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CONWAY CASTLE.



fifcltlon &' Elite



Historical Tales

The Romance of Reality

By

CHARLES MORRIS

Author of "Half-Hours with the Best American Authors," "Tales from the

Dramatists," etc.



IN FIFTEEN VOLUMES



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J. B. LIPPINCOTT COMPANY

PHILADELPHIA AND LONDON



THE NT *K

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Copyright, 1891, by J. B. LIPPINCOTT COMPANY.
Copyright, 1904, by J . B. LIPPINCOTT COMPANY.

Copyright, 1908, by J. B. LIPPINCOTT COMPANY.

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CONTENTS TO VOLUME II.



BOOK VIII.
TRISTRAM AND ISOLDE AT JOYOUS GARD.

CHAPTBK. PAGE.

I. THE TREACHERY OF KING MARK 9

II. How TRISTRAM BEFOOLED DINADAN 23

III. ON THE ROAD TO LONAZEP 36

IV. How PALAMIDES FARED AT THE RED CITY . . 46

V. THE TOURNAMENT AT LONAZEP . . . : 55

VI. THE SECOND DAY OF THE TOURNAMENT 70

VII. THE WOES OF Two LOVERS 83

VIII. THE RIVALRY OF TRISTRAM AND PALAMIDES . 92



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BOOK IX.""- * ?

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THE QUEST OF THE HOLY GPAIL.

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I. THE ENCHANTED CASTLE OF 'KING PELLAM... 117

II. THE MARVEL OF THE FLOATING SWORD 125

III. How GALAHAD GOT HIS SHIELD 141

IV. THE TEMPTATION OF SIR PERCIVALE 155

V. THE STRANGE ADVENTURES OF SIR BoRSc 173

VI. THE ADVENTURE OF THE MAGIC SHIP 195

VII. How LANCELOT SAW THE SANGREAL 207

VIII. THE DEEDS OF THE THBEE CHOSEN KNTGHTS. . 217





11 CONTENTS TO VOLUME II.

BOOK X.

THE LOVE OF LANCELOT AND GUENEVER.

CHAPTER. PAGE.

I. THE POISONING OF SIR PATBISE 226

II. THE LILY MAID OF ASTOLAT 239

III. How ELAINE DIED FOR LOVE 251

IV. THE CHEVALIER OF THE CART 260

BOOK XI.
THE HAND OF DESTINY.

I. THE TRAPPING OF THE LION 280

II. THE RESCUE OF THE QUEEN 288

III. THE RETURN OF GUENEVER 297

IV. THE WAR BETWEEN ARTHUR AND LANCELOT.. 314

V. THE STTNG OF THE VIPER 323

VI. THE PASSING OF ARTHUR 335

VII. IBE' DEATH OF LANOL'JUOT AND GUENEVER 339

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LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.



KING ARTHUR. VOL. II.

PAGE

CONWAY CASTLE Frontispiece.

ST. MICHAEL'S MOUNT, CORNWALL 10

THE ROUND TABLE OF KING ARTHUR 16

MARRIAGE OF SIR TRISTRAM 24

THE ASSAULT OF SIR TRISTRAM 42

SIR TRISTRAM AT JOYOUS GARD 55

THE DEPARTURE 93

ON THE QUEST OF THE HOLY GRAIL 118

JOSEPH OF ARIMATHEA 134

OATH OF KNIGHTHOOD 144

SIR GALAHAD FIGHTING THE SEVEN SINS 153

AN OLD AND HALF-RUINED CHAPEL . . 183

THE MAGIC SHIP 198

SIR GALAHAD^ QUEST OF THE HOLY GRAIL 217

SALISBURY CATHEDRAL 225

"You ARE WELCOME, BOTH," SAID SIR BERNARD .. 241

ELAINE 259

SIR LANCELOT IN THE QUEEN'S CHAMBER 287

THE TOWER OF LONDON 324

THE OLD KITCHEN OF GLASTONBURY ABBEY 345



KING ARTHUR



AXD THE



KNIGHTS OF THE ROUND TABLE.



