporary place of deposit in Boston, with the inten-
tion of removing it as soon as the weather would permit.
It may have been that the placing the body in a receiving
tomb in Boston was considered the same as a burial at
Mount Auburn to all intents and purposes ; or it may have
been that the monument was prepared in anticipation of the
removal of the body to Mount Auburn, but that some delay
occurred, and it was not deemed necessary to be at the ex-
pense of altering the inscription. However this may be.
Miss Adams was not the " first tenant of Mount Auburn,"
but the ninth, her remains having been placed in the Ceme-
tery November 12, 1832.

Pass around the Square, to the left, and between the Knight
lot, No. 662, on right, and the Smith lot. No. 48, on lefi,
pass in front of the Murray monument. No. 687.

John Murray, Preacher of the Gospel. Born in Alton, En^., Dec. 10,
1741 ; died in Boston Sept, 3, 1815. Re-interred beneath this stone
June 8, 1837.

Pass through the narrow path at the right, passing near the
Dana lot, and then turn to the left, into Walnut Avenue.

Walnut Avenue.
On this avenue are various tombs, appropriate in every
respect, but not sufiiciently attractive to the visitor to need
particular mention. The lot of the Scots' Charitable Asso-







MONDMENT TO THE MEMORY OF HANNAH ADAMS.
Sec pngcs GH and 6J.



6*



60 HANDBOOK.

elation, on the right, is noticeable from the peculiarity of its
railing. The Wales, Salisbury, and Welles monuments, on
the right, will next be noticed, particularly the latter to the
memory of John Welles; then, on the left, the Smith an
Xilson lots ; the Sumner, Hall, and Kimball on the righl
A short distance to the right will be seen the monumen
erected to the memory of the various members of the Os
good family, of which Mrs. Frances Sargent Osgood, th
poetess, was one. A harp with broken strings surmouni
this monument. The Holmes monument, on the left, wi
then be noticed, and on the same side that to the memory (

Noah Worcester. Born at Hollis, N. H., Nov. 25, 1758. Died :
Brighton, Mass., Oct. 31, 1837, aged 79 years. Blessed are the peaci
makers, for they shall be called tile Cllildren of God.

The Field monument on the right, a marble obelisk, deservf
the attention of the visitor.

Turn to the right, and pass aromid the Field lot into Pj
tola Path.

Ptrola. Path.

There are several beautiful memorials on this path, hi:
the most of which we cannot, for want of space, mention i
particular, beyond giving the names. On the left there :
one to the memory of Barnabas Bates, " Father of Chea
Postage " — a tall marble obelisk on a massive pedestal
one of granite on the Tyler lot at right ; one on a lot owne
by Charles Leighton and Benjamin Beal ; the peculis
whiteness of the granite used for this monument is worth
of more than a passing notice ; the Edwards lot on righ
with a peculiarly-constructed railing, in which the hou]
glass is plainly observable ; and the beautiful marble mor
ument erected to the memory of the Rev. Addison Searle,
Chaplain in the Navy, buried at sea, Aug. 2, 1850. AV
now reach the Fuller lot, on the left, in which there ai
tributes to the memory of the late Hon. Timothy Fulle:
who died Oct. 1, 1836, his daughter Mrs. Margaret Fullt
Ossoli, and various other members of the family. We giv
the inscription on the Ossoli tablet in fuU. Above th
tablet is a cross, beneath which is sculptured " portrait <
Mrs. Ossoli, with book and sword.

In memory of Margaret Fuller Ossoli. Bom in Cambridge, Mass.,
May 23, 1810. By birth a cliild of New England — Ity adoption a citi-
zen of Rome — by genius belonging to the world. In youth an ins.-itiate
student, seeking the highest culture; in riper years, teacher, writer,
critic of literature and art; in maturer age, compiinion and helper of
many earnest reformers in America and Europe. And of lier husband.




