Thomas Moulton.

Porter, as a portion of Maine: its settlement, etc. (Volume 1) online

. (page 2 of 6)
Online LibraryThomas MoultonPorter, as a portion of Maine: its settlement, etc. (Volume 1) → online text (page 2 of 6)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


Moses Drown, from Rochester, became settlers. May 22,

1792, David Moulton, from Hampton, N. H., purchased a
farm in the plantation, but did not move in until April 27,

1793. The settlement of Benjamin Bickford, jr., David and
Job Allord, Clark, and Drown, continued but a few years.

By the terms of the deed to Hill and others, four lots were
reserved to those settling thereon before the first day of Jan-
uary, 1784 ; to Meshach Libby the lot sold by him to David
Moulton, and now owned by Moses S. Moulton ; to John
Libby a lot now owned by William T. Taylor, who, with his
son Simeon, lived on it until the death of the father about
1804 ; to Stephen Libby the lot, the northern part of which
is now owned by Meshach Mason and sons and by George
W. Ridlon ; and to James Rankins the lot for many years
(fi'om 1793 to 1817) owned and occupied by Daniel Knowles,
and by the late Daniel Towle from 1817 to 1872.

The committee's deed is all the evidence we have that
Rankins ever had a settlement in the plantation. Stephen
Libby and Francis Mathews state in their affidavits, recorded
among the town records, book 3, page 110, that Michael
Floyd first settled upon this lot, and that it was granted to
him as a settler prior to Jan. 1, 1784 ; and in the deed to
Daniel Knowles this lot is described as " the one first inhab-
ited by Michael Floyd and sold by him to James Rankins."
If Rankins had been an actual settler here, the fact would
have been well known, not only to Libby and Mathews, but
to all the early settlers ; but he was never, to my knowledge,
spoken of by them as one of their number, neither is his name



HISTORY OF PORTER.



19



found on the plantation records. Hence I conclude that Ran-
kins' settlement was a mere paper one, and that Michael
Floyd was the fourth settler. After a few years] residence
here, Floyd went to Parsonsfield, where he died. His widow
died in Porter.

Meshach Libby, May 22, 1792, sold his lot to David Moul-
ton, " for sixty pounds, lawful money," and bought that of
liis brother Stephen. Meshach remained on the lot purchased
of Stephen until his death. Stephen, after the sale of his
farm to his brother, bought a tract of land adjoining, and east
of, David Moulton's, embracing the present homesteads of
Truworthy C Libby, Hanson Libby, Henry M. Libby, John
Weeks, a lot of about forty acres owned by Samuel Ridlon,
jr., a part of John C. Mason's farm, and about thirty acres of
the farm of Moses S. Moulton, and made his home thereon
many years.

Families of several settlers who established
their residence before 1800.

Meshach Libby, who was born about 1750, and died in
March, 1829, married, first, Deborah Ely, and second, Hannah
Cram. The children of Meshach and Deborah were, Sarah,
who was born in 1771, and married in June, 1793, Gideon
Mason ; Mary, who married William Hill ; Meshach, jr. ;
Elsy, who married Edward Hill ; Elizabeth, who died in
childhood ; and Eunice, who married Jacob Hurd. Elizabeth
and Eunice only were born after Mr. Libby's settlement
here. Elizabeth was the first child of European descent born
within the limits of Porter, and was buried upon the border
of her father's garden, a few rods westerly of the workshop
of Moses S. Moulton. Widow Lamson, the mother of Ben-
jamin Ellenwood's wife, is said to have been the first white
person dying in town. Her burial place is on the farm of
Simeon Day. Elizabeth Libby was born between 1781 and



^



20



HISTORY OF PORTER.



1786. None of the children are supposed to be now living.
Their father was buried in the family bur^'ing-ground, north-
westerly from the house of Meshach Mason and sons, and
south from the house of George W. Ridlon. Peregrine
White, son of Mrs. Susanna White, who came over in the
Mayflower, was born the last of November, 1620. He was
said to be the first child of European extraction born in New
England.

John Libby and wife died, it is said, about twenty years
after their settlement in the plantation, and were buried a
few rods westerly from their house. There is no record evi-
dence of the time of their birth or death. Their children
were Meshach, Enoch, John, jr., Simeon, Jonathan, Stephen,

Kezia, who married Sargent, and Mary, who married

Daniel Knowles.