BOOK VIII.

TRISTRAM AND ISOLDE AT JOYOUS CARD



CHAPTER I.

THE TREACHERY OF KING MARK.

THE story of Tristram's valorous deeds, and of
the high honor in which he was held at Camelot,
in good time came to Cornwall, where it filled King
Mark's soul with j-evengeful fury, and stirred the
heart of La Belle Isolde to the warmest love. The
coward king, indeed, in his jealous hatred of his
nephew, set out in disguise for England, with mur-
derous designs against Tristram should an oppor-
tunity occur.

Many things happened to him there, and he was
brought into deep disgrace, but the story of his
adventures may be passed over in brief review, lest
the reader should find it wearisome.

Xot far had he ridden on English soil before he
met with Dinadan, who, in his jesting humor, soon

9



10 TRISTRAM AND ISOLDE AT JOYOUS GARD.

played him a merry trick. For he arrayed Dagonet,
the king's fool,, in a suit of armor, which he made
Mark believe was Lancelot's. Thus prepared, Dag-
onet rode to meet him and challenged him to a
joust. But King Mark, on seeing what he fancied
was Lancelot's shield, turned and fled at headlong
speed, followed by the fool and his comrades with
hunting cries and laughter till the forest rang with
the noise.

Escaping at length from this merry chase, the
trembling dastard made his way to Camelot, where
he hoped some chance would arise to aid him in his
murderous designs on Tristram. But a knight of
his own train, named Sir Amant, had arrived there
before him, and accused him of treason to the king,
without telling who he was.

" This is a charge that must be settled by wager
of battle," said King Arthur. " The quarrel is
between you; you must decide it with sword and
spear."

In the battle that followed, Sir Amant, by
unlucky fortune, was run through, and fell from his
horse with a mortal wound.

"Heaven has decided in my favor," cried King
Mark. " But here I shall no longer sta}', for it
does not seem a safe harbor for honest knights."

He thereupon rode away, fearing that Dinadan
would reveal his name. Yet not far had he gone
before Lancelot came in furious haste after him.

" Turn again, thou recreant king and knight/'
he loudly called. " To Arthur's court you must
return, whether it is your will or not. We know
you, villain. Sir Amant has told your name and



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THE TREACHERY OF KING MARK. 11

purpose; and, by my faith, I am strongly moved
to kill you on the spot."

" Fair sir," asked King Mark, " what is your
name ? '

" My name is Lancelot du Lake. Defend your-
self, dog and dastard."

On hearing this dreaded name, and seeing Lan-
celot riding upon him with spear in rest, King
Mark tumbled like a sack of grain from his saddle
to the earth, crying in terror, " I yield me, Sir
Lancelot ! I yield me ! ' and begging piteously
for mercy.

" Thou villain ! ' thundered Lancelot, " I would
give much to deal thee one buffet for the love of
Tristram and Isolde. Mount, dog, and follow me."

Mark hastened to obey, and was thus brought like
a slave back to Arthur's court, where he made such
prayers and promises that in the end the king
forgave him, but only on condition that he would
enter into accord with Tristram, and remove from
him the sentence of banishment. All this King
Mark volubly promised and swore to abide by,
though a false heart underlay his fair words. But
Tristram gladly accepted the proffered truce with
his old enemy, for his heart burned with desire to
see his lady love again.

Soon afterwards Dinadan, with Dagonet and his
companions, came to court, and great was the
laughter and jesting at King Mark when they told
the story of his flight from Arthur's fool.

" This is all very well for you stay-at-homes,"
cried Mark ; " but even a fool in Lancelot's armor
is not to be played with. As it was, Dagonet paid



12 TRISTRAM AND ISOLDE AT JOYOUS CARD.

for his masquerade, for he met a knight who
brought him like a log to the ground, and all these
laughing fellows with him/'

" Who was that ? ' asked King Arthur.

" I can tell you," said Dinadan. " It was Sir
Palamides. I followed him through the forest, and
a lively time we had in company."