OSSOLI MEMORIAL.
See pagD 6B>



68 HANDBOOK.

Giovanni Angelo, Marquis Ossoli. He gave up rank, station, and Some
for tlie Roman Republic, and for lii9 wife and child. And of the child,
Angelo Eugene Philip Ossoli, horn in Rieti, Italy, Sept. 5, 18411, whose
dust reposes at the foot of this stone.

They passed from this life together by shipwreck July 19, 1850.
United in life by mutual love, labors, and trials, the merciful Father
toot them together, and in death they were not divided.

Tlie rough freestone cross on the Eliot lot will be passed,
after noticing which the visitor will continue on, turn to the
left, passing around the Dehon lot, into Bellwort Path, and
then cross over again in the same way into Trefoil Path, the
next path beyond, and turn to the left,
Tbefoil Path.

There is nothing noticeable on this path but a large in-
closure of four lots, with a large granite obelisk inthe cen-
tre, on each side of which is one of the names of Otis, Bates,
Bice, and Bordman.

Pass through Trefoil Path a short distance only, and turn
into Tulip Path, the first path on the right.
Tulip Path.

The Gahne monument will be noticed here ; also the
Brooks lot, on the left ; the Payson, on the right ; and the
Deveiis, Hubbard, and Robbins lots on the right.

Turn to the right into Walnut Avenue ; pass through Wal-
nut Avenue, noticing the Crockett and Snow lots on the left, and
then turn to the left into Mountain Avenue,
Mountain Avenue.

There are several tombs on this avenue. On the left, as
you turn to the tower, is the Hastings lot before referred to.
It is really three lots with one inclosure. On each lot is a
large marble monument, with an urn above. The centre
one, the Hastings monument, has this inscription : —

Mary Robbius, wife of Thomas Hastings, died July 12, 1818, aged 26.
The first adult buried at Mount Auburn.

The Bemis monument is at the left of the Hastings me-
morial, and the Kimball monument on the right, the latter
inscribed, —

Ebenezer Kimball, died Aug. 14, 1839, aged 47 years. A kind hus-
band, a beloved father, and a good citizen. He possessed, in an un-
wonted degree, those qualities of head and heart which endeared him
to those among whom he dwelt.

The visitor can now ascend to the top of the Tower, from
which he will be enabled to obtain, as has been before re-
marked, one of the finest prospects to be had in the suburbs
of Boston. The city, the country towns around, Charles



,.-.^^




TITE TOWER.
See pagca 25 ond 06.



70 HAND BOOK.

River at the foot, all contribute to make up a view that,
for real beauty of natural scenery, few will have an oppor-
tunity to see surpassed.

After having descended, the visitor will pass wound the
Tower, and enter Hazel Path.

Just before entering Hazel Path, there will be seen, on
the left, two large granite obelisks, the largest in the Ceme-
tery, erected to the memory of various members of the Ful-
ler family. On the right wiU be seen a small obelisk on the
Eaton lot.

Hazel Path aud TTabvabd Hill.

Pass through Hazel Path, passing the Farnum tomb, on the
left; then turn to the right and pass across Harvard Hill; pass
the Kirhland and Ashmun monuTnents.

On Harvard Hill, the visitor will notice the monument
to the memory of Rev. John Thornton Kirkland, formerly
President of Harvard College, with an inscription, in Latin.
Near this memorial is another, inscribed as follows : —

Here lies the body of John Hooker Ashmun, Royall Professor of Law
in Harvard University, wlio was born July 3, J800, and died April 1st,
1833. In him the science of law appeared native and intuitive. He
went behind precedents to principles, and books were his helpers, never
his masters. There was the beauty of accuracy in his understanding,
and the beauty of uprightness in his character. Through the slow
progress of the disease wiiich consumed his life, he kept unimpaired his
kindness of temper and superiority of intellect. He did more work
sick than others in health. He was tit to teach at an age when com-
mon men are beginning to learn, and his few years bore the fruit of long
life, A lover of truth, an obeyer of duty, a sincere friend, and a wise
instructor. His pupils raise this stone to his memory.