Stephen Libby first married Mary Knowles. She was
born March 1, 1768, and died in October, 1816. Their
children were : 1, James, b. June 5, 1784, m. Phebe Benson ;
2, Daniel, b. April 3, 1786, m. Mary Rundlett; 3, Josiah,
b. March 23, 1788, d. June 8, 1788 ; 4, Mary, b. July 30,
1789, rn. Josiah Weeks ; 5, Jemima, b. August 22, 1791, m.
Joshua Weeks, and d. May 12, 1879 ; 6, Stephen, jr., b. May
21, 1793, m. Dorothy Blake, and d. Dec. 4, 1868 ; 7, Sally,
b. Jan. 20, 1795, m. Jordan Stacy ; 8, John, b. Feb. 20,
1797, m. Nancy Libby, and d. Jan. 21, 1878 ; 9, David, b.
Jan. 16, 1799, m. Betsy Towle ; 10, Aphia, b. Dec. 6, 1800;
m. Ralph King; 11, OHve, b. July 5, 1802, m. William
Hodsdon. His second wife was Nancy Mathews, b. Dec. 13,
1788, m. Jan. 9, 1817, and died Jan. 9, 1818, leaving one
daughter: 12, Lydia, b. Dec. 23, 1817, m. William Perry.
His third wife was Sally Mathews, a sister of Nancy, who
was born May 13, 1793, m. March 17, 1818, and d. Dec. 16,



HISTORY OF PORTER. 21

1866. Their children were : 13, a son that died in infancy ;
14, Daniel, b. March 19, 1821, m. Almira Howard; 15, Al-
bion, b. June 9, 1823, ni. Harriet Bragg; 16, Nancy, b.
April 28, 1825, m. Ezekiel Jenness ; 17, William T., b. Dec.
28, 1827, m. Susan Marston ; 18, Thomas, b. Dec. 23, 1827,
and d. March 28, 1828; 19, Gideon, b. June 19, 1830, m.
Catharine McMann. The second son, Daniel, was the first
male child born within the limits of Porter. None of the
nineteen children are now living, except Olive, William T.,
and Gideon. Their father was born April 26, 1763, died
Oct. 25, 1855, and was buried in the family burial ground of
the late Jacob French. His first and second wives were
buried in the lot owned by M. S. Moulton.

David Moulton was b. in Hampton, N. H., June 18,
1760, m. Feb. 16, 1794, Dorothy Moulton, of Portsmouth,
N. H., and d. Oct. 18, 1838. His wife was b. June 22, 1770,
and d. Jan. 19, 1853. Their children were : 1, John, b. Dec.
7, 1794, m. Jane Coffin, and d. March 4, 1876 ; 2, Joseph,
b. July 23, 1797, m. Abigail G. Beal ; 3, Sarah, b. Dec. 18,
1799 ; 4, David, jr., b. Aug. 23, 1802, m. Phebe Wentworth,
and d. June 13, 1867 ; 5, Mary, b. Jan. 28, 1805, m. Moses
Swett, and d. Dec. 16, 1836 ; 6, Thomas, b. Aug. 15, 1810.

Daniel Knowles was one of our oldest settlers, his birth
having probably been as early as 1740. He had three wives.
The name of the first is unknown ; that of the second was
Mrs. Pottle, and that of the third, Mary Libby. The second
wife lived about one year after her marriage. Children by
first wife were : 1, Mary, b. Mar. 1, 1768, m. Stephen Libby ;
2, Hannah, m. Simeon Libby ; 3, Jemima, m. Elijah Fox ;

4, Isaac ; 5, Sally, m. Watson ; 6, Experience, m.

Josiah Kezar ; 7, Rachel, m. Jonathan Hodsdon. Children
by third wife : 8, Comfort ; 9, Olive ; 10, Tryphene.



22 HISTORY OF PORTER.

Simeon Libby m. Hannah Knowles. Their cliildren
were : 1, John : 2, Samuel ; 3, Hannah, m. Levi Libby ; 4,
Isaac ; 5, Josiah ; 6, Simeon, jr. ; 7, Job ; 8, Daniel ; 9, Abram,
b. April 11, 1805 ; 10, Lemuel Rich ; 11, Mary, b. 1810, m.
Aaron Houghtaling ; 12, Julia Ann ; 13, Jesse W. D.

