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Thomas Fleming.

A real history of Newark and notable Newarkers online

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A REAL HISTORY




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MAR 23 1917



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NEWARK, X. J.

Tom FlE-mixc. Cartoon Syndicate

191G

Copyright, 1917, 1)y Tom Fleming



PRINTED IN NEWARK, N. J.
P.V H. MURPHY



FO RE WO R D

WE KNOW ()L"U I'LM'.LIC MI'lX iUiST V>\ TllK
CARICATURES MADE OF THKM © THE PROSAIC
PHOTOGRAPH OF A CELEBRFIA" WILL SELDOM BE
RECOGNIZED SO READIL^' AS A (;( )OD BURLESQUE
PORTRArr WILL BE ® EXACiGERATIOX OF THE
PREDOMLXAXT CHARACTERISTICS OF A IvVCE
OFTEX ACCEXTUATMS ITS STRI{XGTI!. AXD W HEX
THIS IS DONE WITHOUT AXV THOUGHT OF
MALICI'. THE RESULT OFTEX l'K()\ ES AMUSING
AND IXSTRUCTIA'E G TIII^RI': IS Too LITTLE
SUNSHINE IX THIS SOMr.RE. XICXATIOUS WORLD.
AND HE WHO DISPELS ITS SHADOWS WELL
DESER\'ES THE PLAUDITS OF MAXKIXD ® LIFE
SHOULD XOT BE T,\KEX TOO SERIOUSLY ® TE^l-
PER IT W ITH LAUGHTER AXD GOOD CHEER ®
THE CHARACTER SKETCHES IX THIS WORK ARE
INTENDED AS SIDELIGHTS OX THE PERSOXALI-
TIES OF XEWARK'S XOTABLE MEX FROM THE
HUMOROL^S STAXDIHMXT. AXD IT IS TRUSTED
THAT THIA' WILL BE REGARDI-J) IX THE
SPIRIT IX WHICH TIIIA' WlUUi COXCI{DT{D AXD
EXECUTED.



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the rfdmihtahk'

l\(>l)cTi Treat. ;ui a-lute Cnnm-cticiit N'ankec.

who. pi'iilialiK wearied li\ the tmi iH-strainin^'

mllueiice m| ^-uiiih'N ^uniptuarx la\\>. and llie

in erci'dw ded cimdilinn ol the Xutnie^ State in

l0()(i, resdKed tn ^eek a new land wherein he

could make i^ond the ^uhtle sii;nitH-ance i no 1 )nteh Treat.

That Treat treated the alxn-i^ine^ of the new land well,
in fact, hetter than the\ had e\'er ])een treated hefore, i^
amph' attested to h\' the reconK. \ eraciou^ ehronieler.s
relate thai he i^ave them iour harrels of "heere" for a tract
of land inhal)ited hv little else th.an hnll froos and |>i>llvwoo-s.
When it is considered that thi - \\a> hefore the ad\ent
of those colossal estahlishnients dex'oted to the mxsteries of
brew, and that the "to,am\' stnh" was prohahlx iin|iorled. it




A REAL HISTORY OF NEWARK



must be conceded that this was indeed a good treat for those
innocent children of the wilderness.

The true story of Newark's settlement has probably never
been adequately told. It has never been related how earnestly
Captain Treat entreated those hard-headed Puritans to leave
their beloved land of steady haliits and embark in an expedition
to a far off land to brave the stings and arrows of adversity,
Indians and mosquitoes.

At first his entreaties fell upon reluctant ears. Indiffer-
ence, mingled with incredulity, greeted his most vehement
appeals and it was not until he dilated upon the vision of
magnificent profits which awaited fortunate investors in
Newark real estate two hundred and fifty years later that the
shrewd New England instinct for bargains was fully
awakened.

In glowing colors he painted the bright future of the
coming citv — of the "Ironbound" district, the "Hill" section,
and — Prince street.

But it was not until he eloquently described the guUi-
bilitv of the red-nosed red-skins, who would trade their best




18



A REAL HISTORY Ol XKWAKK



land tor strings of wooden nutnicys to give to their st|ua\\s
tor beads, that his hearers tinaUy l)ecanie interested in the
excursion.

Althougli Robert Treat was a douglit)- caj^ain and a
soldier to the core, it ninsl not lie inferred tlial lie was an
ensanguined warrior whose only thought was that oi war.

Far from it — he was a man of peace.

It was his hrm resolntion that sangtnnary war was to
have no place in his negotiations witli the Indians, or in his
great scheme of empire. I'-elieving imi)licitly in the principles
of peace as thev were understood in his flay, and not having
the advantage of gra])e-iuice as an aid to his diplomatic
nes-otiations with the savages, he did the next best thmg.
Having witnessed the folly of i)laying the red-skin-game with
implements of war. he wisel\- a])i)roached the unsoi)histicated
spvages with fire-water instead of fire-arms.

He ])lamied better than he knew. Xewark was baptized
with small beere — and !o. and behold! — it was to become the
home of some of the finest breweries in the land. X'erily.
great oaks from little acorns grow.




et i\]> the drinks" hel'ure luakin.^ any
:itteni|)t li> harter with the red men for the inan\ Imtidles >>\
skins the\- hrnu.^iit in the settlement h ir trade. This is proh-
ahlv the uriyin of the \er\ siLinificant i)hrase — '"Skin ,i;ame."