" Aha ! then you have had adventures."

" Eare ones. We met a knight before Morgan
le Fay's castle. You know the custom there, to
let no knight pass without a hard fight for it.
This stranger made havoc with the custom, for
he overthrew ten of your sister's knights, and killed
some of them. He afterwards tilted with Pala-
mides for offering to help him, and gave that
doughty fellow a sore wound."

" Who was this mighty champion Xot Lance-
lot or Tristram ? ' asked the king, looking around.

" On our faith we had no hand in it," they both
answered.

" It was the knight next to them in renown,"
answered Dinadan.

" Lamorak of Wales ? "

" No less. And, my faith, a sturdy fellow he is.
I left him and Palamides the best of friends."

" I hope, then, to see the pair of them at next
week's tournament," said the king.

Alas for Lamorak ! Better for him far had he
kept away from that tournament. His gallant
career was near its end, for treachery and hatred
were soon to seal his fate. This sorrowful story
it is now our sad duty to tell.

Lamora 1 ' had long loved Margause, the queen



THE TREACHERY OF KING MARK. 13

of Orkney, Arthur's sister and the mother of Ga-
waine and his brethren. For this they hated him,
and with treacherous intent invited their mother
to a castle near Camelot, as a lure to her lover.
Soon after the tournament, at which Lamorak won
the prize of valor, and redoubled the hatred of
Gawaine and his brothers by overcoming them in
the fray, word was brought to the victorious knight
that Margause was near at hand and wished to
see him.

With a lover's ardor, he hastened to the castle
where she was, but, as they sat in the queen's apart-
ment in conversation, the door was suddenly flung
open, and Gaheris, one of the murderous brethren,
burst in, full armed and with a naked sword in his
hand. Eushing in fury on the unsuspecting lovers,
with one dreadful blow he struck off his mother's
head, crimsoning Lamorak with her blood. He
next assailed Lamorak, who, being unarmed, was
forced to fly for his life, and barely escaped.

The tidings of this dread affair filled the land
with dismay, and many of the good knights of
Arthur's court threatened reprisal. Arthur himself
was full of wrath at the death of his sister. Yet
those were days when law ruled not, but force was
master, and retribution only came from the strong
hand and the ready sword. This was Laniorak's
quarrel, and the king, though he vowed to protect
him from his foes, declared that the good knight
of Wales must seek retribution with his own hand.

He gained death, alas ! instead of revenge, for
his foes proved too vigilant for him, and overcame
him by vile treachery. Watching his movements,



14 TRISTRAM AND ISOLDE AT JOYOUS GARD.

the} 7 la} 7 in ambush, for him at a difficult place,
and as he was passing, unsuspicious of danger, they
set suddenly upon him, slew his horse, and assailed
him on foot.

Gawaine, Mordred, and Gaheris formed this am-
bush, for the noble-minded Gareth had refused to
take part in their murderous plot; and with des-
perate fury they assaulted the noble Welsh knight,
who, for three hours, defended himself against their
utmost strength. But at the last Mordred dealt
him a death-blow from behind, and when he fell
in death the three murders hewed him with their
swords till scarce a trace of the human form was
left.

Thus perished one of the noblest of Arthur's
knights, and thus was done one of the most villan-
ous deeds of blood ever known in those days of
chivalrous war.

Before the death of Lamorak another event hap-
pened at Arthur's court which must here be told,
for it was marvellous in itself, and had in it the
promise of wondrous future deeds.

One dav there came to the court at Camelot a

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knight attended by a young squire. When he had
disarmed he went to the king and asked him to
give the honor of knighthood to his squire.

" What claim has he to it ? ' asked the king.
"Of what lineage is he? 7

" He is the youngest son of King Pellinore, and
brother to Sir Lamorak. He is my brother also;
for my name is Aglavale, and I am of the same
descent."

" What is his name ? "



THE TREACHERY OF KING MARK. 15

" Percivale."

" Then for my love of Lamorak, and the love I
bore your father, he shall be made a knight to-
morrow."