Gideon Mason was born in Pittsfield, N. H., June 22,
1772, and m. in June, 1793, Sai'ah Libby, daughter of Me-
shach, who was born in 1771. Their children were : 1, Isaac,
b. in Porter, Sept. 4, 1794, and d. Jan. 15, 1867 ; 2, Me-
shach, b. April 6, 1797 ; 3, Betsey, b. March 25, 1799, and
d. unm. May 5, 1835 ; 4, Jonathan, b. Feb. 22, 1802, d. in
Lovell ; 5, Simon, b. June 13, 1806 ; 6, Susan, b. Dec. 13,
1808, m. Abraham Chapman.

John Masois, brother of Gideon, was born Aug. 21, 1774,
m. Aug. 7, 1793, Tryphene, daughter of David Allord, d.
Oct. 12, 1867. She was born Aug. 25, 1775, d. May 1, 1852.
Their children were : 1, Jacob, b. Jan. 1, 1794, d. Oct. 26,
1813 ; 2, Sally, b. July 8, 1795, in Porter, m. David Col-
cord, and d. Feb. 7, 1877 ; 3, Abraham, b. Oct. 25, 1797 ;
4, John, jr., b. Dec. 19, 1799, and d. March 20, 1879; 5,
Henry, b. Feb. 12, 1802 ; 6, Lydia, b. Oct. 30, 1804, m.
Rufus Brooks ; 7, Mary, b. Oct. 8, 1806, m. Ralph McCartee,
and d. Feb. 10, 1851 ; 8, Thomas, b. Jan. 30, 1809, and d.
Nov. 16, 1865; 9, Tryphene, b. April 23, 1812, m. E. C.
Pillsbury; 10, Joseph, b. July 3, 1814; 11, Abigail, b.
April 14, 1816, m. John Lord.

Henry Floyd m. Betsey Bickford, and d. Sept. 20, 1827.
His wife was born in Rochester, N. H., Feb. 27, 1775.
Their children were : 1, Michael, b. in Porter, Oct. 4, 1794 ;
2, Sally, b. Jan. 2, 1796, m. Andrew Varney ; 3, Lovina, b.
Feb. 17, 1798; 4, William, b. Dec. 13, 1803; 5, Henry, jr.,



HISTORY OF PORTER. 23

b. July 13, 1805 ; 6, Lovell, b. Aug. 31, 1807 ; 7, Betsey,
b. May 2, 1809 ; 8, Jacob, b. Nov. 2, 1812 ; 9, Ira, b. Oct.
12, 1815.

William French was born Sept. 15, 1776, m. March 11,
1797, by Elder Benjamin Randall, the founder of the F. W.
Baptists, to Kezia, daughter of Isaac Libby. His wife was
born March 28, 1776. Their children were : 1, James, b.
Sept. 24, 1798 ; 2, William, jr., b. Dec. 3, 1801 ; 3, Isaac,
b. April 26, 1803, and d. June 17, 1827 ; 4, Ruth, b. Dec.
10, 1806, and m. Joseph G. Towle ; 5, John Moulton, b. May
21, 1»13, d. March 11, 1818.

John French, b. Sept. 26, 1775, m. Sally Trefren, and
d. Aug. 21, 1836. His wife was b. Sept. 14, 1774, and d.
March 12, 1856. Their children were : 1, Benjamin, b. in
Farmington, N. H., Feb. 7, 1796 ; 2, Ja(;ob, b. in Porter,
March 1, 1798, and d. Feb. 16, 1878 ; 3, Sally, b. March 23,
1800, m. Nehemiah F. Towle; 4, Aaron, b. April 7, 1802 ;
5, Mary, b. August 5, 1804, d. unm. Feb. 21, 1838 ; 6, John,
jr., b. Dec. 6, 1806 ; 7, Kezia, b. May 25, 1809, m. Alexan-
der Berry ; 8, Lucy, b. August 13, 1811, m. Jesse Bickford,
and d. Jan. 7, 1878.

Charles Nutter, b. in Portsmouth, N. H., Dec. 27, 1783,
m. Mrs. Olive Durgin, daughter of Ebenozer Taylor, and d.
May 1, 1845. His wife was b. Jan. 9, 1778, and d. Aug. 24,
1846. Their children were : 1, Almira, b. Feb. 15, 1808,
m. James Perry; 2, Charles, jr., b. Aug. 28, 1810, d. Sept.
14, 1874 ; 3, Cordelia, b. Oct. 28, 1812, m. Richard Cosins ;
4, Eben. T., b. March 12, 1815 ; 5, Sarah Ann, b. Jan. 20,
1818, m. Alvan Pride ; 6, Henry, b. Jan. 17, 1821.