Thus we can miw readih' perceixe how tlmse shrewd
Connecticut farmers were enahled to dri\e >uch lanious har-
yains for land in tlie \icinit\- of the h'our Corner^, which has
since itecome the env\ and covet of every real estate mani]>u-
lator doiui;' husiness in the thri\-ini^" modern town which now
lies upon the hanks of the turbid I'as^aic stream.




CHAPTER II.



Robert Treat





OBERT TREAT was born of wealthy but
honest parents. This may seem highly anomalous
to many familiar with the methods in vogue
now-a-days to attain the qualification, "wealthy."
,l]ut the records state that his father. Richard
Treat, was a man of great wealth and integrity,
being possessed of an estate of 900 acres in Glastonbury,
Conn. It is further related that he was the financial manager
of the little community in which he lived, where he was known
as a man of assured wealth and financial standing.

It redounds greatly to Robert's credit that he selected
parents so well endowed with wealth, in view of the fact that
he was destined to be connected with many enterprises in
vvhich a plenitude of lucre was extremelv desirable. His



26




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A \ ni hatlle wnuld wind up with the sanguinary
jihrase. "The ca])tives were all killed." Coaded to furv hv the
treacherous sawages. there \\as no merc\' shown to the red-
skins when tile whites got them in their ]iower. v^(|uaws,
children and old men were liurned to death in their wig-
wams. Xo yellow-covered no\el ever contained a fraction
of the aclurd ferocit\- of the warfare wau'cd ayainst the





A REAT. T-ITSTORY OF NEWARK



s

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RY ( H- XRWARK



mental in brinj^inti' lii'^ father to the 1)li)ck. Two nf them,
Cioffe and WhaUey. escaped to New Enghuul and songht
refuge in Cminecticiu. TheN' were concealed 1)\- .Michael
Tompkins, a j)riiminent Puritan, in Xew Haven. This,
coming to the ears of the king, aroused his anger and resent-
ment and resulted in taking a\va\' the independence of Xew
Haven. The leatlers of the Connecticut colon\- were dis-
gruntled at the change and at t.mce lnoked around for a i)lace
to settle where the_\- wnnid he hexond the intluence of "the
Christless nde." as the\' termed the new order nf attairs.
Robert Treat m(_)ulded the>e discontents into a tangible form
and led them to the banks of the I'assa_\ak. tliereb\- founding
the City of Xewark.

Robert Treat \\a- a many sided man. During the first
six years of Xewark there was no activit\- of goxernment in
which he was not the most ])roniinent figure, h'irst on the
list ot signatures to ihe fundamental agreement was his
influential name. Tie v\a-^ the head of the connnission that





43



A REAL HISTORY OF NEWARK





settled the lioundary l)et\veen Newark and Elizabeth. He
I'epresented Xewark in the inrst I'rovmeial Assembly ot New
Jersey. He built the tirst grist mill in Newark. He was
distinetiveh' a man of action. Cromwell was a soldier, but
no statesman. Treat was l;otli. He has never been fullv
honoi'ed for the great service he rendered. New Jersey's
greatest count\- should have been named "Treat County"
n';steail of 'i^sse.x."' of ignoble fame; and Newark's greatest
thoroughfare might well be renamed in his hon(»r, even at
this late dav.

^^"hat a great lack of imagination was dis])la_\ed b\" these
early settlers in tlieir bestowal of names for new localities.
The maiorit\- of places settled appear to ]ia\e been labelled
"New." .\s a result, the maj) shows New Jersey, New ^'ork,
New Kngland, New Ham]ishire, Nev Haven, New Pirunswick,
New London, and the early name for Newark, — New W'orke,
Will the\- remain "New" for all time?' Ts there no virtue in
the maturit\- of aye?" AA'liat did the Duke of York ever do




45



A REA], HISTORY < )F NEWARK



for the yreal cil\ im Manhallan Uland that his ill-fa\in\'(l
lU'.iiK" should he l'ore\er l)ur(lene(l uixni .Xmeriea's great nie-
lr(;])ohs? And is there anv esjjeeial reason or rhxnie for
"\e\\" jersex'." Trealsxhania would l)e just as eui)honious
a name as that of a nei,L;'h])oriniL;' v^tate — after \'ou ""Ot used
10 it.





47



CHAPTER m.



Newark's First Real Estate Deal





HE bargain driven with tl^e Indians for the
site of the new settlement certainly did not
detract from the fame and reputation enjoyed
by the Yankees as shrewd traders.

( )n the eleventh day of July, lb67, fourteen
months after landing on the banks of the Passaic
river, there assembled nearly all the Indians in the vicinity to
pow-wow for their land.

\\ ith all the pomp and ceremony of which the savages
were ca])ab]e. thev proceeded gravely to form a semi-circle
seated ujion the ground. High in front were piled the sundry
articles which were to be given to them in payment for their
land. This was to be no ordinarv real estate transaction.
There were no searches of titles, for the good and sufficient
reason that there were no titles to search.



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Online LibraryThomas FlemingA real history of Newark and notable Newarkers → online text (page 1 of 5)