So when the morrow dawned, the king ordered
that the youth should be brought into the great
hall, and there he knighted him, dealing him the
accolade with his good sword Excalibur.

And so the day passed on till the dinner-hour,
when the king seated himself at the head of the
table, while down its sides were many knights of
prowess and renown. Percivale, the new-made
knight, was given a seat among the squires and
the untried knights, who sat at the lower end of
the great dining-table.

But in the midst of their dinner an event of
great strangeness occurred. For there came into
the hall one of the queen's maidens, who was of
high birth, but who had been born dumb, and in
all her life had spoken no word. Straight across
the hall she walked, while all gazed at her in mute
surprise, till she came to where Percivale sat.
Then she took him by the hand, and spoke in a
voice that rang through the hall with the clearness
of a trumpet,

" Arise, Sir Percivale, thou noble knight and
warrior of God's own choosing. Arise and come
with me/'

He rose in deep surprise, while all the others
sat in dumb wonder at this miracle. To the Eound
Table she led him, and to the right side of the seat
perilous, in which no knight had hitherto dared
to sit.



16 TRISTRAM AND ISOLDE AT JOYOUS CARD.



f Fair knight,, take here your seat," she said.
" This seat belongs to you, and to none other, and
shall be yours until a greater than you shall come."

This said, she departed and asked for a priest.
Then was she confessed and given the sacrament,
and forthwith died. But the king and all his court
gazed with wonder on Sir Percivale, and asked
themselves what all this meant, and for what great
career God had picked out this youthful knight,
for such a miracle no man there had ever seen
before.

Meanwhile, King Mark had gone back to Corn-
wall, and with him went Sir Tristram, at King
Arthur's request, though not till Arthur had made
the Cornish king swear on Holy Scripture to do
his guest no harm, but hold him in honor and
esteem.

Lancelot, however, was full of dread and anger
when he heard what had occurred, and he told
King Mark plainly that if he did mischief to Sir
Tristram he would slay him with his own hands.

" Bear this well in mind, sir king," he said,
" for I have a way of keeping my word."

" I have sworn before King Arthur to treat him
honorably," answered Mark. " I, too, have a way
of keeping my word."

" A way, I doubt not," said Lancelot, scornfully ;
" but not my way. Your reputation for truth needs
mending. And all men know for what you came
into this country. Therefore, take heed what you
do."

Then Mark and Tristram departed, and soon
after they reached Cornwall a damsel was sent



THE TREACHERY OF KING MARK. 17

to Camelot with news of their safe arrival, and
bearing letters from Tristram to Arthur and Lan-
celot. These they answered and sent the damsel
back, the burden of Lancelot's letter being, " Be-
ware of King Fox, for his ways are ways of wiles/'

They also sent letters to King Mark, threatening
him if he should do aught to Tristram's injury.
These letters worked harm only, for they roused
the evil spirit in the Cornish king^s soul, stir-
ring him up to anger and thirst for revenge. He
thereupon wrote to Arthur, bidding him to meddle
with his own concerns, and to take heed to his wife
and his knights, which would give him work enough
to do. As for Sir Tristram, he said that he held
him to be his mortal enemy.

He wrote also to Queen Guenever, his letter being
full of shameful charges of illicit relations with
Sir Lancelot, and dishonor to her lord, the king.
Full of wrath at these vile charges, Guenever took
the letter to Lancelot, who was half beside himself
with anger on reading it.

" You cannot get at him to make him eat his
words," said Dinadan, whom ' Lancelot took into
his confidence. " And if you seek to bring him to
terms with pen and ink, you will find that his vil-
lany will get the better of your honesty. Yet there
are other ways of dealing with cowardly curs.
Leave him to me; I will make him wince. I will
write a mocking lay of King Mark and his doings,
and will send a harper to sing it before him at his
court. When this noble king has heard my song I
fancy he will admit that there are other ways of
gaining revenge besides writing scurrilous letters."