Joseph Pearl m. Catharine Clark, and d. in 1813.



24 HISTORY OF PORTER.

Botli were of Rochester, N. H. Mrs. Pearl d. May 4, 1837.
Their children were : 1, Polly, who m. William Moulton ; 2,
Simeon ; 3, Betsey, m. Ichabod Biekford ; 4, Benjamin, d.
June 1, 1830; 5, Sally, m. Jonathan Quint; 6, Diamond;
7, Anna, m. James Stanley; 8, John; 9, Joseph, jr. ; 10,
James, b. Feb. 26, 1804.



FAMILIES OF PERSONS WHO JOINED THE SETTLEMENT
AT A LATER PERIOD.

Joseph Towle, b. Feb. 18, 1747, ra. Oct. 2, 1769, Eliz-
abeth Coffin, and d. April 1, 1820. His wife was b. March

7, 1753, and d. Feb. 17, 1829. Their children were : 1,
Amos, b. Oct. 1, 1770 ; 2, Joseph, jr., b. Sept. 3, 1772, and
d. Dec. 27, 1848 ; 3, William, b. July 18, 1774, d. April 25,
1841 ; 4, Ezra, b. Feb. 14, 1776, d. June 4, 1802 ; 5, Nan-
cy, b. April 24, 1778, m. Eben. Blazo, d. Dec, 1801 ; 6,
Daniel, b. Jan. 24, 1780, d. March 25, 1875 ; 7, Ehzabeth,
b. Aug. 27, 1783, m. James Garland ; 8, Sarah, b. March
26, 1785, m. Samuel Taylor, d. April 10, 1866 ; 9, David,
b. Dec. 27, 1787, d. Aug. 7, 1860 ; 10, Simon, b. May 16,
1794, d. Oct. 4, 1814.

Jesse Colcord, b. in Newmarket, N, H., Feb. 9, 1769
m. first, Elizabeth Nason, and d. April 3, 1835. Child : John
N., b. in Sanford, April 18, 1793, and d. May 25, 1852. Mr.
Colcord m. April 6, 1794, second, Betsey Emery, who was b.
Oct. 21, 1771, and d. Dec. 6, 1829. Children : Elizabeth,
b. Nov. 30, 1794, d. April 19, 1795 ; David, b. April 28,
1796, d. June 9, 1867 ; Mary H., b. April 27, 1798, m. John
Pearl, d. August 28, 1876 ; Betsey, b. July 13, 1800, d. Dec.

8, 1800 ; Rhoda, b. Mar. 16, 1802, d. April 27, 1802 ; Jesse,
jr., b. April 8, 1803, d. Nov. 25, 1825 ; Phineas, b. Feb. 8,
1806, d. Aug. 21, 1846 ; Susan N., b. in Porter, Dec. 4,



HISTORY OF PORTER. 25

1808, d. July 18, 1832 ; Isabella, b. June 5, 1811, ra. Ste-
phen Brooks ; Caleb E., b. Mar. 4, 1814, d. Aug. 20, 1853 ;
Charlotte S., b. Feb. 18, 1817, m. Peter H. Hatch, and d. m
Oregon City, June 30, 1846.

James Coffin, b. in Biddeford, m. Jane McMillan, and d.
March 11, 1823. His wife was b. in Conway, N. H., and d.
May 27, 1859. Children : James,jr.,b. in Biddeford, Jan. 24,
1799, d. July 8, 1833 ; Jane, b. Oct. 31, 1800, and m. John
Moulton ; Hannah, b. Sept. 12, 1802, m. James W. Thomp-
son ; Martha, b. April 18, 1804, m. William Rice ; Andrew
McM., b. Feb. 7, 1806 ; Catharine, b. in Porter, Dec. 21,
1807, m. Stephen Berry ; Shuah T., b. April 11, 1810, m.
James Norris ; Edmund, b. July 11, 1812 ; Sophia Ann, b.
Sept. 25, 1815, ra. Addison Prentiss.