In the vicinity of the Kirkland and Ashmun monuments
may be seen those of others connected with the College.
This spot is one of the most romantic in the Cemetery. It
is visited by but a very few compared with the whole num-
ber who enter the grounds. The stranger, therefore, who
may never have an opportunity to visit Mount Auburn a
second time, should by no means omit to stop here for a few
moments.

After viewing the Ashmun memorial, keep to the left, and
descend the hill ; pass in front of the Fuller tomb, on Wood-
bine Path ; then ascend Cedar Hill, alongside of the Appleton
monumental temple,

Cedak Hill.

On Cedar HiU will be seen the very beautiful marble
temple, beneath which rest the remains of the Hon. Samuel
Appleton. A cut of this structure will give the reader a
better idea of i^ thaii -vrprds.




ArrLETON MONUMENT.
See page 70.



72 HAND BOOK.

From this spot Consecration Dell may be seen, at the left.

I'resujning the visitor to be standing with the Appleton
monument at his rights he should then continue on nearly in a
straight line, slightly inclining to the right, however, descend the
hill, and enter Lily Path,

Lilt Path.

The Eichards lot, on the left, and the Gray lot, on the
right, are the only ones noticeable in this path. On the for-
mer there is a beautiful granite memorial, and on the latter
a large marble column, surmoimted by an urn.

The visitor will then turn to the right, into Hemlock Path, the
first path on the right, noticing, as he turns, the sun dial on
the corner lot at the left.

Hemlock Path.

On the right will be seen three large lots inclosed in one,
each of wliich has upon it a marble monument, one marked
Young, one Farnsworth, and one Loring. The first-named
is also inscribed : —

In memory of Rev. Alexander Young, D.D., born in Boston, Sept. 92,
1800. Graduated at Harvard College 1820. Ordained Pastor of tlie
New Soutli Ollurch in Boston, Jan. 19, 1825. Died Marcll 16, 1854, in
the 29th year of his ministry. An accomplished scholar, a profound
theologian, a consistent and faithful minister, his character was marked
with piety, truth, lionor, and a tender sense of domestic ties. In the
midst of liis usefulness, surrounded with affectionate relatives and
friends, he was unexpectedly summoned away, and found ready. This
token of respect and love lias been erected by his bereaved congregation.

On the right will be noticed the Humphrey and Wheeler
lot, and the Fairbanks and McDonald lots on the left.

Turn to the left into Willow Avenue, the second path on the
Uft.

Willow Avenue.

On the right is a small marble obelisk, on the Williams
lot, inscribed : —

1 know that THOU wilt bring me to death and to the house appointed
for all living.

On the right, the Waterhouse lot should be particularly
noticed, and, on the same side, the Bradlee monument. On
the left, the Randall monument will then be noticed.
There is a small marble monument on the Pratt lot, on the
left, which bears this inscription : —

O, when a mother meets on high

The babes she lost in infancy,

Hath she not then, for pains and fears,

The day of woe, the watchful night.
For all her sorrows, all her tears,

An over payment of deli'rht.''



MOUNT AUBURN CEMETERY. 7o

The visitor will then pass the Chamberlain, Prentice,
Bartlett and Carr, Gushing and Knapp lots, on the left. In
the latter is a marble slab to the memory of

John Knn|>p,dicd March 19, 1849, JEU 70 years. In him were blended
the tenderest affections, learning without ostentation, and worth with-
out pretension.

The visitor will have an opportunity to view, from this
spot, the beautiful Meadow Pond.

The Torrey lot, and the Thayer lot, on the left, will next
be passed. On the latter is a very peculiar three-sided
monument, to the memory of Amasa Thayer and wife, and
inscribed, —

They meet to part no more,

And, with celestial welcome, greet
On an immortal shore.