II 2



18 TRISTRAM AND ISOLDE AT JOYOUS GARD.

A stinging lay, indeed, was that which Dinadan
composed. When done he taught it to a harper
named Eliot, who in his turn taught it to other
harpers, and these, by the orders of Arthur and
Lancelot, went into Wales and Cornwall to sing
it everywhere.

Meanwhile King Mark's crown had been in great
danger. For his country had been invaded by an
army from Session, led by a noted warrior named
Elias, who drove the forces of Cornwall from the
field and besieged the king in his castle of Tintagil.
And now Tristram came nobly to the rescue. At
the head of the Cornish forces he drove back the
besiegers with heavy loss, and challenged Elias to
a single combat to end the war. The challenge was
accepted, and a long and furious combat followed,
but in the end Elias was slain, and the remnant
of his army forced to surrender.

This great service added to the seeming accord
between Tristram and the king, but in his heart
Mark nursed all his old bitterness, and hated him
the more that he had helped him. His secret fury
soon found occasion to flame to the surface. For at
the feast which was given in honor of the victory,
Eliot, the harper, appeared, and sang before the
king and his lords the lay that Dinadan had made.

This was so full of ridicule and scorn of King
Mark that he leaped from his seat in a fury of
wrath before the harper had half finished.

" Thou villanous twanger of strings ! ' he cried.
" What hound sent you into this land to insult me
with your scurrilous songs ? '

"I am a minstrel," said Eliot, "and must obey



THE TREACHERY OF KING MARK. 19

the orders of my lord. Sir Dinadan made this
song, if you would know., and bade me sing it here."

" That jesting fool ! ' cried Mark, in wrath.
" As for you, fellow, you shall go free through
minstrels' license. But if you lose any time in
getting out of this country you may find that Cor-
nish air is not good for you."

The harper took this advice and hastened away,
bearing letters from Tristram to Lancelot and
Dinadan. But King Mark turned the weight of
his anger against Tristram, whom he believed had
instigated this insult, with the design to set all the
nobles of his own court laughing at him. And
well he knew that the villanous lay would be sung
throughout the land, and that he would be made
the jest of all the kingdom.

" They have their sport now," he said. " Mine
will come. Tristram of Lyonesse shall pay dearly
for this insult. And all that hold with him shall
learn that King Mark of Cornwall is no child's
bauble to be played with."

The evil-minded king was not long in putting
his project in execution. At a tournament which
was held soon afterwards Tristram was badly
wounded, and King Mark, with great show of
sorrow, had him borne to a castle near by, where
he took him under his own care as nurse and leech.

Here he gave him a sleeping draught, and had
him borne while slumbering to another castle, where
he was placed in a strong prison cell, under the
charge of stern keepers.

The disappearance of Tristram made a great stir
in the kingdom. La Belle Isolde, fearing treachery,



20 TRISTRAM AND ISOLDE AT JOYOUS CARD.

went to a faithful knight named Sir Sadok, and
begged him to try and discover what had become
of the missing knight. Sadok set himself diligently
to work, and soon learned that Tristram was held
captive in the castle of Lyonesse. Then he went
to Dinas, the seneschal, and others, and told them
what had been done, at which they broke into open
rebellion against King Mark, and took possession
of all the towns and castles in the country of Lyon-
esse, filling them with their followers.

But while the rebellious army was preparing to
march on Tintagil, and force King Mark to set
free his prisoner, Tristram was delivered by the
young knight Sir Percivale, who had come thither
in search of adventures, and had heard of King
Mark's base deed. Great was the joy between these
noble knights, and Tristram said,

" Will you abide in these marches, Sir Percivale ?
If so, I will keep you company."

" Nay, dear friend, I cannot tarry here. Duty
calls me into Wales."

But before leaving Cornwall he went to King
Mark, told him what he had done, and threatened
him with the revenge of all honorable knights if
he sought again to injure his noble nephew.