John Fox, b. in Gilmanton, N. H., May 26, 1760, m. first,
Deborah Gilman, and d. April 17, 1834. His wife was b.
Nov. 13, 1760, and d. July 26, 1810. Children : 1, Nathan-
iel, b. Nov. 30, 1786, d. Feb. 6, 1853 ; 2, Deborah G., b.
Oct. 4, 1788, m. Thomas Howard ; 3, Sarah, b. May 25,
1791, m. Isaac Bickford ; 4, Mary G., b. Sept. 2, 1793, m.
John Libby, and d. Sept. 4, 1865 ; 5, Anna, b. Dec. 7, 1795,
m. Jonathan Peare, d. July 17, 1865 ; 6, John, jr., b. Dec.
7, 1795, d. May 6, 1852 ; 7, Lydia, b. March 5, 1798, and
d. Oct. 21, 1825 ; 8, Charlotte, b. Nov. 29, 1800, m. Ezra
Bickford ; "9. Ruth P., b. Aug. 9, 1803, ra. Job Libby. Mr.
Fox ra. second, Susan Mills. Their children were : Andrew
G., b. Jan. 20, 1813 ; William, Edward, Susan, and Jaraes.

Tobias Libby, b. in Rochester, April 2, 1783, m. Sept.

29, 1805, Abigail Randall, and d. June 30, 1858. His wife

was b. in Lee, N. H., March 8, 1788, and d. Feb. 19, 1868.

Children : John M., b. Aug. 21, 1806, and d. March 29,
3



26 HISTORY OF PORTER.

1865 ; Isaac, b. Sept. 5, 1809 ; Nancy, b. July 24, 1811, m.
John Stanley, and d. Aug. 13, 1873; Randall, b. Oct. 31,
1815; Tobias, jr., b. Jan. 27, 1821, and d. Oct. 31, 1868;
Edwin B., b. July 11, 1825, and d. 1854 ; Abigail, b. June
17, 1829, m. Joseph T. Rice.

Joseph Stanley, from Shapleigh, m. first, Betsey Parsons ;
second, Eunice Stone ; third, Sally Palmer ; fourth, Mary
Nason. Mr. S. d. Sept. 18, 1843. Children by first wife :
Charles, Samuel,and Olive, who m. Samuel Hooper. Chil-
dren by second wife : Betsey, b. Dec. 28, 1802, m. Caleb
Thompson ; James, b. March 2, 1804 ; Joseph, jr., b. Dec.
21, 1806 ; John, b. May 13, 1808 ; Eunice, b. April 4, 1810,
m. William Ridlon, d. May 7, 1854. Children by fourth
wife : Mary, b. July 24, 1824, m. Charles Hadley ; Benja-
min, b. Sept. 11, 1827.

John Stacy, b. at Berwick, Feb. 20, 1764, m. Ruth
Gould, and d. May 18, 1837. Children : Ohver, b. Sept. 30,
1792; Salome, b. Sept., 1793, m. Jonathan Fox; Jordan, b.
March 5, 1796 ; Hannah, b. 1799, m. John Mason ; George,
b. Nov. 9, 1804, d. April 3, 1876 ; Ruth.

Samuel Taylor, b. in Hampton, N. H., March 27, 1781,
m. Aug. 22, 1803, Sarah Coffin, and d. Aug. 31, 1846. His
wife was b. in Epsom, N. H., March 26, 1785, and d. April'
10, 1866. Children : William T., b. April 24, 1810 ; Sam-
uel, jr., b. March 23, 1812, d. March 9, 1855 ; Simon, b.
April 16, 1815, d. Feb. 16, 1853 ; Eliza Ann, b. July 22,
1820, d. Sept. 17, 1842 ; Daniel, b. March 4, 1823 ; Jose-
phine, b. June 16, 1825, m. John Sutton ; David, b. March
17, 1829, d. Oct. 23, 1868; Amos, b. March 17, 1829.

William Towle, b. in Epsom, July 18, 1774, m. Mercy



HISTORY OF PORTER. 27

Garland, and d. April 25, 1841. Children : Hannah, b. Dec.
18, 1797, ra. James Coolbroth ; William, jr., b. Oct. 3, 1801 ;
Joseph G., b. March 22, 1806, d. Dec. 28, 1875 ; Mercy, b.
May 8, 1809, m. Benjamin Larrabee ; Nancy, b. August 8,
1812, m. Nathaniel Bedell ; Maria, b. April 7, 1819, m. John
Kezar.