There are two very appropriate, but similarly constructed,
monuments on the Norcross and Hurlburt lots, on the left.
The Buckingham lot will next be reached, in which rest
the remains of several members of the family of the Hon.
Joseph T. Buckingham, of Cambridge, formerly editor of
the Boston Courier. A neat marble memorial was erected
to the memory of Edwin Buckingham, a son, a young man
of more than ordinary promise, bom 1810. He edited, un-
til his death, the New England Magazine. He died at sea,
and his loss was sincerely regretted.

** Rest, loved one, rest — beneath tlie billow's swell,
Wliere tongue ne'er spoke, where sunlight never tell ;
Rest — till the God wlio gave thee to the deep,
Rouse thee, triumphant, from the long, long sleep.

The Howe and Wyman lots, on the right, and the Taylor
lot at the left, will then be seen ; after noticing which, th«
visitor will turn to the left into Narcissut Path.

Naucissus Path.
The path to be followed winds along by the left side of
Forest Pond, both sides of which are principally devoted to
tombs. The Hosmer lot, on the right ; the monuments on
the Wingnte and Webster lots, at the left ; the Pierce,
Cunics, Winchester, Samuel Henshaw, and Gushing tombs,
will be particularly noticed. On the Ayer lot there is a
memorial to Lucy Adelaide Ayer, died Aug. 10, ISIS,
aged 21.

Sleep on, sweet one, thy rest has come ;

'Tis for niy>elf I mourn,
And for thi" precious biihe, to whom
Thou never must returo.

7



74 HANDBOOK.

Lone are my paths and sad the houts

Now tl]y meek smile is gone ;
But O ! a brifrliler home than ours
In heaven is now thine own.
Blessed are the pure in heart.
On the left will be noticed the lot in which rest the re-
mains of the late eminent jurist, Joseph Story, first Presi-
dent of the Proprietors of Moimt Auburn.

Keep to the right, and turn into Alder Path ; pass through
Alder Path, and turn to the right into Locust Avenue, and
turn again to the right into Beech Avenue.
Beech Atenue.
There is on this avenue a small granite memorial to Mrs.
Sarah T. Holt, inscribed, —

Farewell \ departed and beloved spirit ;
Our heavy loss is thy eternal gain.

Passing along to the left, will be seen very appropriate,
and in some instances beautiful monuments, on the Emery,
Boardman, S. P. Coolidge, Green, Jacob Bigelow, and
Gould lots ; and also on the Hari-od, Nichols, Pales, Green-
wood, Tirrell, Cobum, and Ellis lots, at the right.

Turn to the right into Linden Path,

Linden Path.
On the Fisher lot there is a monument to the memory of
several infant children, inscribed, —

The mother gave, in tears and pain,

The flowers she most did love ;
She knew she should find them all again

In the fields of light above.

The Bird lot, on the right, and the Barnard lot, on the
left, will then be passed. On the right a monument has
been erected to the memory of

Samuel B. Doane, obit. Sept. 3, 1845, aged G3 years. He is not here,
but has ascended to the bosom of Jus Father and his God.

The Thaxter lot, on the right, and the broken marble
column, on the left, will attract attention.

The, visitor will then continue on, almost in a straight
line, into Catalpa Path.

Catai.p.4. Path.

On this path there are but few raontiments. One on the
Davis lot, at the right, and a Gothic freestone erection on
the Hatch lot, on the same side, will be particularly no-
ticed.

Cojvtinue on, keeping to the left, into Indian Ridge Path.



MOUNT AUBURN CEMETERT.



75



iNDiAjf Ridge Path.
The beautiful marble monument on the Merrill lot, at the
right, will here receive attention ; after noticing which,
continue on, and turn to the right into Central Avenue,
which leads directly to the Gate.



It is not to be supposed that the foregoing route and de-
scription embrace all the objects worthy of notice in tlie
Cemetery. If the route has been followed, the visitor has
seen the principal objects of interest within the grounds ; he
has visited the most attractive places, and viewed the most
interesting monuments, including the larger number cf
those most frequently inquired for by strangers ; in fact, the
visitor has seen sufficient to enable him to obtain a correct
idea of the appearance of the entire Cemetery. There are,
however, on other avenues and paths much that is worthy
of observation ; and a visit to them would well repay the
time occupied in doing so.