" What would you have me do ? ' asked the king.
" Shall I harbor a man who openly makes love to
my wife and queen ? '

" Is there any shame in a nephew showing an
open affection 'for his uncle's wife ? ' asked Perci-
vale. " No man will dare say that so noble a war-
rior as Sir Tristram would go beyond the borders
of sinless love, or will dare accuse the virtuous



THE TREACHERY OF KING MARK. 21

lady La Belle Isolde of lack of chastity. You have
let jealousy run away with your wisdom, King
Mark."

So saying, he departed; but his words had little
effect on King Mark's mind. No sooner had Perci-
vale gone than he began new devices to gratify his
hatred of his nephew. He sent word to Dinas, the
seneschal, under oath, that he intended to go to the
Pope and join the war against the infidel Saracens,
which he looked upon as a nobler service than that
of raising the people against their lawful king.

So earnest were his professions that Dinas be-
lieved him and dismissed his forces, but no sooner
was this done than King Mark set aside his oath
and had Tristram again privately seized and
imprisoned.

This new outrage filled the whole realm with
tumult and rebellious feeling. La Belle Isolde was
at first thrown into the deepest grief, and then her
heart swelled high with resolution to live no longer
with the dastard who called her wife. Tristram
at the same time privately sent her a letter, advis-
ing her to leave the court of her villanous lord, and
offering to go with her to Arthur's realm, if she
would have a vessel privately made ready.

The queen thereupon had an interview with Dinas
and Sadok, and begged them to seize and imprison
the king, since she was resolved to escape from his
power.

Furious at the fox-like treachery of the king,
these knights did as requested, for they formed a
plot by which Mark was privately seized, and they
imprisoned him secretly in a strong dungeon. At



22 TRISTRAM AND ISOLDE AT JOYOUS CARD.

the same time Tristram was delivered, and soon
sailed openly away from Cornwall with La Belle
Isolde, gladly shaking the dust of that realm of
treachery from his feet.

In due time the vessel touched shore in King
Arthur's dominions, and gladly throbbed the heart
of the long-unhappy queen as her feet touched
that free and friendly soil. As for Tristram, never
was lover fuller of joy, and life seemed to him to
have just begun.

iSTot long had they landed when a knightly chance
brought Lancelot into their company. Warm in-
deed was the greeting of those two noble compan-
ions, and glad the welcome which Lancelot gave
Isolde to English soil.

" You have done well," he said, " to fly from that
wolf's den. There is no noble knight in the world
but hates King Mark and will honor you for leaving
his palace of vile devices. Come with me, you shall
be housed at my expense."

Then he rode with them to his own castle of
Joyous Gard, a noble stronghold which he had won
with his own hands. A royal castle it was, gar-
nished and provided with a richness which no king
or queen could surpass. Here Lancelot bade them
use everything as their own, and charged all his
people to love and honor them as they would himself.

" Joyous Gard is yours as long as you will honor
it by making it your home," he said. " As for me,
I can have no greater joy than to know that my
castle is so nobly tenanted, and that Tristram of
Lyonesse and Queen Isolde are my honored guests."

Leaving them, Lancelot rode to Camelot, where



HOW TRISTRAM BEFOOLED DINADAN. 23

he told Arthur and Guenever of what had happened,
much to their joy and delight.

" By my crown/' cried Arthur, joyfully, " the
coming of Tristram and Isolde to my realm is no
everyday event, and is worthy of the highest honor.
We must signalize it with a noble tournament."

Then he gave orders that a stately passage-at-
arms should be held on May-day at the castle of
Lonazep, which was near Joyous Gard. And word
was sent far and near that the knights of his own
realm of Logris, with those of Cornwall and North
Wales, would be pitted against those of the rest of
England, of Ireland and Scotland, and of lands
beyond the seas.



CHAPTER II.

HOW TRISTRAM BEFOOLED DINADAN.

NEVER were two happier lovers than Tristram
and Isolde at Joyous Gard. Their days were spent
in feasting and merriment, Isolde's heart overflow-
ing with joy to be free from the jealousy of her ill-
tempered spouse, and Tristram's to have his lady


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