SETTLERS OF A LATER PERIOD THAN 1792.

The following-named persons had a residence in the town,
as early as 1803, and when there is evidence of an earlier
settlement, the words " as early as " are to be supplied by the
reader, before the year annexed.

Josiah Bridges, who lived at Porter Village, near the
spring called " The Bridges Spring," Benjamin Bridges,
probably a brother of Josiah, who lived and died on the farm
occupied by the late William Floyd (the cultivation of this
farm was his chief employment, but a portion of his time was
devoted to turning out, in a rudely constructed lathe, bowls
and mortars, then an essential part of household furniture),
Josiah Bridges, jr., James Bridges, Jonathan Blazo, 1802,
Samuel Brooks, Hezekiah Bickford, who was the second cap-
tain of the military company first organized in the plantation,
Jonathan Cook, Abraham Cook, Nathaniel Cook, John and
William French, from Farmington, N. H., 1796, Jacob
French, 1802, John Fox, 1801, Edward Fox, Elijah Fox,
Henry Floyd, 1794, John Hayes, an emigrant from Ireland,
where he had been employed as a weaver, David Hodsdon,
Daniel Knowles, 1793, Isaac Knowles, Simeon and Jonathan
Libby, John Libby, jr., who, it was said, had so retentive a
memory that, having heard a lengthy sermon, he could repeat
the whole of it, imitating very accurately both the tones and
gestures of the speaker (aside from memory he was not en-
dowed with superior mental powers), Meshach Libby, jr.,



28 HISTORY OF PORTER.

Hanson and Tobias Libby, and Isaac Libby their father,
Gideon Mason, 1794, John Mason, 1795, Francis Mathews,
1802, Charles Nutter, 1797, Joseph Pottle, 1793, who was
the first captain of the plantation company, David Pottle,
1793, Joseph Pearl, 1793, Thomas Randall, the father of
the poet, Samuel Richards, Samuel Richards, 2d, and John
Thompson.

The following-named persons settled later, but before the
incorporation of the town : Job Bailey in 1806, James Coffin
in 1806, who was the first justice of the peace in the town,
Samuel Hodsdon, 1805, William Stanley, 1805, Joseph and
Elisha Stanley, 1806, John Stacy, April 8, 1804, Eben»Ker
Taylor, 1806, Henry Tibbetts, 1805, and Richard Young,
1805.

Jonatlian Blazo, Elijah Fox, John Hayes, Jonathan Libby,
Meshach Libby, jr., Joseph Pottle, Thomas Randall, Samuel
Richards, 2d, Job Bailey, William Stanley, and Richard
Young, were not permanent settlers. Daniel and Isaac
Knowles and Simeon Libby removed to the State of New
York in 1817.



PLANTATION EECOEDS.

The plantation meetings were held at the dwelling houses
of Wm. Broad, Daniel Brooks, John Wentworth, Abraham
Cook and Josiah Bridges, jr. The first meeting was held
July 12, 1802, at the house of Wm. Broad. At this meet-
ing, Nathaniel Merrill, an original proprietor, was chosen
moderator, and it was voted " to raise twelve pounds for the
plantation's use, to give the collector, John Merrill, two
shillings per pound for collecting, to raise $200.00 in labor
for repairing roads, and not to have any gates or bars across
the county road after this season, and to keep gates or bars
across the other roads till next March meeting."



HISTORY OF PORTER. 29

At a meeting held Aug. 23, 1802, a road previously laid
out " from the north side of Libby's Settler's lot " (the lot orig-
inally granted to Stephen, but then owned by Meshach Lib-
by) " to the county road in Pottle's mill yard " (at Porter
village), was accepted. This was the first highway built by
taxation, in the plantation, the county road having been built
by the proprietors, in accordance with a contract referred to
in their deed. At the same meeting, the road laid out from
Porter village, through the western part of the town, to Free-
dom line, was accepted ; also " a road from Jonathan Blazo's "
(where Geo. E. Stacy now lives), "to the county road " ; and at
a meeting held Sept. 7 of the same year, a continuation of
the first-named road over the hill, to the house of Stephen
Libby (now T. C. Libby) was accepted. At a meeting
April 4, 1803, it was voted "that the assessors shall have 75
cents per day for their services, and the treasurer one dollar
for his services the past year, that good gates may be kept
across the roads, except the county road, and that the annu-
al plantation meetings shall be held on the first Monday of
April." At a meeting held June 13, 1803, the plantation
was divided into five school districts, three of which were
within the present limits of Porter, and two within the lim-
its of Brownfield.