By leaving Mount Auburn, and turning to the right, and
then passing through Coolidge Avenue, the visitor will
reach the Cemetery of the City of Cambridge, where will
be found much that will prove interesting.




M'im



76



HAND BOOK.



DIRECTORY TO AYENUES AND PATHS.









Avenues.


Beech


leads ftom


Central to Poplar.


Cedar


((


tt


Cypress to "Walnut.


Central


t<


tt


the Gate to Walnut.


Chapel


• •


tt


Central to Pine.


Chestnut


((


tt


Mountain to Poplar.


Cypress


((


"


Central to Walnut.


Elm


((


tt


Pine to Mistletoe P. and back to Pine.


Fir


(1


tt


Elm to junction of Walnut and Cy-
press.


Garden


((


"


the Gate to Maple.


Larch


"


"


Poplar to Maple.


Lawn


K


tt


Pine, near the Gate, to Spruce.


Laurel


((


tt


Walnut to the same.


Lime


tt


((


Maple to the same.


Locust


tt


tt


Poplar to Beech


Magnolia


((


tt


Mountain to Maple.


Maple


**


tt


Magnolia, by the easterly and north-
erly sides of Cemetery, to Garden.


Mountain


f(


tt


Chestnut round the Tower.


Oak


(1


tt


Larch to Willow.


Pine


(C


tt


the Gate to Cypress.


Poplar


tt


tt


Central Square to Chestnut.


Spruce


tt


It


Pine to Fir, thence by westerly side
of Cemetery to Wahiut.


Walnut


tt


tt


Central Square to Mountain.


WiUow


tt


tt


Poplar, north to Narcissus P., thence
back to Walnut.



Paths.

Acacia leads from Spruce Av. to Verbena P.
Acanthus " " Larch to Magnolia Av.
Acorn " " Maple Avenue to Evergreen P.

Ailanthus lies between Central, Cypress, and Cedar Avs.

Alder leads from Locust to Poplar Av.
Almond " " Indian Ridge P. to the same.

Aloe " " Indian Ridse P. to Lime Av.



MOUNT AUBURN CEMETERY.



I t



Amaranth encircles the


Anemone


leads from


ArbutTiB


(1




Arethusa


((




Asclepias
Asphodel
Aster


41




Azalea


it




Bellwort


<<




Catalpa
Columbine


((




Cowslip

Daisy

DeU


If
(1




Elder


(t




Eglantine
Evergreen
Fern


tl
«4




Gentian


If




Geranium li


es between


Greenbrier


leads from


Hai-ebeU


11


14


Hawthorn


14


44


Hazel


44


44


Heath


41


41


Heliotrope
Hemlock


41
41


44
II


Hibiscus lies between


Honeysucldi
Holly


5 leads from

44 II


Hyacinth
Indian Bidgi
Iris


44

B "

41




Ivy
Jasmine


44




Laburnum


44




Lilac


41




Lily


44




Linden


44




Lupine


"





7*



crown of Harvard Hill.

Spruce Av. to Orange P.

Lime Av. to

Walnut Av. to Trefoil P.

Spruce to Fir Av.

Lawn Av. to

Vine to Ivy P.

Spruce Av. to same.

Spruce Av. to Orange P.

Indian Ridge P. to same.

Spruce to Fir Av.

Spruce to Walnut Av.

Locust Av. to Alder P.

Vine P., on east and west sides of
Pond to S. side, thence to Ivy P.

Walnut to Spruce Av.

Fir to Spruce Av.

Lime Av. to same.

Moimtain to Walnut Av.

Cypress to Pine and Spruce Avs.

Central and Beech Avs.

Pine Av. to Mistletoe P.