The following is the list of names as recorded in the three
districts :

FIRST DISTRICT. SECOND DISTRICT. THIRD DISTRICT.

Thomas Randall, David Moulton, Isaac Knowles,

Samuel Richards, Simeon Libby, Samuel Brooks,

Sam'l Richards, 2d, Stephen Libby, Henry Floyd,

Joseph Pottle, Edward Fox, Hezekiah Bickford,

John French, Meshach Libby, jr.,Joseph Pearl,

Wm. French, John Mason, John Hayes,

Hanson Libby, Jonathan Libby, Jonathan Cook,



30 HISTORY OF PORTER.

Tobias Libby, Elijah Fox, Nathaniel Cook,

Daniel Knowles, John Fox, James Bridges,

Francis Mathews, Gideon Mason. Josiah Bridges, jr.,
Meshach Libby, David Hodsdon,

Jacob French. Abraham Cook,

John Thompson.

At this time there were no settlers in the eastern part of
the plantation, south of the present limits of Brownfield.
If we suppose a line drawn from the Ossipee river due north,
to the south line of Brownfield, and about one mile east of
our Town House, all the permanent settlers then resided west
of it. The first school district embraced the families in' the
southern part, the second, those in the middle, and the third,
the families in the northern part. At the previous annual
meeting, April 4th, it was voted to raise $200.00 for the
support of schools. Thus early did our ancestors appreciate
the value of our public schools. At the presidential election
held at the dwelling house of John Wentworth (the only
presidential election held under its plantation organization),
Nov. 5, 1804, nineteen candidates for electors were voted
for, viz. : two for electors at large (James Sullivan, then of
Boston, and Elbridge Gerry of Cambridge) ; thirteen for
that number of congressional districts in Massachusetts, and
four for the Maine districts, to wit : Cumberland county form-
ing one, York county, one, Kennebec, Hancock and Wash-
ington, one, and Lincoln, one. From the first Maine dis-
trict (Cumberland county), Charles Turner of Turner was
the candidate ; from the second district, John Woodman of
Buxton ; from the third, Thomas Fillebrown of Hallowell ;
and from the fourth, John Farley of Newcastle. Each can-
didate received thirty-seven votes, except Farley, who had
thirty-six. These nineteen candidates having been chosen,
voted for Jefferson for President and George Clinton for



HISTORY OF PORTER. 31

vice-Presiclent. In the record of a meeting, April 1, 1805,
this contract is stated : " The collector, William Boynton,
agreed to collect the taxes for 10^ cents upon every three
dollars and 33 cents, i.e., for 19i cents per pound. New
England currency. The change from pounds, shillings and
pence, to dollars, cents and mills, was to many an undesira-
ble innovation. The proposed Metric System of weights
and measures is destined to meet a more formidable opposi-
tion. At a meeting, Aug. 5, 1805, it was voted " to have
the plantation of Porterfield incorporated " [as a town], " and
to have it called Denmark." The town of Denmark was
not incorporated until 1807.

At the last annual plantation meeting, held April 7, 1806,
James Sullivan had forty-two votes for governor, and Caleb
Strong, one. On the same day it was " voted to allow Han-
son Libby $1.50 for his services as treasurer the past year,
and Samuel Wentworth 82 cents for his services as planta-
tion clerk."



INCIDEJ^'TS OF THE TIMES.

In one respect, the period of our town's settlement was
fortunate. The question of supremacy as between England
and France had been settled by Gen. Wolfe, on the plains
of Abraham, in 1759. The Indians under Paugus, in 1725,
had been driven by Capt. Lovell and his valiant band, from
their hunting grounds on the Saco and Ossipee, and the
power of the more distant tribes, that had devastated so many
New England settlements, was utterly broken. But if mar-
tial prowess was not then needed, other manly virtues were,
and in these our early settlers were not wanting. It is true,
they were generally poor, but they were hardy, energetic,
self-reliant and honest. On their arrival, the first labor for


2 4 5 6

Online LibraryThomas MoultonPorter, as a portion of Maine: its settlement, etc. (Volume 1) → online text (page 2 of 6)