Walnut Av. to Trefoil P.

Chestnut Av., by two ways, to Sweet-
brier P.

Mountain Av. to Rose P.

Spruce to Fir Av.

Spruce to Fir Av.

Poplar Av. to Ivy P.

Cypress and Cedar Avs., entrance
and exit on Cypress.

Greenbrier P. to St. John's Lot.

Poplar Av. to Ivy P.

Cypress to Chapel Av.

Central to Larch and Maple Avs.

Moss to Ivy P.

Central Square to Woodbine P.

Chestnut Av. to Hawthorn P.

Spruce Av. near Lawn to

Willow Av. to Indian Ridge P.

Poplar Av. to Aster P., thence to
Woodbine P.

Beech Av. to same.

Cypress to Spruce Av.



HAND BOOK.



Mimosa


leads from Spruce to Fir Av.


Mistletoe


"


tt


Elm Av. to St. John's Lot, thence to
Fir Av.


Moss


C(


It


Laurel Avenue to Ivy P.


Myrtle


"


tt


Chestnut Av. to Hazel P.


Narcissus


((


tt


Willow Av. to Catalpa P., and around
Forest Pond back to Willow Av.


Oleander


tt


tt


Myrtle to Rose P.


Olive


n


tt


Myrtle to Sweetbrier P.


Orange


it


tt


Walnut Av. to same.


Orchis


"


• t


Walnut Av. to Tulip P.


Osier


"


tt


Willow Av. to Indian Ridge P.


Oxalis


((


tt


Willow Av. to


Peony-


((


tt


Chapel to Cypress Av.


Petunia


"


tt


Larch to Magnolia Av.


PUgrim


"


((


Walnut Av. to Snowdrop P.


Primrose


"


tt


Central Av. to


Pyrola


"


tt


Spruce Av. to Orange P.


Ehodora


"


"


Oak to Larch Av.


Eose


encircles


Harvard Hill.


Rosemary


leads from Jasmine to Hawthorn P.


Saftron




"


Spruce Av. to St. John's Lot.


Sedge




tt


Fir Avenue to Heath P.


SoiTcl




tt


Spruce to Fir Av.


Snowberry


"


it


the Gate to Central Av.


Snowdrop




tt


Walnut to Spruce Av.


Spira;a




tt


Fir Av. to Mistletoe P.


Sumach




it


}losB to Violet P. and Walnut Av.


Sweetbrier




<•


Chestnut Av. to Hawthorn P.


Sylvan


tt


tt


Walnut to Mountain Av.


Thistle




ti


Spruce Av. to Cowslip P.


TrefoU




((


Spruce to Walnut Av.


TuUp




((


Walnut Av. to Trefoil P.


Verbena




((


Spruce to Fir Av.


Vine




((


Moss to Iris P.


Woodbine




((


Hawthorn to Ivy P.


Yarrow




((


Greenbrier, westerly to Fir. Av.,
thence easterly to Pine Av.



BROWN'S .BRONCHIAL.TROCHES



COUGHS.

The great and sudden changes of our climate are fruitful sonrcoi
of Pulmonary and Bronchial afftctions. Experience having proved
that simple remedies often act speedily and certainly when taken in
the early stage of disease, recourse should at once be had to
" Brovinh Bronchial Troches^" or Lozenges, let the Cold, Cough, or
Irritation of the Throat be ever so slight, as by this precaution a
more serious attack may he effectually warded on.

" That trouble In my Throat (for which the " Trochts " is a spe-
eiflo) oiien making me a mere whisperer." N. P. WILLIS.

" I recomnend their use to Fublio Speaebbs."

EEV. E. H. CHAPm.
" Hare proved extremely serviceable for Hoabskkess."

REV. H. W. BEECHEE.



Online LibraryThomas F. ByrnesGuide through Mount Auburn. A hand-book for passengers over the Cambridge Railroad. Illustrated with engravings and a plan of the cemetery → online text (page 5 of 36)